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PacificWild

Last month, a significant rockslide took place in B.C.’s Fraser River, blocking multiple species of wild Pacific salmon from migrating upstream to spawning grounds. The news has received significant media attention and sparked widespread concerns for Chinook salmon populations that are already at risk.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Concern for this issue comes at a critical time of year for wild Pacific salmon. All across the B.C. coast, salmon are returning from the ocean, entering creeks and rivers, and migrating to their respective spawning grounds. Their return breathes new life into the coast. Here in the Great Bear Rainforest, salmon provide important nutrients tor First Nations communities, wildlife, and even the trees themselves.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Today, salmon populations are struggling. In 2018, the rivers of the Great Bear Rainforest saw one of the most devastating returns on record. Aside from natural slides, like in the Fraser River, widespread destruction of upstream habitat caused by logging, construction of roads, bridges, and pipelines, along with other land-use changes are making migrations more challenging for salmon trying to reproduce.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ We'll be shedding more light on the migration of wild salmon and current monitoring activities over the coming weeks and months.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ #SaveBCSalmon #WildSalmon #BCPoli #KeepItWild #Salmon #PacificSalmon

PacificWild

We missed #SharkAwarenessDay last week and felt a bit of FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out). Shark populations in Canadian Pacific waters are poorly understood - what do they eat? How many are there? Why do they come to the B.C. coast and for how long? This information is vital for conservation and ecosystem-based management of Pacific marine ecosystems.⁣ ⁣ A few years ago this very same month, marine biologist Dr. Rob Williams and his associates answered some of these questions when they made an accidental and remarkable discovery. Williams and his team found more than 20,000 blue and salmon sharks gathered in a small area of western Queen Charlotte Sound, also known as a “hot spot”. A highly migratory species found visiting B.C. waters in the summer months, blue sharks are a common bycatch in commercial fishing and are currently listed as ‘near threatened’ due to large numbers being caught in unmanaged global fisheries. Stay tuned for more images of blue sharks in honor of Shark Week (beginning July 28) 🦈⁣ ⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister ⁣ #sharksofinstagram #finfree #sharkconservation #sharkweek

PacificWild

Photo by @iantmcallister | Transparent and majestic hooded nudibranchs are able to swim with small paddle-like flippers. These predatory sea slugs are found throughout the North and Central Coast and Haida Gwaii. Learn more under “Marine Life” on our new marine protection education hub (link in our bio).⁣ ⁣ #nudibranch #underwaterphotography #seaslug #marineconservation

pacificwild

#Repost from @iantmcallister // The fairly recent and successful reintroduction of sea otters after the fur trade extirpated them from the BC coast is seeing profound ecosystem benefits. Kelp forests are flourishing now that the otters are keeping the kelp-eating urchins in check. In turn, these marine forests increasingly provide a nursery for countless species of fish.⁣ .⁣ .⁣ .⁣ #ExploreBC #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #seaotters #ottercoast

pacificwild

In British Columbia, hunters and trappers kill more than 1,200 wolves annually. So far, 700+ wolves have been killed province-wide under the government's cull program. Killing all the wolves in B.C. won’t bring the caribou back in the absence of habitat protection.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣ The B.C. government has approved hundreds of logging cut blocks in endangered caribou habitat and continues to entertain discussions about building open-pit coal mines in critical caribou habitat within several Central Mountain ranges, where every single herd is in decline.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣ Our goal is to stop government-supported wolf kill programs and ensure that wolves have adequate habitat to continue their critical role as a keystone species. Together we can stop this kill program and give wolves the protection and respect they deserve as top predators.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Take action to #SaveBCWolves by signing our petition (link in the bio) 🐺⁣⁣⁣ . ⁣⁣ 📸 @iantmcallister ⁣⁣⁣ #wolvesofinstagram #wolfconservation #wolf #bcpoli

pacificwild

As members of the dolphin family, killer whales are capable of echolocation, a sonar-like system that enables them to find food without actually seeing it. A single killer whale can consume up to an astonishing 180 kilograms (400 lbs) of fish in only 24 hours.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Learn more about these incredible marine mammals and celebrate #WorldOrcaDay by visiting our marine education hub (link in our bio). ⁣⁣ ⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister ⁣⁣ ⁣ #MarineConservation #KillerWhale #Orca

pacificwild

Photo by @nickhawkinsphotography // In just one month, six critically endangered North Atlantic right whales have died in Canadian waters, three of which were struck and killed by boats. This is entirely due to human activity and is a nightmare for the population. With less than 400 individual animals left on Earth, the North Atlantic right whale cannot afford any more deaths. If Canada and the US do not implement stronger regulatory changes to protect this species soon, we may lose them forever. ⁣ ⁣ Here on the Pacific coast, we must continue fighting to keep large oil tankers out of our marine environments. While the recent passing of Bill C-48 has prohibited tankers carrying more than 12,500 metric tonnes of crude and persistent oils from stopping at all ports between northern Vancouver Island and the B.C.-Alaska border, it does not apply to tankers carrying Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) or refined oil, or to articulated tug barges. Large vessels like these pollute the ocean with harmful noise, increase the likelihood of spill devastation, and create the potential for deadly ship strikes like those seen on the east coast. Let's do what we can to save our whales and other marine creatures from more incidents like this one.⁣ ⁣ @nickhawkinsphotography @sealegacy #TurningTheTide #NorthAtlanticRightWhale #EndangeredSpecies #MarineConservation

