Pacific Wild - instagram lists #feedolist

PacificWild

A #ThrowbackThursday to a day in the trees on the Ecstall river - a system which is lucky to remain fairly intact today. Our old-growth forests are not a renewable resource. They directly contribute essential, wide-ranging services to our coastal ecosystems and to our livelihoods and it is our responsibility to sustain them. We commend the @greenpartybc for having the courage to stand up for our ancient forests on Vancouver Island. Thank you, from us and from future generations. . . . #ExploreBC #treesofinstagram #conservation #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #Ecstall #TBT #filmphotography #fujivelvia

PacificWild

"URGENT - Help pass Bill C-48" (Link in bio). We need your voices today. Bill C-48, The Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, is in the Senate on the brink of being scrapped in the face of hard lobbying by the oil and gas industry. We have experienced the dangers of oil spills to coastal communities and ecosystems on a small scale through incidents like the sinking of the Nathan E Stewart tug, the impacts from which Heiltsuk territory has not yet fully recovered. We cannot risk huge tankers travelling through our sensitive and unpredictable coastal waters. Our coastline is long, and the negative impacts of a tanker spill would be wide-ranging. If this bill doesn't pass, it puts everything we've all worked towards at risk. We strongly urge you to take a moment today to send a personal appeal to the Senate's Transport Committee. They haven't heard enough from you, and each letter makes a big difference. Go to the link in our bio under "URGENT - Help pass Bill C-48". Our sincerest thanks to those who have spoken up for our coastal waters. 📸 @iantmcallister @coastalfirstnations #BillC48 #NoTankers . . . #marineconservation #pnwonderland #marineprotection #wildernessculture #wildlife_seekers #oilfree #ExploreBC #GreatBearRainforest #GreatBearIMAX #cdnpoli

pacificwild

We spend a lot of time underwater, and are constantly struck by the beauty and fragility of the vibrant wilderness that we are so lucky to have in our backyards. Many people don’t realize what we have under the surface of the thin blue line of the Pacific ocean. One of the biggest manmade threats to these rich waters and the life they bring is ocean plastic. Plastic doesn’t break down easily, and it’s accumulating rapidly in the environment, from straws, bags and food containers to tiny pieces, like microbeads and fibres. On February 20th, Nathan Cullen (MP for Skeena-Bulkley Valley) tabled Bill C-429, the Zero Waste Packaging Act, in the House of Commons. Bill C-429 would eliminate all consumer product packaging in Canada, unless it’s recyclable or compostable. To support the Zero Waste Packaging Act, sign Nathan Cullen's petition at the link in our bio under "Support the Zero Waste Packaging Act". . Selfie 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #plasticfree #zerowaste #plasticfreeforthesea #diveworld #marineprotection #marineconservation #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #explorebc #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors

pacificwild

Happy #MarineMonday! Last week, we received quite a bit of fish love and yes, if you guessed Red Irish Lord (Hemilepidotus hemilepidotus), you were correct. Speaking to this species' exceptional camouflage, here is a gem of an excerpt from Andy Lamb and Bernard P. Hanby's 'Marine Life of the Pacific Northwest': "So confident is this sculpin in its camouflage and its capacity for concealment, it is easily picked up by a diver. A resourceful underwater photographer may turn this behaviour to advantage by placing a specimen on a suitable background." (We will also say that we do not promote or condone this suggested type of physical interaction with any marine life.) For next week, here's a fun one for you in honour of the mysterious and vast offshore region we have on our doorstep in the Pacific. 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #fishlove #underwaterphotography #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #offshore #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers

pacificwild

A playful moment between members of a pack of coastal wolves on a lazy afternoon in the Great Bear Rainforest. The BC government's wolf cull has now killed over 700 wolves since its inception in 2015. The province is proposing to continue both predator and primary prey (largely moose) culls in two new draft agreements to save Southern mountain caribou. Meanwhile, the government-owned BC Timber Sales has 11 cut blocks set aside for current and future logging within the Central Selkirk herd range, home to the last 25 members of that herd. The irony of scapegoating other species while destroying habitat and food supply, and increasing predator access, is not lost on us. The government is choosing extermination of wolves and other species over necessary protections of critical caribou habitat. Please take a moment to send your feedback to the BC government before May 31st at 4pm. The Wilderness Committee ( @wildernews) has made it easy to respond to these two draft agreements - just add your personal touch. Go to "BC Draft Caribou Agreements Spring 2019" at the link in our bio. 📸 @iantmcallister #SaveBCWolves . . . #ExploreBC #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #wolfconservation #wolvesofinstagram #pnwonderland #seawolves #wildlifephotography #wildlifemanagement #bcpoli

pacificwild

It's been a while since we posted a #MarineMonday guessing game - but if you guessed Northern Abalone on April 15th, you got it! The Northern Abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana, is a very special marine snail whose iridescent shell you can't miss gleaming on the shores of our pacific coastal waters, and has been important for food and culture of coastal First Nations for millenia. It is also the only invertebrate in BC for which all harvesting is prohibited, after their densities declined by over 80% since commercial harvesting began in 1975. Here's another one for you - if you can see it! Photo by @iantmcallister . . . #fishlove #underwaterphotography #marinelife #diveworld #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #pnwonderland #marineconservation

