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We got a sneak peek at Anthony McCall: Dark Rooms, Solid Light, opening tonight at the @albrightknox in Buffalo and occupying the entire 1905 Edward B Green Neoclassical building. It is the British artist’s first solo museum show in the U.S. #art #architecture #light #dark

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This two-story, single-family residence by @DyniaArchitects is located in a cottonwood forest on the west bank of the Snake River, just south of the Teton Range. The family wanted the common spaces and master bedrooms to have expansive mountain and river views. Read more about it at the link in our Instagram Stories and #FeaturedHouses Highlight. Photos © @BruceDamonte.

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An architectural firm designed a visitors center in an urban park to blend intricately with the landscape. The roof—partly sawtooth and copper clad, the curved part covered in grass—melds with an existing earth Vern and an allée of ginkgo trees for an arresting fusion of nature and building. Swipe up in our “Guess” Highlight to guess the architect!

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@forms_surfaces materials transform L.A.’s decades-old Beverly Center. Featured throughout, F+S VividGlass and LightPlane Panels bring a dynamic glow to the interiors and help evolve the mall into a contemporary destination for social and cultural experiences. #ad #interiors #interiordesign #interiorstyle #interiorarchitecture #architecture #architecturalglass

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Casa Reutter, built by @WMR_Arquitectos for a single family with three children, characteristically includes living and dining spaces along with a master bedroom and supplementary, bunk-style bedrooms. Read more about Casa Reutter at the link in our Instagram Stories and our #FeaturedHouses highlight. Photos © @SergioPirrone, plan courtesy of @WMR_Arquitectos

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Minneapolis is reshaping its urban fabric by implementing a redesign of the Nicollet Mall, led by the landscape architecture and urban-design firm @fieldoperations, with lighting by New York–based @tillotsondesign and local expertise contributed by the notable @snowkreilich Architects and landscape architect @coenpartners.​ The design team created welcoming public spaces: a reading "room" (shown) with floor-lamp-style fixtures, and a two-block-long mirror-topped trellis outlined with light. Read more about Nicollet Mall at the link in our Instagram Stories and August Highlight. Photos © @muggphoto.

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According to lighting designer Stephen Margulies, hiding luminaires helps a project to mature gracefully. “If a viewer’s first impression includes lighting equipment, then you run the risk of looking out of date,” says the partner of @oneluxstudio. Heeding this philosophy, the New York–based firm achieved an ageless character in the three-story-high lobby of @kohnpedersenfox’s recently completed office tower at 55 Hudson Yards. Read more about this lighting project at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo © Connie Zhou ​

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An Indiana family commissioned @deborahberkepartners to design a house that would blend in with the local Midwestern landscape and celebrate the region’s legacy of modern architecture. The single-story, long, low volume sits atop a hill.​ Read more about the house at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @magnuslindqvist (first, third) @chriscooperphotographer (second, fourth) #FeaturedHouses

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In designing a weekend house for a couple from Manhattan, @RyallSheridanArchitects in New York first helped locate its site on the North Fork of Long Island. Bill Ryall, firm principal, who has built up a substantive portfolio of quietly modern residences in the area, found a 5.5-acre plot in Orient, a quaint rural village of 700 people. The flat property ends on a high bluff overlooking the Long Island Sound. Read more about the House of the Month at the link in our Instagram Stories and August Highlight. Photos © @TyCole, text by Wendy Moonan

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Bogavante House is near a rugged, expansive nature reserve in the small coastal town of Paracas. The house is composed of two dwelling units; the main one, in a cubiform block, is two stories high, where a master bedroom on the second floor has a panoramic view of the Paracas Bay. An additional dwelling unit occupies a one-story wing at the rear. Read more about this Featured House at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Elsa Ramirez, plans courtesy of Riofrio Arquitectos #FeaturedHouses

