Ashleigh Kane - instagram lists #feedolist

ashleighkane

Last Friday, talking about mythology, religion, sport, identity, and journey with wonderful @gray_wilbank for the closing of their show ‘Dark Air’ at @seagergallery @dateagleart & more brilliant memes from Gray’s research on @dateaglestudio 🖤 📷 @lizmakesphotos

ashleighkane

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Wya 🕗 Raqs Media Collective “A Day in the Life of _____” (2009)

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Openings at openings @cindysherman

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Recharging 🔋〰️💛〰️🔐

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I spoke with curator @tamarhemmes about the almost-open Keith Haring exhibition at @tateliverpool and asked her to help guide me through key points of his life through six of the artworks which will be on display. Here's a teaser, full article on @dazed now: “The club scene was important, not just for his work, but for his life. Haring came to New York in 1978 and very quickly started going to Club 57, a nightclub, which was the kind of place where he met a lot of performers and artists who became a part of his social circles, people like Madonna, for example. But at the same time, he started organising performance evenings and was curating work by his peers. It was a very creative, artistic scene that was taking place. He first painted the body of Grace Jones in 1984, and covered her in his marks and symbols. That process and the end result were photographed by both Andy Warhol and Robert Mapplethorpe. The photographs appeared in Interview magazine. But Haring collaborated with Grace Jones on quite a number of occasions, and one of them was for a performance at the Paradise Garage, as well as for her video for her 1986 single ‘I'm Not Perfect’. In that you see Haring painting a skirt that she wears. This particular image (shown) is just one of Grace Jones having her body painted by him, but they worked together for a number of years. Haring was interested in using the body as a canvas in a way. He also did this with Bill T. Jones, a choreographer, and he painted a number of other people later on. But he and Grace Jones became friends and it was very much a creative collaboration, it wasn't just Haring painting her, but it was her incorporating it into her performances.” Keith Haring painting Grace Jones, photographed by Andy Warhol in 1986

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Last Thursday and Friday night I had the pleasure of interviewing @myhilism and @francescasorrenti_ at two screenings of @see_know_evil, a documentary about #DavideSorrenti, at @everymancinema 💙

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Ekaterina Bazhenova-Yamasaki’s ( @Yekate) photographs taken inside Tokyo love hotels, often used as porn sets, explore female desire and attitudes towards sex in Japanese culture, now on @dazed

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I got into bed (via Skype) with art mom Marina Abramović to talk about empathy, saving the planet, and how we will all have to live as avatars in the next 100 years for @dazed’s A Future World campaign 💚🌏

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Cindy Sherman’s “Untitled (#305)"(1994). This was the first set of images I ever saw from Sherman, when I was in my first year of my ill-fated Arts degree. A handful of these were used as my reference point for a photography series I made with a sex doll in domestic settings, but my tutor didn’t think these were suitable references or that my work was a proper example of ‘photography’ (she insisted I shoot some nice landscapes), so I quit the class 🤓 no clue what happened to the tutor or my series, but this is still one of my favourite sets of Sherman’s images 😌

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Nan Goldin: You’ve said: ‘Hell is a place on earth and heaven is a place in your head.’ In reading your work that comes right through. I mean, I can’t avert my eyes any more, because of your text. But how do you walk down the street without averting your eyes? ⚜️ David Wojnarowicz: I’ve done that since I was a kid. I remember trying to describe this to someone. And I said: ‘The two of us could walk down the street and you would probably notice the fresh begonias in the window up there, that drift of cloud on the right, that building and maybe this attractive person. And I would come away seeing the bum’s rotted feet, with the infections and the maggots and the stink and the smell, and I would come away with the full weight of what that block contained.’ ⚜️ Nan Goldin: And how do you translate that horror into something that you can live with? Through your writing? ⚜️ David Wojnarowicz: Yeah. And I think it quickly develops into rage. I’ve been in rage all my life at this thing we call ‘society’. ⚜️ Photography credit: Peter Hujar, “Forbidden Fruit (David Wojnarowicz Eating an Apple in an Issey Miyake shirt)”(1983). This segment is from the book Brush Fires in the Social Landscape, published three years after David's death from Aids-related complications💚

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Heavenly and important photographs from @kingtexas on @dazed today, speaking about the power that portraiture has in making space for the marginalised, unrepresented, and erased🌈

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Angel @rheadillon you are above and beyond. We love you so much ❤️ The rest of London, go and see this stunning film art installation, “The Name I Call Myself”, (and beautiful sculpture) screening for the next two days, if you know what’s good 📶

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Looking back on summer 2019 ☁️

