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Meet the Museum returns this October! Each week kids ages 2-3 and their caregivers will visit a different exhibition, exploring color bursting all around them, and learn how to create their own colors and shades. Check out our link in bio to register! ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Photo: Valentina Vidusin #bkmeducation

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Our 74th birthday bash honoring #MarshaPJohnson takes place this Thursday! Join us as we celebrate her life and legacy with🥂🎂 and 📽️ of @hbdmarsha and Pay it No Mind: The Life and Times of Marsha P. Johnson, as well as 🎶 by @ROZE_ROYZE. A portion of the proceeds will benefit @mpjinstitute. Tap link in bio for tickets! ⁠ #Stonewall50 #NobodyPromisedYouTomorrow⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Still from Happy Birthday, Marsha!, 2018. Video, color, sound; 14 min. Courtesy of Frameline Distribution. © Sasha Wortzel © Tourmaline⁠

brooklynmuseum

These pups are the physical embodiment of dog days of summer. Stop by our Plaza to show off your mutt and be sure to tag your photos with #mybkm for a chance to be featured next! 📷 by recent dog parents @mipacopacorro @sarahlukacher @meet.the.papaya @lula.thedoodle @keithrob2and4 @gunnicool @elpugmomo @cody.the.springer @brooklynaussies and @boo_bleps.⁠ #oyyo

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Today is your last chance to get down with #LizJohnsonArtur’s thirty-year photographic archive documenting the multiplicity of everyday life in Africa, Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. Don't miss out on this soulful show.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Liz Johnson Artur (born Bulgaria, 1964). Untitled, 1996–2012. Chromogenic photograph. Courtesy of the artist. © Liz Johnson Artur⁠

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To be etched, a polished, metal plate is first coated with a ground—an acid-resistant material like varnish or wax. The artist scratches a reversed image into the coating with a stylus, exposing small areas of the plate which is then submerged in acid. The acid eats away, or etches, the exposed areas of the metal. The remaining coating is removed. Ink is spread across the surface and then the plate wiped, leaving ink only in the etched lines. As in engraving, the inked plate is now ready to print and a damp paper is pressed onto the surface. This technique alone produces an image entirely made up of lines, as we see in #Piranesi’s The Well; he creates shading with clusters of parallel lines and crosshatching, hallmarks of printmaking. #BKMWorksonPaper⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Giovanni Battista Piranesi (Italian, Venetian, 1720-1778). Invenzioni Capric di Carceri; Hind 13, First State of Three, ca. 1749. Etching on laid paper. #BrooklynMuseum, Frank L. Babbott Fund and Carll H. de Silver Fund, 37.356.11 #BKMEuropeanart

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One: Egúngún tells the life story of a 20th century Yorùbá masquerade dance costume (egúngún), from its origins in Ògbómọ̀ṣọ́, Nigeria, to its current home in Brooklyn. Composed of over three hundred textiles from Africa, Europe, and Asia, this egúngún swirls into motion during festivals honoring departed ancestors. Though no longer ritually empowered according to its community of origin, the egúngún here remains a compelling symbol of belief, history, and global connections. ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ We thank and acknowledge the Lekewọgbẹ family—the makers of this egúngún. This exhibition honors their family name and masquerade heritage. See #OneEgúngún before it closes this Sunday.

brooklynmuseum

As the summer comes to a close, we bid farewell to our 2019 cohort of summer interns who worked behind-the-scenes throughout the Museum's many departments. We're so grateful for their hard work, keen insights, and bright energy. For those interested in our internships, we encourage anyone curious about art and museums to apply in 2020! In the words of one of our interns, “I cannot imagine a more exciting and educational internship experience... I was not expecting to ever feel so personally valued at an internship.”⁠ #BKMInterns⁠⠀

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Explore what @vogue​ called "the connective tissue that binds the African diaspora with tender intimacy" through #LizJohnsonArtur's Black Balloon Archive. Now in its final week, see the artist's photographs in Liz Johnson Artur: Dusha, through August 18.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Liz Johnson Artur (born Bulgaria, 1964). Untitled, 1996–2012. Chromogenic photograph. Courtesy of the artist. © Liz Johnson Artur

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The 1950s were a busy and productive time for #PierreCardin. In 1957 he traveled to Japan for the first time, teaching three-dimensional cutting at the invitation of Bunka Fukuso Gakuin, a fashion college in Tokyo, where his students included future designers Hanae Mori and Kenzo Takada. The same year (1957) Pierre Cardin became a member of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, the association that designates which fashion houses are haute couture. #PierreCardinBKM⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Pierre Cardin with a Japanese audience, 1960s. © Archives Pierre Cardin⁠

