Ian McAllister - instagram lists #feedolist

iantmcallister

Mom has her paws full keeping her eye on these little guys while having to catch salmon at the same time. #mothergrizzly #fam #nopebblemine @pacificwild #grizzlybear #grizzlybears #ig_discover_wildlife

iantmcallister

Salmon and bears are two species that represent functioning and intact ecosystems. At one time unbroken deeply worn grizzly bear trails existed between California and Western Alaska but today these trails are only found from the #greatbearrainforest north. #grizzlybear #wildsalmon

iantmcallister

Last week we were surrounded by bears and salmon and all things related to the proposed Pebble mine issue and tomorrow we set sail for Bowie Sea mount - one of the most spectacular and remote underwater anomalies in the North Pacific. More on this underwater filming expedition to follow.... @pacificwild #bowieseamount #nopebblemine with @d.leowinata #marineconservation #mpa’s #marineprotectedareas

iantmcallister

Chasing waterfalls in the #greatbearrainforest with these two rascals.... @callummca7325 @lucymcallisterr

iantmcallister

What could possibly be better than the warmth, devotion, strength and protection of this grizzly bear mother to these little cubs of the year.

iantmcallister

Sea wolves, always on the move. An old Russian proverb says that the ”wolf is fed by its feet” and it is a great description of these constant wanderers. #seawolves @pacificwild #explorebc #destinationbc #greatbearrainforest

iantmcallister

Wolf pups are now beginning to leave their natal den sites to begin occupying nearby rendezvous sites. It must be pretty exciting to explore their future home for the first time. #rainwolves #seawolves #oceanfeedstherainforest #greatbearrainforest #wolves @pacificwild

iantmcallister

The #greatbear estuaries have a lot going on at this time of year. Here two grizzly bears are having a bit of a discussion about who really is in charge. @pacificwild @sealegacy @spiritbearresearch @spiritbearbc with @d.leowinata @riverroadfilms @mercedz_jade @douglas_neasloss

iantmcallister

Great Bear summer time fun with a pretty amazing group of individuals. So good to know you guys and looking forward to more adventures down the road. ..until. #stag #canyons #whitesideddolphin #hotsprings

iantmcallister

Yesterday the BC government announced that they are planning to protect 54 old growth trees with tiny protection buffers around them. For years British Columbian’s have been waiting for an old growth forest strategy that would protect the remaining ancient forests left in the province but it looks like this is all we will get from this NDP provincial government for at least another year or two. More than 80% of Vancouver Islands productive old growth has now been logged and the Great Bear Rainforest is not far behind in unsustainable deforestation. What a surreal announcement given the scale of industrial logging going on right now in BC. Appreciate the Green party of BC speaking out on this issue. @pacificwild @greenpartybc @ancientforestalliance @sierraclubbc @bcndp @johnhorgan4bc

IanTMcAllister

Within a 24 hour period Prime Minister @justinpjtrudeau declared a climate emergency and then after a good nights sleep he announced the approval of the Trans Mountain tar sands oil pipeline. Our Fisheries Minister @jonathanwnv then went on to describe how the decision to ship nearly a million barrels of the dirtiest climate destroying oil in the world will actually help Canada “accelerate” towards a clean energy future. We also found out yesterday that the so-called oil tanker ban for the #greatbearrainforest will be reviewed in five years so no celebration to be had with that announcement either. Simply can’t make this stuff up.

iantmcallister

A bit of good news to share on the run up to #worldoceansday. Canada’s Fisheries Minister @jonathanwnv who until last week was a full time cheerleader for the destructive fish farm industry has finally capitulated under public pressure, lost court cases and the undeniable research and science of @alexmorton4salmon and the Namgis Nation to begin testing for Piscine Orthoreovirus (PRV) in farmed salmon. Of course this should have been standard practice years ago but it is one more step to getting this harmful industry out of our ocean. The other good news is that the oil tanker ban, Bill C-48, continues to march through the House of Commons despite being challenged by a group of Senators who were clearly listening to the oil industry lobbyists and not the majority of Canadians who are opposed to oil tankers in the #greatbearrainforest. Not out of the water yet for both these issues but steps in the right direction. @pacificwild #notankers

iantmcallister

In a landscape dominated by ocean tide, rivers, estuaries, lakes and fiords grizzly bears need to learn to swim at a very young age. #greatbearrainforest @pacificwild

