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NYTimes

Amelia Earhart’s disappearance in 1937 has led to wild and unfounded theories: that she was an American spy captured by the Japanese, or that she lived out her days after assuming a false identity as a New Jersey housewife. But a new and unexpected clue about the details of her plane crash recently emerged: a tiny speck (less than one millimeter long) in a photograph that intelligence analysts say resembles the landing gear of Earhart’s Electra. After studying the photo, Robert Ballard, who found the Titanic and other famous shipwrecks, began searching for the lost plane this month with Allison Fundis, a rising explorer he hopes will eventually take his place. The two explorers are confident they will find the lost plane. Visit the link in our bio to find out more and see the new photographic evidence.

NYTimes

A common peeve among tailors: too much dry cleaning, poorly done. Unless there is a stain or a lot of sweat, let the wool heal itself. Inside the colorful hives of activity that are Brooklyn’s tailor shops, politics are a battleground, but so are pleats. The photographer @stephensperanza, who owns a total of one suit — off-the-rack — started venturing into tailor shops in Brooklyn to explore what seemed like a dated practice. But inside their doors he found vibrant cultural scenes, with virtuosic artisans and conversations out of barber shops. For Yosel Tiefenbrun, a bespoke tailor and non-practicing Chabad rabbi of East Williamsburg, it is difficult to watch a customer drape a custom suit over a metal chair. One tailor said he had made suits for Jay-Z; another said his business boomed during the crack era, but when the neighborhood gentrified, clients stopped commissioning suits and instead only came for quick alterations. “I like to mix colors and fabrics to make one-of-a-kind garments,” said Antonio Brown, pictured in the third photo. “Once I make a design, I don’t do it again.” Click the link in our bio to see more of Stephen’s photos and make sure to follow @nytimesfashion for more sartorial inspiration.

NYTimes

Plastic waste is a scourge of modern life. On the Ivory Coast, a group of women is turning it into an asset that will help other women earn a decent living while cleaning up the environment – and improving education. The women make their living in Abidjan picking up plastic waste on the city streets and selling it for recycling. They’re lead players in a project that turns trash into plastic bricks to build schools across the West African country. The new plastic-brick classrooms are badly needed — some classrooms now pack in as many as 90 students. And while mud brick erodes in the sun and rain, the new plastic classrooms could last practically forever. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @yagazieemezi took this photo.

NYTimes

Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @darrenshiggins shot these photos for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think he was when he captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)

NYTimes

Candace Bushnell, the writer best known as the creative force behind “Sex and the City,” lives in a one-bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper East Side. “It’s a single woman’s apartment, which feels great,” she said. “I’m in the same building where Dorothy Parker lived.” We asked her to detail her Sunday routine, which includes a 30-minute bounce session on her mini trampoline. “As I’ve gotten older I’ve become more solitary. This routine isn’t the routine I had 20 years ago. I wouldn’t have exercised. I would have had a boozy brunch with friends,” @candacebushnell said. Visit the link in our bio to get into the nitty-gritty of how she spends her Sunday. @michelleagins took this photo of Candace in her apartment.

NYTimes

Don't go in that water. Normally, New Jersey’s largest lake would be buzzing with swimmers and water skiers this time of year. But workers have been laid off, sailing lessons canceled and summers ruined as clouds of blue-green algae — which make the water unsafe for swimmers — are blooming in quantities never before recorded. Climate change is a likely factor, scientists say, in an increase in blooms of cyanobacteria — single-cell organisms that, when they grow densely, can produce toxic substances. Click the link in our bio to read more. @rickloomis shot this photo.

NYTimes

“It’s like the Olympic ceremony of wine — except it happens daily for almost a month,” writes Sebastian Modak, our #52Places traveler. The Swiss aren’t generally known for dancing all night to ABBA. But every 20 years or so, the small town of Vevey lets loose with an over-the-top party during its winegrower’s festival, Fête des Vignerons. The celebration of local winemaking traditions prides itself on happening only once in a generation, and the entire town is transformed throughout the festival, with parades marching along the shore of Lake Geneva. Every day of the festival, a different canton of Switzerland is represented — a crowd of wizard-looking men in cork top hats from Geneva one day, steampunk marching bands from Fribourg, pictured, the next. Click the link in our bio to read more from @sebmodak, who took this photo, and make sure to follow @nytimestravel.