pacificwild

"Bill C-48 is not about stopping existing oil tanker traffic. It’s about legislating an existing policy and preventing oil supertankers from being introduced and minimizing risk. For the love of the coast and Skeena Watershed, we urge the Senate committee to pass C-48 as soon as possible. And we welcome Albertans and Canadians across this country to continue visiting this iconic region of the country." We expect to hear the results of the committee in the near future. We join our voices with @coastalfirstnations and many others in a final plea to the Senate's Transport Committee - For the love of salmon, pass Bill C-48. Thank you, Nikki Skuce from Friends of Morice-Bulkley for the beautiful love letter to salmon in the @edmontonjournal. And to all of you who sent your letters to the Senators sitting on the committee where the future of this bill will be determined. 📸 @iantmcallister #NoTankers #BillC48 . . . #pnwonderland #fishlove #salmonnation #wildernessculture #underwaterphotography #marineconservation #forthewildones #salmonaresacred #ExploreBC

PacificWild

A recent decision by Norway's labour party to not allow offshore oil drilling in the Lofoten islands is a sign that the oil superpower is serious about transitioning away from an oil-based economy. Norway has accumulated an incredible trillion dollar sovereign fund created exclusively from oil revenue and the country is now in the enviable position to have the resources to invest in a sustainable future built on alternative energy. Meanwhile, back in Canada, the Canadian taxpayers are footing the bill for a doomed multi-billion dollar tar sands oil pipeline that, if built, would hold the country hostage to a planet destroying economy for decades. Unlike Norway, Canada has chosen to squander its oil wealth while giving control of its reserves to foreign countries and oil companies. Imagine if we had followed Norway’s example. We certainly wouldn’t be allowing more super tankers to transit our fragile waters and we would not be providing massive tax subsidies to oil and gas companies to build destructive pipelines and LNG plants. Canada currently is operating without any climate change or environmental leadership. It is just one more desperate fossil fuel mega-project after the other with no consideration for future generations or the planet. We can still change Canada’s legacy, but it won’t be easy. What kind of future do we want for Canada? Go to www.PacificWild.org and have a look at our campaigns – get involved today. #BillC48 #NoTankers 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #OilFreeLofoten #whalesofinstagram #wildernessculture #ig_discover_wildlife #killerwhale #cetacean

PacificWild

The Canadian Federal government took a step in the right direction today for marine protection in federal waters. Minister @jonathanwnv announced today that they will be prohibiting oil and gas activity, as well as mining, waste-dumping and bottom-trawling, in federal marine protected areas, finally adopting some #IUCN standards. However, there are major steps to be taken for true protection. Existing oil and gas discovery tenures have yet to be cancelled, and marine refuges offer highly variable degrees of protection from industry. We applaud the government for this important step, and look forward to seeing both our federal and provincial governments follow up with strict minimum standards for all protected areas, as well as seeing Bill C-48 pass in the Senate. Go to the link in our bio to learn how you can help protect our oceans. 📸 @iantmcallister #MarineProtection #MPAs . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #starfish #ig_discover_wildlife #cdnpoli #conservation

PacificWild

Foster’s rule, first published by Dr. Bristol Foster in the scientific journal Nature in 1964, posits that on island systems smaller animals get larger in the absence of predators, and larger animals become smaller with less predictable food sources. This seems to follow for some species of the Great Bear Rainforest, including coastal wolves like this one, whose diet consists of Sitka black-tailed deer, marine mammals, small birds, mice, as well as marine invertebrates like crabs and chitons. #SaveBCWolves 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #wolfconservation #pnwonderland #scicomm #biogeography

PacificWild

Our coast provides us with our food, our climate, and our economy: our livelihood simply depends on the health of the ocean. For decades, a voluntary tanker exclusion zone has been in place in the #GreatBearRainforest. Now it’s time to legislate the ban and prohibit oil tankers in this vulnerable region. Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, would prohibit vessels carrying over 12,500 metric tonnes of crude or persistent oil in the North and Central coast and Haida Gwaii, but it is stuck in Senate. The Senate’s Transport Committee is currently hosting hearings across Canada on Bill C-48, including in Price Rupert on April 16th, and Terrace on April 17th. Senators on the Transport Committee still need to hear from the people who have the most to lose in the event of a catastrophic oil spill. Go to Stop Tankers in the Great Bear at the link in our bio to send in your letters. #BillC48 #NoTankers 📷by @iantmcallister

PacificWild

It's #MarineMonday, meaning that it is time for another texture photo of marine life found off the Pacific coast of B.C. What do you think this one is? Comment your answer below. . For our last #MarineMonday on April 1st, if you guessed the photo was of a hooded nudibranch, or melibe leonina, you were correct. Pronounced “new-dee-brank,” a nudibranch is a type of sea slug that has naked (“nudi”) gills (“branchs”). Only able to sense light and dark, these hooded nudibranchs emit a fruity scent in order to attract one another and to mate. Pacific Wild’s photographer @iantmcallister says these pheromones smell similar to a watermelon 🍉. . "You must be patient to find a nudibranch in a tidepool. Pretend the tidepool is history and the nudibranch a lacuna of history. When you do find a nudibranch, its brilliant cerata mane blinds you with truth— not the possession of truth but the effort in struggling to attain it brings joy to the searcher— you’re never the same again." — Poem by Jeffrey Yang, from An Aquarium