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Piaggio House is @spinagustudio’s renovation of a two-story, single-family 1960s residence on a tight site in Rosario, Argentina, about a four-hour drive northwest of Buenos Aires. The house, adjacent to the Parana riverfront, was designed for a couple that seeks privacy in outdoor living. In response to the client’s request for security features typical of this urban neighborhood, the Los Angeles firm subtly incorporated fences, gates, and window grates into its design. Read more about the Featured House at the link in our Instagram stories. Images © @javieragustinrojas (first, second) courtesy of Spinagu (third) #FeaturedHouses

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By 2022, the Korean American National Museum will have a permanent home in Los Angeles—after some 20 years of discussion. @morphosisarchitects unveiled the design this week at a public event announcing $4 million in funding from the State of California to support the project. Since the Museum’s founding in 1991, it has partnered with other local cultural centers to house satellite exhibitions and events. The new building will finally give the museum a dedicated space in Los Angeles’ Koreatown. Read more about the new design at the link in our Instagram Stories. Images courtesy @MorphosisArchitects, text by Kara Mavros

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The first hint that there is something unusual about the new outdoor swimming pool by @gh3architects at Borden Park in Edmonton, Alberta, is what isn’t there—that insidious but telltale odor of chlorine. This is because the 64,000-square-foot recreational complex, which includes a sandy beach, changing rooms, and plenty of space to soak up the sun, is Canada’s first “natural” public swimming facility. Instead of using chlorine or other chemicals for disinfection, it relies on the cleansing capabilities of sand, gravel, and carefully selected aquatic plants and organisms. Read more about Borden Park Natural Swimming Pool at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos courtesy @gh3architects, Raymond Chow. Text by Joann Gonchar, FAIA

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The new Aga Khan Garden by @nelsonbyrdwoltz, near Edmonton, in the Canadian province of Alberta, is the largest garden in North America to interpret the landscape traditions of Islam. At a latitude above 53 degrees, it is also the world’s northernmost, translating the desert-based horticultural traditions of Islam for Alberta’s short summers and cold winters. Read more about the Aga Khan Garden at the link in our Instagram Stories and August Highlight. Photos © @futurelandscapes​ (first), @wherezjeff (second, third). Text by Katharine Logan

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If you caught some of the Wimbledon tournament last month, you may have noticed a new retractable roof over Court 1. That roof, along with other improvements to the stadium just beside Centre Court, was designed by @grimshawarch, which has also developed a master plan for the All England Lawn Tennis Club. The global firm, known mainly for highly complex transportation facilities and innovative science and educational buildings, is beginning to flex its muscle when it comes to athletics. In County Kildare, Ireland, @grimshawarch has just completed another sporting venue—with another impressive roof. Read more about Curragh Racecourse by Grimshaw at the link in our Instagram Stories and August Highlight. Photos © @sportsfile (first), Roger O'Sullivan (second), courtesy @grimshawarch (third). Text by @josephineminutillo_

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In the last six years, 12 acres of land on the banks of Shanghai’s Huangpu River, where five cylindrical metal tanks once stored aviation fuel, have been transformed into a park and culture complex. Now called @TankShanghai, the ambitious endeavor by @OPEN.Architecture, which opened in March, is about a half hour’s drive from the downtown.​ Read more about Tank Shanghai at the link in our Instagram Stories and August Highlight. Photos © @wuqingshan.archphotographer

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In the early 20th century, the actress known as Madame Thébault built a villa on an idyllic plot of rolling landscape in Étretat, France, atop the rocky cliffs of Normandy’s Alabaster Coast. The grounds, which she made into a garden for her orchids, became a favorite painting spot for her friend Claude Monet, who produced many artworks depicting the Porte d’Aval, a natural stone arch in the distance. In 2016, Russian landscape designer Alexandre Grivko transformed Thébault’s former estate into Les Jardins d’Étretat—a public garden that hosts both permanent and temporary displays of sculpture by international artists. Read more about Les Jardins d'Étretat at the link in our Instagram Stories and in our August Highlight. Photos © Matteo Carrasale (first), Richard Bloom (second, third)