pacificwild

Help us get to 500,000 petition signatures to #SaveBCWolves (link in our bio)⁣ 🐺⁣ ⁣ In an attempt to save the endangered caribou, the B.C. government launched a multi-year wolf kill program in the South Peace and South Selkirk regions in January of 2015, against the recommendations of independent scientists. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ The government’s decision to scapegoat wolves for this precipitous southern mountain caribou decline is a failure to protect and restore the habitat required: old-growth forest that has been fragmented and destroyed by industrial logging, mineral development, oil and gas exploration and recreational activities such as snowmobiling and commercial heli-cat skiing. Beyond this failure, the government-sponsored wolf kill program is a disastrous management experiment that imposes an immense burden of suffering on wolves. ⁣ ⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister⁣ ⁣ #wolfconservation #wolvesofinstagram #bcpoli #caribou #wildlifemanagement

pacificwild

When hunting, humpback whales are often seen “bubble-net feeding”, strategically working together to cooperatively trap fish. The rhythmic feeding call, or "humpback song" used in these hunts can exceed 180 decibels, loud enough to burst a human eardrum. Visit our marine protection education hub (link in our bio) to learn about the many marine species that can benefit from Marine Protected Areas in B.C. While there, fill out our survey and you’ll be entered to win one of our marine prints. Contest closes Friday, July 12 at 12pm PST. Photo by @iantmcallister #humpback #whale #marineconservation #marineprotectedareas #greatbearrainforest #britishcolumbia #keepitwild #oceanoptimism

pacificwild

This mother grizzly and her cubs were observed routinely emerging from the forest to spend hours digging for clams. In the Great Bear Rainforest, black bears, grizzlies and spirit bears alike comb the shores for clams, oysters, mussels and barnacles. Some bears break the shells off the rocks and suck out the fleshy creatures inside. Others eat everything, including the shell. ⁣ ⁣ Visit our new marine protection education hub via the link in our bio to learn more about the creatures living on the sea's edge. This intertidal zone changes regularly and is a meeting place where a rich tapestry of life—from land and water—comes together.⁣ ⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister

PacificWild

In an attempt to save endangered southern mountain caribou populations, the B.C. government has announced a moratorium on new resource development in part of the Peace River region until June 20, 2021. However, plans to continue killing wolves under the government-sanctioned wolf cull near four caribou herds in the area are moving forward. The government will also allow already-permitted logging and road building to continue in critical caribou habitat throughout the moratorium.⁣ ⁣ Only 220 caribou remain in this region, down from 800 animals less than 20 years ago. One of these herds, the Burnt Pine herd, recently became locally extinct after its last surviving member fell into a mining exploration pit.⁣ ⁣ Against the recommendations of independent scientists, B.C. politicians have chosen extermination of wolves and other species over necessary protections of critical caribou habitat. Now, more than 300 wolves have been killed in the Peace River region.⁣ ⁣ Join our online community The Call via the link in our bio and help us #SaveBCWolves. Here, you can also read our latest article about caribou guardians who have been fighting back against the never-ending onslaught of industrial development in the Peace River region: the Saulteau and West Moberly First Nations. Photo by @iantmcallister

pacificwild

Once pushed to the edge of extinction in Canada, the sea otter has had a remarkable comeback in British Columbia. Today, these charismatic marine mammals are an at-risk species protected under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), as well as the federal Fisheries Act and the British Columbia Wildlife Act.⁣ ⁣ Sea otters are voracious consumers of kelp-eating sea urchins. By keeping urchin populations in check, the otters promote giant kelp growth. Where otters swim, kelp forests grow, providing nurseries for seals and pelagic forage fish — which are consumed by rockfish.⁣ ⁣ Head to “Conservation Issues” on our new marine protection education hub (link in our bio) to watch a video about rockfish. Think you know your #FishFacts? Comment below how many species of rockfish there are in the world and how many different species are found in the waters of B.C.⁣ ⁣ #MarineConservation #SeaOtters #KelpForests #Conservation#ExploreBC⁣ ⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister

pacificwild

A recent article from @timescolonist has highlighted B.C.'s long history of poor forest management. Under its Forests and Range Practices Act, the provincial government has given large private sector companies primary decision-making power for too long. With the oversight of B.C.'s forests in the hands of industry, community interests and the environment will continue to suffer. Not only is this killing B.C. forests, but B.C. jobs as well.⁣ ⁣ Today, the Forests and Range Practices Act is up for review and in public comment periods until mid-July.⁣ This is not an experts-only survey. If you have ideas about better forestry regulation, ensure your voice is heard. Visit engage.gov.bc.ca (link in our bio) to share your views on the state of forestry regulation across our province. ⁣ Photo: @iantmcallister

