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Deep in the Central African Republic lies an unknown wildlife refuge. Few have heard of Chinko, a unique area that spans a vast 19,846 km2 where savannah and tropical forest collide. These mixed habitats have resulted in an extraordinary diversity of wildlife. Despite an onslaught of threats including decades of civil war, intense poaching, and illegal grazing, wildlife persisted and are making a comeback. Chinko has become a wildlife haven and is home to as many as 10 primate species, the highly vulnerable Central African lion, both savannah and forest elephants and a variety of bird and fish species including the enigmatic Goliath tigerfish. It is a beacon of hope in a country that is 80% controlled by rebel groups. It has become an area of stability where we are funding teachers’ salaries, providing healthcare and driving a conservation-led economy. This new-found security is leading to nature’s return, and Chinko is becoming a frontier destination for the intrepid and adventurous traveler. To learn more about Chinko, click the link in our bio. Photos: 1 & 4) @gylemartin 2 & 3) @brentstirton / Getty Images #africanparks #CAR #chinko #wildlife #conservation #forceforgood @goliathexpeditions

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We are proud to announce that seven extremely committed African Parks Rangers are finalists of the 2019 Paradise Ranger Awards. Leonidas Mpumuje and Anthony Nkuzi from @akagerapark in Rwanda, Dari Narakoua and Juste Sokoutinde from Pendjari National Park in Benin, Benito Willie from @majetewildlifereserve in Malawi, Daoba Dieudonne Komerewa from @garamba_national_park in the DRC, and Forment Kalaba Chisala from Bangweulu Wetlands in Zambia were six of fifty finalists recognized for their exceptional dedication to the protection of wildlife and wild areas. Established by the Alibaba Foundation, Paradise International Foundation and the Founder of Alibaba Jack Ma, the Ranger Awards pay tribute to the indispensable contributions made by Africa’s Rangers to the conservation of our collective natural heritage facing a myriad of threats. But, with the largest ranger team for any one NGO in Africa, with 1,000 Rangers in nine countries, there are countless other Rangers with similar stories who continue to stand steadfast in their posts, providing safety and security for the wildlife and people living in and around the 15 parks under our management. We thank them for the commitment and the sacrifices they make. Click the link in our bio to read the full press release. 📷 @mana_meadows #AfricanParks #Ranger #Alibaba #ParadiseFoundation #ForceForGood

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Recent camera trap footage in Ennedi Natural and Cultural Reserve, Chad, recorded 24 different species! This promising diversity, which included Dorcas gazelle, Barbary sheep and striped hyaena, is a testament to the uniqueness of Ennedi’s ecosystem, its sculpted desert landscape, and the life sustaining resources it provides. At 50,000 km2, Ennedi was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2016 and has a rich cultural history told in the tales of 7,000 year-old rock art which are scattered throughout the reserve. African Parks, in partnership with the Chadian Government, formally assumed management of Ennedi in 2018. Together we are securing a future for this globally significant landscape, an Eden in the Sahara, for the benefit of thousands of people and wildlife who call this place home. #africanparks #Chad #Ennedi #Eden#Saraha

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Most of what we hear about lions is about their steep decline in numbers- from 200,000 a hundred years ago to just fewer than 20,000 remaining today. But today, on World Lion Day, we want to share stories of hope for the species. Thanks to our government partners, major donors and supporters like you, African Parks has been able to undertake some extraordinary conservation initiatives to safeguard Africa’s lions. In 2015, together with the Rwanda Development Board (RDB), we brought lions back to @akagerapark after they were hunted out in the 1990’s and their numbers have since tripled! In Pendjari in Benin, we are protecting 100 of the 400 remaining critically endangered West African lions. In @liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia, a small but growing pride now exists after just one single lioness remained after years of poaching. And in @majetewildlifereserve and @liwonde_national_park in Malawi, together with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), we reintroduced lions in 2012 and 2018 respectively, after they had been absent for decades, re-establishing the country’s lion populations and helping to make Malawi a prime wildlife destination. The future of Africa’s lion is in jeopardy, but this iconic species can rebound, and with our help hope is brimming in places like Rwanda, Malawi, Zambia and Benin. If you would like to learn how you can take action and help us continue to create good news for Africa’s lions, please click the link in our bio to sign up today! Photos: 1 & 3) @lifethroughalensphotography 2) @heinmyers 4) Daan Smit 5) @naudewashere #AfricanParks #BigCats #WorldLionDay #Wildlife #Conservation #protectthepride

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We all know that dogs get the zoomies, but what about rhinos? Watch as three of Akagera’s five newest residents zoom around their enclosure during an energetic play time. In June, these three youngsters were recently part of the largest ever translocation of rhinos from Europe to Africa where they traveled over 6,000 km, in a 30-hour journey from the Czech Republic to @akagerapark in Rwanda. Having already spent just over a month in their new home in Akagera National Park, they are doing extremely well acclimatizing to their new environment and were recently released into larger one-hectare enclosures where they remain under the watchful eye of their dedicated team. To learn more about their journey, please click the link in our bio. 🎥 @drewbantlin @visitrwanda_now #EAZA @safariparkdvurkralove @reeparksafari @flamingolandresort @chesterzoo #RhinostoRwanda #RhinoMove #AfricanParks #Akagera #RemarkableRwanda #goodnews

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Malawi’s predators are on the rise! Little more than a decade ago, this small but vibrant country had very few predators left, with the majority of the big cat numbers dwindling due to habitat loss, human-wildlife conflict, poaching and the illegal wildlife trade. However, over the last couple of years African Parks has made extraordinary efforts to restore Malawi’s top predators. Lions had been entirely absent from the country since the 1990s until we reintroduced a small founder population to @majetewildlifereserve in 2012, creating Malawi’s first and only ‘Big Five’ destination. The population has since doubled and following the success of Majete’s lions, we reintroduced a founder population of lions to @liwonde_national_park in 2018. Cheetahs had also been absent from Malawi for over 20 years until we reintroduced the species to Liwonde in 2017 and an additional founder population to Majete just over a month ago. With fewer than 6,700 cheetahs remaining in the wild, these initiatives to increase the range of these majestic creatures is critical to their long term conservation. Predators are an essential element to any healthy ecosystem, and this work is only possible due to our partnership with the Malawi Government and the support of @peoplespostcodelottery, @lionrecovery, #dutchgovernment, @wwfbelgium, The Wyss Foundation. 📷 @wesley_hartmann, @naudewashere #africanparks #malawi #majete #liwonde #conservation #community #bigcats #forceforgood

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@departuresmag has just published a lovely feature on African Parks and Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Congo. Established in 1935, Odzala is one of Africa’s oldest protected areas and consists of 13,500 km2 of thick primary forest, jungled-fringed rivers, and an abundance of wildlife including 10% of the global population of Western lowland gorillas. Since 2010, African Parks in partnership with the Ministry of Forest Economy, Sustainable Development and Environment has managed this expansive wilderness. “Total control of a reserve—and total accountability—is crucial to African Parks’ success.” Said Peter Fearnhead, CEO of African Parks. Odzala is a crucial projects within African Parks’ portfolio as it is thought to be the largest protected piece of the Congo Basin rainforest— the globe’s second-largest forested area. Having overcome numerous challenges, this special park offers a unique tourism experience, where guests are exposed to grassroots conservation whilst being able to enjoy close-up wildlife experiences in one of the world’s most extraordinary ecosystems. To read the full article, click the link in our bio. 📷 @love_wild_africa #africanparks #odzala #conservation #congo #community #tourism #forceforgood