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The sight of @sou_fujimoto’s bushy, white, curvilinear 17-story tower in the city of Montpellier, France, could stop you in your tracks. And this is before you notice that the balconies of this mostly residential building extend out like branches of a thickly foliated tree, almost defying gravity. Aptly called L’Arbre Blanc (White Tree), the recent addition to the city of 278,000, close to the Mediterranean, makes a dramatic gesture to the region’s sunny climate. Here 113 luxury apartments, contained in the “trunk,” open onto balconies that cantilever as much as 25 feet. Read more about L'Arbre Blanc at the link in our Instagram Stories and August Highlight. Photos © @iwanbaan, plans courtesy of @sou_fujimoto

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During last September's Hurricane Florence, the small North Carolina city of New Bern was inundated by the compound effects of storm surge and river flooding. In Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, @localofficelandscape and architect Javier Bonnin Orozco created a beachfront park that includes wetlands capable of storing storm-surge waters. A team that includes @akrfinc and @big_builds has developed a flood-protection scheme for 2.4 miles along New York's Lower East Side that calls for raising the elevation of an existing park about 8 feet. On Staten Island, once-degraded stream beds have been restored and linked together to help control outflow volume and prevent flooding in low-lying neighborhoods. @rogerspartners and collaborators propose combining hard and soft flood protections for Galveston Bay that would include floodgates and new parkland, created from soils dredged from a shipping channel. @swagroup's Buffalo Bayou Park in Houston, completed in 2015, included reconfiguring the watercourse to control runoff — the landscape proved resilient during Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Read more about projects that protect vulnerable coastlines at the link in our Instagram Stories. Images © Jim Lo Scalzo / @shutterstock (first); @localofficelandscape (second)' NYC Mayor's Office of Resilience (third, fourth); James S. Russell, FAIA (fifth); courtesy @rogerspartners (sixth), @unnoj / @swagroup (seventh), David Lloyd / SWA Group (eighth)

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The August Issue is out today! Read about Landscape & Leisure, Coastal Resilience, and Lighting at the links in our August Highlight. Featuring landscape projects by @gh3architects, @rawnarch, @open.architecture, @nelsonbyrdwoltz, @kerearchitecture. Also featuring Arbre Blanc by @sou_fujimoto in Montpelier, France. On the cover: Les Jardins d'Étretat in Normandy, France, by Alexandre Grivko. Photo by Matteo Carrasale. On the Table of Contents: Tank Shanghai, China, by @open.architecture. Photo by Wu Qingshan. On the introduction to the Landscape & Leisure section: Xylem at @tippet.rise Art Center in Fishtail, Montana, by @kerearchitecture. Photo by @iwanbaan.

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Although San Francisco has yet to institute a gas ban similar to the one recently enacted across the bay, in Berkeley, several residential projects there anticipate such restrictions, including @mithun_design’s Maceo May Apartments, a 105-unit building for formerly homeless veterans and their families slated for completion in 2021. Architectural Record spoke to @hilarynoll, a Mithun senior associate, about the Berkeley natural gas ban. Read more at the link in our Instagram Stories. Image courtesy @mithun_design

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Swipe to see six pavilions sweeping the U.S. and the UK this summer: SelgasCano's prismatic 2015 Serpentine Pavilion, scheduled to open in September, is the first of the 19 structures built for @serpentineuk’s annual program to travel to the United States. Hórama Rama, ​this year's winner of @themuseumofmodernart's Young Architects Program, by Mexico City–based @pedroyjuana, brings seating, shade, and even a waterfall to @momaps1's courtyard in Queens. Billowing over the green of London's Kensington Gardens like a jagged stone sail, @junya.ishigami_associates's 2019 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion has a thin canopy, heaped with thick flakes of loose-laid slate. At Dulwich Picture Gallery in South London, Colour Palace is brightening the sky. Salvage Swings​, a project by Fayetteville, Arkansas–based architecture practice @SomewhereStudio, uses scrap timber salvaged from a construction project. Finally, @markdionstudio's Follies at @stormkingartcenter features 13 highly diverse structures, from a glass menagerie to a truck that serves as a mobile laboratory. Photos © @iwanbaan (first), Rafael Gamo (second), @norberttukaj (third), Adam Scott (fourth), @SomewhereStudio LLC (fifth), Jeffrey Jenkins (sixth) ​