NYTimes

The only words more beautiful than "tomato season" are "Hi, I made you this roasted tomato tart with ricotta and pesto." For this savory snack, you'll want smaller, sturdier tomatoes, salted to accompany the tanginess of the crispy, crème fraîche-brushed pastry. This tart is best eaten at its flaky prime straight out of the oven, but it’s also great cold, devoured directly from the fridge. Get @alexaweibel's recipe from @nytcooking at the link in our bio, and don't forget to hit save to bookmark this for later. @christophertestani took this photo and it was styled by @bwashbu.

NYTimes

The deep blues and white-out whites of Santorini exercise a particular hold on the romantic imagination. The Greek island has become the ultimate destination for pre-wedding photographs and developed into a multibillion-dollar business — particularly for Chinese and Taiwanese couples. For 26-year-old Tzuchi Lin and his fiancée, Yingting Huang, having their pre-wedding shots made on Santorini meant the world. “It’s very exciting. Actually, we didn’t sleep last night,” he said. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @lauraboushnak took this photo of the couple in the midst of their photo shoot.

NYTimes

Jeffrey Epstein, the financier indicted on sex trafficking charges last month, committed suicide at a Manhattan jail, officials said on Saturday. This is a developing story. Tap the link in our bio for more details.

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Which of these people should run a media empire? “Succession” returns for its second season on Sunday. In its first season, the HBO series was perfectly attuned to this era of the 0.0001 percent, offering a no-holds-barred look inside the fictional Roy family that bristled with the drama of generational conflict. Savored by fans for its ability to cut the rich and influential down to size, the show will try to continue to strike its balance of discord, farce and tragedy without repeating itself and avoid the dreaded sophomore slump that plagued “Big Little Lies,” “Westworld” and “True Detective.” “Sometimes when you write a second season, the first draft can feel like self-parody,” said Jesse Armstrong, its creator, in a recent interview that also included the actors who play Logan Roy (Brian Cox) and his children Kendall (Jeremy Strong), Roman (Kieran Culkin), Shiv (Sarah Snook) and Connor (Alan Ruck). To find out who the cast thinks should take over the Waystar Royco media empire, click the link in our bio. @vincenttullo shot these portraits.

NYTimes

David Morrison is 7 years old and carries the scars of Ferguson’s upheaval. A veteran protester, he has fled gunshots and tear gas, marched, waved signs and played dead on the asphalt in years of activism that unspooled after a white police officer killed an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown. This is the inheritance of the children in Ferguson, Missouri, where a generation has grown up amid uneven progress in the aftermath of a national reckoning. David’s mother, Aminah Ali, got involved in a citizen-journalism project after the killing of Michael Brown and took David along to protests when he was a preschooler. But one night she began to notice the toll on her son. He jolts awake from nightmares on the living-room couch where he often sleeps, and then cracks open her bedroom door to reassure himself she is still there. “I overexposed him,” she said. “I just felt like, my son needs to be out here. He needs to be exposed to what the police are doing to us. But he was too young.” Many of Ferguson’s young residents threw themselves into student activism, while others pulled away from the rising movement they watched their parents join. And although the city has made some visible changes to its government and criminal justice system, some residents say Ferguson is not moving quickly or aggressively enough to undo long-running racial inequities. Check out our Instagram story and visit the link in our bio to read more. @jaredsoares took this photo.

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An unmarried woman older than 25 in Japan was once called a "Christmas cake," a slur referencing pastries that can’t be sold after Dec. 25. Now the slur is fading as more and more women are choosing to remain single, rejecting the traditional path in which wives and mothers are expected to bear the brunt of domestic labor. The wave is so striking that a growing number of businesses now cater specifically to single women. There are single karaoke salons with women-only zones, restaurants designed for solo diners and apartment complexes that target women looking to buy or rent homes on their own. Travel companies book tours for single women, and photo studios offer sessions in which women can don wedding dresses and pose for solo bridal portraits. “We don’t have to rely on men anymore,” said one single woman, who lives in a condominium she bought herself. @andreadicenzo took these photos. Read more about Japanese women’s newfound cultural and economic freedom at the link in our bio.