IanTMcAllister

Douglas channel. Today is busy in Ottawa as oil lobbyists work around the clock to try and convince our unelected Senators to block Bill-C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act which would ban oil tankers from the Great Bear Rainforest. These rogue Senators are questioning Coastal First Nations and the countless people from around the world that have been very clear that our north coast is no place for tar sands ladened supertankers. These Senators say that a compromise is needed but they seem to forget that this Act only pertains to oil tankers and not the countless other nightmare shipping traffic scenarios like LNG and refined oil that @justinpjtrudeau and @johnhorgan4bc are trying to push through the Great Bear. If this bill gets derailed it will ensure that @justinpjtrudeau has done infinitely more damage to our environment in four short years than Stephen Harper was able to do in ten. And that is saying a lot. There are a number of ways to voice your support for Bill-C48 @pacificwild.org #notankers

IanTMcAllister

Lucky for BC’s coastal wolves the timber and oil and gas companies have not found a way to blame them for all the environmental destruction that these industries have caused. Unfortunately, for interior wolves the same cannot be said as they continue to be slaughtered by inhumane govt sponsored kill programs and now that we are getting into election season we can expect even more blame put on wolves as industry is given more access to the last pockets of intact habitat, the last lifeline for endangered caribou herds. Much more needs to be done to amplify this wildlife crisis. If you care about BC wolves think about supporting these groups. @wildlifedefenceleague @pacificwild @speakforwolves @bearsmatter @wildernews

IanTMcAllister

Kwatna River, #greatbearrainforest. Culturally, ecologically this wild salmon river is one of the jewels of the BC coast. Salmon supporting river valleys like this one are globally rare yet International Forest Products continues to propose logging its remaining old growth forests. In the age of run away climate change and collapsing salmon stocks future generations are going to judge us harshly for the unsustainable deforestation that we continue to witness. Saving these last watersheds should be a very simple decision given the incontrovertible evidence supporting the protection of ancient forests to fight climate change and protect biodiversity. #ancientforest #temperaterainforest #kwatna #heiltsuk #nuxalk

IanTMcAllister

Black bear cub getting ready for the week. #mondaymorning

IanTMcAllister

Reflections of herring season. For thousands of years the ancestors of this wolf would come to the shoreline after the herring spawn to feast on herring eggs. This would have been a predictable guaranteed food supply for coastal residents like this until Europeans arrived and turned herring - the foundation of our coast - into fish meal, oil and fertilizer. Now we mine the last few populations for Atlantic salmon farm feed, sushi roe and ocean tuna ranches. Time to give herring a break. #biglittlefish

IanTMcAllister

Drought conditions and low snow pack are one more stress wild salmon are most likely going to be facing again this year in the #greatbearrainforest. Salmon fishing wolves like this one will be one of countless species impacted by our changing climate. #wildsalmon #savebcwolves #oceanfeedstherainforest

IanTMcAllister

Grizzlies generally move slowly and purposefully but when they need to get up and go they can move like a race horse. #grizzlybear

IanTMcAllister

Back to wolves. Looking forward to speaking with @chrismorganwildlife tonight at @kuow and @npr at the @mountaineersorg - should be lots of fun swapping stories with this adventuring bear guy. @eventbrite @pacificwild #seattle

IanTMcAllister

Today, the Canadian government announces that it intends on banning oil and gas drilling, mining, bottom-trawling and waste-dumping from marine protected areas. Wow, what a reassurance that within our meagre marine protected areas (less than 10% of our jurisdictional waters) the most destructive practices that humans can commit to the ocean won’t be allowed. Of course oil and gas super tankers will probably be allowed to transit MPA’s, mid-water trawling, log sort areas, industrial fishing and a host of other harmful activities will still be allowed. When is Canada going to wake up to the fact that our oceans are in peril, salmon and countless other species are collapsing and we are running out of time. Get ready for more useless announcements as we gear up for a fall election. #marineprotectedareas @justinpjtrudeau @jonathanwnv

IanTMcAllister

Days turn into weeks into months and sometimes a plaintive howl from deep in the rainforest is the only sign that wolves are in the area. And then sometimes, usually when least expected, a wolf wanders out of the forest edge and promptly drops by for a visit. Here, Pacific Wild’s ever patient and talented @d.leowinata finds herself face to face with a coastal wolf while undoubtedly wondering why she chose such a long lens on this particular morning. Wildlife film making provides the visual storytelling tools that help us advocate for a new relationship with wildlife, one that is not based on exploitation, gratuitous trophy hunting and reckless habitat destruction that sadly is still the norm in British Columbia. Ensuring quality of life for wildlife - not just managing for existence - should be a basic standard enshrined in conservation decision making but yet is rarely contemplated by government and industry. Join the efforts of @pacificwild to help ensure a future for wildlife in western Canada. #savebcwolves @reddigitalcinema #greatbearrainforest #womeninfilm