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Education is key to building a constituency for conservation. We believe in investing in the next generation, in empowering young men and women with the knowledge and tools to create a future where they are not only able to support their families but their communities as well. Last year we enabled over 79,000 children to receive an education and built and supported 278 schools. These actions combined with sustainable livelihood initiatives enable the development of conservation-led economies, where younger generations are emerging and are driving their communities towards a better future. In 2017, one of our first beneficiaries of the scholarship programme in @liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia, Gladys Namushi, applied to become a ranger. She passed her basic training with flying colours and joined the law enforcement core. In 2018, she qualified as a field medic, and not only provides life giving first responder support to her patrol team but works in the local hospital, to improve her skills and support her community. Our goal is to inspire more young people, like Gladys, to pursue a career within or around the parks we manage, whether in conservation, Law Enforcement, tourism, human health, education or becoming an entrepreneur. It is ultimately people like Gladys who will ensure for the long term survival of these wild areas. #africanparks #liuwa #community #conservation #education #forceforgood

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Notre rapport annuel 2018 est désormais disponible en français ! Il y a plus de 18 ans, African Parks a décidé de créer un nouveau paradigme pour la conservation, mais nous savions que protéger la faune ne suffirait pas. Pour que les paysages sauvages puissent fonctionner et s’épanouir, nous devions veiller à ce qu’ils profitent aux êtres humains. Notre Rapport Annuel 2018 comporte certaines de nos réalisations clés depuis notre création, et nous sommes ravis de les partager avec vous ! Tout ceci n’aurait pas été possible sans nos partenariats avec les gouvernements au niveau national et nos bienfaiteurs, dont l’engagement et la vision partagée nous aident à ouvrir la voie pour une meilleure manière de vivre tant pour les humains que pour la faune. Cliquez sur lien de notre biographie et veuillez explorer notre Rapport Annuel intitulé : « Réaliser la valeur des aires protégées » 📸 Michael Viljoen. #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Conservation #Communities #Wildlife #Forceforgood _____________________________________________________ Our 2018 Annual Report is now available in French! Click the link in our bio to read the full report and explore some of the impacts we were able to make last year with the help of our partners and supporters. 🐘🦒🦏🐆💜

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On Saturday the @elephantcrisisfund released its mid-year report. Amazingly 2019 has seen some big wins for elephants that range from significant arrests of high-level traffickers to strong enforcement by China of their ivory ban. Unfortunately, elephant populations across Africa remain under threat, particularly those in the forests of Central Africa. However, small pockets of hope do exist. @garamba_national_park, in the DRC, was once home to more than 22,000 elephants as recently as the 1970s, today fewer than 1,200 remain as a result of rampant poaching by militarised poachers. But in 2016 we redefined the future of Garamba’s elephants through the implementation of an extensive law enforcement strategy, dramatically decreasing poaching by an astounding 98%! With this increased security achieved in just three years, elephant numbers have stabilised and civility and hope are returning for people and wildlife in this small corner of the world again. To read the Elephant Crisis Fund’s mid-year report, click the link in our bio. Photo: Tom Parker #africanparks #elephantcrisisfund #garamba #elephants #communities #wildlife #forceforgood

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Birds bring colour, pattern and sound to a landscape. They form an integral part of any ecosystem, with an astounding array of different species of all shapes and sizes. Africa alone is home to over 2,000 different bird species! The majority of which are heavily reliant on protected areas and their pristine habitats as a life-source. Bangweulu Wetlands in the north east of Zambia is precisely one such area, classified as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by Birdlife International and a Ramsar site this wetland system is home to a staggering avian diversity of over 433 bird species! It hosts an amazing 10% of the world’s population of wattled crane but its most famous resident is the elusive and prehistoric looking shoebill stork. Although this species is severely threatened by habitat destruction, disturbance and the illegal pet trade, African Parks has found a unique way to protect them. We have partnered with local communities to support our ‘Shoebill Guards’ programme where local fishermen guard known nests with eggs (in the wild), and watch over them until the eggs hatch, and the chicks fledge. In the last two years, the guards have helped protect more than 12 fledglings – helping to protect this incredible species. This story is one of many that has provided inspiration to @massimoalba and @clementinasketchbook in creating a series of gorgeous handkerchiefs and shawls that show the majesty of Africa's wildlife including its glorious birds. And we're honored that every purchase supports our work, helping us to protect the continent’s avian diversity. Please click on the link in our bio to see how you can purchase these inspired and special items or visit @massimoalba to learn more! #africanparks photos: 1 & 2) @lifethroughalensphotography 3 & 4) @lorenzfischer.photo #massimoalba #wildlife #conversation #goodnews

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A rare pangolin has found sanctuary in @liwonde_national_park in Malawi. Confiscated from traffickers who were planning to sell the creature into the ruthless Illegal Wildlife Trade, this little Temmincks Ground pangolin was thankfully given a second chance at life under the careful protection of our rangers. Unfortunately, many other pangolins are not so lucky. Approximately 300 pangolins are poached every single day, making them the world's most trafficked animal! On Sunday, Singapore authorities seized 11.9 tonnes of pangolin scales valued at $35.7M, believed to have belonged to about 2,000 of these extraordinary creatures. In addition to the scales, authorities also confiscated 8.8 tonnes of ivory at estimated value of $12.9M, believed to have come from nearly 300 African elephants it is the largest seizure to date. Several multi-tonne seizures made this year alone highlight the rate at which these heavily trafficked animals are being swept from the wild into the lucrative illicit market, estimated to be worth as much as $20bn a year. While demand for wildlife products is driving the decline of countless species, it is also putting people and their livelihoods at risk. Well-managed protected areas are critical to combatting the illegal wildlife trade and its devastating, far-reaching effects. By implementing effective law enforcement and community development programmes, we are creating secure places where wildlife are protected and where people can access the numerous benefits of stable, functioning landscapes driving opportunities for a prosperous future. Click the link in our bio to read the full article. Photo: @wesley_hartmann #wildlife #endangered #worthmorealive #conservation #africanparks #DNPW #WildlifeCrimeInvestigationsUnit @lilongwewildlife

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From the rich rainforests of the tropics to the savannahs of Africa, only about 15 percent of the planet’s land and less than eight percent of its oceans are currently protected. Thankfully, it is not too late to safeguard more of what remains to stem species’ extinctions, mitigate climate change and ensure the persistence of natural landscapes upon which millions of people depend. Last year, Mr. Hansjörg Wyss, philanthropist and African Parks’ Board Member, committed to donating $1B over the next decade to accelerate conservation efforts around the world to help protect 30% of the planet by 2030. As part of this momentous commitment, the Wyss Campaign for Nature has announced its second round of investments, providing an additional $44M in philanthropic support for locally-driven conservation projects that will help secure new, permanent protections for up to 10M acres of land across the Americas, Australia, and Africa. As one of several partners in @natgeo’s Last Wild Places initiative, African Parks is working tirelessly with other groups to protect the planet’s remaining wild landscapes. Together we can safeguard nature for future generations. Click the link in our bio to read the Wyss Campaign for Nature’s announcement. Photo: @love_wild_africa #CampaignForNature #WyssCampaign #LastWildPlaces #wildlife #forceforgood