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This salad is essentially just a bowl of all the juicy, crunchy things to love about summer. Mix up a watermelon and feta combo with medium-diced cucumbers and melon — or cut them smaller to make it more of a salsa. Don't forget the feta. Click the link in our bio for @martharoseshulman's recipe and more from @nytcooking. @dmalosh took this photo.

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Toni Morrison, the Nobel laureate whose work explored black identity in America, died on Monday in New York at 88. She was the first African-American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature for works which, as the Swedish Academy put it, gave “life to an essential aspect of American reality.” In her first novel, “The Bluest Eye,” she told the story “with a prose so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry,” wrote John Leonard in his New York Times review. . Morrison authored 11 novels as well as children’s books and essay collections, among them celebrated works like “Song of Solomon” and the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Beloved,” widely considered her masterwork. As her writing makes clear, the past is just as strongly manifest in the bonds of family, community and race — bonds that let culture, identity and a sense of belonging be transmitted from parents to children to grandchildren. These generational links, her work unfailingly suggests, form the only salutary chains in human experience. Visit the link in our bio and check out our Instagram story to read more. @damonwinter took this portrait.

NYTimes

Kayakers fear them. Commercial captains hate them. But once a year, the Jet Ski Invasion takes over New York’s waterways for a couple of hours of controlled chaos. The invasion is a simple idea with a precise schedule. During the last week of June, participants met at the Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City, near the border of Queens and Brooklyn. They traveled the narrow expanse of the East River and concluded in the Hudson by the George Washington Bridge. “Jet skiing is one of the lowest price points to entry to get into boating generally, and certainly in New York,” said Adam Schwartz, the owner of Sea the City, a tour company based in Jersey City, N.J. But one logistical challenge is the increasingly crowded harbor. This year, the New York City Ferry Service added additional routes. Personal watercraft tourism is continuing to expand but, not everybody is happy about it. @thecadejo took this photo of the gathering. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

NYTimes

At a vigil on Sunday in Dayton, Ohio, strangers grasped each other in long, tearful hugs after yet another mass shooting in America, as friends of those who had died stood alongside those who had escaped. “I don’t know why I’m surprised,” one mourner said. “This happens all the time.” The gunman’s own sister was among the 9 people killed in the barrage of gunfire in Dayton, which happened less than 14 hours after a shooting at a Walmart in El Paso that left 22 dead and dozens wounded. On a bluff overlooking the store, which is near the border with Mexico, mourners stood silently at a memorial Sunday night. “Even though it is a big city,” one resident said, “it’s a small community.” The gunman in El Paso, angered by what he called a “Hispanic invasion of Texas,” targeted Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in the attack, and the city’s residents — though hurt and shaken — were defiant as a ubiquitous message appeared on signs and in speeches at vigils: “Hate will not define us.” Mourners in both cities have implored lawmakers for gun control, and on Monday, President Trump initially called for tougher background checks for prospective gun buyers. Hours before speaking at the White House, the president proposed “marrying” gun measures with new immigration laws — two of the most politically divisive issues facing U.S. lawmakers. But in his address later Monday morning, he stopped well short of endorsing broad gun control measures, instead falling back on time-honored Republican remedies, calling for stronger action to address mental illness, and violence in the media and in video games. @maddiemcgarvey, @ajmast and Jim Wilson took these photos from Dayton and El Paso. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio for the latest updates.

NYTimes

Setesdal has long been considered by many Norwegians to be a fascinating but provincial region whose inhabitants clung to outmoded ways. The area’s rich traditions of fiddle music, song, dance, costume and even language are all curiously distinct from the rest of Norway. But the very distinctions that once prompted urbanites to mock the valley’s rural inhabitants have become sources of interest and pride, even as some inhabitants are leaving for school and work opportunities elsewhere. As those from the region are looking for ways to preserve their customs and keep relevant in the digital era, the historically insular valley is now opening itself to visitors and sharing Setesdal’s natural beauty and cultural wealth with outsiders. Click the link in our bio to read more and follow @nytimestravel for more travel inspiration. @villanueva.photo shot these photos.