pacificwild

Today is #CanadaDay — a day we’d like to celebrate our nation’s stunning abundance of marine biodiversity. But just how well does Canada rank in marine protection globally? ⁣ ⁣ In spite of having deep economic and cultural connections to the sea, Canada is lagging far behind leading countries like Australia, the UK, and Chile in marine protection. Of the ten countries with the largest ocean areas globally, Canada ranks seventh in the percentage protected with only 8.3%. ⁣ ⁣ This year, Canada banned industrial activity in all new federally protected marine areas, but these regulations will not apply to the many areas protected by provinces and territories. ⁣ Effective marine protection also depends on cooperative agreements that respect Indigenous communities. Historically, protected areas often violated Indigenous rights and traditional knowledge by forcefully relocating communities and prohibiting access to territories, medicines, and foods. In recent decades, Canada has committed to reconciliation with Indigenous people. Today, co-governance arrangements are being negotiated in both new and already-established MPAs.⁣ ⁣ You can learn more about #MarineProtectedAreas in Canada via the link in our bio. While visiting oceans.pacificwild.org/marine-protection, take our survey for a chance to win a fine art print by @iantmcallister. ⁣ ⁣ Photo by @iantmcallister

pacificwild

A new article from @thenarwhalca provides insight into a recently announced interim moratorium on resource development in part of the Peace River region - an area of critical importance for declining southern mountain caribou populations.⁣ ⁣ While this may seem like good news for caribou, already-permitted logging and road building will continue throughout the moratorium. Human activities such as these contribute to habitat loss and have been cited as the root cause of caribou declines.⁣ ⁣ In spite of this, the BC government continues to vilify wolves as the scapegoat, promoting its culling program as a way to save caribou. This is a band-aid solution which will only yield temporary positive results. Unless their habitat is also repaired, caribou will continue to struggle.⁣ ⁣ You can help us #SaveBCWolves by joining The Call, our global community of wolf advocates (link in our bio)⁣ 🐺 ⁣ Further reading: https://thenarwhal.ca/bc-government-delays-endangered-caribou-plan-herds-dwindle/⁣ ⁣ Photo: @iantmcallister

pacificwild

🔈MPAs matter. Here, Harvey Humchitt, Hereditary Chief from Heiltsuk Nation and HIRMD speaks about the importance of caring for marine protected areas properly. ⁣ ⁣ “Our hereditary chiefs have been really clear. Anything that threatens our environment is not supported by the Heiltsuk people. This includes increased tanker traffic, gas and oil exploration, and fish farms.” ⁣ ⁣ Visit oceans.pacificwild.org via the link in our bio to learn more about marine protection on the Pacific north coast.⁣ ⁣ 🎥: @lindsaymariestewart ⁣ ⁣ #ForOurOceans #Towards2020 #MarineProtectedAreas #MarineConservation

pacificwild

This week, Bill C-48 passed its third reading in the Senate by three votes. The Oil Tanker Moratorium Act is finally going to become law. Thank you to everyone who sent in letters and stood with @coastalfirstnations and other allies to speak up for this Bill, which honours a 1972 federal decision to ban oil tanker traffic on the central and north coasts, and was enforced by the voluntary tanker exclusion zone which was adopted in 1985. Although it passed with an amendment to be reviewed in 5 years, for now our Pacific waters and the coastal communities that rely on them are a little bit safer because of you. With appreciation. #ForOurOceans . 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #BillC48 #marinelife #marineconservation #underwater_world_ #underwaterphotography #pnwonderland #oilfreecoast

pacificwild

This week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declared a climate emergency, and the next day approved the Trans Mountain oil pipeline (for the second time) which will drastically increase Canada's carbon emissions, and will support the world's dirtiest oil. When the irony of this week receives international attention, it gives us some confidence in the confusion we're feeling. Ian Anderson, CEO of the pipeline, stated that costs for the pipeline expansion are still increasing, stating, "I can give you some certainty that the number will be north of $7.4 billion," paid for with taxpayer dollars. The Trudeau government is telling us that the pipeline is good for the environment because any profits from it will be invested in clean energy. Next they are going to tell us that we should start smoking to fight cancer. We are indeed in a climate crisis. If Canada makes a move like this, what does it say to the rest of the world? Promises to ban single use plastics will not help us recover from this. We need drastic action for our climate and our oceans, now. We will keep fighting for our coast and our climate, and we hope you will too. #NoTMX . 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #ForOurOceans #transmountain #nopipelines #canadianpolitics

pacificwild

🔊 MPAs matter. Desiree Lawson from the Heiltsuk Nation is a team member of the RELAW project - Revitalizing Haíɫzaqv [Heiltsuk] Law for Land, Air and Water, a joint partnership between @heiltsukcouncil, HIRMD, and @wcelaw. Watch and listen as she speaks to why marine protected areas are important, and what she thinks should not be allowed in an MPA. www.oceans.pacificwild.org 📽 @lindsaymariestewart #ForOurOceans #Towards2020 . . . #marineconservation #pnwonderland #marineprotection #heiltsukterritory #indigenouswomen

pacificwild

🔊 Swipe right for more or watch uninterrupted on our new IGTV page. Marine Protected Areas work. In this video, learn about New Zealand’s Horomaka / Banks Peninsula Marine Mammal Sanctuary. This MPA has helped the world’s smallest dolphin, an endangered species called Hector’s dolphin, increase its survival rate by more than 5% since the Sanctuary’s designation in 1988. In Canada, 95% of our waters remain unprotected. Learn how you can help protect oceans and their inhabitants at oceans.pacificwild.org (link in our bio). #MarineProtectedAreas #PacificWild Footage: @iantmcallister Voice: @lindsaymariestewart Edit: @geoffreymcampbell Night Sky Time-lapse: @d.leowinata Music: Dexter Britain