PacificWild

A wolf leaves its mark in the snow during a winter snow. For all things wild and free, this #ThrowbackThursday we are taking it back to an open letter the late Patrick Lane presented to a @universityofvictoria graduating class in 2013, reflecting on a defining moment of his life when he watched a cougar fall lifeless from a tree after being shot in BC's interior. . . "You are also one of the wild creatures of the Earth. I want you for one moment to imagine you are a ten-year-old on a half-blind, grey horse. You are watching a cougar fall from the high limb of a Ponderosa pine into a moil of raging dogs. The ones who have done this, the ones who have brought you here, are shooting at the sun. They are trying to bring a darkness into the world." . . Trophy hunting is an archaic, unethical activity that is often inhumane, especially in the case of big cats where hounds are used to track and chase animals into trees so they can be shot. Our friends at @wildlifedefenceleague have started a petition for a #TrophyFreeBC. You can help ban trophy hunting of our province's wild cats. Go to the link in our bio and sign their Change.org petition at "Ban Trophy Hunting of Our Wild Cats". Read the rest of Patrick's address in the @timescolonist. #TrophyFreeBC 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #landscape_captures #SaveBCWolves #bigcats #conservation

PacificWild

This is important. Today is the last day to submit your comments for BC's Northern and Southern Salmon Integrated Fisheries Management Plans. Despite a Canadian federal court ruling in February that farmed salmon must be tested for piscine orthoreovirus, the Parliamentary Secretary for @fisheriesoceanscan gave a less than satisfying response on federal plans to change aquaculture regulations after questioning by NDP Fisheries critic @gordyjohns in the House of Commons. Here's a must-read: A disturbing study published this past weekend in the @thetorontostar investigates Fisheries and Oceans Canada refusal to acknowledge mounting scientific evidence that shows the threat marine fish farms pose to wild salmon. Read it at the link in our bio under "Toronto Star: Fish Farms". Email DFO.PacificSalmonRMT-EGRSaumonduPacifique.MPO@dfo-mpo.gc.ca with your comments on the management of wild salmon in BC. We need concrete plans to get fish farms out of the water. Tell DFO to stop ignoring the science. "Two studies have connected the virus with fish diseases in B.C. But court records and government documents previously released under Access to Information laws reveal the DFO has a pattern of downplaying this research. By law, the department can only allow farms to transfer fish into the ocean if they are free from any 'disease or disease agent' that could be harmful to wild fish." With rapidly diminishing salmon returns and seemingly declining federal interest in saving these critical species, this is truly the last stand for wild salmon. #FortheWildOnes #FishFarmsGetOut #MarineMonday @cleansingourwaters @alexmorton4salmon 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #wildsalmon #fisheriesmanagement #wildernessculture #salmonnation #cdnpoli #pnwonderland #SRKW #fishlove #HoC #explorebc

PacificWild

Salmon are the lifeblood of our coast. Right now, young smolts are starting their migration out of the creeks of the Great Bear Rainforest for their first taste of the salty Pacific Ocean, feeding on the newly hatched herring from eggs that have covered coastal waters for the past weeks. The public input period for the Northern and Southern Pacific Salmon Integrated Fisheries Management Plans ends on Monday. If you are concerned about the future of these vital species, please take a moment this weekend to provide your thoughts and feedback by emailing DFO.PacificSalmonRMT-EGRSaumonduPacifique.MPO@dfo-mpo.gc.ca. Tell DFO that we need to prioritize investments in the creek walkers that monitor our salmon-bearing creeks, and remove fish farms from the ocean. Find the draft plans and other relevant information about threats to our wild salmon for your email at https://pacificwild.org/campaign/protect-wild-salmon/ 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #FortheWildOnes #wildsalmon #wildernessculture #conservation #wildlifephotography #pnwonderland #cleansingourwaters

PacificWild

Carrie Humchitt from the Heiltsuk Nation and April Bencze from Pacific Wild bear witness to the last commercial seine fishery in Spiller channel in 2015. Four years ago yesterday, the commercial seine and gill net fleet were escorted out of Bella Bella after the Heiltsuk's decades long battle with DFO over herring fisheries management finally concluded with a closure of the seine and gill net sac roe fishery. This week, the shoreline of Spiller channel is thick with herring eggs as a future generation of herring readies itself to once again provide a foundation of life for the coast. Central coast stocks are far from historical abundance but cautious optimism still prevails in Bella Bella as previously overfished areas begin to show signs of recovery. With @aprilbencze and @heiltsukcouncil 📸 @iantmcallister #BIGLittleFish . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #herringiscaring #fisheriesmanagement #feedthecoast #stewardship