IanTMcAllister

Looking forward to being in Seattle this week for two special events. This Wednesday at the Pacific Science Centre we will be hosting the Washington State Premiere of the Great Bear Rainforest IMAX film and on Friday I will be joining Chris Morgan and his NPR affiliated show The Wild for an evening of discussion on bears, wolves, whales and all things #greatbearrainforest. Tickets for both events can be found at Eventbrite. Hope to see you there. @pacificwild @chrismorganwildlife @npr #greatbearimax #explorebc #earthday🌎 @kuow @mountaineersorg @macfreefilms

IanTMcAllister

For a century timber companies have liquidated interior old growth forest habitat to the point of no return for many herds of caribou. Oil and gas, mining, snowmobilers - unbridled backcountry access - have now pushed the remaining herds to critically endangered levels. Now that the federal government has finally forced the BC government to actually do something about this wildlife crisis all we hear now from industry is how more and more wolves need to be killed. BC taxpayers just paid for the slaughter of over 500 wolves over the last few years to ostensibly save mountain caribou while at the same time the BC government approved the clearcutting of more and more old growth critical habitat. It is shameful that we are inflicting so much pain and needless suffering on one of the most socially evolved animals on earth only to provide a distraction from the root cause of the decline of caribou. The feds should have intervened years ago and forced the BC government to protect enough habitat for the caribou but now that the last scraps of lichen rich forest are being fought over by industries that will never give an inch for the protection of wildlife the BC government is looking to kill even more wolves. It is shameful and gives little hope for the future when we cannot make simple sacrifices to protect another species from extinction. visit pacificwild.org to find out how to lend your voice to wolves and caribou. @pacificwild @wildlifedefenceleague @bearsmatter

IantMcAllister

Herring eggs reach up into the cedar trees along Spiller Channel from last week's spawn. This was the location of conflict between DFO and the Heiltsuk First Nation four years ago, as the Nation asserted its stewardship role in protecting local herring stocks after decades of unsustainable commercial fishing. The Nation was successful in achieving a suspension of the industrial kill fishery, but even after a four year reprieve, Central Coast herring stocks are still a fraction of their former abundance. The good news is that a few areas on the central coast that have been previously absent of spawn have shown small signs of return. While there is still hope for the future of these stocks it remains unclear how many years it will take for central coast stocks to fully recover. #BIGLittleFish #heiltsukstrong . . . #wildernessculture #herringiscaring #ExploreBC #foragefish #fishlove #feedthecoast

iantmcallister

What does it say about our society when we wantonly inflict needless cruelty and hardship on some of the most intelligent animals that we share landscapes with? The fact that wolf kill contests are occurring in this province with an open season, no harvest limits, and no compulsory reporting, makes it virtually a government-supported cull effort. The same provincial government is saying that they have an understanding of the predator-prey dynamics and populations levels of wolves in this province, but if they're allowing people to kill wolves without any reporting, how can they possibly know how many wolves are being killed and what their status is? Many thanks to groups like Bears Matter, @furbearers, @wildlifedefenceleague, and @projectcoyoteorg, for bringing attention to these abhorrent wildlife-killing contests. Whoever participates in them, supports them, and/or organizes them, should be ashamed of themselves. It does a disservice to the honourable tradition of subsistence hunting and wildlife management by both hunters and non-hunters alike. Visit the Fur Bearers page to take action and #endkillingcontestsbc in the link in @pacificwild's bio under "End Killing Contests in BC". #SaveBCWolves . . . #wolvesofinstagram #conservation #wildlifephotography #ExploreBC #BCPoli

iantmcallister

Spring is here, and among other things, it means puppy season - in the Great Bear Rainforest and throughout BC. These little pups need our protection, and that means your voices. Look out for ways to help here and at @pacificwild. #SaveBCWolves . . . #GreatBearRainforest #ig_discover_wildlife #wolfconservation #wolvesofinstagram