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We hope you are intrigued and inspired to add Malawi and these four landscapes to your wildlife bucket list. "Malawi is in the business of revival, be it creating Southern Africa’s newest safari destination by repopulating its epic wildernesses…or ushering travelers to its lakeside beaches." - Amelia Duggan, National Geographic Travel. Whether you choose to visit @MajeteWildlifeReserve - the country’s Big Five wildlife destination, or drift peacefully down the Shire river in @liwonde_national_park to spot the newly reintroduced lions or cheetahs, or relax in Nkhotakota’s lush miombo woodland, hope to now over 600 elephants, you are guaranteed an adventure of a lifetime. And even better, when you choose to visit these stunning wild landscapes, or any other park under our management, you are helping to protect wildlife and people who call these magical places home. To find out more and to book your trip, please visit the link in our bio. Photos: @naudewashere & @FrankWeitzer #travelbucketlist2019 #africanparks #liuwa #zambia #safari #wildlife

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African Parks is proud that two dedicated members of staff, Institutional Funding Manager Hugues Akpona and @garamba_national_park’s Head of Law Enforcement Pascal Adrio, have been recognized as rising leaders by the @obamafoundation’s Leaders: Africa program for 2019. Initiated last year, the highly competitive programme brings together 200 emerging leaders from 45 countries across the continent. This diverse group convened in Johannesburg earlier in July to kick off a year-long leadership development programme to build on the participants’ successes to further serve their respective fields and communities. • “It is a great honour to have been selected by the Obama Foundation Leaders: Africa programme. Leadership is key to building a more prosperous continent for the next generation, and we each have an important role to play in making this happen. I look forward to participating in the programme and utilizing the tools and ideas gained to help drive sustainable development in Africa which would not be effective without the conservation of our valuable natural heritage, wildlife and wildlands.” said Hugues Akpona. • Click the link in our bio to read the full press release. Photos: 1 & 2) The Obama Foundation 3) African Parks #africanparks #obamafoundation #obamaleaders #conservation #communties #wildlife #forceforgood

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The rhino has survived on this planet for millennia. But today, fewer than 25,000 remain due to one thing: the illegal demand for their horns. Today, news about rhinos is typically about poached individuals and the near demise of the species. However, African Parks, together with our Government partners, have made extraordinary efforts to ensure that these incredible animals stand more than just a fighting chance. In 2003 and 2007 we reintroduced rhinos back to @majetewildlifereserve in Malawi, in partnership with the DNPW, and today due to our work with communities and improving law enforcement this population is thriving and not one individual has been lost to poaching. Most recently we were able to supplement @akagerapark’s rhino population with the translocation of five individuals from European zoos, creating the most genetically diverse population on the continent. These truly hopeful efforts inspired @massimoalba and @clementinasketchbook to create the Africa series of exquisite handkerchiefs and shawls that portray the continent’s iconic wildlife, including rhinos. We're honoured that every purchase supports our work, helping us to protect these extraordinary creatures. Please click on the link in our bio to see how you can purchase these beautiful items or visit @massimoalba to learn more! Photo: @frankweitzer #africanparks #massimoalba #wildlife#conversation #goodnews

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The European Premiere of #TheLionKing took place at the Odeon Theatre in London last night. The event was attended by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, alongside the incredible cast and filmmakers. In celebration of the film’s release, The Walt Disney Company announced #ProtectThePride campaign, a global conservation initiative where @disney and the @lionrecovery have partnered in an effort to protect the rapidly diminishing lion population across Africa. African Parks, a partner and beneficiary of the Lion Recovery Fund, is honoured to have been given the opportunity to attend such an event alongside our President, The Duke of Sussex. We too are committed to protecting this iconic big cat and are doing so where lions occur in eight of the 15 parks under our management (Zakouma, Pendjari, Garamba, Chinko, Akagera, Liuwa Plain, Majete and Liwonde). Through effective park management and protection, in partnership with Governments, we have transformed these landscapes enabling lions, other wildlife and people to recover and thrive. To learn more about what African Parks is doing to save lions, click the link in our bio and follow @lionrecovery to learn more about conserving lions range-wide. Photo: @a.mac.photo. @sussexroyal #TheLionKing #ProtectThePride #africanparks #lions #conservation #wildlife _________________________________ #repost @sussexroyal ・・・ Photo: PA images / Getty Images - Chris Jackson

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We are delighted that @sussexroyal, the official Instagram account of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex has chosen to feature African Parks as one of the organisations working towards positive change for the environment in July. • “Environmental damage has been treated as a necessary by-product of economic growth. So deeply ingrained is this thinking that it has been considered part of the natural order that humankind’s development comes at the expense of our planet. Only now are we starting to notice and understand the damage that we have been causing. With nearly 7.7 billion people inhabiting this Earth, every choice, every footprint, every action makes a difference.” Said The Duke of Sussex. • Our planet is at a critical juncture facing habitat loss, the destruction of natural resources, the disappearance of iconic wildlife and climate change. African Parks in partnership with Governments is working tirelessly to protect and preserve Africa’s last wild places and the unique species that occur within them. Our goal is to manage 20 parks by 2020, creating the largest and the most ecologically diverse portfolio of parks under management by any one NGO on the continent. #PostiveChange #DukeofSussex #PrinceHarry #DuchessofSussex #MeghanMarkle #africanparks #conservation #communities #forceforgood

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Did you know that Odzala-Kokoua is one of Africa’s oldest protected areas? Designated in 1935, the park is located at the heart of the second largest rainforest in the world, the Congo Basin. Humans have occupied this area for over 50,000 years, yet it is still one of the most biologically diverse and species rich areas on the planet. But this spectacular wilderness is not without its challenges. Odzala has around 130,000 people living on the periphery of the park, who survive off the natural resources the area provides. Due to limited opportunities throughout the region, bushmeat poaching remains a major threat to Odzala and its wildlife, especially the park’s Western lowland gorillas which amount to 10% of the remaining global population. Odzala’s future relies on the urgent need to unlock the park’s value for the surrounding communities who are the primary stakeholders in its management, and whose actions will determine if this park persists long into the future. This is why our focus is to roll out several community projects from compensating communities for human-wildlife conflict, to investing in sustainable livelihood programmes with farming projects and capacity building activities. Odzala’s future rests on our interventions, and ensuring that the communities’ value, and therefore truly benefit from the park’s existence. To learn more about the impact we are making in Odzala and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio to download our Annual Report. Photo: @love_wild_africa. #africanparks #odzala #congo #communities #conservation #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018

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Great news – today the local community of Chibwalizo, on the boarder of @majetewildlifereserve in Malawi, is celebrating their achievement of self-reliance, after @thpnederland started their ‘Epicenter strategy’ here in 2011. This community with around 4500 inhabitants has become a leading example for other neighbouring communities surrounding the reserve as through their efforts they have created an active, local hub where people can meet their very basic needs in health care, education, access to clean water, food storage and financial services which has in turn dramatically decreased hunger and poverty. This spectacular achievement was made possible by The Hunger Project, in partnership with Dioraphte and African Parks. Just 16 years ago, Majete was an empty forest, wildlife was hunted out, trees were felled for charcoal and tourism was non-existent. But this all changed in 2003, when African Parks, in partnership with the DNPW, assumed management of Majete and began to revive the landscape through a series of reintroductions, introducing more than 2,900 animals of 15 different species. The return of wildlife revitalized tourism, which increased employment and is generating important revenue for the park and surrounding communities. This unique collaboration with The Hunger Project and Dioraphte ensures that Majete’s surrounding communities continue to benefit from its existence and builds a future where hunger and poverty are a thing of the past and people and wildlife can coexist and thrive. For more information on The Hunger Projects impact around Majete, click the link in our bio. Photos: @lifethroughalensphotography, Maria Thundu. #africanparks #majete #community #conservation #wildlife #forceforgood