NYTimes

Earth is to elephants as the ocean is to whales. It is their medium, their world, their instrument. They communicate through it. They migrate vast distances across it. They cover themselves in it as protection from the sun. They gather the bones of their dead herd members on it for mourning rituals. But despite mounting evidence that elephants find captivity torturous, some American zoos still keep acquiring them from Africa — aided by a tall tale about why they needed to leave home. At what point does our wonder no longer warrant wounding another being? Read more from @nytmag at the link in our bio. Photographed by@robin_schwartz.

NYTimes

In less than 24 hours, 2 mass shootings in the United States have left at least 29 people dead. The killings are the latest in a particularly brutal week for gun violence in the country. On Saturday, a 21-year-old gunman turned a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, into a scene of chaos in an attack that left at least 20 people dead and 26 others wounded. About 13 hours later, a man stormed an entertainment district in Dayton, Ohio, and killed at least 9 people and wounded another 27. Last week, a gunman killed 3 people and wounded 13 others in a shooting at a garlic festival in Gilroy, California. In all, there have been at least 32 mass shootings — defined as 3 or more killings in a single episode — in the U.S. this year. @adrianazehbrauskas, Jorge Salgado, @cttobin, @howdyluke and Carlos Sanchez took these photos, which are from Dayton and El Paso. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio for the latest updates.

NYTimes

If you're a fan of “Gossip Girl,” you probably recognize this room. At Lotte New York Palace in New York there is a tour that isn’t advertised online or at check-in for hotel guests. The only way to find out about it is through word-of-mouth — or, well, this Instagram post. The hotel was the home of Serena van der Woodsen and Chuck Bass, some of the main characters of “Gossip Girl.” Throughout the show’s 6 seasons, the hotel became a character of its own, with other characters referring to it just as “the palace.” With the show’s reboot on HBO Max announced in July, the tour — which is currently free — may become even more popular. @kmarksphoto took this photo. Visit the link in our profile to read more. XOXO, @nytimestravel.

NYTimes

Mango sticky rice, but make it... an ice-cold pudding pop. For this take on the beloved Thai dessert, use glutinous sticky rice soaked overnight, then steamed. Don’t be tempted to use any other kind of rice here — the signature chew is a big part of this frozen treat's appeal. Click the link in our bio to get @samanthaseneviratne's @nytcooking recipe, or tag a friend who would love it. #nyticecream @linda.xiao took this photo.

NYTimes

Should black people wear sunscreen? Because people of color are often left out of clinical trials and treatments, there is very little research available about dark-skinned people and skin cancer, and the answer is more complicated than it may seem. Click the link in our bio to read more. @nytchangster took this photo.

NYTimes

A team of hurricane hunters (yes, that’s a real job), a photographer and one of our reporters flew into the heart of Tropical Storm Barry in July. Like doctors taking a CT scan, hurricane hunters gather real-time data that is crucial to understanding hurricanes across the globe. It is especially important to gather data from weather systems like Barry that defy predictions: The weirdest storms can sometimes produce the best science. The 14-member crew — all with earplugs and a plastic sick bag handy — spent a total of eight hours on the flight researching the storm. “Think about putting a GoPro in the dishwasher — and then running it,” said one of the pilots about flying near storm systems. “That’s what you see.” Click the link in our bio to read more. @nytchangster took these photos.

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No, the answer is not 100. This seemingly simple equation has blown up the (usually quiet) world of Mathematical Twitter. But the question has a clear and definite answer if we all play by the same rules governing PEMDAS or what high school teachers call “the order of operations,” meaning the order in which we tackle multiple components — like parentheses, multiplication, addition — of a math problem. Everyone agreed parentheses should be evaluated first, but here’s the rub: When faced with a division and a multiplication, standard convention holds that they have equal priority. So which comes first? To break the tie, we should work from left to right. Visit the link in our bio to read more and leave your answer in the comments.

