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The artist Tyree Guyton made his Detroit street into a museum. Now he’s taking it all down. Tyree had been unwilling to watch Heidelberg, the 4-block-long street he loved so much, crumble into nothing. So as more and more families left, he took what remained, the detritus of neglect, and made it into sculptures, paintings and installations, holding up a kind of cracked mirror to the street and everything that had been lost there. Tyree’s art arose out of decline, and it has required decrepitude to exist. But after years of fighting off destruction from vandals, from elected officials, from arsonists and the police, Tyree must now effectively destroy his work in order to save it. Visit the link in our profile to read more about the @heidelbergproj. @damon_c shot these photos for @nytmag.

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Venezuela is crippled by a gas shortage, but a nurse in Venezuela packed a bag with food and hitchhiked to help the 2-year-old girl pictured here. The child, Anailin Nava, was featured last week in a New York Times article about the economic collapse of Venezuela. Now the girl, who was malnourished, is getting the supplements she needs. Toas island, where she lives, is practically cut off from the mainland, and bags of subsidized food from the government arrive every 5 months. According to Anailin’s mother, Maibeli Nava, and her neighbors, families consume much of the food within a week. The nurse, Fabiola Molero, said Anailin’s case was one of the worst she had seen. The family often could not afford to feed her more than once a day — and sometimes had only rice or cornmeal to eat. Anailin’s mother was afraid her daughter was going to die. But the arrival of the nurse, and the food, made an immediate difference: “Now she’s cheerful.” @meridithkohut shot this photo on the ground in Venezuela. Visit the link in our profile to read more about the nurse’s contribution and Venezuela’s collapse.

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What is the power of bodies meeting together in a public space? That is what Mia Habib, a Norwegian-Israeli choreographer, aims to explore in her work “ALL — a physical poem of protest.” The piece, which was performed as part of the La MaMa Moves! dance festival in New York, focuses on the pedestrian actions of walking and running. It can be performed for up to 12 hours (though the longest performance so far clocked in at 3 hours) and all the performers are nude. “What’s really exciting with this piece, but really scary, is letting go of control,” said Mia, 38. The La MaMa Moves! dance festival is going on now until May 26. @george_etheredge shot these photos. Visit the link in our profile to learn more about Mia’s performance.

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This simple cucumber salad with soy, ginger and garlic is cool, yet satisfyingly hot. Visit the link in our profile to get the recipe or ☝️tap the bookmark to save it for later. @juliagartland shot this photo and @bwashbu styled the dish. Follow @nytcooking for more delicious eats. #🥒

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The phone call that ruined Mohammed Hoque’s life came in April 2014. It was from a businessman who was selling a medallion, the coveted city permit that allows a driver to own a #taxi instead of working for someone else. If Mohammed gave him $50,000, he promised to arrange a loan for the purchase. So Mohammed emptied his savings and signed his name. He had no idea, he said later, that he had just signed a contract that required him to pay $1.7 million. A 10-month New York Times investigation found example after example of drivers trapped in exploitative loans, including hundreds who signed interest-only loans that required them to pay exorbitant fees, forfeit their legal rights and give up almost all their monthly income, indefinitely. Visit the link in our profile to read more. @kholoodeid shot this photo.

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Meet Robert Smith, the man paying off the loans of the 2019 Morehouse College graduating class. Robert, a billionaire investor and the richest black man in America, said that his family would eliminate the graduates’ student loan debt as he delivered @morehouse1867’s commencement speech on Sunday. He told the graduates of the private, all-male, historically black college that his gift was meant to set an example of paying it forward. Visit the link in our profile to read more about Robert and the surprise pledge. Chester Higgins Jr. shot this portrait in 2014.

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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @sw_photo shot these photos while on assignment for a story we published this week. Where do you think she was when she captured these scenes? Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer, and visit the link in our profile to read the story behind these photos.