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The story of the largest transport of rhinos from Europe to Africa has just been featured in @cntraveler. Manny, an eight-year-old male rhino, and his four traveling companions are recovering well after their 30-hour translocation from the Czech Republic to Rwanda’s ravishing broad-plain savannah that is @akagerapark. Their 3,700-mile-long journey was a herculean operation that began in November 2018 with the transfer of all rhinos to @safariparkdvurkralove where they started to acclimatize to the prospect of a life in the wild. Now, having arrived in Akagera with their support team of vets and zoo keepers the rhinos are beginning their rewilding process, moving from their small bomas to increasingly larger enclosures, until they are released into the sanctuary of the park’s Magashi peninsula. Ultimately, Manny, Olmoti, Mandela, Jasmina, Jasiri will join a founder group of 18 black rhinos in Akagera, bought from South Africa in 2017 with the support of the Howard G. Buffet Foundation. To read the full article, click the link in our bio. Photo: @sophy_roberts. #RhinostoRwanda #RhinoMove @visitrwanda_now @chesterzoo @flamingolandresort @reeparksafari #AfricanParks #Akagera #RemarkableRwanda #EAZA #goodnews

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Garamba National Park is a prime example of creating value out of a once deadly and lawless landscape. The park contained as many as 22,000 elephants as recently as the 1970’s, but today fewer than 1,200 remain as a result of rampant and militarized poaching in a war-torn region. Armed rebel groups terrorized local villages and tragically 23 rangers lost their lives in an effort to prevent Garamba’s resources being used to fund criminal activities. In just a two-year period the park has been transformed into a nucleus of safety and security for the people who live here through the implementation of an extensive law enforcement strategy. With the support of critical donors, the new strategy heightened the level of professionalism and increased security measures afforded to the Rangers, local staff, and communities within the Garamba complex. Elephant poaching has since dropped by 98% and a responsible Sustainable Development initiative has been implemented that will impact more than 100,000 people around Garamba, providing them with electricity, clean water and educational and medical facilities. Seven mobile health clinics have also been launched servicing more than 2,500 people from 21 villages. Today, Garamba’s story is about hope and how in the face of adversity the park has been reinvented into a landscape that serves as a center of excellence and innovation. To learn more about the impact we are making in @garamba_national_park and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released Annual Report. Photos: David Santiago Garcia, Design & Animation: @dayfeels @stephenjroth. #africanparks #garamba #DRC #community #conservation #wildlife #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018

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Some Good News - the five rhinoceroses that were flown 6,000 km from @safariparkdvurkralove in the Czech Republic yesterday, Sunday June 23rd, have touched down in Kigali, Rwanda, and been successfully released into their bomas within @akagerapark. They were met at the airport by national and global media in the early hours, and as they neared the entrance of the park they were greeted by singing school children who welcomed them to their new and wild home. This exciting initiative, which was announced just last Thursday, involves a unique collaboration among the Government of Rwanda (RDB), the European Association of Zoos & Aquaria (EAZA) and African Parks to show how captive rhinos can help supplement and repopulate wild populations within secure landscapes. These five rhinos are joining an already existing rhino population, which were successfully reintroduced in 2017 together with the RDB and with support by the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. This comes at an exciting time for Akagera. With its wildlife thriving, visitation by tourists is at an all-time high, generating $2M per year in revenue and making it 80% self-sustaining which supports both park operations and local communities. Akagera serves as a living example of how a once threatened and depleted landscape can be fully transformed for people and wildlife alike. These five rhinos will remain in their bomas for several weeks before being released into a small sanctuary within Akagera and then into the wider park. To follow these special rhinos and their journey over the coming months, click the link in our bio. Photos: Ben Gasore, @love_wild_africa #RhinostoRwanda #RhinoMove @visitrwanda_now @safariparkdvurkralove @chesterzoo @reeparksafari @flamingolandresort #AfricanParks #Akagera #RemarkableRwanda #EAZA #goodnews

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We are honoured to share that just yesterday, His Majesty the Litunga Lubosi Imwiko II of the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE) officially opened the luxury King Lewanika Lodge, operated by our partners Time +Tide, in @liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia, commemorating over a century of conservation in one of Africa’s most extraordinary parks. The event heralded the existence and rise of Liuwa Plain under the traditional custodianship of the BRE, which has maintained a unique coexistence between people and wildlife for over 100 years. African Parks has been managing Liuwa Plain in partnership with the DNPW and the BRE since 2003. Home to around 15,000 people who legally live within its boundaries, Liuwa is also one of Africa’s most important grassland ecosystems, annually hosting the second largest wildebeest migration on the continent. This event serves as a significant step in the economic revival of the park, and is a testament to this history and our partnership in restoring Liuwa Plain as a globally important wilderness destination and as a thriving landscape for people and wildlife. The ceremony was attended by senior officials and representatives of the BRE’s Royal Household, the Zambian Government, DNPW, African Parks, @timeandtideafrica and other key stakeholders. Together we are ensuring the park’s protection, promoting socio-economic growth and creating opportunities for communities to derive long-term benefits from a healthy, functioning ecosystem. Security has been overhauled, staff recruited and trained, infrastructure implemented and wide-ranging community programmes initiated to improve livelihoods, including the development of an effective land use plan, provision of educational and healthcare support, water points in villages, employment, and sustainable livelihood schemes. Wildlife numbers have proliferated over the past decade, and key predators have started to flourish once again. Click the link in our bio to read the full story. Photos: @love_wild_africa . #LiuwaPlain #NYT52Places #KingLewanika #GoodNews #PeopleNeedNature

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It’s World Giraffe Day today – and sadly this animal needs all the attention it can get! Did you know that fewer than 100,000 giraffe exist today across all of Africa? Giraffe numbers have been plummeting, albeit quite silently, over the past few decades. The IUCN has even recently declared three of the six subspecies of giraffe as being Critically Endangered and Threatened. This iconic African species is experiencing declines because of the extensive use of wire snares for bushmeat, hunting for their meat and skins, and in some cases even being killed just for their tails to be sold as dowries. But we’ve got some good news to share at African Parks. Giraffes in @garamba_national_park in the DRC are on the rise. In 2012, just 22 Kordofan giraffe remained in the entire country (all of which were found in Garamba) – today, due to improved law enforcement this population has grown to over 55. @zakouma_national_park in Chad is home to 50% of the entire population of Kordofan giraffe, where 1,000 of these magnificent animals live safely within the park. And just last year, together with the Malawian Government and @giraffe_conservation we translocated 13 giraffe from South Africa to @majetewildlifereserve in Malawi to continue to rewild the park, expand the giraffe’s range, and help boost tourism to support local communities. Good things are happening here at African Parks for giraffe - but we need your help. Please visit our website at africanparks.org to sign up for more good news and how you can help, or donate, where 100% of your donation goes to the parks to support efforts like these. #WorldGiraffeDay #GoodNews #AfricanParks #Giraffe