IanTMcAllister

Happy St. Patrick’s day. Hoping the next few weeks bring more green to the dark waters of Canada’s Pacific coast. #herringspawn #biglittlefish #stpatricksday

iantmcallister

🔊 For 25 years I watched the Heiltsuk Nation on the BC central coast fight DFO in the courts and on the front-lines in an effort to save local herring populations.  Tragically, the tone deaf DFO continued to allow the seine and gill net fleets destroy population after population of herring to the point in 2015 where the Heiltsuk community occupied the local DFO office thereby forcing the department to close the fishery.  Unfortunately, it is probably too late for the central coast stocks to ever recover from so many years of industrial fishing. Now every single commercial herring kill fishery on the BC coast has been closed due to collapsed stocks and the last one open is in the Salish Sea.  The entire fishing fleet is gearing up right now to take out over 21000 tons of herring from the same waters that half of the chinook salmon populations are considered endangered and the southern resident killer whales are starving to death.  21000 tons is the equivalent in weight to a full sized BC ferry full of fuel and cars. DFO insists, just like they did in every other herring fishery before they collapsed, that the Salish sea herring population is healthy and that 20% of the herring biomass can be taken.  90% of this  fish will be ground up for fish meal for pet food and fish pellets to feed Atlantic salmon fish farms.  The irony that we are killing our wild herring to feed farmed salmon that in turn is spreading fatal diseases to our wild salmon is all but lost on DFO. Let's make DFO listen - our team at @pacificwild has made it easy. Call or email your local representative and tell them that you vote for Harriet using the tools on our site. Link in my bio. Thank you @cammacarthur at @sitka_ for producing this great video. And to @ashperson for lending your voice. Footage by: @aprilbencze @tavishcampbell @bakkenaction and myself @heiltsukcouncil #BIGLittleFish #explorebc #marineconservation #pnwonderland #herring #fisheries #protectourcoast #leaveitbetter

iantmcallister

Happy Valentine’s Day. For all things wild and free. #valentines

iantmcallister

“Going out on a limb” definitely means different things to different people but mostly I love the saying because it means stepping away from protection and safety. It is here, in this kind of environment, that progress and change are most often found. However, being able to sleep so comfortably out on that thin limb, so far off the deck, is something we may just have to learn from bears. #sundayramble

iantmcallister

Fresh out of LA - here is the very first 70mm film reel to be made for the Great Bear IMAX film and i have to say, it looks pretty damn good. Opening here to public on Feb 15th. @ontariosciencecentre. Image: @d.leowinata

iantmcallister

Deciding on a favourite image, especially when selecting for a book, is such a subjective process. I am always amazed how so many photo editors can have such varied opinions about my images but when I think of the process that is involved in making certain images and how that influences my own view of them it is understandable. For example, I spent a week in the pouring rain watching this spirit bear family fishing for coho salmon on the other side of the river but there was no way that I could get to them because the river was in full flood. On the last day of my trip I couldn’t wait for the rains to stop any longer and I decided to put my camera gear in a pelican case and swim for it. I managed to get to the other side of the river and later in the day the bears walked down the fallen tree, mom bear jumped in the river and just as she swung around with a fresh coho salmon in her mouth I pulled out my camera and managed a few frames before the rain covered the front of the lens. So is it a favourite image because I sat in the rain for a week and swam a flooded river to make it happen or does it stand on its own? My friend @thomaspeschak gave me some great advice a bunch of years ago. “Forget the editors, if you love the image that is all that matters.” Now this advice might not always get you published but at the end of the day it should be what matters most. #conservationphotography @ilcp_photographers @natgeoimagecollection @pacificwild #spiritbear

iantmcallister

There may be only 200 hundred Spirit Bears in the world, making them one of the rarest bears on the planet. To see two in one day, and to have them in the same frame for an IMAX film is a dream come true for all the crew that worked on the #greatbearimax film. With so much gratitude to the Gitga’at Nation and to @gitgaatspirit for this opportunity. Coming soon to the Giant Screen. @hellobc @gitgaatspirit @pacificwild @macfreefilms #greatbearrainforest www.greatbearrainforestfilm.com

iantmcallister

The #greatbearrainforestimax film crew and the Kitasoo Xaixais First Nation grizzly bear researchers take a moment after a super fun and productive couple of days shooting the grizzly bear sequence. This was the magical day that a grizzly bear wandered into the middle of our rainforest set and of course no one needed to be told to keep rolling the cameras. So stoked to see this on the Giant Screen soon and also to see young @mercedz_jade light up the screen with her infectious smile and in-depth knowledge of her culture and territory. #greatbearimax @macfreefilms @pacificwild @spiritbearresearch @spiritbearbc www.greatbearrainforestfilm.com @hellobc