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Rihanna opens up in an interview with @tmagazine about becoming the first black woman to run a major luxury fashion house: “I want to be as disruptive as possible.” Visit the link in our profile to read the interview where @badgalriri goes deep on her life, her music and her businesses. Kristin-Lee Moolman shot these photos of Rihanna wearing Fenty. Follow @tmagazine for more coverage of culture and style.

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“I had interviewed every porn star about every orifice,” Howard Stern says of his wilder days. “Don’t get me wrong, I was fascinated, but I couldn’t be that guy anymore.” In his first new book in more than 20 years, “Howard Stern Comes Again,” he discusses his transition to a more refined conversational style. “By going into therapy I developed empathy and began to care about the fact that I was a fan of some people,” he explained to @nytmag. Visit the link in our profile to read our interview with a career interviewer. @mamadivisuals shot this photo.

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The school photo industry is a wild ride of big money, lawsuits and lice panics. The school picture behemoth Lifetouch leads the trade, photographing roughly half of America’s 50 million schoolchildren every fall. But there’s a resistance, and Chris Wunder is its leader. Chris runs the 5-day “#1 Original School & Sports Photography Boot Camp,” where you can learn to be a school portrait photographer. He teaches students how to beat Lifetouch as well as regional competitors. We visited the camp and learned about the perfect head tilt, the dark side of the school photo industry and which words yield the perfect expression. (“Cheeseburger” for young kids. “Money” for adolescents. “Weekend” for adults.) Visit the link in our profile to read more. For @nytimesfashion, @allisonvsmith shot this photo of Mitchell Moore demonstrating a popular pose with Indy Gleave during the camp.

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Megan Mullally and Stephanie Hunt are the cabaret act @nancyandbeth — a choreographed, poker-faced, very funny vaudeville live performance. The duo, who met in 2012 on the set of the indie film “Somebody Up There Likes Me,” connected over a shared interest in music. The next thing they knew, they were in a band (which includes neither a Nancy nor a Beth). They released a self-titled album 2 years ago, and have crisscrossed the country, usually backed by a group of ace musicians from Los Angeles, Austin and New York. Unlike many stage duos, which often rely on the contrast between 2 starkly different performers, the 2 women sing and move in unison. “Even though we have a 30-year age difference, we can be so much the same,” said Stephanie. @joe_carrotta shot this photo of @meganomullally and @teppiehunt. Visit the link in bio to read more about their choreographed antics. #👯

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Which dishes define Persian cuisine? We asked Samin Nosrat, the author and star of the Netflix show “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,” to pick the 10 plates that resonate with her. She did not take her task lightly: “I interviewed my mother, surveyed 2 dozen Iranian and Iranian-American cooks, and compared ingredient lists and techniques with just about every Iranian cookbook published in the English language in the last 30 years.” Polo ba tahdig (Persian rice with bread crust), kuku sabzi (Persian herb frittata) and salad-e shirazi (Persian cucumber, tomato and onion salad) are 3 dishes that made @ciaosamin’s list. Visit the link in our profile to get the recipes and see all 10. @conpoulos shot these photos, @simoncooks styled the dishes and @paigehicksnyc styled the props. Follow @nytcooking for more delicious eats. #😋

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Being chosen for the Whitney Biennial can help make an artist’s career. The exhibition instantly marks a creative as a figure at the forefront of American contemporary art. But it also exposes artists to heightened scrutiny as some use their work to address social issues head-on. Recent visits with 8 first-time participants — including @meriembennani, @toddgrayla, @maia_ruth_lee and @calvinmarcus, shown here — found them completing work that made their points subtly. If anything, the artists we met seemed to seek areas of calm — for the viewer, for themselves. Visit the link in our profile to read more about the artists’ work as well as the @whitneymuseum’s exhibition, which opens May 17. @cgregoryphoto shot the 1st and 3rd photo; @brianguido shot the 2nd and 4th.