PacificWild

It's #ChildrensBookDay, and to celebrate we thought it was a great time to tell you about some of our own children's literature that celebrates the Great Bear Rainforest ecosystems and all of its inhabitants. If you caught the #GreatBearIMAX, get an in-depth look at the behind-the-scenes world of the film with the accompanying book. For the really little ones (or to get your fill of cute), we also have a new baby book from Ian McAllister at https://shop.pacificwild.org/collections/books. Thanks to Orca Book Publishers for their continued support and partnership - they've put a ton of work into bringing the film and the Great Bear Rainforest to life on paper, and continue to be leaders in BC children's literature. #GreatBearRainforest With @gitgaatspirit @macfreefilms @orcabook 📸 @d.leowinata . . . #bcreads #childrensbooks #ig_discover_wildlife #naturalhistory #imax #filmmakersworld #behindthescenes

PacificWild

Happy #MarineMonday! It is time for another texture photo of marine life found off the Pacific coast of B.C. Last time if you guessed sunflower star, twenty-arm star, or many-rayed starfish, you were correct. No, it wasn't a victim of sea star wasting disease, although many of its comrades were. The disease severely affected sunflower stars like this one, and taught us how important these sea stars are to maintain balance in our marine ecosystems. This voracious predator is the largest sea star on the planet, asserting control over urchins and other primary consumers up and down the coast with up to 26 arms and up to 15,000 tube feet. What do you think this one is? Comment your answer below. Photo: @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #MPAs

PacificWild

Against the advice of the the Lax Kw'alaams Band and Metlakatla First Nation, DFO opened the Prince Rupert commercial spawn-on-kelp fishery this past week. SOK can be a sustainable fishery, but subsistence for local communities comes first. DFO's mandate seems clear - fisheries before fish, before community subsistence. Another fisheries opening has resulted in direct action - is this what it takes to get our government's attention? Current on the water demonstrations on the north coast will continue until May. Show your support for the Lax Kw'alaams and Metlakatla. Edit: We have slightly altered this post's text to reflect more our main concern - that these Nations are not able to harvest enough for their communities' subsistence. From their press release: "Food, Social, and Ceremonial needs have not been met for herring eggs or for the many fish species that depend on it." For the story in the Haida Gwaii Observer see the link in our bio. #BIGLittleFish 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #feedthecoast #pnwonderland #reconciliation #fisheriesmanagement #herringiscaring #landscape_captures

PacificWild

Here's another #MarineMonday texture for you. Last week, if you guessed northern feather duster worm (also known as Vancouver feather-duster, plume worm, or parchment tube worm), you were correct! No, it wasn't a crinoid - feather dusters are actually in the phylum Annelida, or segmented worms, vs. crinoids which are in the same phylum, Echinodermata, that includes all of your favourite starfish. Their beautiful crowns are deceptive, but serve primarily for respiration and filter feeding. Feather dusters are found up to 100 feet deep, and were first described on Vancouver island where early records estimated groves of up to 500,000 individuals. Congratulations to those of you who were not deceived by this fabulous marine invertebrate. What do you think of this one? Guess away. 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #MPAs

PacificWild

Two crosses serve as a reminder of Shirley Rosette and Gerald Foisy, lives that were lost in BC waters 13 years ago today. Today we remember the tragic sinking of the Queen of the North ferry, which reminds us that no amount of technology will provide mitigation for human error. It's #WorldWaterDay, and there is work to be done in making our waters safer in British Columbia. Bill C-48, the oil tanker moratorium act, is one of those ways. It sits in front of the Senate this spring, and coastal First Nations and communities are fighting for their livelihoods, which have already been affected by spills like the Nathan E Stewart. The theme of this year's World Water Day is "Leave No One Behind". If we don't do anything about the tankers that still threaten our coastal waters, we're leaving behind not only these Nations who are directly affected, but all others that rely on our coastal waters - humans, wildlife, ecosystems. Learn more at the @coastalfirstnations website: https://coastalfirstnations.ca/bill-c48 Take a minute and send your letter today through the link in our bio under "Stop Tankers in the Great Bear". 📸 @iantmcallister in #Gitgaat territory. #BillC48 #NoTankers . . . #ExploreBC #queenofthenorth #bcferries #memorial #neverforget #marineprotection #longexposure

pacificwild

It was before the plum blossoms. Before that. Before the mist and the wind rising from the sea. And the little brown bats in the false dawn gorging on fragrant moths. The feast that is the promise of light. The raccoon was only a tail, a slip in the failing shadow. And Basho coming home, his ear torn, happy with the night. And, please, before I forget. Write this. Write this down: the old rat turns and turns in his paws a delicate seed. And the Horned owl meditates upon death on the yard pole. O, and yes, before the pilgrim sea lion's moon song was your hand in my hand in the dark. We have learned from the Nations we work with the critical importance of words. There are few people that really command language. Patrick Lane was one of them, and today on World Poetry Day we honour him, his life, and the wild things he loved. Many of us fight for the things we love without being able to describe fully what we mean. A man who spoke for many of us, Patrick gave us the gift of words, and his words and courage will continue to touch those fighting for wild things. This image of Patrick and his love, fellow poet and incredible human Lorna Crozier, was captured on their trip to the Great Bear Rainforest in 2013. He passed away this month. #WorldPoetryDay 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #poetry #explorebc #pnwonderland