pacificwild

This #MarineMonday, can you guess the name of this little guy? Last week, we featured the vividly coloured Puget Sound king crab. These candescent crustaceans can grow up to 30 cm wide, making them one of the largest crabs on the coast. The bumps on their carapace help them camouflage among rocks, where they feed on urchins, sea stars, and sea cucumbers. . 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineprotection #marineconservation #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #GreatBearRainforest #diveworld #fishlove

pacificwild

Bill C-48 lives. Now there is still a chance British Columbia's waters will be protected from large oil spills into the future. The Senate Transport Committee's recommendation to reject the bill was voted down in a Senate vote of 53-38, meaning it will go to a third reading before going to the House of Commons. There is still a period of amendments and voting, but the Bill is still alive. THANK YOU to everyone who gave their voices by sending a letter or sharing with your friends and colleagues. Our coastal communities, both human and not, are grateful. #BillC48 #NoTankers With @coastalfirstnations @wcelaw . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #bcpolitics #canadianpolitics #oilfree

pacificwild

Under an April federal court ruling in favour of the 'Nagmis First Nation and @alexmorton4salmon, @fisheriesoceanscan was required to create a new testing policy for Piscine Orthoreovirus (PRV) in farmed salmon by June 4, 2019. Because of the heroic and tireless efforts by the 'Namgis, Alex Morton, and countless others, the Department has just announced new requirements to conduct “enhanced testing and reporting” of two diseases that have been linked to PRV: heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) and jaundice syndrome. DFO staff will also screen freshwater hatcheries for the presence of two strains of PRV that originated in Iceland and Norway. Today, we celebrate a much-needed step forward for wild salmon, but as Morton always says - the devil is in the details and we'll be watching closely as this is carried out. Sea lice remains an epidemic, and we look forward to seeing the transition of farms to land, but we hope this means diseased fish no longer make their way to the channels and inlets of our Pacific waters. . 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #cleansingourwaters #fishfarmsgetout #salmonnation #salmonaresacred #marineconservation

pacificwild

This #MarineMonday, guess the name of this strange and colourful underwater inhabitant. Last time, we showcased the Mola mola, or ocean sunfish. Sometimes weighing more than a tonne, this huge and mysterious fish has been known to make appearances around lucky boaters in BC's nearshore waters. It is, however, largely pelagic, most often found soaking up the sunshine at the surface of offshore blue waters. . 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #pnwonderland #underwater_world_

pacificwild

Go to the link in our bio and tell Canada's Senate that Bill C-48 must be passed. The Bill must be voted on in the next week so it can go back to the House before the end of the current legislative session on June 21st. A recent article in @thenarwhalca reveals the exhaustive lobbying efforts the oil and gas industry has been making. These lobbyists and the Senators that agree with them are ignoring the fact that legislating an oil tanker ban was an election promise by the current democratically elected government. . "From November 20 to April 11, [the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, CAPP] lobbied senators 19 times, meeting up to four senators on the same day, according to the federal lobbyist registry. Records show that CAPP lobbied Alberta independent Senator Paula Simons, who cast the deciding transport committee vote recommending that the Senate reject Bill C-48, on three different occasions during that time period. Sixteen individual oil and pipeline companies and groups also lobbied a slew of individual senators from November 2018 to the end of April 2019, reporting a total of 122 lobbying communications with senators, including with more than one senator at a time, according to the registry. Those companies and groups included Enbridge, Imperial Oil, TransCanada and the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association." . #BillC48 #NoTankers @coastalfirstnations @wcelaw . 📸 @aprilbencze . . . #landscape_captures #ExploreBC #stormyweather #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #canadianpolitics #canadianpacific

pacificwild

🔊 Swipe right for more. Long time wolf biologists, John and Mary Theberge, have been studying wolves in various ecological systems within North America for a lifetime, including seminal work in Yellowstone, Algonquin, and in the Yukon. Watch and listen as they speak to the limits posed on caribou populations by our own species' impact on their habitat, and why culling predators won't save them in human-disturbed systems. Some important food for thought on the last day to submit comments for British Columbia's two new Section 11 Agreements for Southern Mountain Caribou. If you haven't submitted your thoughts yet, the deadline is 4pm today at the link below. We urge you to voice your concerns about the ongoing predator and primary prey culling in our interior - it is not the solution for caribou whose populations are being controlled from the bottom-up by continued destruction of habitat: https://feedback.engage.gov.bc.ca/193557 Or visit the link in our bio. . 📽 @iantmcallister @d.leowinata #SaveBCWolves . . . #wildernessculture #sciencecommunication #wildlifemanagement #wolfconservation #ExploreBC #mountaincaribou