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Many Russians say Lake Baikal, which holds nearly 20% of the earth’s fresh surface water, is under siege. Framed by pine forests and distant mountain peaks, the picturesque lake draws visitors in both summer and winter, when even trucks can navigate across its thick, intensely blue ice. More than 1.6 million tourists, mostly Russians, visited the region last year; the 186,200 Chinese were the largest foreign group. While residents of Listvyanka, an old resort town on the lake, worry about the influx of tourism, they see in the flood of visitors the best hope they have for new jobs and economic development in an impoverished region. @emileducke shot these photos. Visit the link in our profile to read more from @nytmacfarquhar.

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One of the world’s most revered architects, I.M. Pei, died on Thursday at 102. The glass pyramid at the Louvre Museum in Paris is among his many famous designs. I.M. Pei was one of the few architects whose work was equally attractive to real estate developers, corporate chieftains and art museum boards. All of his work — from his commercial skyscrapers to his art museums — represented a careful balance of the cutting edge and the conservative. Visit the link in our profile to read more about #impei and 6 of his most important buildings. Ernie Sisto shot this photo of the architect in 1970 and @kostyukov shot the photo of the #LouvrePyramid at @MuseeLouvre in 2017.

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This Cantonese opera about President Trump and China includes an extraterrestrial spacecraft, the ghost of Abraham Lincoln and a scheming Kim Jong-un. “It’s crazy,” said the librettist, Li Kui-ming. The 3-and-a-half-hour opera, “Trump on Show,” sold out last month during a 4-day run. That provided a boost for the Sunbeam Theater, Hong Kong’s last commercial Cantonese opera venue. Another run is planned for next year, and Kui-ming dreams of a performance in the White House. “One day I want to show the opera to the real Donald Trump and make him laugh,” he said. @lamyikfei shot this photo. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art says it will stop accepting gifts from Sackler family members linked to the maker of OxyContin. The announcement on Wednesday severed ties between one of the world’s most prestigious museums and one of its most prolific philanthropic dynasties. The move reflects the growing outrage over the role the Sacklers may have played in the opioid crisis, as well as an energized activist movement that is forcing museums to reckon with where their money comes from. In a statement, the Sackler family members with ties to Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, said that the allegations are “false and unfair,” but that “accepting gifts at this time would put the Met in a difficult position.” @karstenmoran shot this photo in the Sackler Wing of the @MetMuseum. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

NYTimes

Should selling fur be banned in New York? A City Council proposal would ban the sale of fur garments and accessories, but it would allow the sale of used fur clothing and new apparel using #fur from older products. The measure has pit animal rights advocates against a diverse set of opponents, such as black ministers who say the measure would be culturally insensitive. Shop owners and garment manufacturers have also raised alarms over the potential loss of jobs and an attack on a centuries-old industry with a deep history in New York. What do you think? Let us know in the comments and visit the link in our profile to read more. @sarahblesener shot this photo.

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Thousands of women have shared abortion stories with #YouKnowMe. Busy Philipps was the first. She opened up last week about her abortion at 15 in a plea to protect women’s reproductive rights. On Tuesday, after reading about the abortion ban in Alabama, she decided to get other women to join her with the hashtag. “Women deserve compassion and understanding in their personal health choices,” Busy said. “This is something a lot of people experience and go through in their lives, and it’s a health care decision like many health care decisions.” @nytimesfashion spoke with @busyphilipps about speaking out, the response to her story and what comes next. Visit the link in our profile to read the interview, and follow @nytgender for more stories on women’s issues, gender and identity. @tawnibannister shot this photo.

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During neon’s heyday, New York was ablaze with color, and Times Square was an enormous flame. “Between the 1930s and the 1970s, neon signs were a potent American symbol for both glamour and depravity, hope and desolation,” @jeffmgiles writes. Las Vegas didn’t fully embrace #neon until after World War II, but made up for lost time quickly: Nobody had to tell them not to be subtle. These photos were shot by Carl T. Gossett Jr. in Las Vegas in 1963; a Times photographer in Times Square in 1945; Sam Falk in Times Square in 1948; and a Times photographer in Times Square in 1960. Visit the link in our profile to see more dazzling signs, and follow @nytarchives for more #throwback photos.