pacificwild

"For more than 40 years, coastal First Nations communities have told Ottawa that our waters are no place for oil tankers because of the navigation hazards and risk of a spill. A voluntary ban has been in place since the 1980s — now it’s time to formalize it." - Chief Marilyn Slett, Heiltsuk First Nation and president of @coastalfirstnations in @theprovince. In October 2016, the Nathan E Stewart spilled over 110,000 L of fuel into the waters of Heiltsuk territory. This spring, Senators will vote on whether to ban large oil tankers along the North Coast. These spills have already affected the #GreatBearRainforest and the lives that have relied on its waters for thousands of years. It's time to formalize the tanker ban and make sure these catastrophes do not threaten the coast again. Go to the @coastalfirstnations website to find out more and support #BillC48: https://coastalfirstnations.ca/bill-c48/ or through the link in our bio under "Coastal First Nations - No Tankers". #NoTankers @heiltsukcouncil . . . #oilfreebc #notankersbc #marineprotection #marineconservation #pnwonderland #ExploreBC

pacificwild

"Agencies like DFO and the National Energy Board have tremendous research budgets and their conclusions are backed by authority of law, but they’ve become what environmental lawyer Eugene Kung has referred to as “captured regulators.” They can no longer be trusted to interpret their research in the public interest because of the pressure of private interests: respectively, commercial fishing and fish farm industries, and in the case of the NEB, powerful energy interests". The herring spawn in the Strait of Georgia continues, and though the seine fleet has left, the gill net fishery is still open. DFO has left the grounds, leaving these boats to monitor and manage their quota of 11,472 tons themselves as of March 15th. Today  @thetyee published a deeper window into the herring fishery and its management, what's at stake, and what we have to lose. If you've been invested in our #BIGLittleFish, have a read. It's worth your while. Go to the link in our bio under "The Tyee - BC's Herring War and the Sacrifice of the Salish Sea". #BIGLittleFish 📸 @iantmcallister With @tavishcampbell @sitka_ @sealegacy . . . #feedthecoast #fishlove #herringiscaring #fisheriesmanagement #DFO #hornbyisland #ExploreBC

pacificwild

It's #MarineMonday again, and it's time for another Texture of the Great Bear Sea. Last time if you guessed aggregrating anemone with what are likely pandalid shrimp larvae in them, you were probably right. Pandalid shrimp larvae are opportunistic hitchhikers, using jellyfish for transport. They rely on the tentacles of anemones for protection, but there is still a lot we don't know about them and their deep sea relations. This one's a bit easier. Guess away! #MarineMondays 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors #wildernessculture #exporebc

pacificwild

From the 39th Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, 1907, Ottawa, p. lxvii: "In the Straits of Georgia the schools in certain months of the year, usually the fall, may extend for many miles. Indeed in 1893 I was informed that a small tug passed for three hours through a continuous mass of migrating herring in the month of June, while I myself have seen in February dead herring thickly covering the surface of the sea near Nanairno for a distance of over two miles. Purse seines of 1-inch extension measure were tried 14 or 15 years ago in March and April with considerable success." The history of the industrial herring harvest on this coast goes back about 200 years, after at least 14,000 years of successful First Nations stewardship. From coast to coast, Fisheries and Oceans Canada's mandate is to "sustainably manage fisheries and aquaculture and work with fishers, coastal and Indigenous communities to enable their continued prosperity from fish and seafood". Yet there are many examples when this department has not (1) sustained fisheries; (2) worked with fishers and communities; or (3) continued prosperity. On the BC coast, many herring populations can no longer sustain fisheries and many communities can no longer prosper from herring. Even First Nations have had to fight DFO legally and through direct action for recognition of declining stocks, as well as their basic rights to fish them. DFO needs to engage more with communities and fishers, incorporate new science into old models, and consider ecosystem needs. Take action today for our #BIGLittleFish at pacificwild.org or using the link in our bio. For a detailed timeline, check out Hakai's Herring School website: https://www.pacificherring.org/timeline Thanks to @cammacarthur at @sitka_ for creating this video! #BIGLittleFish With @sitka_ @iantmcallister @tavishcampbell @sealegacy @pacificyellowfincharters . . . #herringiscaring #feedthecoast #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #pnwonderland #history #fishlove #fisheriesmanagement #DFO

PacificWild

How many species can one little fish feed? During the herring spawn, the fish and the millions of eggs they deposit along the intertidal zones of our coast provide essential nutrients to our marine life, but also to our terrestrial carnivores. Bears and wolves migrate to beaches rich with herring eggs to take part in the bounty of the season. Speak up today for the foundation of our coastal food web at the link in our bio under "Give Your Voice to Our #BIGLittleFish". #BIGLittleFish 📸 @iantmcallister With @sitka_ @tavishcampbell @pacificyellowfincharters @sealegacy . . . #herringiscaring #ig_discover_wildlife #feedthecoast #blackbearsmatter #wildernessculture #fishlove #ExploreBC #pnwonderland #harriettheherring