pacificwild

The time is now to respond to BC's Draft Caribou Agreements. There are only 3 days left to tell the BC government that culling wolves and primary prey is not the solution to saving Southern Mountain caribou. Please take a moment to provide your feedback on BC's new draft agreements at the link in our bio. These agreements lack the integrity needed to tackle the issues facing caribou, especially around critical low-elevation habitat, and the strategy continues to impact communities and community members while making allowances for industry. The Wilderness Committee ( @wildernews) has provided some great answers on an easy-to-use form, which we encourage you to review and add to with your personal thoughts before submitting. See below or go to the link in our bio under "Respond to BC Draft Caribou Agreements". https://www.wildernesscommittee.org/take-action/hope-southern-mountain-caribou . 📸@iantmcallister With @wildlifedefenceleague @bearsmatter @hsi_canada #SaveBCWolves . . . #wildlifemanagement #wolvesofinstagram #wolfconservation #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #wildlifephotography #animalrights #speciesatrisk #ig_discover_wildlife #mountaincaribou

pacificwild

Coastal First Nations have relied on the bounty of the ocean for millenia, and have passed on the importance of stewardship through generations. Watch and listen to our former team member, Jordan Wilson, a member of the Heiltsuk Nation, as he talks about why marine protected areas are important to him. High standards of protection matter to coastal communities. @heiltsukcouncil . 📽 @d.leowinata Edit: @lindsaymariestewart . . . #MPAs #mpas #marineprotection #stewardship #ExploreBC #towards2020 #canadianpolitics #Heiltsuk

PacificWild

BC's wildlife need your voice. May 31st is the deadline for public feedback on the province's new Southern Mountain Caribou recovery strategy draft section 11 agreements. While there are some steps forward, especially in the first agreement between the BC government, Saulteau, and West Moberly First Nations, the government continues to avoid high level habitat protection in favour of industrial interests. These agreements are scapegoating primary prey and predators while avoiding the decisive, long-term solutions that we need at this time. The Wilderness Committee has made it easy to give your feedback through an easy online form with a thoughtfully prepared set of answers that touch on some of the key issues with these plans. Have a look and add your thoughts at the link in our bio under "BC Draft Caribou Agreements Spring 2019". 📸@iantmcallister #SaveBCWolves . . . #waronwildlife #ExploreBC #wildernessculture #caribou #ig_discover_wildlife #canadianpacific

PacificWild

Oil and gas lobbyists have put our coastal waters at risk to large tankers. Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, was rejected by a tie vote in the Senate's Transport Committee. However, it still has to go through the Senate vote. We may still be able to change things - but your voices are critical to stop super tankers from transiting our waters. If you haven't sent a letter to the Senate yet, please do so today for all of our livelihoods which depend on these waters. Go to the link in our bio under "URGENT - Help Pass Bill C-48". . 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #BillC48 #NoTankers #notankers #pnwonderland #marineprotection #marineconservation #canadianpacific #canadianpolitics #wildernessculture #killerwhale

PacificWild

A #ThrowbackThursday to a day in the trees on the Ecstall river - a system which is lucky to remain fairly intact today. Our old-growth forests are not a renewable resource. They directly contribute essential, wide-ranging services to our coastal ecosystems and to our livelihoods and it is our responsibility to sustain them. We commend the @greenpartybc for having the courage to stand up for our ancient forests on Vancouver Island. Thank you, from us and from future generations. . . . #ExploreBC #treesofinstagram #conservation #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #Ecstall #TBT #filmphotography #fujivelvia

PacificWild

"URGENT - Help pass Bill C-48" (Link in bio). We need your voices today. Bill C-48, The Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, is in the Senate on the brink of being scrapped in the face of hard lobbying by the oil and gas industry. We have experienced the dangers of oil spills to coastal communities and ecosystems on a small scale through incidents like the sinking of the Nathan E Stewart tug, the impacts from which Heiltsuk territory has not yet fully recovered. We cannot risk huge tankers travelling through our sensitive and unpredictable coastal waters. Our coastline is long, and the negative impacts of a tanker spill would be wide-ranging. If this bill doesn't pass, it puts everything we've all worked towards at risk. We strongly urge you to take a moment today to send a personal appeal to the Senate's Transport Committee. They haven't heard enough from you, and each letter makes a big difference. Go to the link in our bio under "URGENT - Help pass Bill C-48". Our sincerest thanks to those who have spoken up for our coastal waters. 📸 @iantmcallister @coastalfirstnations #BillC48 #NoTankers . . . #marineconservation #pnwonderland #marineprotection #wildernessculture #wildlife_seekers #oilfree #ExploreBC #GreatBearRainforest #GreatBearIMAX #cdnpoli

pacificwild

We spend a lot of time underwater, and are constantly struck by the beauty and fragility of the vibrant wilderness that we are so lucky to have in our backyards. Many people don’t realize what we have under the surface of the thin blue line of the Pacific ocean. One of the biggest manmade threats to these rich waters and the life they bring is ocean plastic. Plastic doesn’t break down easily, and it’s accumulating rapidly in the environment, from straws, bags and food containers to tiny pieces, like microbeads and fibres. On February 20th, Nathan Cullen (MP for Skeena-Bulkley Valley) tabled Bill C-429, the Zero Waste Packaging Act, in the House of Commons. Bill C-429 would eliminate all consumer product packaging in Canada, unless it’s recyclable or compostable. To support the Zero Waste Packaging Act, sign Nathan Cullen's petition at the link in our bio under "Support the Zero Waste Packaging Act". . Selfie 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #plasticfree #zerowaste #plasticfreeforthesea #diveworld #marineprotection #marineconservation #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #explorebc #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors

pacificwild

Happy #MarineMonday! Last week, we received quite a bit of fish love and yes, if you guessed Red Irish Lord (Hemilepidotus hemilepidotus), you were correct. Speaking to this species' exceptional camouflage, here is a gem of an excerpt from Andy Lamb and Bernard P. Hanby's 'Marine Life of the Pacific Northwest': "So confident is this sculpin in its camouflage and its capacity for concealment, it is easily picked up by a diver. A resourceful underwater photographer may turn this behaviour to advantage by placing a specimen on a suitable background." (We will also say that we do not promote or condone this suggested type of physical interaction with any marine life.) For next week, here's a fun one for you in honour of the mysterious and vast offshore region we have on our doorstep in the Pacific. 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #fishlove #underwaterphotography #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #offshore #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers

pacificwild

A playful moment between members of a pack of coastal wolves on a lazy afternoon in the Great Bear Rainforest. The BC government's wolf cull has now killed over 700 wolves since its inception in 2015. The province is proposing to continue both predator and primary prey (largely moose) culls in two new draft agreements to save Southern mountain caribou. Meanwhile, the government-owned BC Timber Sales has 11 cut blocks set aside for current and future logging within the Central Selkirk herd range, home to the last 25 members of that herd. The irony of scapegoating other species while destroying habitat and food supply, and increasing predator access, is not lost on us. The government is choosing extermination of wolves and other species over necessary protections of critical caribou habitat. Please take a moment to send your feedback to the BC government before May 31st at 4pm. The Wilderness Committee ( @wildernews) has made it easy to respond to these two draft agreements - just add your personal touch. Go to "BC Draft Caribou Agreements Spring 2019" at the link in our bio. 📸 @iantmcallister #SaveBCWolves . . . #ExploreBC #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #wolfconservation #wolvesofinstagram #pnwonderland #seawolves #wildlifephotography #wildlifemanagement #bcpoli

pacificwild

It's been a while since we posted a #MarineMonday guessing game - but if you guessed Northern Abalone on April 15th, you got it! The Northern Abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana, is a very special marine snail whose iridescent shell you can't miss gleaming on the shores of our pacific coastal waters, and has been important for food and culture of coastal First Nations for millenia. It is also the only invertebrate in BC for which all harvesting is prohibited, after their densities declined by over 80% since commercial harvesting began in 1975. Here's another one for you - if you can see it! Photo by @iantmcallister . . . #fishlove #underwaterphotography #marinelife #diveworld #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #pnwonderland #marineconservation

pacificwild

"Bill C-48 is not about stopping existing oil tanker traffic. It’s about legislating an existing policy and preventing oil supertankers from being introduced and minimizing risk. For the love of the coast and Skeena Watershed, we urge the Senate committee to pass C-48 as soon as possible. And we welcome Albertans and Canadians across this country to continue visiting this iconic region of the country." We expect to hear the results of the committee in the near future. We join our voices with @coastalfirstnations and many others in a final plea to the Senate's Transport Committee - For the love of salmon, pass Bill C-48. Thank you, Nikki Skuce from Friends of Morice-Bulkley for the beautiful love letter to salmon in the @edmontonjournal. And to all of you who sent your letters to the Senators sitting on the committee where the future of this bill will be determined. 📸 @iantmcallister #NoTankers #BillC48 . . . #pnwonderland #fishlove #salmonnation #wildernessculture #underwaterphotography #marineconservation #forthewildones #salmonaresacred #ExploreBC

PacificWild

A recent decision by Norway's labour party to not allow offshore oil drilling in the Lofoten islands is a sign that the oil superpower is serious about transitioning away from an oil-based economy. Norway has accumulated an incredible trillion dollar sovereign fund created exclusively from oil revenue and the country is now in the enviable position to have the resources to invest in a sustainable future built on alternative energy. Meanwhile, back in Canada, the Canadian taxpayers are footing the bill for a doomed multi-billion dollar tar sands oil pipeline that, if built, would hold the country hostage to a planet destroying economy for decades. Unlike Norway, Canada has chosen to squander its oil wealth while giving control of its reserves to foreign countries and oil companies. Imagine if we had followed Norway’s example. We certainly wouldn’t be allowing more super tankers to transit our fragile waters and we would not be providing massive tax subsidies to oil and gas companies to build destructive pipelines and LNG plants. Canada currently is operating without any climate change or environmental leadership. It is just one more desperate fossil fuel mega-project after the other with no consideration for future generations or the planet. We can still change Canada’s legacy, but it won’t be easy. What kind of future do we want for Canada? Go to www.PacificWild.org and have a look at our campaigns – get involved today. #BillC48 #NoTankers 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #OilFreeLofoten #whalesofinstagram #wildernessculture #ig_discover_wildlife #killerwhale #cetacean

PacificWild

The Canadian Federal government took a step in the right direction today for marine protection in federal waters. Minister @jonathanwnv announced today that they will be prohibiting oil and gas activity, as well as mining, waste-dumping and bottom-trawling, in federal marine protected areas, finally adopting some #IUCN standards. However, there are major steps to be taken for true protection. Existing oil and gas discovery tenures have yet to be cancelled, and marine refuges offer highly variable degrees of protection from industry. We applaud the government for this important step, and look forward to seeing both our federal and provincial governments follow up with strict minimum standards for all protected areas, as well as seeing Bill C-48 pass in the Senate. Go to the link in our bio to learn how you can help protect our oceans. 📸 @iantmcallister #MarineProtection #MPAs . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #starfish #ig_discover_wildlife #cdnpoli #conservation