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#NowOnView in #BKMEuropeanart: This recently acquired portrait by #ElisabethVigéeLeBrun, a celebrated and successful woman in the male-dominated late 18th-century art world. After the Revolution in 1789 Vigée Le Brun left France for twelve years, supporting herself through commissions like this vivid portrait of Countess Maria Theresia Czernin that she painted while living in Vienna. The Countess, who may have wanted to emphasize her interest in classical scholarship, is shown holding open a well-known book about ancient Greece. ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Elisabeth Louise #VigéeLeBrun (French, 1755-1842). Portrait of Countess Maria Theresia Czernin, 1793. Oil on canvas. #BrooklynMuseum, Gift of Lilla Brown in memory of her husband, John W. Brown, Mrs. Watson B. Dickerman, A. Augustus Healy, Helen Babbott MacDonald, Charles H. Schieren, and L.L. Themal, by exchange , 2018.53 ⁠⠀

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#RindonJohnson’s video poem It Is April dives into the artist’s personal journey into a physical and fantastical landscape of love and care for himself and his partner. With an original musical score by Milo McBride, the video echoes Lucille Clifton’s poem “My Wife” (1987) by describing the house they will live in and the warmth of his lover’s apartment: “You and I can lie in the sun and read books all day long without putting on any clothes.” The striking visual of the artist’s head and neck stroked by his lover’s white hands is heightened by the artist’s musings on interracial desire. #Stonewall50 #NobodyPromisedYouTomorrow⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Rindon Johnson (American, born 1990), featuring Milo McBride. [Still] It is April, 2017. Single-channel video, color, sound; 20 minutes. Courtesy of the artist. © Rindon Johnson

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Unlock the power of your family’s imagination in our weekly F.A.M. (Family Art Magic) classes! This fall, ages 4-6 and an adult think about the future they want to see, drawing inspiration from the artists and activists of #Stonewall50 and designing their own futuristic outfits as seen in #PierreCardinBKM. ⁠Sign up for the full series, or join us for just one day! Check out our link in bio to register! ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ 📷 @kolinmendez #bkmeducation

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⁠We're throwing a 73rd birthday bash for #MarshaPJohnson on Thursday, August 22! Join us as we commemorate the life and legacy of the late activist with screenings of @hbdmarsha and Pay it No Mind: The Life and Times of Marsha P. Johnson, followed by a champagne toast, @drunkbakers cake, and music by @ROZE_ROYZE. A portion of the proceeds will benefit @mpjinstitute. Tap link in bio for tickets! ⁠#Stonewall50 #NobodyPromisedYouTomorrow⁠⠀ ⁠⁠⠀ Photo: Marsha P. Johnson (detail). (Photo: Johnny Romanek)⁠

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Although he was terrified of air travel, #GarryWinogrand repeatedly photographed at airports, which were filled with well-dressed crowds. During these years, flying was an aspirational activity, and its glamorous image was reinforced by advertisements, newspapers, and magazines that were full of glossy photographs showing celebrities jetting around the world. Winogrand focused on the more banal moments of air travel, observing how travelers killed time waiting for flights, luggage, and loved ones. #WinograndColor⁠

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⁠“What I call sketches are the life line in my archive,”⁠ says #LizJohnsonArtur. “Without them, I would have⁠ drowned a long time ago.” Johnson Artur fills these books⁠ with photographs, drawings, and thoughts that⁠ demonstrate her own logic. See them on view in Dusha through August 18th.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Liz Johnson Artur (born Bulgaria, 1964). Book for Thought, 2018. Vintage papers and mixed media. Courtesy of the artist. © Liz Johnson Artur⁠