PacificWild

Have you ever taken a close look at herring eggs? Did you know that herring can live up for up to 15 years, or even longer on occasion? A female herring can lay up to 20,000 eggs, and can spawn from 6-10 times in her life. The eggs that don't survive feed our coast through the nutrients that feed into our oceans and our intertidal zones, as well as the eggs that sustain not only our marine life, but seabirds and our large carnivores as well. Thanks to these little guys, for feeding our coast. Lend your voice in thanks at the link in our bio under "Give your voice to our #BIGLittleFish". With #ConservancyHornbyIsland #ADIMS @sitka_ @sealegacy 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #feedthecoast #herring #hornbyisland #wildernessculture #conservation #macrophotography #explorebc #funfacts #ig_discover_wildlife

pacificwild

In a few short days, the Salish Sea will play host to one of the greatest natural history events on earth. Hundreds of millions of herring are now migrating from the depths of the Pacific to the shallow inshore waters of our coast for a massive spawning event that gives life to our ocean for the year ahead. Elder herring will lead the young to the spawning grounds, and the waters in our backyard will once again turn turquoise with life as whales, pinnipeds, salmon, birds and countless other species follow the feast that herring and their eggs provide. We hope to see some of you at Conservancy Hornby Island's annual Herringfest next week, where we will be celebrating this #BIGLittleFish with them, the Association for Denman Island Marine Stewards, and @sitka_. Remember Harriet? Herring still need our help - as these waters play host to the last industrial herring fishery on the coast. Learn more and lend your voice at: https://pacificwild.org/campaign/protect-pacific-herring/. See the link in our bio. #BIGLittleFish 📸 @iantmcallister . . . . #marineconservation #landscape_captures #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #marinelife #fisheriesmanagement #ExploreBC

PacificWild

Just two years ago Rob Morley, the VP of Canfisco, stated to reporter Larry Pynn that the herring they process are fed to livestock and farmed fish. Are we really taking food from our wild salmon and feeding it to fish farms...and cows? If you agree that this is unacceptable, call or email your local MP and tell them how you feel using the link in our bio under "Give Your Voice to Our #BigLittleFish". With #conservancyhornbyisland #ADIMS @sitka_ and @sealeagacy #FishFarmsGetOut #CleansingOurWaters #wildsalmon #fisheries #herring #marineconservation #ExploreBC #wildernessculure

pacificwild

Over 60,000 of you have signed the petition to suspend the Georgia Strait herring fishery. Jonathan Wilkinson and DFO have not listened, and have allowed another 20% quota for this year's fishery - over 21,000 tons of herring will be harvested from the waters off of Vancouver Island. These are herring that our coast needs right now, and these are herring that could spawn for years to come. The test boats are already in the water. It's time to make them listen - call your local representative and Minister Wilkinson and tell them that you vote for our #BIGLittleFish. We've made it easy for you with a convenient calling tool and some key messages! Go to the link in our bio under "Give Your Voice to Our #BigLittleFish". Call today. 📸 @iantmcallister With  @sitka_ and @sealegacy. . . . #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #herringiscaring #fisheriesmanagement #marineconservation #animalconservation #SRKW

pacificwild

🔊 (Swipe left for part 2) This is the story of Harriet the herring, the little silver fish with the BIG role. 60,000 of you have signed the Conservancy Hornby Island petition to stop the industrial herring fishery that is happening right outside our doorsteps in the Salish Sea - thank you. But Jonathan Wilkinson and the DFO have not listened. They have chosen to go ahead, business-as-usual, with a 20% quota, allowing 21,000 tons of herring to be removed for fish farms and livestock feed despite the tens of millions of dollars that they have allocated to Chinook salmon and Southern Resident recovery. Harriet feeds our coast. 21,000 tons of herring could feed up to 900,000 Chinook. It's time to make them listen. Call or email your local representative and tell them that you vote for Harriet using the tools on our website. Link in bio under "Give Your Voice to Our #BIGLittleFish". For Harriet, and for the coast. Thank you @cammacarthur at @sitka_ for producing this beautiful video about our favourite little fish. And to @ashperson for lending her wonderful voice to this campaign. Footage: @iantmcallister @aprilbencze @tavishcampbell @bakkenaction #BIGlittlefish #leaveitbetter #marineconservation #ExploreBC #pnwonderland #SRKW

pacificwild

Yes, you heard right. We're looking for an expert to join our fabulous Communications team as a Social Media Engagement Specialist! Help us elevate the Great Bear Rainforest and its wildlife by using your expertise to support our campaigns with unlimited access to our incredible media library. And yes, that does mean you can pair our beautiful bear pictures with cheesy text, if it helps (on occasion). Learn more and apply online at the link in our bio - Your first test is finding it. We look forward to meeting you! 📸 @iantmcallister #jobposting #conservation #ExploreBC #GreatBearRainforest

pacificwild

It's finally here. Experience the Great Bear Rainforest on the giant screen today at the @royalbcmuseum, @scienceworldca, @sciencenorth, and the @ontariosciencecentre in Canada, as well as the @modsftl, @golfhalloffame, and the @whitakercenter in the US, and will continue to roll out internationally over the coming months. For more theatre listings, and to enter the sweepstakes for a chance to see the Great Bear Rainforest in person through Spirit Bear Lodge and Mothership Adventures, go to www.greatbearrainforestfilm.com. For a special behind-the-scenes peek at filming the rich underwater world with director @iantmcallister, check out our Facebook page! Links in our bio. @macfreefilms @hellobc #GreatBearRainforest #GreatBearIMAX #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #ig_discover_wildlife #naturalhistory #pnwonderland