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When African Parks began managing @liwonde_national_park in partnership with the DNPW in 2015, the park contained more wire snares than large mammals. To compound the threat of poaching, human-wildlife conflict was rife and so the park was in a in terminal decline. But, in just four years Liwonde has been transformed. The park now has one of the best ranger forces and training grounds in southern Africa; it has integrated the most advanced technology to protect and monitor wildlife with the help of Vulcan Inc., Smartparks and others; we have removed a total of 36,200 wire snares since 2015 (4,945 just this last year); and orchestrated historic animal reintroductions including bringing back cheetahs and lions in the last two years. And, in 2018 Liwonde’s footprint grew by 60% by adding the contiguous Mangochi Forest Reserve to its mandate. Tourism is flourishing, and employment is on the rise, and we are witnessing a growing sector of local community guides whose jobs entail showing tourists their national park and its wildlife. A budding partnership has been made with @americares in order to deliver healthcare services to surrounding communities, and for the first time in decades, Liwonde is providing for people and wildlife, cementing a sustainable future for all. Our work here would not be possible without the ongoing support of the Malawian Government, The Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality; @peoplespostcodelottery, Stichting Dioraphte, @thewyssfoundation and @wwfbelgium. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Liwonde and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Photos in order of appearance: @naudewashere. Design & Animation: @dayfeels & @stephenjroth. #africanparks #malawi #liwonde #community #conservation #wildlife #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018

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Liuwa Plain has one of the oldest conservation histories in Africa, where in the 19th century the King of Barotseland, Lubosi Lewanika, appointed his people as custodians of the park. They maintain that sentiment today and Liuwa is a prime example of how a protected area can be the catalyst for economic development for a region. But this was not always the case. Liuwa was once a struggling landscape with little staff, no infrastructure or tourists and rampant poaching. In 2003, African Parks entered into a long-term agreement with the Zambian Government and the Barotse Royal Establishment to manage Liuwa Plain and revive the park. The implementation of a new management and law enforcement strategy saw poaching levels subside and sustainable land-use including fish harvesting plans have created livelihoods for the 12,500 people who legally live within the boundaries of the park. Liuwa now employs 123 full-time employees and 104 seasonal workers, making it the largest employer in the region, and supports 28 schools that provide education to more than 11,000 students and covers 89 scholarships a year. Liuwa’s wildlife is recovering and each year the park hosts one of the most glorious spectacles on the planet: the second largest wildebeest migration on the continent. Once home to the legendary lioness, Lady Liuwa, the park has become a safe-haven for predators, a coveted tourism destination with the opening of the high-end King Lewanika Lodge, and is developing a growing conservation-led economy which supports the prosperity of the people. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Liuwa and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Photos in order of appearance: @a.mac.photo/Time+Tide, @heinrichvandenberg and @mana_meadows. Design & Animation: @dayfeels & @stephenjroth #africanparks #Zambia #Liuwa #community #conservation #AnnualReport2018

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Ennedi Natural and Cultural Reserve in Chad, is a natural sandstone masterpiece spanning an extensive 50,000 km2 of sculpted landscape marked by cliffs, natural arches and water catchments. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2016, Ennedi’s people have an ancient history in its desert landscape, learning to tame their hostile environment through a nomadic life style and leaving evidence of their predecessors in the form of 7,000 year-old rock art scattered throughout much of the reserve. In February 2018, African Parks formally assumed management of Ennedi in partnership with the Government of Chad. Despite intense poaching in recent decades, the biodiversity that remains is remarkable. Labelled as an Eden in the Sahara, Ennedi is home to a relict population of desert-adapted West African crocodiles, herds of Barbary sheep and at least 199 migratory bird species. This Reserve also remains an important resource for two semi-nomadic groups in need of pastures and water for their livestock. Despite the challenges that exist in this harsh desert ecosystem, there is a tremendous opportunity to transform this landscape through effective management, engagement with the local nomadic population, law enforcement and tourism, to sustainably provide for the survival of its people and wildlife. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Ennedi and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Photo: Michael Viljoen. Design & Animation: @dayfeels & @stephenjroth #africanparks #Chad #Ennedi #Eden #Saraha #Community #AnnualReport2018

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Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve was just until recently an empty forest. Decades of poaching and poor management reduced its elephant population, which numbered 1,500 in the 1990s, to fewer than 100 by 2015, and game animals were few and far between. In 2015, African Parks in partnership with the DNPW, assumed management of this 1,800 km2 reserve and immediately began to breathe life back into this landscape. We revamped law enforcement and made the park safe, and between 2016 to 2017 we translocated almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals into the reserve. Employment has increased, and due to the influx of wildlife, tourism has begun to grow. We have also created livelihood projects for the more than 100,000 people who live within 5 km of Nkhotakota as it is imperative that these communities directly benefit from the reserve without placing unsustainable pressure on its resources. In 2018, as part of our Resource Use Programme, 2,676 community members harvested thatch grass, bamboos, reeds, mushrooms, edible termites, and palm fronds. We also trained five beekeeping clubs, established 21 groups of moringa farmers, created new educational programmes, and conducted 124 school outreach efforts that reached 47 schools and nearly 7,000 students. In only four short years, Nkhotakota is developing along a pathway of hope and possibility where for the first time in decades, local communities are beginning to experience the real benefits of this newly-revived national reserve. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Nkhotakota and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Design & Animation: @dayfeels @stephenjroth Photo: @naudewashere #africanparks #nkhotakota #community #conservation #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018

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In the eastern Central African Republic, surrounded by insecurity, civil war and a history of deadly violence, there lies a bright spot of governance and hope for both people and wildlife in a 19,846 km2 protected area called Chinko. Despite decades of civil war, intense poaching, illegal grazing and heavily armed herdsmen, an incredibly diverse group of species and important remnant populations persisted and are now making a comeback. Over the past five years since African Parks assumed management of Chinko, chimpanzees, elephants, lions, buffalo, and eland are all steadily increasing in numbers. Incredibly 800 to 1,000 chimpanzees were recorded in a park-wide survey in 2018! This chimpanzee population and other wildlife are rebounding due to our efforts in keeping cattle, who once roamed the park in the hundreds of thousands, out of the entire landscape while maintaining a core area of 4,000 km2 completely free of threats. But even more remarkable is the life-saving role that Chinko is playing for people. In this war-torn corner of the world, Chinko is the only stabilizing area in the entire region for the people who live here. We are funding dozens of teacher salaries, providing healthcare, and because of employment and resources needed to manage the park, markets have arisen creating a conservation-led economy – all in a place where just a few years ago, there was no hope to be seen. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Chinko and 14 other parks, click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Photo: @brentstirton / Getty Images Design & Animation: @dayfeels @stephenjroth #africanparks #chinko #community #conservation #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018

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National Geographic is currently hosting its Explorers Festival, which aims to bring together some of the greatest minds from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. Today is the second day of Symposium and it kicked off with @insidenatgeo presenting Hansjörg Wyss with the inaugural Philanthropist of the Year Award for the incredible Wyss Campaign for Nature’s $1 billion investment to help protect 30 percent of the planet by 2030. African Parks is honored to be in partnership with the Wyss Foundation and National Geographic as well as the Government of Benin who together are committing initially more than $23M to restore, protect and revitalise Pendjari National Park in West Africa. Later in the day, African Parks’ CMO @aheydlauff will present her talk, What’s Working: Rewilding, at 02:45 pm and Garamba National Park’s Research and Development Director @naftali_honig will present his talk, Data-Driven Conservation, at 3:35 pm in Washington (GMT-7). Click the link in our bio to catch Andrea’s and Naftali’s talks live! Photo: Michael Lorenz. #africanparks #natgeofest #CampaignForNature #WyssCampaign #Benin #Pendjari #forceforgood