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For the first time in history, brothers — @stephencurry30 and @sdotcurry — are up against each other in the @NBA conference finals. That’s a problem for their parents, Dell and Sonya Curry, who have mastered cheering for their basketball star sons — just not at the same time. “I normally don’t get nervous at all,” Dell said. “But this has changed that.” After the 116-94 @warriors win on Tuesday, Sonya said the matchup “was wonderful.” “I got to see my oldest son do what he does and be himself,” she said, referring to Stephen. “I got to see my younger son in his first playoffs, going for a championship and filling his role.” As for their attire, the Currys represented both teams, wearing stitched half-and-half jerseys that the brothers were nice enough to sign. Our reporter @MarcSteinNBA spoke with the Currys about the nerve-racking series. Visit the link in our profile to read more. @jasonhenry shot this photo. #🏀

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San Francisco on Tuesday became the first major U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition technology by the police and other municipal agencies. The city, long at the heart of the technology revolution, is taking a stand as many police forces are turning to facial recognition to search for criminal suspects. The authorities used the technology to help identify the suspect in the mass shooting in Annapolis, Maryland, last June. But civil liberty groups have expressed unease about the technology’s potential abuse by government. @joebuglewicz shot this photo of @CES convention attendees interacting with a facial recognition demonstration at this year’s conference in Las Vegas. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Updated: Alabama @GovernorKayIvey signed a bill on Wednesday that effectively bans abortion in the state. Across the U.S., states are passing some of the most restrictive abortion legislation in decades, deepening the growing divide between liberal and conservative states and setting up momentous court battles that could profoundly reshape abortion access in America. Visit the link in our profile to read more. @_melissagolden shot this photo. Follow @nytgender for more stories on women’s issues, gender and identity.

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“I would have thought coming to an HBCU there would be more black people, but things aren’t always what you expect,” said Clarence Carter III, a junior infielder at @BethuneCookman. As the number of African-American baseball players continues to decline, black players are often surprised to find themselves in the minority even at historically black colleges. Visit the link in our profile to read more, and follow @racerelated for more stories on race and identity. @mariaalejandra2.8 shot this photo.

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For the past 12 years, Blanca Pereyra and Marcelo Fabian Velazquez have made a living by selling scraps from this dump outside Parana, Argentina. In the past 2 years, life has gotten harder, they said. The cash they earn does not buy as much food, and the number of people descending on the dump has doubled. Poverty afflicts a third of Argentina’s population, and the figure is climbing. Since taking office more than 3 years ago, President @MauricioMacri of Argentina has turned away from budget-busting populism. He’s slashed subsidies for electricity, fuel and transportation, causing prices to skyrocket. Now, as Macri seeks re-election this year, Argentines are waiting on the economic revival that was supposed to follow the pain. @_sarahpabst_ shot these photos. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Hi, it’s John Schwartz, a @nytimes climate change reporter. I recently wrote a story about the JoCo Cruise, a grand annual gathering of the nerd tribe, for @nytimestravel. It’s named for Jonathan Coulton, the singer-songwriter, but it extends far beyond him and his music to include science fiction, gaming, cosplay, crafts and more. It’s sweet and fun, and as one passenger put it, “For people on the far sides of the bell curve, this is a once-a-year opportunity to be themselves — and it’s heartwarming to watch.” Tony @Cenicola0 shot these photos. Visit the link in our profile to read more about the #jococruise, and follow me at @jswatznyt.

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“Dead to Me” follows two 40-something women who are linked by devastating loss. It’s a comedy. Mostly. The new Netflix show, starring Linda Cardellini, left, and Christina Applegate, goes from comedy to drama to thriller, and includes frank discussions of women’s health — miscarriage, perimenopause, mastectomy — and provides a nuanced view of female friendship. We sat down with @lindacardellini and Christina to talk grief, camaraderie and career longevity. Visit the link in our profile to read their conversation. @tawnibannister shot this photo.