PacificWild

Textures of the Great Bear Sea: British Columbia has approximately seven thousand known marine species. The lion’s share of these, about 95 percent, are invertebrates, including sixty-eight species of starfish, seventy-five species of sea anemones, nearly five hundred species of polychaete sea worms, and over a hundred species of nudibranchs, a type of mollusk. The number of the much more celebrated vertebrate species of marine mammals, birds, and fish hasn’t yet topped six hundred. On Mondays for the next few months we’ll be sharing some curious underwater sights and sounds that you may or may not be able to identify, and we’d love for you to participate in a Great Bear guessing game. Can you guess what this one is? #MarineMondays 📸 @iantmcallister

PacificWild

A win for BC's wild Pacific salmon. This week a federal court ruled that @fisheriesoceanscan must change their farmed salmon policy to ensure that smolts are free of Piscine Reovirus (PRV), which is recognized as a threat to wild salmon, before entering open-net marine salmon farms. @jonathanwnv has four months to enact this change in policy. Congratulations to the 'Namgis Nation, @alexmorton4salmon, @ecojustice_ca, @cleansingourwaters and others who have fought long and hard for this. A hard-won step forward. Let's keep this momentum going - have you given your voice to wild salmon yet? #fishfarmsgetout #wildsalmon #fisheries #explorebc 📸 @iantmcallister

PacificWild

Remember the Blob? The marine heatwave that appeared in the Northeast Pacific in 2013? Unusually warmer water caused 'morbid convulsions' throughout the ocean food web, beginning with phytoplankton, starving out the krill, forage fish, seabirds, bigger fish like cod, and the great whales. It may have even exacerbated the wasting disease that decimated sea stars like this sunflower star. A new article in @sciencemagazine predicts that by 2050, Blob-like ocean temperatures will become normal in the NE Pacific, and heatwaves will be even more extreme. There's no doubt about it - we have to act together now to get net carbon emissions down to zero - for fish, forests, and for our kids. Donate to our efforts in the Great Bear Rainforest at the link in our bio under "Protect Canada's Oceans". . . . #MarineMondays #MarineConservation . 📸 @iantmcallister

PacificWild

Like catching a leaping salmon, the Great Bear Rainforest IMAX film required patience, knowledge, hard work, and a little bit of luck. The #GreatBearIMAX is only two weeks away from its first rollout. Curious about what went behind the production of this epic project? A reminder to join us on this channel at 2pm PST TODAY for a special Instagram Live event behind the scenes with director @iantmcallister. We'll see you there! #GreatBearRainforest #IGLive #ExploreBC @macfreefilms 📸 @iantmcallister

PacificWild

We’re going Live! This Saturday, February 2nd, join our Executive Director @iantmcallister in a LIVE Q&A session about The Great Bear Rainforest film, coming to theatres on February 15th. Learn about the who, what, when, where, and why of the project, and ask your burning questions about the film and the Great Bear Rainforest. The Instagram Live event will take place on our Instagram channel from 2:00-2:30pm PST on Saturday, February 2nd. Looking forward to seeing you here! 📸@iantmcallister @macfreefilms #GreatBearRainforest #GreatBearIMAX #conservation #IGLive #ig_discover_wildlife

PacificWild

Canada has gone from 1% marine protection to 7.9% protection in only 4 years. Still short of the 10% by 2020 target pledged as part of the UN Convention of Biodiversity (CBD), a new report by SeaBlue Canada shows that more than half of that 7.9% is protected through Fisheries Act marine refuges. These “refuges” don't restrict shipping, oil and gas activity, or mining. We need stronger protection and equitable governance for sensitive marine areas. Write your letter in support of internationally-accepted minimum protection standards for Canada's marine protected areas. Link in bio under “Protect Canada’s Oceans”. #MarineMondays #MarineConservation #cdnpoli

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The world is full of beautiful natural places like this, but they are increasingly under threat from government and industry that view the earth as a resource merely meant to be exploited. To our American supporters, please vote for the planet today. Throw your support behind people and parties who put the environment ahead of profit. Voting is just the beginning, but it’s an important start. We are all in this together so let’s each do our part. Thank you. Photo: @iantmcallister #greatbearrainforest #vote

pacificwild

The Canadian government has decided not to issue an emergency order under the Species at Risk Act to protect the endangered southern resident killer whales in the Salish Sea, a move that would have cut through bureaucracy and applied wide-ranging protections for species at risk. Department of Fisheries and Oceans Minister Jonathan Wilkinson said on Friday that the government "carefully weighed various options" to protect the whales, and it does not believe an emergency order would be helpful.” There are only 74 orcas left alive. We fail to see how the situation isn’t worthy of an emergency order. We need to let the Strait of Georgia herring fishery go fallow so fish stocks can rebuild, update and repair municipal sewage systems, and reduce acoustic pollution. We need to do it now. Photo: @iantmcallister