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#NowonView: Brooklyn artists @jencatron and @paul_outlaw have transformed ordinary things, a bathroom sink and an ice cream sundae, into spectacularly oversized sculptures. The monumental scale of these works suggests a celebration of our consumer culture—one that includes access to running water and indulgent treats—and at the same time, a more dystopic version of the American Dream. On view in our glass Pavilion through September 29.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Jen Catron (American, born 1984) and Paul Outlaw:(American, born 1980). B.S.O. (Bright Shiny Object) and Sin(k), 2019. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery and the artists. Installation view, photo: Jonathan Dorado.⁠

brooklynmuseum

Our outdoor Market is open this Saturday from 11 am to 6 pm! Over thirty vendors return to our Plaza with an exciting collection of artwork, jewelry, fashion, home and apothecary goods, and more for sale. Tap link in bio for more details. 📷 @brooklyn.pop.up

brooklynmuseum

Let the Brooklyn Museum be your muse! We love seeing our visitors getting creative and using our building and collections as inspiration. Show us what's in your sketchpad on your next visit by using #mybkm—and be sure to check out #bkmworksonpaper for some inspo!⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Thanks to our artists @zouzthebird @lockandspoon @wkrantz @artofhobson @sowhatpress @craigsartlessons @eve_devore @reid.schlegel @steplin and @sanikakarnik.

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⁠The first step to a printed engraving is carving the reversed image into a polished metal plate. A sharp metal tool called a burin to gouges lines into the surface. Once carved, ink is spread over the surface. The smooth areas of the plate are then wiped clean leaving ink only in the carved grooves. A damp paper is placed on top of the inked plate and run through a press, transferring ink to the paper. Because the sharp burin allows the artist to finely control the thinness of lines, engraving proved an excellent medium for the high level of detail characteristic of Albrecht Dürer, probably the first famous printmaker in European history. #BKMWorksonPaper⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528). Melencolia I, 1514. Engraving on laid paper. #BrooklynMuseum, Gift of Mrs. Horace O. Havemeyer, 54.35.8 #BKMEuropeanart

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We’re deeply saddened to hear of Toni Morrison’s passing. In her honor, on August 15, we’ll be screening Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 2019), an intimate meditation on the life and works of the legendary storyteller and Nobel prize-winner, whose writing shifted the American literary landscape. The screening is free, but please RSVP through link in bio. ⠀ Toni Morrison in TONI MORRISON: THE PIECES I AM, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Timothy Greenfield-Sanders.

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Regarde! Installation is now underway for JR: Chronicles, opening October 4. If you can't wait until fall to take in two decades of @jr's ambitious public art projects, stop by our Great Hall and see portraits of our own community members temporarily on view as part of his @insideoutproject. #jrbkm

brooklynmuseum

Registration is now open for our newest semester of art classes for young artists, families, teens, and adults! Sign up for a variety of fall classes that will sharpen your artistic skills and spark your imagination after spending time in our galleries and special exhibitions. ⁠Visit link in bio and tap the “Fall Art Classes” tab to learn more!⁠ #bkmeducation 📷 Kenneth Chen

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Mobile art center caribBEING House is back in residence throughout August! Stop by during Museum hours all month long to see @iamcaribbeing's spotlight exhibition Close-Lines, featuring a site-specific installation by Cuban photographer @guajire.⁠ Tap link in bio for more info.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Photo: Alexis Ruiseco-Lombera (Cuban, born 1991). Alaska de Conde, 2017⁠. (Photo: Courtesy of the artist)⁠⠀

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The 1960s witnessed travel on a scale never before seen, and #GarryWinogrand took advantage of new modes of transportation to cross the country just as Americans enjoyed new opportunities for domestic vacations. During his numerous trips, he frequently photographed automobiles, boats, and airplanes—symbols of prosperity in the postwar years. He often photographed from his car, focusing his lens on seemingly absurd and sometimes surreal scenes on streets and highways. #WinograndColor

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On view for two more weeks, take one last deep look at a single type of egúngún, a vibrant Yorùbá masquerade dance costume worn to honor ancestors and their living descendants, on view alongside distinctive West African textiles and garments. #OneEgúngún closes August 18.

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"I was in tune with the times. The postwar years were wonderful. There was real creativity, great freedom. I used fabric in generous volume. My first collection presented original coats and suits of an impeccable cut combining inventiveness and attention to detail. This was an immediate success and praised by the press." — #PierreCardin⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Pierre Cardin in his couture salon, 1952. (Photo: Courtesy of Archives Pierre Cardin. © Archives Pierre Cardin) #PierreCardinBKM⁠

BrooklynMuseum

What can a painting be? Who can it reflect? #EricNMack pries open the bounds of painting, ushering in both new materials and muses: waxed cloth and plaid swatches; suitcase fragments, moving blankets; musical luminaries Prince and Kelis; everyday black girls, Seat Pleasant, D.C., and more. Consisting of textile assemblages held in physical and metaphorical tension with the Museum walls, Lemme walk across the room is both example of, and prompt for charting new spaces for aesthetic experience. See this expansive show before it closes this Sunday, August 4.