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We’re guessing this is not the first time you’ve seen a colorful pool float in your Instagram feed this summer. The trend of lounging on an inflatable unicorn, swan or pineapple — then sharing photographic evidence of it — shows no signs of deflating. Unlike luxury cars or designer clothing, floats are relatively accessible to the average person, not just celebrities and #influencers. Float-mania has provoked competition between companies, all of them vying to create the float design to rule them all, at least for the summer. “Animals are done,” said Barry Glick, C.E.O of the Australian brand @sunnylifeaustralia. Read more from @nytimesfashion at the link in our bio. Photos by @vnina. #🦄#🍕#🍩#🦢#poolfloat

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Five hours of debating over two nights. A widening rift between the party's populist and centrist wings. Strong messages from the race's leading progressives. A shaky front-runner. Click the link in our bio to read what we learned about the 2020 Democratic primary from the debates on Tuesday and Wednesday nights. @erinschaff shot these photos.

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At first glance, roller derby seems like a feminist punk fever dream. It is unapologetic and aggressive, a full-contact whirlwind populated by characters with names like Carnage Electra, Miss U.S. Slay and Bleeda Kahlo. But the blood, sweat and mascara that seem so essential to the modern sport have roots stretching back nearly a century. Roller derby was born in Chicago in 1935, drawing crowds from all over for a trifecta of “noise, color, body contact.” From the sport’s earliest days, men and women skated by the same rules, for the same amount of time, on the same track. And it’s making a comeback — with roller derby leagues now on every continent except Antarctica. Photographer John Sotomayor shot this photo at a New York Chiefs’ women’s squad bout in 1972. Check out the link in our bio to learn more about the long and surprising history of #rollerderby and make sure to follow @nytarchives.

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Sometimes humans and animals have a shared interest, but humans have to save the animals first. The people with nets chasing dogs know this, but the dogs running away didn’t get the message. Dogcatchers who work for Mission Rabies wear T-shirts emblazoned with a paw print logo and carry the canine rabies vaccine. Once they give a dog a shot, it should be safe for at least a year. @missionrabies has targeted Goa, India’s smallest state, as a place to demonstrate its program’s viability to stop the spread of canine rabies. Like other states, Goa has an abundance of street dogs and rabies. Worldwide, about 59,000 people a year die from rabies, including about 20,000 in India — 99 percent of them because they were bitten by a rabid dog. Deaths of people from rabies in Goa fell to zero last year from 15 in 2014, when the campaign started. There have been none so far in 2019. Swipe left to see more photos from @lokeatul and visit the link in our bio to read the story.

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Think about driving for 8,500 miles over 36 days. Now imagine doing it in a classic car. That’s what these racers cover, cajoling their collectible vehicles from Beijing to Paris, and across dirt paths, rivers and mountains. 105 cars started this year near the Great Wall of China, and raced through 12 countries, including Russia, Kazakhstan, Estonia and Poland. The #pekingtoparis race started in 1907 and was originally meant to test the endurance of the newly emerging automobile. The route had never been driven before; a large chunk of the way was missing roads. Noele Illien, who took this photo, signed up as a chronicler and participant in this year’s race, teaming up with her father, an automotive engine designer, to race in a 1955 Citroën Traction Avant. “We finished in 49th place,” she wrote. “But the satisfaction came in just making it to Paris, even though there were times we thought we wouldn’t.” Click the link in our bio for more photos from the race.

NYTimes

17 cyclists have died in New York so far this year, 7 more than all of last year. The fatalities have provoked an outcry from cyclists and transportation advocates and ratcheted up pressure on Mayor Bill de Blasio — a Democrat running for president — to better protect cyclists at a time when biking is booming across the city. In response, @billdeblasio plans to unveil a $58.4 million bike safety plan that will focus on rapidly installing and creating a citywide network of protected bike lanes, redesigning intersections to make turns safer for cyclists, and stepping up enforcement of traffic rules. “No loss of life on our streets is acceptable,” de Blasio said. @theotherchrislee took this photo of a memorial for Robyn Hightman, a bike messenger who was killed by a delivery truck in June. Visit the link in our bio to read more.