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At 1,454 feet tall, the Empire State Building, designed by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, was completed in 1931—and is now home to the Architectural Record offices. Yesterday, the Empire State Building unveiled a new visitor observatory experience and museum. The 10,000 square foot space—designed by @thincdesign, Beneville Studios, @corganinc, @ideo, and @squintopera, among others—occupies part of the second floor of the Art Deco skyscraper. Exhibitions highlight the structure’s modern-day interventions, guiding visitors through its storied past and ultimately escorting them up to the 86th floor observatory. Read more about the new experience at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @evanjosephphoto

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London has been in search of its High Line since the day that the first phase of New York’s game-changing stretch of public space opened in 2009. Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge project was spurred by the desire of local leaders to have what New Yorkers had: an elevated piece of infrastructure, both garden and public space, with dramatic views of the city. That idea, which was much derided and unfairly lambasted, died in 2017. But now, another elevated public walkway has come to fruition: the Tide, designed by @diller_scofidio_renfro in collaboration with @neiheiserargyros, on the eastern reaches of the Thames, opened July 5—predictably drawing comparisons to the High Line from local media. Read more about the Tide at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Jeff Moore (first, third), Charles Emerson (second, fourth)

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Submit your entries for RECORD’s Products of the Year Awards, which salute the best building materials introduced to the U.S. market after August 15, 2018. Winners will be published in the December 2019 issue of RECORD. Hurry, the September 6 deadline is approaching. Enter online at architecturalrecord.com/call4entries

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Furniture and objects by Switzerland-based American designer @IniArchibong are steeped in his unique background. The son of Nigerian emigrants—an engineer and a computer scientist—Archibong grew up in Pasadena, California, in a household where mathematical minds also meditated on West African totems, masks, and antiquities. Read more about Ini Archibong at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo courtesy Sé, text by Brooke Henderson

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As the number of books available in digital and audio formats keeps rising, brick-and-mortar libraries have had to adapt and evolve into much more than lending facilities and repositories to stay relevant. “Libraries are the new town squares,” says Lee Skolnick, founding principal of Skolnick Architecture + Design Partnership. “They must be multifunctional, welcoming, provide space for people to gather, and incorporate an ever-increasing set of analog and digital content delivery platforms.” The architect used these guidelines when designing the new Jackie and Harold Spielman Children’s Library and inserting it into a gutted space within the existing Port Washington Public Library on Long Island in New York. Read more about the library at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo © John Wallen, text by Sheila Kim

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Since it was established 349 years ago, Charleston, South Carolina, has amassed a well-preserved sampling of architectural styles from the Colonial, Victorian. and Classic Revival periods. So when San Francisco-based @DavidBakerArchitects partnered with local firm McMillan Pazdan Smith ( @mpsarchitecture) to design Willliams Terrace, a 41-apartment complex for residents age 62 and older, it was clear that in addition to modern convenience (flood-resistance was part of the brief in this low-lying coastal city), the design should also evoke some Charleston charm. Read more about this design at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Kris Decker / @FirewaterPhotography (first), @LukerPhotography (second, third), text by Victoria Elliott

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​"Architects should stand up and say stop," RECORD editor-in-chief Cathleen McGuigan writes, referring to horrendous conditions in the detention facilities at the U.S. border. The AIA has now issued a statement denouncing the facilities. Read both her words and the AIA's statement at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo © Jose Luis Gonzalez/REUTERS/Newscom