iantmcallister

Over the last three years, I was part of a crew that spent over 400 days through the BC central and north coast filming the Great Bear Rainforest IMAX Film. Over 7000 nautical miles, nearly 200 dives, 400 terabytes of media, 9 broken propellors, 5 hurricane force events, 2,400 feet of 70mm film, 22 different deckhands (all of them amazing) and a whole lot more. Now the #greatbearimax film is getting close to hitting the giant screen and somehow I have been convinced to talk about it on camera. Actually kinda looking forward to it. Today at 2pm PST I’ll be doing an Instagram Live on @pacificwild talking about making of the film and answering any questions you might have. See you there. #greatbearimax #greatbearrainforest #explorebc #wildernessculture @macfreefilms @hellobc Photo by @d.leowinata

iantmcallister

Clearly, as wolves disappear, so does much of the wild nature that wolves signify and that people depend on for spiritual nourishment and physical sustenance. Wolves and people are both understood to be victims of unrestrained industrial progress. From this perspective, wild wolves living in wild areas of the Great Bear Rainforest provide hope for many that not all has been lost. Ironically, the species once regarded as a threat to our survival is turning out to be a test of how likely we are to live sustainably in the natural world. From #lastwildwolves @greystonebooks @pacificwild #savebcwolves

iantmcallister

It is no coincidence that as we dismantle and clearcut our ancient forests like there is no tomorrow that more and more public attention focuses on the imbalance that is being observed between predator - prey relationships throughout British Columbia. The following is an excerpt from my book Last Wild Wolves that explores this issue LWW - “ The deer tracks took me to the base of the trees, where long, stringy rafts of green lichen danced in the wind. The deer were up here browsing. This forest type, distributed in natural patches throughout the landscape, is critical for the maintenance of stable deer numbers throughout the years. It is especially important on the mainland, where snows can be deep and last for many months. It’s easy to underestimate the value of deer winter range in milder winters with less snow. But during so-called catastrophic winters, significant numbers of deer die if they have nowhere to go for shelter. During snowy winters, larger old-growth stands of forest receive disproportionately high deer use because of the ability of the forest canopy to intercept snow before it accumulates on the ground. John Schoen and Matt Kirchhoff, two Alaskan researchers conducting deer and wolf studies, have shown that it takes only about fifteen centimetres (six inches) of snow to force the deer into these large stands of old forest. Although climatic conditions for the coast are generally mild, they do vary greatly from year to year. In our area of the mainland, thirty-year averages in snowfall vary from 86 centimetres in Bella Bella to 155 centimetres (imperial measurements) at Ocean Falls. Back in the mountains, this figure can easily quadruple. In southeast Alaska, researchers tally the number of deer deaths after heavy snow years. During those years, weakened and starving deer go to the shorelines to die. There can be so many dead that researchers walk shoreline transects counting corpses. On Admiralty Island, in southeast Alaska, Schoen and Kirchhoff found that 39 per cent of adult radio-collared deer died during one severe winter. The researchers estimated that the final mortality figure was closer to 60 per cent.

iantmcallister

Strength is drawn from many places and life experiences but I feel that I draw more from my time with wolves than perhaps any other species. Finding strength often means being true to your beliefs so when I listen to and hear about the hate-filled vehemence directed at wolves from so many of our own and then compare these views to my own life experiences with wolves over the last 25 years I have to take a step back and wonder how wolves have possibly inspired such differing perspectives. Perhaps it is just that they are too wild, too intelligent, too social, too independent and too beautiful for us to fully respect and leave alone. I don’t know exactly but I do know that fear lies in the unknown and unfamiliar- and these two things will forever haunt our relationship with a species that we share so much with. #savebcwolves

iantmcallister

Seeing the forest through an ocean lens. Ninety-five percent of British Columbia’s marine species are invertebrates, including sixty- eight species of starfish, seventy-five species of sea anemones, nearly five hundred species of sea worms, and over a hundred species of nudibranchs. The number of the much more celebrated vertebrate species of marine mammals, birds, and fish hasn’t yet topped six hundred. @pacificwild #winterdiving #marineconservation #oceanfeedstherainforest