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16-year-old Kyle Giersdorf, known as Bugha, won $3 million at the first Fortnite World Cup last weekend. A massive crowd filled Arthur Ashe Stadium and roared while they watched the in-game action on mammoth 4K LED screens. In Fortnite Battle Royale, players are dropped on a virtual island and fight to be the last ones standing. Some analysts think the market for such battle royale games like @fortnite and Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds has plateaued, but the format remains extremely popular. Competitors at this World Cup were battling for $30 million in prize money, the same amount awarded at soccer’s Women’s World Cup this summer. “Everything I’ve done, the grind, it’s all paid off,” Giersdorf said. “It’s insane.” @brianfinke and @vincenttullo took these photos and video of the Fortnite World Cup event. Visit the links in our bio to read more.

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Have you ever been scammed on Instagram or Facebook? Sgt. Daniel Anonsen of the U.S. @marines contended with dozens of impostors on social media using his name and photos to cheat vulnerable women out of their money. He reported 200 fake accounts before quitting Facebook and @Instagram entirely. On our new TV show, @theweekly, we investigated why the Pentagon and @Facebook can’t seem to stop these scams. Watch our Instagram story and click the link in our bio to learn more. If you’re not caught up yet, there are 7 episodes of #TheWeeklyNYT ready for you to binge-watch on @hulu or on-demand on @fxnetworks.

NYTimes

Ice cream is a go-to summer treat. But how do you make vanilla ice cream less, well, vanilla? The answer is pretty obvious: chocolate. First, melt chunks of bittersweet chocolate in a small metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Then stir in coconut oil and heat until dissolved, about 1 minute. This will create something nearly identical to the commercial product Magic Shell but with a far richer, more fudgy flavor. @andrewhpurcell took this photo of the sweet treat. Visit the link in our profile to read more. 🍨🍫

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On Sunday, a gunman opened fire at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in California, killing 3 people and wounding a dozen others. Among the dead was Stephen Romero, a 6-year-old whose mother was shot in the stomach and his grandmother in the leg. His uncle, Noe Romero, holds a family photograph of Stephen in this image. For several decades the event has acted as a kind of family reunion for the community, according to the festival’s executive director. There would have been more bloodshed had 3 officers not responded in under a minute, with one of them fatally shooting the gunman, who was carrying a semiautomatic rifle, the police chief said. The shooting in Gilroy took place days after 4 people were killed and 2 people were injured in a rampage through the San Fernando Valley. @sbmaneyphoto took these photos. This is a developing story. Click the link in our bio to read the latest.

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“I’m not going to be naïve and think that I’m going to sit down with Trump and he’s going to change his mind. There are children locked up at the border who are dying, and that’s not fazing him. So why would I faze him?” Megan Rapinoe and the U.S. national women’s soccer team achieved a monumental victory at this summer’s World Cup — the squad was never seriously threatened. But what was happening off the field was perhaps even more significant. @mrapinoe and her teammates swept through the tournament while also suing their own country’s soccer federation over gender discrimination and taking on President Trump after she said that she would decline a White House visit should the @uswnt win (in reply, Mr. Trump ramped up the pressure by tweeting, essentially, “Put up or shut up”). All the while, they were competing against perhaps the strongest group of women’s teams ever assembled. Megan was awarded the tournament’s Golden Boot as its top goal-scorer and the Golden Ball as its best player, becoming an activist-athlete icon in the process. “For girls now, it’s amazing to see different types of women come to power,” she said. @mamadivisuals took this photo. Visit the link in our bio to read more.

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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @csmphotos shot these photos while on assignment for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think he was when he captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)

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“Dropping” is when groups of children, generally pre-teens, are deposited in a forest and expected to find their way back to base. It’s meant to be a challenging exercise, and the teams often stagger in at 2 or 3 in the morning. If this sounds a little crazy, it’s because you aren’t Dutch. The Dutch teach children not to depend too much on adults; adults are taught to allow children to solve their own problems. Droppings distill these principles into extreme form, banking on the idea that even for children who are tired, hungry and disoriented, there is a thrill to being in charge. Droppings are such a normal part of Dutch childhood that many in the Netherlands are surprised to be asked about it, assuming it’s common in every country. @kostyukov shot this photo. Read more about the opposite of helicopter parenting at the link in our bio.