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Born in Argentina, Cesar Pelli had one of the most illustrious careers of any American architect of the last century: He worked for Eero Saarinen on the celebrated TWA Flight Center. He was dean of the Yale School of Architecture. He designed landmarks on four continents, including the Petronas Towers (pictured here) in Kuala Lumpur, the tallest buildings in the world when they were completed in 1999; the World Financial Center in New York; three towers in Spain; and the Gran Torre Santiago, the tallest building in South America. Read more of Pelli’s obituary at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo © Luke Watson, text by Fred A. Bernstein

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At the 2019 Bundesgartenschau ( @buga2019), or Federal Garden Show, in Germany, the most interesting structures are built of paradox. Inspired by nature but designed and partly built by robots, the BUGA Wood Pavilion was created by the Institute for Computational Design and Construction at the University of Stuttgart ( @ICDStuttgart) for the biennial, which takes place at a new venue every other summer. This year, @buga2019 is set on an island in the Neckar River, which runs through the town of Heilbronn, just over an hour south of Frankfurt. Read more about the wood pavilion at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo © Roland Halbe, text by Kara Mavros

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While new fitness trackers and other health-related products seem to come to market at light-speed, progress in how health-care services are delivered to patients does not have a reputation for similar swiftness. San Francisco–based company @goforwardhealth is using high-tech infrastructure—as well as some dazzlingly exclusive gadgetry—to disrupt that, with a new model of subscription-based medical practice. The Silicon Valley start-up recruited Alexander Jermyn Architecture to develop a suitably expectation-defying design aesthetic for the concept, which is now being deployed at sites around the country. Read more about @goforwardhealth at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos ©​ @jeremybittermann, text by David Sokol

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The Royal Institute of British Architects ( @riba) has named six finalists for the 2019 #stirlingprize, one of the United Kingdom’s most highly regarded architectural honors. RIBA will announce the 2019 winner in a ceremony on October 8 in Camden, London.​ Read more about the finalists at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @paulrafphoto (first), Hélène Binet (second), Ricky Jones (third), @joasphoto (fourth), @timcrockerphotographer (fifth), Peter Cook (sixth), text by @elielevine

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In the early 1990s, following his graduation from Rice University’s School of Architecture and a stint at Ricardo Bofill’s office in Barcelona, Eduardo Aizenman returned to Mexico City, which still had not recovered from the devastation of the 1985 earthquake. Wanting to​ create community, breathe new life into the city, and just have a place to hang out, Aizenman and his friends conceived a bookstore-café (or Cafebrería) in the historic Condesa neighborhood, which had been particularly hard hit. The move helped fuel a local renaissance and, over the years, the partners brought their Cafebrería El Péndulo concept to various precincts. Read more about this bookstore-café at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @jaimenavarros, text by Beth Broome

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Rock your world with @forms_surfaces glass & the Zoom Digital Darkroom. 8 new hi-res images give you vibrant ways to bring the photographic beauty of rocks & minerals to glass projects of any size. Options ranging from graphic to bold to subtle and serene fit a wide array of settings. #ad #interiors #interiordesign #interiorstyle #interiorarchitecture #architecture #architecturalglass

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Say the word “airport” and even the most intrepid road warriors are likely to think of the headaches associated with air travel. Travelers are probably not envisioning a verdant landscape with cascading water features or meandering walking trails. But that is what people encounter inside Jewel at Singapore’s Changi Airport. The $1.2 billion structure, designed by Cambridge, Massachusetts–based @SafdieArchitects, weaves retail space, food outlets, and passenger conveniences together with a flourishing green space of palm and bamboo trees, canyons, and a 130-foot-tall waterfall—all within an immense, climate-controlled toroidal glass enclosure. Read more about this project, part of our special Airports of the Future section, at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @timhursley, text by Joann Gonchar, FAIA