pacificwild

Five months ago, the Canadian Federal Government claimed “the level of urgency [for protecting caribou] is high.” However, almost half a year later, British Columbia has since approved 83 new logging cutblocks within the ranges of the most endangered herds. British Columbia’s southern mountain caribou have been listed as an endangered species for 15 years. There are an estimated 3000 alive. Some of the herds are so small, they can be counted as effectively extinct. For the past five years, B.C. has been shooting, trapping and poisoning wolves in a misguided attempt to save these caribou, but as long as the province continues to log the herds’ habitat, they will continue to be extirpated and, eventually, become extinct. How many wolves have died for nothing? How many have suffered being poisoned, trapped and shot in the name of caribou protection, while destructive logging continues unabated? These policies are unacceptable. Federal Minister of Environment @cathmckennaottcen has the power to invoke Section 80 of the Species at Risk Act. It’s an emergency order that could prohibit activities—like logging—that might adversely affect a threatened species and their habitat. Is Minister McKenna strong enough to act on behalf of the caribou and wolves? We need immediate habitat protection. We need action. We need politicians who put the environment over quick profits. Please click the link in our bio to tell McKenna that we want to #savebcwolves. Thank you. Photo: @iantmcallister

pacificwild

Photo by Pacific Wild supporter @jackjeplant // It’s International Artist Day. We give thanks for all the artists—like Jack and many other generous talents—who donate proceeds of their sales to the work @PacificWild does, and lend their influential voices to #wildlife causes. We are a small team of dedicated advocates for the Great Bear Rainforest, so every bit of help from the artist community helps us get our message out there. If you’d like to support @PacificWild please visit the link in our bio for a range of ways, from donating to sending letters to buying art or merchandise. Thank you.

PacificWild

Last week, the Final Report of the National Advisory Panel on Marine Protected Area Standards for Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) was released. The recommendations included minimum protection standards according to the IUCN guidelines for MPAs, which explicitly exclude industrial and extractive activity, measures for public accountability, and explicit support for Indigenous Protected Areas as well as full Indigenous participation in planning, management, and decision-making around all marine protection measures. More specifically, the panel recommends that industrial-scale commercial activities such as oil and gas exploration, seabed mining and bottom-trawl fishing should be prohibited. We applaud the panel for their recommendations. If you’d like to help echo the panel’s recommendations to our government and put the pressure on Canada to achieve its ocean protection targets for 2020, please visit the link in our bio to send a letter to the appropriate politicians. We are gaining momentum. Let’s keep applying pressure. Thank you. Photo: @iantmcallister

pacificwild

The precise and efficient actions of wolves during hunting gives tremendous insight into history of the salmon and wolf interaction. Such skill, coupled with a consistently high success rate (wolves get their targeted salmon in at least 30 per cent of their attempts, which is high for any predator) illuminates the behaviour is clearly ancient; salmon are not a new resource for the wolves. The size, shape, and behavior of these salmon have most likely been forged at least partially by the ancestors of these fishing wolves. In turn, the wolves have most likely developed characteristics suited to preying on salmon—for example, their digestive system physiology and coloration (the red-orchre coiling seen in many coastal wolves reflects the colour of the seaweed adorning the rocking shores). And we know that this co-evolution is old, because of the high efficiencies and observed behavior in both species. These traits witnessed in predator-prey relationships take a long time to evolve. Photo: @iantmcallister #wolfwednesday #wolf #greatbearrainforest #seawolf #seawolves

pacificwild

Happy Indigenous Peoples Day. #stewardship #greatbearrainforest Photo: @iantmcallister

pacificwild

For three years, our very own @iantmcallister has been directing an #IMAX film about the Great Bear Rainforest. Finally, we can show you the trailer. Much gratitude to the First Nations partners, cinematographers and friends who helped make this film a reality. Music by @hanszimmer. Be sure to tell everyone. If the world witnesses what is at stake in the #GreatBearRainforest, they will join in protecting it. Swipe left to see the full trailer. Premiering in February, 2019.

pacificwild

When you just sit quietly in the Great Bear the power of nature will find you. A mother grizzly bear and her 3 cubs crossed the river at low tide largely oblivious to our presence. 20 years ago seeing a grizzly was an incredibly rare sight as their numbers were decimated by trophy hunting. 13 years ago the area was protected and now this is a common sight. • Please follow our IG Stories for behind-the-scenes footage of our most recent trip. • Photo: @anthonybonello #GBRvr #greatbearrainforest #grizzlybear #nature #gbrvr

pacificwild

Despite a long-running wolf cull in the province of B.C., ungulate populations continue to diminish or flourish based on the merits of habitat alone. In yet another misguided move, the cull has been extended while also opening up the big horn sheep hunt, simultaneously killing both the predator and prey in an ecosystem, and for what? Since 2016, 13 wolves and 5 coyotes have been killer to protect these big horn sheep. Now we hunt the sheep. Do ungulates need protection or do they need to be hunted? This irresponsible, shoot-from-the-hip style of wildlife management points—once again—to the painfully obvious problem at the centre of the issue: habitat encroachment and segmentation. We continue to log, mine and bisect habitat, and then blame predators for the poor health of prey. This has to stop. Know this—three more years of killing these wolves will solve nothing. When will the provincial government listen? Please click the #SaveBCWolves link in our bio to sign an important petition. We are doubling down on wolves yet again. Photo: @iantmcallister @johnhorgan4bc @georgeheyman @lanapopham @ctv @thenarwhalca @cbc @cbcnews @globeandmail @nationalpost @walrusmag @wildlifedefenceleague