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👑 I interviewed my favourite photographer and one of my best friends @tylersphotos for my first feature for @anothermagazine 👑 just in time for the opening of his first solo show at @foam_amsterdam 💙 Link in my bio ⚜️ thank you @ted_stansfield 💚 This photo is from AnOther’s latest issue, styled by @robbiespencer

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John Giorno, Dial-A-Poem “The busiest time was 9am to 5pm, so one figured that all those people sitting at desks in New York office buildings spend a lot of time on the telephone. The second busiest time was 830pm to 1130pm then the California calls and those tripping on acid or couldn't sleep, 2am to 6am." (212)628-0400

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At home, 📷 for @nightsglobal 🌙

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Surrealist Leonor Fini in 1934 is a 2019 mood

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I am so pleased to share my first story for @crack_magazine and the cover of the latest issue ❤️ I met the beautiful @iamkelseylu in her London AirBnb a few weeks back and we spoke until long after the sunset. She was a dream and I can’t wait for her debut album Blood to drop this spring 💕 you can read the full feature on Crack now, link in my bio 🌷

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Spent three hours speaking with Julia Gruen, who was Keith Haring’s assistant until his passing, and now the executive director of the Keith Haring Foundation, at Keith’s studio. The following slides are all the residue and markings left by Keith himself when he was working.

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⚜️💗⚜️ Naudline Cluvie Pierre ( @cluvie) “And A Light Appeared” (2018)

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Manifesting this energy, this time last week 🇺🇸

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Marina and Ulay “Rest Energy” (1980)

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Toyin Ojih Odutola ( @toyinojihodutola), “The Flavor and The Intent” (2015), marker on paper. Currently on show at @flagartfoundation 🖤

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Stole this from @aimeecliff coz it hit. From Tracey Emin’s @whitecube show

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Doing up Beverly Hills art mom ☀️

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@hart_leshkina's new photography book, Out Of You, bridges the fleeting gap between childhood and being a teen. It “explores the moment when one becomes aware of being viewed, and how this often catalyses the way in which one presents themselves”. More on @dazed now

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Beating hearts baby

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Caught snacking 🍿🍬🥂🍺 @joshuawoods

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“Tulip” (1984), Mapplethorpe 🖤

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One of my favourite places to be: James Turrell’s “Meeting” 🔭

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Art shows that you should definitely leave the house for in 2019, read thr full feature now on @dazed. This photo is Gao by @hannamoon69, for ‘Cherry Baby’ published in Dazed Fall 2017. It will be shown as part of English as a Second Language, an exhibition curated by wonderful @shonaghmarshall which also features @joyceszeng and launches this month at Somerset House 👀

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My print from @phoebethegorgon via @ripostemagazine @amnestyuk just arrived 👀 Phoebe has described the image: “We Don't Need Protecting. We need reparations and abolition. A message outside the 28th Precinct Police Station in Harlem, New York holds a hollow promise that, "We are here when you need us" – but who is the “you” and “us”? Despite being painted by Franco the Great, an important artist hero in the historic black community of Harlem, the sentiment only appears to serve the growing influx of white and wealthy newcomers into the area. In the foreground stands another man's work and home, full of that morning's bottle collecting.” It’s still available to buy via @ripostemagazine, all proceeds to @amnestyuk

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The good shade 🐨🌿

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The beautiful @themisstoto, photographed by @jda.usa as a celebration of Miami’s local art scene for @dazed. “The only reason I am actually doing any of this is that I moved to Miami. I grew up doing art, my mum was a dancer, I went to art school, and to art classes all throughout my younger years. But then I kind of lost that throughout high school and college because I was focused on doing science and trying to be the stereotypical idea of success. When I got to Miami, I realised, that this isn’t what’s going to make me happy in the long run and I needed to get back into doing art. So pulling at the references from the city that created Miss Toto makes my drag very quintessential to Miami. If you're looking at the stuff that I do, you’ll see that this is a specific Miami queen. Like the colours that I like to choose from, the way I perform, the styling, and then taking people's idea of what Miami and what Miami drag is and blowing it out of the water.”