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Majete Wildlife Reserve is a living beacon of hope, a park restored that delivers significant benefits to people living along its boundaries. Fifteen years ago, Majete was an empty forest, wildlife was hunted out, trees were felled for charcoal, only 12 scouts worked for the reserve and tourism was non-existent. However, the reserve’s trajectory changed in 2003 where, thanks to the Malawian Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), African Parks signed a 25-year management agreement to manage and revive this spectacular landscape. We immediately began a series of species reintroductions bringing back more than 2,900 animals of 15 different species, including rhinos in 2003, elephants in 2006, lions in 2012, and most recently 13 charismatic giraffes in 2018. Their return revitalized tourism, which in turn increased employment and generated important revenue for the park and surrounding communities. Majete is so successful, it now contains a ‘source population’ that helps repopulate other Malawian regions in need of wildlife, providing elephants, lions and other game species. Malawian nationals make up 50% of the tourists who are coming to the reserve every year, showing that there is now a national constituency who have bought into conservation, which perhaps is the greatest hope of all. To learn more about the impact we’re making in @majetewildlifereserve and 15 other parks, please click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Design & Animation: @dayfeels @stephenjroth Video: @wesley_hartmann #africanparks #majete #communties #conservation #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018

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“I come from a tribe where we’ve been called “pygmys”, people think of us just as poor and aloof. But several years ago, people from Akagera came and spoke to us, and asked if we’d like to learn tailoring skills. That changed everything. For the first time in my life, I’m earning money, and can even pay for health insurance. I am not a pygmy anymore; I am neither poor and underestimated, nor am I aloof. I dream of all the designs and products I want to make now to sell at the Akagera shop, and deliver them to other markets, country-wide…why not? It all seems possible now.” Mukamana Joselyne, Akagera National Park, Rwanda ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ Akagera National Park’s story is nothing short of remarkable. In just nine years, @akagerapark has transformed from once housing over 30,000 cattle and rampant poaching, to now being a safe-haven for wildlife. In 2010, African Parks signed a long-term agreement with the Rwanda Development Board to help restore this spectacular landscape into a leading wildlife destination in Africa. In 2018 alone, we saw over 44,000 visitors visit Akagera (almost 50% of whom were Rwandan nationals), 18 freelance community guides were recruited and trained and as many as 1,680 school children and 300 local leaders were supported in visiting the park. Akagera is a prime example of how a well-managed protected area can deliver benefits that change people’s lives, providing opportunities that would otherwise not be available, and creating a conservation-led economy. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Akagera and 15 other parks, please click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. Photo: @love_wild_africa #africanparks #akagera #communties#conservation #forceforgood#AnnualReport2018

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Bazaruto Archipelago National Park was declared a protected area in 1971 and is Mozambique’s first and oldest marine park. However, for years this splendid marine scape has been under threat due to unregulated natural resource use and uncontrolled tourism activities, threatening the park’s biodiversity and revenue. In December 2017, African Parks signed an agreement with the National Administration of Conservation Areas (ANAC) to manage, restore and develop this incredibly rich 1,430 km2 productive seascape. Spanning five islands, Bazaruto home to approximately 5,800 people who heavily rely on its marine resources for their livelihoods making the community work here paramount to the success of the project. The park also protects 250 dugongs – which is the last viable dugong population in all of the Western Indian ocean, making Bazaruto a critical sanctuary for this globally important species. While we are just at the beginning stages of our efforts, our vision is that Bazaruto will be elevated to its rightful position as one of Africa’s greatest marine sanctuaries through the growth of local employment, diversified tourism opportunities and the development of sustainable local enterprises to create a conservation led economy. To learn more about the impacts you helped us make in 2018, please download our Annual Report: Unlocking the Value of Protected Areas (link in our bio). Photo: @a.mac.photo Design: @dayfeels @stephenjroth #africanparks #mozambique #bazaruto #ANAC #island #forceforgood #conservation #Mozambique #MarineReserve #AnnualReport2018

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@zakouma_national_park has experienced one of the most spectacular transformations to occur in all of Africa. From 2002 over an eight year period, as many as 4,000 of Zakouma’s elephants were killed for their ivory, which was 95% of the population. By 2010 only 450 of these gentle giants remained. However in the nine years we have managed this park in partnership with the Chadian Government, much needed security has been delivered to the people and wildlife who live here. With this new level of safety, Zakouma’s elephants began to settle down and breed. In 2018, for the first time in decades their population began to rise. Last year, we counted 559 individuals, including 127 calves under the age of five years old – in 2011 we only counted one. Employment has risen, tourism is flourishing, over 6,600 children have received an education, and a conservation-led economy is emerging in this once lawless landscape. To learn more about the impacts you helped us make in 2018, please download our Annual Report: Unlocking the Value of Protected Areas (link in our bio). Design: @dayfeels @stephenjroth #africanparks #zakouma #elephants #AnnualReport2018

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Did you know that shoebills are heavily threatened by the illegal bird trade? People take eggs and chicks from the wild and sell them illegally as pets as part of the lucrative but devastating wildlife trade. But here in Bangweulu Wetlands in Zambia, we’ve been working with local community members who are volunteering as “Shoebill Guards” to help protect and safeguard nests, ensuring that chicks can safely fledge. Last year, six nests were protected helping to protect this incredible species – once which people travel from all over the world to come and see in the wild, including here in Bangweulu. To learn more about the impacts you helped us make in 2018, please download our Annual Report: Unlocking Value of Protected Areas (link in our bio). Design and animation by @dayfeels @stephenjroth #AfricanParks #Shoebills #AnnualReport2018

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“I used to ask myself, ‘will I have to take my child to another country to see a lion or elephant ‘ but now I know the answer is ‘no’ – that Pendjari is now being protected and that I too have a role in working here, to make sure this park survives, because its for my children, and for their children.” André Tankouanou, Team Leader, Pendjari National Park, Benin. ⠀ ⠀ Pendjari National Park is the last remaining wild ecosystem in West Africa, and little over a year ago this globally significant yet neglected landscape was thrown a tremendous lifeline. African Parks together with the Benin Government, the Wyss Foundation, @natgeo and the Wildcat Foundation announced a $24M commitment over 10-years to protect and revitalize Pendjari through sustainable development for the good of the people. As an anchoring part of the transnational W-Arly-Pendjari (WAP) complex which spans Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger, this extraordinary park is the regions last refuge for its 1,700 elephants and 25% of the remaining 400 critically endangered West African lion. The revival of this exceptional wildlife destination will unlock its potential to support both people and wildlife, allowing people to become direct beneficiaries of what the park can deliver. To learn more about the impact we’re making in Pendjari and 14 other parks, please click the link in our bio where you can download our newly released 2018 Annual Report. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography⠀ #africanparks #pendjari #conservation #communities #sustainabledevelopment #forceforgood #AnnualReport2018 ⠀ ⠀