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In 1987, Steven Holl completed the Berkowitz-Odgis House, high on the dunes in Martha’s Vineyard, overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. The wooden building’s slender rectangular form took inspiration from Herman Melville’s description in Moby-Dick of the shelters regional Native Americans created from whale bones and animal hides. The widely celebrated building received a Progressive Architecture citation and a National AIA Honor Award—yet, by 2013, the 26-year-old structure had been demolished. Now in its place is a new house, by locally based @hutkerarchitects, that pays homage to Holl’s forms and ideas without literally recreating the original. Read more about this redesign at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Eric Roth (first, third), @paul_warchol (second), text by Sarah Amelar

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A little over a decade after Beijing Capital Airport constructed a new terminal by @fosterandpartners to accommodate an additional 50 million passengers a year, the capital city is unveiling a new airport just 30 miles to the south. The 7.5 million-square-foot Beijing Daxing International Airport, designed by @zahahadidarchitects and airport specialist ADP Ingénierie, will include four runways (compared to three at the Capital) and serve 45 million passengers yearly when it opens this fall; by 2025, that capacity is expected to reach an annual 72 million. Read more about this project, part of our special Airports of the Future section, at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Xinhua / Alamy Stock Photo, text by @alex_klimo

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When the TWA Terminal by Eero Saarinen opened at Idlewild Airport (now JFK) in New York in 1962, it embodied the allure of air travel. Its open “wingspan” welcomed travelers into the glamorous interior, with its sweeping concrete curves. Despite the beauty of its structural expressionism, it proved not to be functional for the long term. Read more about the TWA Flight Center at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photo © Balthazar Korab / Library of Congress.

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The @unescoworldheritage Committee has added eight buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright to the World Heritage List. The eight structures, taken together, constitute a single new “cultural site” on the UNESCO list. They include Fallingwater, a residence designed for the Kaufmann family in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, and completed in 1938; the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House in Madison, Wisconsin, considered Wright’s first Usonian structure; Unity Temple (1908), a monumental, luminous church in Oak Park, Illinois; the Hollyhock House in Los Angeles, built in 1917; and the circular, spiraling @Guggenheim Museum in New York, finished in 1956. Read more about Wright's works at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Carol M. Highsmith via Wikimedia Commons (first); by @dmheald, © James Dennis (second); © Tom Rossiter, courtesy of Harboe Architects (third); by @joshuawhitephotography, © @hollyhockhouse (fourth); by @dmheald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation (last). Text by @elielevine

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In New York, where real-estate costs are at a premium, it’s practically criminal to waste space—even the subterranean kind. One underutilized site was a block-long passage below street level that leads from the Columbus Circle subway station to West 57th Street. In 2014, local firm @archoutfit began working with Oases Development to devise a plan for the Metropolitan Transit Authority to transform it into a flexible underground food-and-shopping pedestrian street named Turnstyle. Read more about this Good Design Is Good Business winner at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @tycole, text by Sheila Kim

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A new building at the Metropolitan Community College (MCC) has become a versatile research, development, and training resource for students and industry. Designed by @bnimarchitects, the 65,000-square-foot Center for Advanced and Emerging Technology includes a virtual-reality lab, 3-D printing, laser cutters, plasma-cutting technology, and a high-bay space for such endeavors as prototyping new equipment. Read more about this Good Design Is Good Business winner at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Nick Merrick, @hallmerrickphoto, text by Laura Raskin

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In 2016, when law practice Boies Schiller Flexner decided to relocate its Manhattan office from traditional, disjointed Midtown quarters to four contiguous floors in 55 Hudson Yards—a new skyscraper by @kohnpedersenfox that was under construction at the time—the firm commissioned @schillerprojects to invigorate its workplace by reflecting its increasingly collaborative culture. In response, the architecture studio launched an 11-week audit of the existing facility to determine logistical and spatial needs, and what should change. The resulting data enabled the design team to clearly communicate its strategy to the client and develop a program that would substantially revise the way it does business. Read more about this Good Design Is Good Business winner at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @davidsundbergphoto / @estophoto, text by Linda C. Lentz