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Is this what the Democrats want? So much about Joe Biden says yesterday’s man, Michael Steinberger writes in this week's @nytmag cover story. And yet this can obscure the fact that he is an enormously popular figure in the Democratic Party, commanding a degree of affection that is rare in politics. From the gutted middle class to America’s diminished stature, loss is the subtext to this election — and perhaps no political figure in American history has experienced loss as Biden has. He knows there is skepticism about his candidacy. He knows that another failure will be seen as especially humiliating. “Everybody said, ‘Well, wouldn’t it be awful if you lost?’ I know what loss is, man. Losing the race is not loss in the same sense.” Read the full profile in the link in our bio. Photographed by @dedecim.

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BTS is K-pop's biggest group. And behind them is a dedicated network of translators who devote their time to interpreting lyrics, tweets and interviews for listeners who don’t speak Korean. These translators — who have Twitter accounts with followings ranging from tens of thousands to the low millions — are hard-working, passionate and unpaid. Many got involved because they noticed incorrect or incomplete English transcripts online, but also because they saw an opportunity to participate in the rise of a group they wanted to see succeed. Translating for @bts.bighitofficial comes with plenty of pressure; there’s the risk of burnout, the fear of making errors and the difficulty of having to choose the right interpretation. “People think we’re machines,” said Rachel, whose Korean name is Yejin, a translator and busy 20-year-old college student in the United States. Read more at the link in our bio. @vnina shot this photo. #BTS

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It's “extremely painful, but so, so good.” That's how Hooni Kim, a chef who owns and operates 2 Korean restaurants in Manhattan, recalled his first time eating cheese buldak, or “fire chicken.” The primary ingredients are gochujang, the Korean red-pepper sauce; gochugaru, dried red peppers; and that same cheap, low-moisture mozzarella that tops delivery pizza (which helps temper the dish’s spiciness). The rest is heating and melting. Click the link in our bio to get the spicy recipe from @nytcooking. @Bobbybloherty took the photo.

NYTIMES

For the fitness-minded people who’ve built a community in New York City’s public parks, the Pull-Up Park Jam (call it the “Pup-Jay” for short) is one in a series of cherished summer events. The first one was held in Brooklyn’s Jackie Robinson Park, and later moved to Lincoln Terrace. Today, there are several calisthenics events at parks all over the city, some highly competitive, some just for fun. “It’s more than just building your muscles,” said Keith Fields, who co-founded the contest in 1998. “It’s the interaction, the friendship, the love, that comes with the territory of this bar.” To see more, tap into our Instagram story above or click the link in our bio. @leslyedavis shot this photo in Wingate Park.

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A typical subdivided flat in Hong Kong, pictured here, is only 60 square feet or 5.5 square meters. The city of 7.4 million people, which was shaken this summer by huge protests, may be the world’s most unequal place to live. Rent is higher than New York, London or San Francisco for apartments half the size. Nearly 1 in 5 people live in poverty and the minimum wage is $4.82 an hour. Anger over the growing power of mainland China in everyday life has fueled the protests, but beneath that anger lurks an undercurrent of deep anxiety over residents’ own economic fortunes — and fears that conditions will only get worse. Housing lies at the root of many of the frustrations. Visit the link in our bio to read more about the economic roots of the protests. The graphic is by Jin Wu and Tyrone Siu shot this photo.

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Never in recorded history has Paris been hotter than it was yesterday. The same was true of Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands as temperatures rose and records tumbled across Western Europe, scorching the continent and sending residents scrambling to seek relief from a dangerous heat wave. The temperature soared to 42.6 degrees Celsius (108.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in the French capital, breaking a record set in 1947. The hottest summers in Europe in the past 500 years have all come in the last 17 years, scientists say. Several of the heat waves have been linked to human-caused climate change, and many more are likely to scorch temperate zones like northern Europe in the years ahead, according to experts. @andreamantovaniphotography shot this photo. Visit the link in our bio to read more.