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Over 18 years ago, when we set out to create a new paradigm for conservation with the formation of African Parks, we knew that protecting wildlife was not enough. For wild landscapes to function and thrive, we needed to ensure that people benefited from their existence. We’re excited to share that our 2018 Annual Report is now available for you to see some of the impacts that we have been able to make. Last year our teams delivered healthcare to almost 83,000 people, created almost 5,000 jobs, oversaw the growth of wildlife populations, key species reintroductions and brought safety and security to over 10.5 million hectares of land across Africa. None of this would have been possible without our partnerships with national governments and all of our supporters, whose commitment and shared vision are helping us to change the trajectory and pave a better way of life for humans and wildlife alike. Start exploring the 2018 Annual Report “Unlocking the Value of Protected Areas” by clicking the link in our bio. Photo: Arent Fock #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Conservation #Communities #Wildlife #Forceforgood

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Rwanda’s reinvention is a remarkable story of national survival and recovery and one that has most recently been highlighted by the @financialtimes. This small but astonishingly diverse nation is making a name for itself in upholding it reputation for being basically litter-free, extremely efficient and very safe. As a result Rwanda has been dubbed by many tour operators as ‘this year’s hottest high-end holiday destination in Africa’. Among Rwanda’s must-see tourism destinations is Akagera National Park, a park whose story mirrors Rwanda’s story of a revival. @akagerapark has been transformed from a park on the brink of being lost forever, to one of the top wildlife safari destinations in Africa. Thanks to our partnership with the Rwanda Development Board, over the last eight years together we have restored this park to its ‘Big 5’ status through the reintroductions of lions and rhinos, and overall protection allowing for wildlife to thrive. We have also developed a thriving tourism industry where accommodation options range from the magnificent five-star @wearewilderness Magashi Lodge to the picturesque African Parks owned and run Ruzizi Tented Lodge on the lake, and the semi-permanent Karenge Bushcamp that takes advantage of the park’s highlands. When you visit this spectacular landscape you are helping to secure a future for wild Africa – for both people and wildlife. Proceeds from tourism revenue are invested back into this park (which in just eight short years has managed to become 80% self-financing) and help support local communities who live in and around these areas, making sure that real benefits are derived for the people who need them most. To read the full article, click the link in our bio. Photo: @love_wild_africa #africanparks #akagera #toursim #conservation #forceforgood

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@garamba_national_park has six new recruits! Welcome to Pax, Hina, Qalla, Perla, Rocky and Dano our brand new @invictusk9 team who will assist our rangers in enhancing Garamba’s overall law enforcement strategy. These six canines were chosen for their excellent detection and tracking ability and will be used to supplement the park’s current law enforcement efforts by locating illegal wildlife products and apprehending criminal offenders through detection and tracking. Generously funded by the @europeancommission and @explorersagainstextinction, these energetic canines have acclimatized well to their new environment and have already developed strong bonds with their highly dedicated handlers. They will continue to undergo daily training for the next month (with some well-deserved rest days in between!) in order to fully prepare them for all the challenges they will face when they are fully integrated into the law enforcement team and join the front line against the illegal wildlife trade. Thanks to the efforts of our Rangers and since implementing a new law enforcement strategy in 2016, elephant poaching has dropped by 98% in the park, and key wildlife populations including giraffe and hartebeest have either stabilised or are increasing. The Illegal Wildlife Trade is a urgent global issue, which not only threatens some of the world’s most iconic species, but also those who have dedicated their lives to protect them. Help support Pax, Hina, Qalla, Perla, Rocky and Dano in their quest to protect Garamba and other projects like these by clicking on the link in our bio. 🐶🐕💜📷 @mia_collis #africanparks #garamba #canineprotectors #conservation #forceforgood @weratedogs @dogsofinstagram

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Zakouma’s transformation, from being a killing field for elephants and people, to now a safe haven for all who live here, would not have been possible without our biggest allies, the local communities. Along with providing a stabilising force in the region through effective law enforcement, African Parks has been providing education, teacher salaries, employment and tourism over the years. Since 2013, we have built and funded 24 schools, delivering education to 6,646 children, and in 2018 alone we provided $64K in teacher salaries. All of this has been in an area where prior to 2010, no options for education existed. We installed VHF radios in villages so, if need be, community members could contact our park control room at any time for any help at all! And because of the much needed manpower to help manage the park, local employment grew, making @zakouma_national_park the largest employer in the region. With law enforced and security reclaimed, tourism could then be realised. The tourist camps started to be heavily frequented, delivering needed funds back into the park to protect its wildlife and the surrounding communities. More than 25,000 tourists have visited Zakouma since 2010, 50% of whom are Chadian nationals, and together they have generated $1.7M in tourism revenue which goes back to the park and the communities who live here. And that’s not all. Within this safe haven, elephants have begun to rise. In early 2018, we counted 127 calves under the age of five years old. In 2011, we counted one. The elephant population has now surpassed 560 individuals and are on the rise for the first time in a decade. @europeancommission @europeaid⠀ 📷 @stevewinterphoto #africanparks #zakouma #chad #europeanunion #forceforgood #bemoved⠀ ⠀

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We have some exciting news from Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve – a roan antelope was recently captured on camera! Although this quirky looking species historically occurred in the area, it was thought to be locally extinct as not one sighting had been recorded in a number of years. The discovery of this individual is extremely positive news for Nkhotakota and the @u.s.forestservice who, in partnership with African Parks, have deployed a number of camera traps throughout the reserve as part of a larger wildlife monitoring survey. Nkhotakota has had a difficult past where poaching decimated the majority of its wildlife, reducing a population of 1,500 elephants to fewer than 100. But African Parks had a different vision for this extraordinary reserve and in 2015, in partnership with the Malawian Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), we secured the areas, drastically reduced poaching and immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. Over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals (but roan antelope weren’t one of them!). Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, it is still early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature and species, like this roan antelope, can do with our help if only given the chance. Learn more by clicking the link in our bio. Photo: @u.s.forestservice #africanparks #conservation #nkhotakota #wildlife #forceforgood #naturesreturn

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Did you know that Bazaruto Archipelago National Park was the first marine reserve to join our management portfolio? As Mozambique’s first and oldest marine park, Bazaruto spans 1,430 km2 of incredibly rich and productive seascape consisting of five islands. Three of the islands are permanently inhabited by approximately 5,800 people who heavily rely on the area’s marine resources for subsistence and for their primary livelihoods. The park is also a critical sanctuary for dolphins, sharks, whales, manta rays, whale sharks and turtles and harbours the last viable population of dugongs in the Western Indian Ocean, making it a globally important conservation area and an exceptional tourism destination. However, this spectacular marine protected area was once under threat due to illegal and unsustainable fishing practices, unregulated natural resource use and uncontrolled tourism activities. But at the end of 2017 African Parks signed an agreement with the National Administration of Conservation Areas (ANAC) to restore, develop and manage Bazaruto and to elevate it to its rightful position as one of Africa’s greatest marine sanctuaries. Learn more by clicking the link in our bio. Photo: @a.mac.photo #africanparks #mozambique #bazaruto #island #forceforgood #conservation #Mozambique #MarineReserve