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“I was so loyal to GM, but it’s just a game to them.” For more than 50 years, life in Lordstown, Ohio, revolved around the GM plant. In November, GM announced it was “unallocating” the plant, and the last car was shipped on March 8. The “unallocation” will cause the loss of more than $8 billion in economic activity, and wipe out nearly 8,000 jobs in the region. What happens to a factory town when the factory shuts down? For @nytmag, LaToya Ruby Frazier photographed the people whose lives will be affected due to the plant’s closing. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @burchamphoto shot these photos while on assignment for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think he was when he captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)

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Aperol Spritz... what's YOUR take? 📷 @KarstenMoran #aperolspritzgate

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“A baby albino giraffe.” This is what flutes sound like, according to Björk. There are 7 flute players, all women, in Björk’s latest live extravaganza, “Cornucopia.” The show is a sci-fi, feminist fairy tale opening this week at the Shed, the new arts venue at Hudson Yards on the West Side of Manhattan. Billed as @Björk’s “most elaborate staged concert to date,” it includes a 50-member Icelandic young people’s choir, a custom-made reverb chamber, mesmerizing video projections, carefully positioned 360-degree sound and multiple bespoke instruments. @ryanpfluger shot this photo of the Icelandic singer. Click the link in our profile to read more about her show at @theshedny.

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How do you get here? Well, first you crawl through a clothes dryer “portal” to another universe. The House of Eternal Return charms in part because it feels like a discovery: In the middle of this stodgy old-person’s town, who would expect to find this improbable riot of colors, all anchored by hand-built charm. Now, Meow Wolf, the artist collective turned multimillion-dollar dream factory, is building an "immersive bazaar" in Las Vegas. The question is whether @meow__wolf will be able to make something that is magical, on budget and replicable without seeming too much like a millennial version of Chuck E. Cheese’s. Jeff Minton shot this photo at the “Dryer Portal” at the House of Eternal Return in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Visit the link in our profile to read more about how this art collective is trying to make itself the Disney of the experience economy. And follow @nytmag for more stories of financial ruin and ingenuity.

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Rihanna will become the first woman to create an original brand at @lvmh, the first woman of color at the top of an LVMH maison, and her line will be the first new house created by the group since Christian Lacroix in 1987. It joins such storied heritage brands as Dior, Givenchy, Celine and Fendi and positions @badgalriri as a breakthrough designer on a number of levels. Photo by @vnina. Click the link in our profile to read the full story and follow @nytimesfashion for more Styles coverage.

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A new UN report has concluded that humans are transforming the natural world so dramatically that as many as 1 million species are at risk of extinction. With the human population passing 7 billion, activities like farming, logging, poaching, fishing and mining are altering the natural world at a rate “unprecedented in human history." The loss of #biodiversity around the world has become as big a threat as #climatechange, posing severe risks to human well-being. @joshhaner shot this photo at the #RioGrande of dead fish left behind after the river dried up. Visit the link in our bio to read more about the report's findings. #🌎

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The changing climate may harm the future of maple syrup. A good maple syrup season requires daytime highs above freezing with nighttime lows below freezing. Climate change is narrowing the window for those conditions and making it harder for #maplesyrup producers, whose work relies on knowing the exact timing to put in taps. @cmoosh took this photo of this season’s maple syrup being bottled at @fultonsmaple in #Pakenham, Ontario. #🍁