PacificWild

Foster’s rule, first published by Dr. Bristol Foster in the scientific journal Nature in 1964, posits that on island systems smaller animals get larger in the absence of predators, and larger animals become smaller with less predictable food sources. This seems to follow for some species of the Great Bear Rainforest, including coastal wolves like this one, whose diet consists of Sitka black-tailed deer, marine mammals, small birds, mice, as well as marine invertebrates like crabs and chitons. #SaveBCWolves 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #ig_discover_wildlife #wildlife_seekers #wolfconservation #pnwonderland #scicomm #biogeography

PacificWild

Our coast provides us with our food, our climate, and our economy: our livelihood simply depends on the health of the ocean. For decades, a voluntary tanker exclusion zone has been in place in the #GreatBearRainforest. Now it’s time to legislate the ban and prohibit oil tankers in this vulnerable region. Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, would prohibit vessels carrying over 12,500 metric tonnes of crude or persistent oil in the North and Central coast and Haida Gwaii, but it is stuck in Senate. The Senate’s Transport Committee is currently hosting hearings across Canada on Bill C-48, including in Price Rupert on April 16th, and Terrace on April 17th. Senators on the Transport Committee still need to hear from the people who have the most to lose in the event of a catastrophic oil spill. Go to Stop Tankers in the Great Bear at the link in our bio to send in your letters. #BillC48 #NoTankers 📷by @iantmcallister

PacificWild

It's #MarineMonday, meaning that it is time for another texture photo of marine life found off the Pacific coast of B.C. What do you think this one is? Comment your answer below. . For our last #MarineMonday on April 1st, if you guessed the photo was of a hooded nudibranch, or melibe leonina, you were correct. Pronounced “new-dee-brank,” a nudibranch is a type of sea slug that has naked (“nudi”) gills (“branchs”). Only able to sense light and dark, these hooded nudibranchs emit a fruity scent in order to attract one another and to mate. Pacific Wild’s photographer @iantmcallister says these pheromones smell similar to a watermelon 🍉. . "You must be patient to find a nudibranch in a tidepool. Pretend the tidepool is history and the nudibranch a lacuna of history. When you do find a nudibranch, its brilliant cerata mane blinds you with truth— not the possession of truth but the effort in struggling to attain it brings joy to the searcher— you’re never the same again." — Poem by Jeffrey Yang, from An Aquarium

PacificWild

A wolf leaves its mark in the snow during a winter snow. For all things wild and free, this #ThrowbackThursday we are taking it back to an open letter the late Patrick Lane presented to a @universityofvictoria graduating class in 2013, reflecting on a defining moment of his life when he watched a cougar fall lifeless from a tree after being shot in BC's interior. . . "You are also one of the wild creatures of the Earth. I want you for one moment to imagine you are a ten-year-old on a half-blind, grey horse. You are watching a cougar fall from the high limb of a Ponderosa pine into a moil of raging dogs. The ones who have done this, the ones who have brought you here, are shooting at the sun. They are trying to bring a darkness into the world." . . Trophy hunting is an archaic, unethical activity that is often inhumane, especially in the case of big cats where hounds are used to track and chase animals into trees so they can be shot. Our friends at @wildlifedefenceleague have started a petition for a #TrophyFreeBC. You can help ban trophy hunting of our province's wild cats. Go to the link in our bio and sign their Change.org petition at "Ban Trophy Hunting of Our Wild Cats". Read the rest of Patrick's address in the @timescolonist. #TrophyFreeBC 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #landscape_captures #SaveBCWolves #bigcats #conservation

PacificWild

This is important. Today is the last day to submit your comments for BC's Northern and Southern Salmon Integrated Fisheries Management Plans. Despite a Canadian federal court ruling in February that farmed salmon must be tested for piscine orthoreovirus, the Parliamentary Secretary for @fisheriesoceanscan gave a less than satisfying response on federal plans to change aquaculture regulations after questioning by NDP Fisheries critic @gordyjohns in the House of Commons. Here's a must-read: A disturbing study published this past weekend in the @thetorontostar investigates Fisheries and Oceans Canada refusal to acknowledge mounting scientific evidence that shows the threat marine fish farms pose to wild salmon. Read it at the link in our bio under "Toronto Star: Fish Farms". Email DFO.PacificSalmonRMT-EGRSaumonduPacifique.MPO@dfo-mpo.gc.ca with your comments on the management of wild salmon in BC. We need concrete plans to get fish farms out of the water. Tell DFO to stop ignoring the science. "Two studies have connected the virus with fish diseases in B.C. But court records and government documents previously released under Access to Information laws reveal the DFO has a pattern of downplaying this research. By law, the department can only allow farms to transfer fish into the ocean if they are free from any 'disease or disease agent' that could be harmful to wild fish." With rapidly diminishing salmon returns and seemingly declining federal interest in saving these critical species, this is truly the last stand for wild salmon. #FortheWildOnes #FishFarmsGetOut #MarineMonday @cleansingourwaters @alexmorton4salmon 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #wildsalmon #fisheriesmanagement #wildernessculture #salmonnation #cdnpoli #pnwonderland #SRKW #fishlove #HoC #explorebc