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Happy Friday from these (slightly unimpressed) felines. While @zakouma_national_park is known for its growing elephant herd, did you know that there are approximately 120 lions living there too? Large prides can often be found lounging in the shade avoiding the mid-day heat; feasting on fresh kills on the floodplains; or heard calling at night from the tourism lodges in the park. Lions are under threat across their range, with fewer than 20,000 remaining in Africa – but Zakouma and other parks under our management in Benin, Zambia, Malawi, Rwanda, DRC and even CAR, are slowly becoming refuges for Africa’s iconic but severely threatened cat. We’re pleased to be working with the @lionrecovery who have provided several grants to us, including in Zakouma, where we hope to answer critical questions and provide a bright future for Africa’s lions. To learn more, click the link in our bio. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography #africanparks #zakouma #lions #predators #threatened #bigcats #wildlife #conservation #chad #forceforgood

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Community engagement is central to the long-term sustainability of @garamba_national_park in the DRC, with a focus on healthcare, education and alternative livelihoods for the communities who live alongside the park. Last year, over 2,500 people benefitted from healthcare services provided by Garamba, which included the Nagero Hospital and three mobile clinics operating in the park’s periphery. Three schools were also supported during the year, and 700 students benefited from scholarships, ensuring that children from the community have access to an education in an area where there previously was none. In a region with little to no economic opportunity, Garamba provides local employment to almost 500 full-time staff and 2,000 staff on short-term contracts. By helping to restore peace to a region plagued by conflict, we are now able to provide critical socio-economic benefits to local communities who are our key partners in conserving the area's biodiversity long into the future, and whose lives are impacted by having a safe and thriving Garamba National Park. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography / Marcus Westberg #africanparks #community #garamba #drc #conservation #goodnews #EuropeanUnion #WildcatFoundation @usaid @usfws @worldbank ⠀ ⠀

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Today is the International Day to celebrate and shine a spotlight on Biological Diversity. Functioning wild ecosystems provide countless benefits for millions of people including clean air, water, and food security. But the last of the wild is seriously under threat around the globe, and must be protected in order to continue to provide for and support humanity. African Parks currently has 15 protected areas under our management in nine countries, spanning more than 10.5 million hectares and representing seven of the eleven ecological biomes in Africa. This is the largest and most ecologically diverse amount of land under protection for any one NGO on the continent. With safety and security re-established in these areas, wildlife numbers can rise, key species can be restored, and people can benefit from these secure and functioning landscapes. We are seeing elephants on the rise in @zakouma_national_park, rhinos and lions reintroduced to @majetewildlifereserve and @liwonde_national_park in Malawi and @akagerapark in Rwanda; the endangered Kordofan giraffe is increasing in @garamba_national_park and important game animals are growing exponentially in @liuwaplainnationalpark and Bangweulu in Zambia. Due to effective park management, Africa’s biodiversity is making a come-back, resulting in increases in employment and tourism and a rise in other social benefits being delivered to underserved communities including educational and medical services. What we are seeing is where national parks can be protected, conservation-led economies can follow, helping to change the lives of the millions of people who share and depend on these wild areas. People need nature, and what we see time and time again is that where wildlife thrive, people thrive. Photo: @mana_meadows #biodiversity #africanparks #nationalparks #conservation #forceforgood #naturesreturn

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The spectacular Magashi Camp has just opened its doors in @akagerapark the country’s newest luxury camp where travelers can see it all. Operated by @wearewilderness, the camp is set within the park’s northeastern corner and is comprised of six spacious tents overlooking the gorgeous Lake Rwanyakazinga. In addition to Ruzizi Tented Lodge, Karenge Bush Camp and Akagera Game Lodge, Magashi will offer guests a rare opportunity to experience first-hand one of the continent’s most extraordinary conservation success stories. Behold thousands of plains game and thriving populations of lion and rhino, which were reintroduced to Akagera in the past four years, making it Rwanda’s only ‘big five’ status park. Here is a landscape that was once inundated with 30,000 cattle and overcome by poaching, which in just under a decade of concerted efforts alongside the Rwanda Development Board, has transformed into a secure, vibrant and globally sought-after wilderness. Click the link in our bio to learn more. Photos: @wearewilderness #africanParks #akagera #rwanda #conservation #travel

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After the state of the world’s biodiversity was laid bare by the UN’s global assessment published last week, the editorial board of @nytimes has provided strong commentary on the primary culprits of the destruction of the planet’s precious ecosystems and on what is urgently needed to protect them. Their article, “Life as We Know It”, spotlights the role of protected areas and the call for a Global Deal for Nature, which would see 30% of the Earth’s lands placed under formal protection by 2030 to address biodiversity loss and climate change, securing the natural systems which underpin human well-being. As part of @natgeo’s Last Wild Places programme, African Parks is one of a group of organisations that have joined forces with governments to expand the protection of wild landscapes across Africa to create safe places for people and wildlife alike. Click the link in our bio to read the full article. @natgeo @insidenatgeo #lastwildplaces #globaldealfornature #africanparks #nationalparks #conservation

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The Central African Republic seems only to make headlines for the human crises that occur there, including lack of governance and instability sewn by ruling rebels and civil war. Previously, the @washingtonpost has reported that more than a dozen armed groups and local militias control about 80 percent of this impoverished country – a country where 1 in 4 people is displaced, and tens of thousands of children are malnourished. But they also report that “besides the armed authority of rebel groups, there are other, more promising forms of governance in the Central African Republic – Chinko Wildlife Reserve”. The reporter continued that @chinko.project “has managed to bring some stability and development to the unruly southeast. Spanning more than 6,800 square miles, Chinko not only protects an extraordinary mix of wildlife but also offers the trappings of a working state, providing education, health care, law enforcement and an economy. The park funds the salaries of dozens of local teachers and trains its own employees in hygiene, money management and sexual health. Its nurses make visits to nearby communities. Weekly markets supply Chinko’s 450-strong workforce — a boon to this destitute region. A dedicated ranger corps patrols the reserve to combat poaching”. In 2017, almost 400 internally displaced people fled to Chinko for protection from near-certain death as a result of local ethnic violence. After a year of receiving shelter and life-saving assistance within Chinko, with some even being employed, last year they voluntarily returned to their village and all are doing well. Thanks to the support received from the European Union and @usaid, Chinko has become a beacon of hope that wildlife and communities are turning to for sanctuary where they can see a future for themselves and their children. For more information click the link in our bio. Photo by @c.mararv ⠀ #Chinko #CentralAfricanRepublic #Hope #AfricanParks #Rangers #Conservation⠀

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@liwonde_national_park’s predators are thriving! We are pleased to share that the seven cheetahs that were reintroduced to Liwonde by the end of 2018 are loving their new home and their population is booming already. Since their reintroduction, we have been lucky enough to welcome four litters of cubs, each with 100% cub survival rate during denning stage and guess what? There is a fifth litter expected very soon! We are also pleased to report that Liwonde’s lions are settling in well. Only reintroduced to the park in mid-2018 it is still early days for these large predators, but the nine individuals have already naturally split up into two prides that spend their time between the vast flood plains and the hilly interior of the park. Liwonde National Park is on the forefront of predator restoration, where the return of these apex predators is part of the larger strategy to restore a naturally, functioning ecological system while conserving these highly valuable species. None of this would be possible without the tremendous ongoing support we receive from the Malawian DNPW, the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @lionrecovery and the Endangered Wildlife Trust. Photos: 1. Olivia Sievert 2. @sean_viljoen #liwonde #malawi #bigcats #predators #wildlife #forceforgood #naturesreturn