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“They told us there’s poison in the sea. But we have no money, so we still fish.” Water is the lifeblood of Rennell Island, a windswept speck in the Pacific Ocean that has already been scarred by the ravages of mining. Now an oil spill has polluted the water and threatens a World Heritage site and the way of life of locals whose lives revolve around the ocean. @davidmauricesmith shot this photo of children playing in the ocean near Lavangu Village. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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🔈Turn your sound on for this series of photos from our archives. When a hard rain descends on New York, the whole city feels it. Traffic stands still, puddles get deceptively deep and even the most intrepid among us cower in the wakes of passing cabs. Any object an unsuspecting pedestrian is carrying quickly becomes a makeshift umbrella, and actual umbrellas become hazards themselves, catching the wind or flipping inside out. The best of these photos make you feel caught in a downpour. All they need to make you feel truly soaked, though, is sound. So the photo editor @jmwender asked a sound artist to create short soundtracks for these images. Don Hogan Charles, Neal Boenzi and William Eckenberg took these photos and Craig Henighan created the audio. Visit the link in our profile to view and hear more, and follow @nytarchives for more #throwback photos. #☔

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Ehren Tool, a Gulf War veteran, has spent the last 18 years creating handmade ceramic cups intended to start conversations about the grief and suffering of armed conflict. The scale of his work is vast, with over 21,000 cups made, and the images depicted are usually disturbing, graphic and purposefully harrowing. Ehren wants to create pieces that people will receive as gifts and use in their regular lives, but his cups can’t be bought. “I would like my work to vindicate the principles of peace and justice in the world,” he said. “That is a lot to ask of a cup.” @kelseymcclellan shot these photos of Ehren and his stoneware for @nytmag. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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In some ways, there’s a template for being a teenage girl in America: going to school, hanging at the mall, staying up late texting friends and studying for tomorrow’s test. But for the “valley girls” of #RioGrande, the borderland where Mexico and the U.S. meet, life is bilingual, binational and often riddled with the daily drama of poverty and deportation. We spoke to young women like Gaby Brown, 15, who recently celebrated her quinceañera and wants to join the military like her mom, and Jocelyn Guzman, 18, a U.S. citizen who lives in Matamoros, Mexico, and crosses the border to attend high school in Brownsville, Texas. @ilanapl shot this photo of Gaby getting ready for her #quinceañera. Visit the link in our profile to read about coming of age in the borderland and follow @nytgender for more stories on women and girlhood.

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This is not Black Star Pastry’s famous strawberry-and-watermelon cake — a.k.a. Australia’s most Instagrammed dessert. But it’s pretty close. This is our food critic @tejalxrao’s watermelon-rose trifle: just as delicious, but not as structured — meaning you can be a little messier! The recipe was inspired by @blackstarpastry’s cake, which was invented by the pastry chef Christopher Thé as a one-off for a friend’s wedding more than a decade ago. And though he didn’t know it would become an unofficial national treasure and a must-stop on the Sydney tourism circuit, he did know how to make a beautiful cake. @blobbybloherty shot this photo for @nytmag and @maggie_ruggiero did food styling and @bartoshesky did prop styling.

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Scenes of love and hope in revolutionary Sudan followed the unseating of President Omar Hassan al-Bashir. After decades of airless, joyless rule under al-Bashir, a wave of exuberance has rippled across the capital, Khartoum, where young Sudanese are reveling in newfound freedoms — to talk politics, to party and even to find love. Women in jeans move about without fear of harassment. Couples mingle easily, some holding hands. Sudan’s new freedoms are fragile, and whether they can endure is unclear. Some say the struggle has just begun. “It’s like you’re in a dark place and you can see a small light,” one protester said. “We have a long road to freedom.” @bdentonphoto shot these photos. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Tens of thousands of people have fled gang violence in Honduras, many heading north toward the U.S. Our journalists followed a group of young men in San Pedro Sula to tell the story of gang violence through the voices of residents, shopkeepers, families and gang members themselves. The struggle to protect their neighborhood encapsulates the inescapable violence that entraps and expels millions of people across Latin America. Since the turn of this century, more than 2.5 million people have been killed in Latin America and the Caribbean. The region accounts for just 8% of the global population, yet 38% of the world’s murders. Tyler Hicks shot these photos. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Lisa Hanawalt, the illustrator behind @bojackhorseman, has created a whole universe of anthropomorphic characters with deeply human concerns and base animal instincts. Now she finally has a show of her own: @tucaandbertie, an animated series on @netflix about two 30-something bird-women. Tuca (voiced by @tiffanyhaddish) is a toucan who swaggers aimlessly through life, and Bertie ( @aliwong) is a shy, creative songbird who is afraid of everything, including heights. The characters reveal parts of women we rarely see onscreen — the strangest, horniest, hungriest parts. “It was very important to me to show that women are gross,” @lisadraws said. @elizabethrweinberg shot this photo of Lisa and her horse, Juniper, in Los Angeles.