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Experience @jr’s most ambitious global art projects in his largest solo museum exhibition to date. Opening October 4, the expansive exhibition premiers a new monumental mural, The Chronicles of New York City, and features iconic works by the French artist that foster conversations and collaborations with communities around the world. #jrbkm⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ JR (French, born 1983). The Chronicles of New York City, 2018–19 (detail). © JR-ART.NET⁠⠀

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As all good things must come to a close, it's time to bid farewell to #infinitebluebkm. Closing this Sunday, take one last stroll through this cross-departmental survey that features blue in all its variety. Tag your photos with #mybkm for a chance to be featured next! 📷 by recent visitors @lucasben1 @pedrocantizani @mayaevephoto @artwiseonline @jacklyn.lune @mstiff1986 @simrandesign @bestiabx138 @kbodrock and @efearturo

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By the 18th century, Europe was awash in printed images that delighted large, diverse, and eager audiences. On view in shop windows or collected by connoisseurs for private study, prints shaped and reflected current societal tastes, customs, and beliefs. Satire, like this example by #WilliamHogarth, flourished as an artistic mode in prints that were in tune with the critical spirit of the age. By the early 19th century, other artists like #WilliamBlake began to question the Enlightenment notion that the universe was objectively knowable and controllable and instead embraced the subjectivity and emotion of Romanticism, the first major artistic movement of the modern age. #BKMWorksonPaper⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ ⁠William Hogarth (British, 1697-1764). Gin Lane, 1751. Engraving on laid paper. Bequest of Samuel E. Haslett, 22.1855 ⇨ William Blake (British, 1757-1827). Behold Now Behemoth which I Made with Thee, from Illustrations of the Book of Job, 1825. Engraving on wove paper, image. Bequest of Mary Hayward Weir, 69.4.1p #BKMEuropeanart #BrooklynMuseum

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Only a few mats remain for our Saturday, August 10 @adidasnyc: Art & Yoga class. Tap link in bio for tickets to enjoy a morning of yoga and meditation, followed by a special self-guided tour through our galleries.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ #mybkm moment by @siren_yoga

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#JeffreyGibson’s painting draws its title from Rhythm Controll’s track “My House” (1987), popularized by Larry Heard’s iconic deep house remix “Can You Feel It.” For Gibson, the lyric recalls the house clubs he frequented in adolescence, which served as spaces for queer and trans communities of color to express themselves on the dance floor. Pairing patterned beadwork and abstracted text, the work gestures to the artist’s Choctaw-Cherokee heritage and the range and innovation of indigenous artistic production. #nobodypromisedyoutomorrow #stonewall50⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Jeffrey Gibson (American, born 1972). BECAUSE ONCE YOU ENTER MY HOUSE IT BECOMES OUR HOUSE, 2018. Acrylic on canvas; glass beads and artificial sinew inset into wood frame. Private collection. © Jeffrey Gibson

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Love talking about art? Consider applying to join our A.R.T. (Art, Research, and Teaching) Program to learn more about art and how to engage others in discussions in the galleries as a volunteer guide. Tap link in bio to learn more, and be sure to apply by the October 25 deadline. #BKMEducation⁠ 📷 @jonathan_dorado

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Photographs taken by #GarryWinogrand on the road in the 1960s are observations of a native New Yorker and a first-generation Jewish American who was dazzled by, yet ambivalent about, the rest of the United States, especially following the assassination of John F. Kennedy and in the midst of the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement. Winogrand attempted to visualize what he thought to be a more honest representation of the U.S., photographing isolation, consumerism, gender and racial prejudice, and the military-industrial complex. Yet he managed to find humor, joy, and hope in many of his subjects. #WinograndColor 📸 Anna Burholt

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The opposite of the pedestal is the grave rests at the intersection of sculpture, painting, and fashion. Organically draped textiles approximate the body’s soft curves and contrast with the hard, angular materials of the ladder and pole. Here #EricNMack has “styled” the textiles around the metal fencing, as would a fashion professional. Yet the metals and textiles also all share the language of the grid, an organizing principle important to the modern industrial, art, and fashion worlds alike.⁠