iantmcallister

Ending the gratuitous trophy hunt of large carnivores like wolves has consumed significant conservation energy for the team @pacificwild over the years and yet some people question the disproportionate amount of time being spent on the issue given the scarce resources for wildlife research, management, and education, but I believe it is justified. We simply don’t fully (or even partly) understand the ecological role that wolves play in all the varied ecosystems that they inhabit. If we continue killing them as a legal form of sport we can’t possibly continue building a basic level of respect with wildlife. The trophy hunt and cull programs are anachronistic and based on a bankrupt set of ethical and scientific principles. Over the years the ever-changing rationale that the provincial government puts forward to support the hunt, culls and trapping etc has been flawed, outdated, and usually contradictory. First it was the jobs argument, but now that wildlife viewing has eclipsed trophy hunting in revenue and job creation, that argument has been dropped in favor of wolf killing being “based on science”—as if science can somehow excuse unethical behavior. Simply ending the legal killing of large carnivores is not without precedent or we would still be hunting sea otters, whales, eagles, and countless other species once feared, hated, and killed indiscriminately—but now celebrated as icons of our natural heritage. #savebcwolves

iantmcallister

Walking through airports and a few different cities recently reminded me how much we treasure domestic dogs in our lives. Yet, I can’t help but wonder how many people that smile when a dog walks by remain indifferent when they read about the government sponsored wolf kill programs that are under way, especially in #albertacanada and #britishcolumbiacanada. Millions of tax dollars are being spent on ineffectual predator kill programs to ostensibly save ungulates like caribou. We said it years ago and it remains true today. If you don’t protect habitat and you keep punching roads, oil and gas wells, mines, ski resorts, clearcuts, wind farms, houses etc etc into every last pocket of wilderness then killing every last predator in North American is not going to save these animals. #savebcwolves @pacificwild #stopthewolfcull

iantmcallister

"Deer were introduced to the islands of Haida Gwaii a century ago, and the gentle browsers, in the absence of any natural predators, have done more to impact Haida Gwaii’s forest environment than the Haida people have managed to do in over ten thousand years. An entire succession of western red cedar and the associated thick understory of berry bushes are absent. Even the salal is over- browsed. It stands in amazing contrast to the mainland side of Hecate Strait, where wolves would never allow such naive prey to go unchecked.” Excerpt from the book Great Bear Wild, Dispatches from a Northern Rainforest. #oceansfeedstherainforest @pacificwild #rainforestwolves

iantmcallister

Fogo Island, Newfoundland. After Canada allowed the factory ships inshore to mine the last of the east coast cod communities on remote Fogo Island were left with no economy and no way to subsist. In 1992 DFO fully closed the cod fishery and most people were forced to move from an island that had supported countless generations of fishers for nearly 500 years. The most productive fishery in the world collapsed because of DFO mismanagement and greed. For the few people that stayed on there was little hope until one of their own came back from a very successful business career and decided that Fogo did indeed have a future. Zita Cobb, an absolutely inspiring woman who joined us at a gathering of Canadian non-profit leaders held at her spectacular @fogoilsandinn this week is an absolute force of nature. The list of her accomplishments made through her family run foundation @shorefastfogoisland is nothing short of incredible. Her focus on local people and tradition, art, architecture and design to create beauty and most importantly economic opportunities for Fogo residents has to be one of Canada’s great success stories. “Business is a part of life, but it needs to behave in every gesture as supportive to the whole.” - #zitacobb - Involved in community economic development? Learning about Zita’s story is a must. @fogoislandinn @shorefast @power_to_be #newfoundland #explorecanada @fogoislandarts #socialentrepreneur

iantmcallister

On #worldfisheriesday day (and every day) let’s hope that the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Ocean #DFO come to their senses this winter and place a moratorium on the herring kill fishery. Forage fish, like herring, are the very foundation of the marine environment. More herring, more cod, more salmon, more whales. It is pretty simple. @pacificwild #herring #foragefish #oceanfeedstherainforest #marineconservation #unsustainablefisheries

iantmcallister

Trust and understanding with another species is something many of us are comfortable with when it comes to our own domestic animals. Yet, for whatever reason, we do not extend such feelings to the wild. Still so much myth and lore driving our relationships with the natural world. #savebcwolves @pacificwild #seawolves

iantmcallister

Soft light on a gem of a rainforest. #mrbeales #greatbearrainforest #coastaltemperaterainforest #heiltsukstrong

Iantmcallister

Love this planet. Hate what we are doing to it.

IantMcAllister

Clear waters return to the #greatbearrainforest as the nights get cold and the days get shorter. #winterdiving @pacificwild #batstars