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“Even my boyfriend who doesn’t like tofu or coconuts had seconds,” one @nytcooking reader wrote. This week, try @clarkbar's coconut red curry with tofu recipe, which calls for jarred curry paste, instead of homemade. Visit the link in our profile to get the recipe, along with other climate-friendly plates, or ☝️tap the bookmark to save this dish for later. @juliagartland shot this photo for the special #foodandclimate issue and @monicapierini styled it. Follow @nytcooking for more delicious eats.

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We went inside fashion’s party of the year: the cocktail reception at the #MetGala. It was a night of a thousand stars, stylists and a couture cheeseburger. @landonnordeman took the photos. For all the looks from the party and the red carpet, see the link in our profile. Can't get enough? Follow @nytimesfashion fashion for more coverage.

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Sometimes known as “the Oscars of the East Coast” the Met Gala is like an awards show without the awards — pure, unadulterated red carpet. This year, the theme was camp, but it’s a slippery thing to define. The dress code: “studied triviality.” For all the looks from the red carpet, click the link in our bio. @karstenmoran and @vnina shot these photos. Want more #camp glam? Make sure to follow @nytimesfashion.

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The theme of the Met Gala is camp and @LadyGaga knows how to put on a show. She walked in wearing a fuchsia dress with an enormous train and an entourage of umbrella-holding, suit-wearing men to handle it. But soon enough, she started to morph. Eventually, she revealed four different outfits on the steps at #metgala. See all the looks from the red carpet in the link in our bio, and make sure to follow @nytimesfashion for all the fashion moments from the event.

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“The day you start thinking about comfort, you’re getting old.” We were with @celinedion as she got ready for the Met Gala. On the red carpet, she decided to wear a clinging champagne-colored bodysuit embellished with silvery sequins in fish-scale patterns designed by @oscardelarenta. The sleeves are draped in 3,000 strands of floor-length fringe made from micro-cut glass bugle beads. The outfit took 3,000 hours to create and was inspired by one Judy Garland wore in the MGM classic “Ziegfeld Girl.” @vincenttullo shot these photographs of her getting ready and @karstenmoran shot her on the red carpet. To read about what it's like to get ready with Celine, visit the link in our bio. For more coverage from the #MetGala, follow @nytimesfashion.

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Saffron is a notoriously fussy spice to harvest: delicate and labor intensive. It is also a rare success story in Afghanistan, now the 3rd-largest #saffron producer in the world, behind Iran and India. Hashim Aslami, an aid worker, is one of the proud visionaries of the $25 million export industry that continues to grow despite Afghanistan's seemingly endless war. Hashim, 63, went village to village convincing farmers that even though harvesting the spice can be tricky and time consuming, the financial returns can be substantial: Known as “red gold,” the spice can sell for as much as $700 a pound on the local market and much more elsewhere. @kianahayeri shot this photo. Read more about Afghans’ successful spice economy at the link in our profile.

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This week in an interview with @nytmag, Georgia’s Stacey Abrams is still saying she won: “I won because we transformed the electorate, we turned out people who had never voted, we outmatched every Democrat in Georgia history.” Despite being the first black female nominee from a major party to run for governor of any state, @staceyabrams surely couldn’t have anticipated that losing her election bid would have catapulted her to the heights of the Democratic Party. She sat down to talk about self-doubt, voter suppression and her future ambitions. @mamadivisuals shot this portrait. Read the full interview at the link in our profile.