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Last night, we launched Dazed+Labs’ first term (ever) exhibition. I am so, so unbelievably honoured and proud to be a part of this, and to have met these students. Here is @graceimari with her prints. Thanks so much to @dhagren @dazed @redhooklabs @rpt_media (especially Leone!) and @cbam8 ❤️ you can see photos from the exhibition on @dazed now. 📷 by @thomasgorton 💙

ashleighkane

When I first went to Miami for Basel in 2017, someone told me not much else happened there outside of that one week. Obviously I didn’t believe it, and have spent the past two visits there uncovering a vibrant, beautiful, progressive, important art scene. I spoke to @jda.usa about what I wanted to do as a story, and, as a Miami-born creative, he knew all the connects, and went and photographed @venusroots @coreydamonblack @ajamonet @themisstoto and @_zackmars for this incredibly insightful feature about what Miami’s artists think and hope its future will look like 💙 thanks to everyone involved for their time and words. I honestly can’t wait to return and keep learning and meeting people 🏹 read the full feature on @dazed now

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An actual honour to write an essay on @maisiecousins - one of the first artists I met when I started at Dazed - and how she reclaims and co-opts classic motifs of femininity, sensuality, and sexuality with her photography. Full essay is in @foam_magazine’s “Talent Issue” 🌸 out now 👀

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Feeling very enlightened after discussing “Gendered Rage and Creativity” with some wonderful artists I admire, @joymiessi @phoebethegorgon @_lotte_andersen_ @stephwilsonshoots as part of @ripostemagazine x @amnestyuk’s exhibition. Open til Sunday, with some incredible (affordable) £50 prints on sale from these artists and many more, with 100 per cent of the profits going to charity 💙 A recording of this will be available via @ripostemagazine tomorrow❗️

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@zorasicher spoke to @dazed about her incredibly intimate first photo book, Progreso 110 🏹

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Gm

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Lucky charms 🎠 thanks for having me @secret_cinema 🍿

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“I was just looking for happiness” - wonderfully beautiful and clever @rheadillon speaking to @dazed today and debuting her series “Sistah’s” 💙

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So very blessed to have you, T ❤️

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“What is art, anyway?” Very blessed to have been in conversation with my art angel @museummammy at the #ConverseXJWAnderson pop up gallery🎨✨ Highlights screening on @converse IGTV now

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Bitch don’t steal my wine

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Spoke to Japan’s IMA magazine (Summer 2018, vol. 24) about some of my favourite people combining art and fashion in new ways 💙 I can’t remember what it says anymore, but thank you so much @miwasusuda ☺️ p.s I need a new portrait photo 👀

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Kate Moss in 1994 by Glen Luchford

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“Few artists encapsulate the power of fury better than David Wojnarowicz. The incendiary creative was born in 1954 to parents who soon divorced; he then spent his formative years enduring childhood abuse and hustling for money on the streets of New York City. After a short hiatus, he returned in the late 1970s to immerse himself in its avant-garde art scene, quickly finding acceptance amongst a similarly-minded group of luminaries. He was openly gay, relentless political, and later built a reputation as one of the most radical Aids activists in American history, famously protesting the government in a painted leather jacket which read; ‘If I die of Aids – forget burial – just drop my body on the steps of the F.D.A.’... Over the years, Wojnarowicz created a number of self-portraits. In the late 1970s, he wandered the streets of New York in a mask of Arthur Rimbaud, a French poet described by the New York Times as a ‘sexually fluid renegade genius’. Not only was it a commentary on their similarities as outsiders and outlaws, it was a musing on changing societal attitudes to any sexualities which deviated from the norm. By the time this self-portrait was being created in 1983-84, America was in the midst of its Aids epidemic. Little was known about the lethal disease, but the tail end of 1983 saw the first discrimination case filed by Gay Men’s Health Crisis against a New York doctor. The virus was increasingly gaining a stigma and, as an openly gay artist, Wojnarowicz bore the brunt of this stigma; it’s why his work bristles with urgency and burns – in this case, literally – with anger. From looking at this portrait, it’s clear that he saw himself as a man swathed in the flames of a chaos which would never succeed in disrupting his defiance... Read more about how Wojnarowicz set the art world alight with his fury, as demonstrated by six of his works on @dazed. Words by Jake Hall🔥

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South Korean artist and disruptor Lee Bull’s performance, “Sorry for suffering – You think I’m a puppy on a picnic? (1990)”, began when she boarded a plane at Seoul’s Kimpo airport and headed for Tokyo, swamped by the heavy, flesh-coloured material of her bulging bodysuit, and ready to let loose on the capital city. While she says that she will never discuss what her art means, “Sorry for suffering – You think I’m a puppy on a picnic” (1990) is believed to be a feminist critique on the controlling of women’s bodies in patriarchal East Asian society, given Lee had transformed her female body into something monstrous; something socially unacceptable. This early piece would kick off a three-decade-long career for Lee. From the late 80s up until now, she has been prolific in creating a wide-range of works, which draw on a jumble of references from Masamune Shirow’s Ghost in the Shell (1989-90) manga series, to South Korean politics, and even the decaying stench of a fish market. Her work sees her revisiting past experiences (even her own abortion) and then imagining what our future hopes could look like. Text by Bea Windsor. Read more about the artist on @dazed. Her show Lee Bul: Crashing is on at London’s Hayward Gallery now