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An ancient, 25-ton head carved out of basalt makes a pit stop at the Seagram Building, so the Park Avenue crowd can check it out for a month or two. One of a number of heads made by the Olmec people of Mesoamerica, the sculpture dates to sometime between 1200 and 900 B.C. It was lowered into this spot by crane in May 1965, and it made for a striking juxtaposition with the Seagram Building, a new, much-praised addition to the skyline with a sleek exterior of bronze and glass. The message seemed to be: This is where mankind has been; this is where it’s going. Visit the link in our bio for more examples of office building art, and follow @nytarchives for more photos from our archives. Photo by Eddie Hausner.

NYTIMES

After days of fervent public protests and looming impeachment proceedings, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló of Puerto Rico announced his resignation on Wednesday night. The popular uprising and calls for his resignation began after a leaked private group chat revealed crude conversations between Rosselló and his close advisers. In addition to the text exchanges, Puerto Ricans said they’ve had enough after years of financial mismanagement and the government’s poor response to Hurricane Maria, which ravaged the island and killed an estimated 3,000 people 9 months after Rosselló took office in 2017. The new governor is expected to be the secretary of justice, Wanda Vázquez Garced, who is next in line under the territory’s Constitution after the secretary of state, who was also part of the texting scandal, resigned last week. Read more at the link in our bio. @ilanapl and @erikaprodriguez shot these photos.

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Robert Mueller, the former special counsel, is testifying in back-to-back congressional hearings about his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election and possible obstruction of justice by @realdonaldtrump. The hearings come a little over 3 months after the release of Mueller’s report and have the power to potentially reshape the political landscape around President Trump’s re-election campaign and a possible impeachment inquiry by the Democrat-controlled House. Mueller was reluctant to testify — his 448-page written report, he asserted, should speak for itself — but the 2 committees issued subpoenas compelling him to speak, and he accepted. Read more at the link in our bio. We’ll be posting our takeaways in our Instagram story later today. @nytmills and @erinschaff shot these photos in the hearing room this morning.

NYTimes

When were you told to “go back”? Last week, President Trump attacked 4 Democratic congresswomen, telling them to “go back” to where they came from. We asked readers here on Instagram and on Facebook, Twitter and nytimes.com if they've ever been told to “go back.” Some 16,000 responses flooded in. Readers recounted the insults they’ve heard, and many recalled first becoming aware of their “otherness” as young children and said that slurs had followed them into adulthood. Their stories span decades, with notable upticks after 9/11 and Trump’s election. And several readers expressed regret after telling others to “go back.” Read more responses at the link in our bio, and share your story in the comments.

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On Tuesday, Boris Johnson, Britain’s brash former foreign secretary and one of the architects of Brexit, was selected to be the new leader of the Conservative Party. He is now set to be Britain’s next prime minister, succeeding Theresa May, who resigned after failing to come up with a Brexit agreement. Johnson, upon taking office, would immediately face the challenge of managing Britain’s exit from the EU by October 31. But his policy swerves, lack of attention to detail and contradictory statements leave the country guessing how things will unfold. Additionally, the hard facts that brought down May have not changed: deep divisions on Brexit among Conservatives in Parliament, implacable opposition from other parties, and the insistence of European officials that they will make no major concessions. Johnson insists that while he intends to hammer out a better agreement, Britain will leave the union by the October deadline, even if that means exiting without a deal, raising fears of Britain leaving the EU with no trade agreement in place, no political pact, not even a framework for further talks. Click the link in our bio to read more. @adamfergusonstudio shot this photo in 2016 when Johnson was campaigning in Preston, England.

NYTimes

Loco moco is a classic Hawaiian dish, like a heartier version of Japanese hambāgu (a ground-beef patty topped with a ketchup-based sauce). Smothered with caramelized onion gravy on a pile of white rice, and topped with a fried egg, this classic Hawaiian dish can be eaten for breakfast, lunch, dinner — or any time in between. Click the link in our bio to get the recipe from @nytcooking and don’t forget to hit save. Romulo Yanes took this photo.