PacificWild

Salmon are the lifeblood of our coast. Right now, young smolts are starting their migration out of the creeks of the Great Bear Rainforest for their first taste of the salty Pacific Ocean, feeding on the newly hatched herring from eggs that have covered coastal waters for the past weeks. The public input period for the Northern and Southern Pacific Salmon Integrated Fisheries Management Plans ends on Monday. If you are concerned about the future of these vital species, please take a moment this weekend to provide your thoughts and feedback by emailing DFO.PacificSalmonRMT-EGRSaumonduPacifique.MPO@dfo-mpo.gc.ca. Tell DFO that we need to prioritize investments in the creek walkers that monitor our salmon-bearing creeks, and remove fish farms from the ocean. Find the draft plans and other relevant information about threats to our wild salmon for your email at https://pacificwild.org/campaign/protect-wild-salmon/ 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #FortheWildOnes #wildsalmon #wildernessculture #conservation #wildlifephotography #pnwonderland #cleansingourwaters

PacificWild

Carrie Humchitt from the Heiltsuk Nation and April Bencze from Pacific Wild bear witness to the last commercial seine fishery in Spiller channel in 2015. Four years ago yesterday, the commercial seine and gill net fleet were escorted out of Bella Bella after the Heiltsuk's decades long battle with DFO over herring fisheries management finally concluded with a closure of the seine and gill net sac roe fishery. This week, the shoreline of Spiller channel is thick with herring eggs as a future generation of herring readies itself to once again provide a foundation of life for the coast. Central coast stocks are far from historical abundance but cautious optimism still prevails in Bella Bella as previously overfished areas begin to show signs of recovery. With @aprilbencze and @heiltsukcouncil 📸 @iantmcallister #BIGLittleFish . . . #wildernessculture #ExploreBC #herringiscaring #fisheriesmanagement #feedthecoast #stewardship

PacificWild

It's #ChildrensBookDay, and to celebrate we thought it was a great time to tell you about some of our own children's literature that celebrates the Great Bear Rainforest ecosystems and all of its inhabitants. If you caught the #GreatBearIMAX, get an in-depth look at the behind-the-scenes world of the film with the accompanying book. For the really little ones (or to get your fill of cute), we also have a new baby book from Ian McAllister at https://shop.pacificwild.org/collections/books. Thanks to Orca Book Publishers for their continued support and partnership - they've put a ton of work into bringing the film and the Great Bear Rainforest to life on paper, and continue to be leaders in BC children's literature. #GreatBearRainforest With @gitgaatspirit @macfreefilms @orcabook 📸 @d.leowinata . . . #bcreads #childrensbooks #ig_discover_wildlife #naturalhistory #imax #filmmakersworld #behindthescenes

PacificWild

Happy #MarineMonday! It is time for another texture photo of marine life found off the Pacific coast of B.C. Last time if you guessed sunflower star, twenty-arm star, or many-rayed starfish, you were correct. No, it wasn't a victim of sea star wasting disease, although many of its comrades were. The disease severely affected sunflower stars like this one, and taught us how important these sea stars are to maintain balance in our marine ecosystems. This voracious predator is the largest sea star on the planet, asserting control over urchins and other primary consumers up and down the coast with up to 26 arms and up to 15,000 tube feet. What do you think this one is? Comment your answer below. Photo: @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #MPAs

PacificWild

Against the advice of the the Lax Kw'alaams Band and Metlakatla First Nation, DFO opened the Prince Rupert commercial spawn-on-kelp fishery this past week. SOK can be a sustainable fishery, but subsistence for local communities comes first. DFO's mandate seems clear - fisheries before fish, before community subsistence. Another fisheries opening has resulted in direct action - is this what it takes to get our government's attention? Current on the water demonstrations on the north coast will continue until May. Show your support for the Lax Kw'alaams and Metlakatla. Edit: We have slightly altered this post's text to reflect more our main concern - that these Nations are not able to harvest enough for their communities' subsistence. From their press release: "Food, Social, and Ceremonial needs have not been met for herring eggs or for the many fish species that depend on it." For the story in the Haida Gwaii Observer see the link in our bio. #BIGLittleFish 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #feedthecoast #pnwonderland #reconciliation #fisheriesmanagement #herringiscaring #landscape_captures

PacificWild

Here's another #MarineMonday texture for you. Last week, if you guessed northern feather duster worm (also known as Vancouver feather-duster, plume worm, or parchment tube worm), you were correct! No, it wasn't a crinoid - feather dusters are actually in the phylum Annelida, or segmented worms, vs. crinoids which are in the same phylum, Echinodermata, that includes all of your favourite starfish. Their beautiful crowns are deceptive, but serve primarily for respiration and filter feeding. Feather dusters are found up to 100 feet deep, and were first described on Vancouver island where early records estimated groves of up to 500,000 individuals. Congratulations to those of you who were not deceived by this fabulous marine invertebrate. What do you think of this one? Guess away. 📸 @iantmcallister . . . #marineconservation #diveworld #underwaterphotography #coastprotectors #wildernessculture #pnwonderland #ExploreBC #MPAs