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Innovative hospital buildings don’t necessarily appear to be so from the outside. Often, it’s the fine-tuning of the internal organization that can appreciably improve health care. The new oak-clad patient building at Haraldsplass hospital is nestled nicely into the foot of the heavily wooded Ulriken Mountain, the highest of the celebrated seven mountains that surround the city center of Bergen, Norway’s second-largest city. The gently angled outward-facing facade follows the course of the Møllendalselven River beneath it. Read more about the hospital at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Jørgen True, text by @josephineminutillo_

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Five projects currently under way at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are aligned to the institute’s goal of melding with its Cambridge surroundings, whether Kendall Square to the east or Central Square to the west.​ Noting the “increasingly blurred line between the campus and the city,” associate provost Krystyn Van Vliet hopes the projects on both sides of MIT will foster “a healthier, more dynamic interaction” between the institute and its neighbors. Read more about MIT's building boom at the link in our Instagram Stories. Renderings courtesy @weissmanfredi (first); @howeleryoon (second); @michaelmaltzanarchitecture (third); photo © Bryce Vickmark, courtesy MIT Department of Facilities (fourth); @nadaaainc (last). Text by James McCown

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Expensive, inconvenient, daunting, even painful: perceptions of orthodontic treatment can run the gamut of negative emotions, for adult and younger patients alike. @clarknexsen's design of a new office helps alleviate those stresses, presenting clients with a calm, soothing environment that highlights the region’s natural beauty. Read more about Blue Ridge Orthodontics (@BRO_Smiles) at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @markherboth, text by Miriam Sitz

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Not many buildings can compete with the skewed geometries of @frankgehry’s sculptural architecture, but, despite its simple rectilinear form, @perkinswill’s new Gardner Neuroscience Institute at @uc_health manages to make its neighbor—the bulging redbrick Vontz Center for Molecular Studies (1999)—recede into the background. What’s captivating about the Institute is its tensile white scrim, a delicately crinkled surface that varies in transparency and iridescence, like a mood ring, as the sun cycles through the day. Read more about the building at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @markherboth, text by @alex_klimo​

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@clevelandclinic is creating a new 11-acre Health Education Campus, to be completed at an estimated cost of $515 million. Its first building is the 478,000-square-foot Sheila and Eric Samson Pavilion, designed by Foster + Partners of London in association with @dlr_group | Westlake Reed Leskosky of Cleveland. This new facility, completed in April, will serve 2,200 students from Case Western’s three medical programs and from the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner College of Medicine. Here, under one roof, future doctors, physician assistants, nurses, and dentists will learn to collaborate and communicate as a team. Read more about the pavilion at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © @nigelyoungphotos, text by James Gauer

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Just in time for New York’s first real heatwave of the season, a new installation by 2019 Young Architects Program winners @pedroyjuana has opened, setting the stage for @momaps1’s annual Warm Up summer concert series. Hórama Rama—a 40-foot-high, 90-foot-wide cyclorama—brings seating, shade, and even a waterfall to the museum’s courtyards in Long Island City, Queens. Read more about Hórama Rama at the link in our Instagram Stories. ​Images © @rafaelgamo (first); @kgprojects, courtesy @momaps1 (second, third); courtesy @pedroyjuana and @momaps1 (last)

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This summer, a luxuriant Brazilian jungle has made its way to, of all places, the concrete jungle. At the New York Botanical Garden ( @nybg) in the Bronx, the serendipitously named landscape architect Raymond Jungles ( @rjistudio) has created a verdant nirvana that celebrates the work of #robertoburlemarx (1909–94), the Brazilian painter, botanist, and master sculptor of flora. Read more about the exhibition at the link in our Instagram Stories. Photos © Curtice Taylor (first), Claus Meyer/Tyba (second), @rjistudio (last)