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#PierreCardin apprenticed with a tailor starting at age 14. From this young age, he learned to pattern, cut, even hand-sew buttonholes. At eighteen, he left home to pursue his dream of being a couturier. However soon, like other young men of the time, he was called into wartime service, eventually joining the Red Cross, where he studied accounting—a skill that would serve him later. After World War II, Cardin moved to Paris with a letter of recommendation to work at a couture house. After working for other designers, he opened his own atelier in 1950 and was immediately the talk of Paris. #PierreCardinBKM⁠⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Pierre Cardin in his atelier, 1957. (Photo: Courtesy of Archives Pierre Cardin. © Archives Pierre Cardin)

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Are they crystal formations? Asteroids? Is it the surface of the moon? Closing this Sunday, experience six works by South Korean artist #KwangYoungChun that are simultaneously Space Age and nostalgic, beautiful and violent, powerful and fragile. Tag your photos with #mybkm for a chance to be featured next! ⁠ ⁠ 📷 by recent visitors @bklyn_saiyan @hopeyourehappydear @jenwith5chicks @_vibrantvicki @mitch.bleier @bygabrielagil @miranda_cerny @m.y.l.i.e.n @justinwdupree and @cleverkatherine

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Woodcuts are printed from carved wood blocks from which white areas are removed and inked areas are left raised. Often, artists draw designs on paper and have professionals trace them and then carve the printing block using chisels, gouges, and knives. A thin layer of ink is daubed or rolled onto the carved block which can then be transferred to a page; the image will be reversed. The fine lines of Franz Marc’s Tiger contrast with the way ⇨ Edvard Munch incorporated the wood’s grain into the final work. Multiple colors, as seen in Munch’s work, require multiple blocks; each carved with only the shapes that appear in one color. #BKMWorksonPaper⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ #FranzMarc (German, 1880-1916). Tiger, 1912. Woodcut on Eastern laid paper, image. Ella C. Woodward Memorial Fund, 52.2.2 ⇨ #EdvardMunch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Moonlight (Mondschein), 1896. Color woodcut on laid paper, image). Carll H. de Silver Fund, 43.18. © artist or artist’s estate #BKMEuropeanart #BrooklynMuseum

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In Liz Johnson Artur: Dusha, the Russian-Ghanaian artist "explores the connective tissue that binds the African diaspora with tender intimacy. [...] With nearly 200 images on display, the exhibit looks and feels expansive," @voguemagazine writes. Johnson Artur's photography captures candid moments from across the diaspora, covering "a broad sweep of Europe, Africa, and North America." See the artist's work at the Brooklyn Museum before it closes on August 18. #LizJohnsonArtur⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Liz Johnson Artur (born Bulgaria, 1964). Country Show, 2016. Chromogenic photograph. Courtesy of the artist. © Liz Johnson Artur⁠⠀

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Reunite with old friends and meet new ones at our @bkmteens reunion on Thursday, August 1 from 5-7:30 pm. Current, past, and future teen staff are invited to celebrate the 20th anniversary of our teen programs—featuring pop-up talks and tours, as well as music, film, refreshments, and more. Tap link in bio for more info.⁠⠀

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This Sunday, celebrate a decade of @originalplumbing, the magazine dedicated to trans male culture, with founding editors @amosmac and @roccokatastrophe. They'll also be joined by @kingtexas, @themrmilan, and @marquisevilson for a conversation on the future of transmasculine representation in media and visual culture. Presented with @feministpress. Tap link in bio for tickets.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Photo from Original Plumbing: The Best of 10 Years of Trans Male Culture.

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👋 Reno! Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern is making its way out West. This must-see exhibition, on view at @nevadaart now through October 20, offers a fresh, compelling look at the career of one of America’s most iconic artists through personal objects, paintings, and photographs. If you have a friend in Reno who you think will enjoy this show, tag them and tell them to check it out! #BKMTours #OKeeffeModern⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Laura Gilpin (American, 1891–1979). Georgia O’Keeffe, 1953. Gelatin silver print.). Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; 2014.3.38. © 1979 Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, TX⁠⠀

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There's only a few weeks left to walk across the room of #EricNMack's site-responsive installation of new and existing textile-based, closing August 4. Tag your photos with #mybkm for a chance to be featured next! 📷 by recent visitors @lennkilla @athena.eliana @amymariebannon @vasilinany @liana.kleinman @heycitygirl @cgologursky @inherentlyqueer @andrea_austriaa and @callme_winter

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In her collage and watercolor series FREE OUR SIBLINGS///FREE OURSELVES, #TuesdaySmillie explores two eras of the fight for transgender justice in New York City. Along side two works that represent the early 1970s Christopher Street Liberation Day protests, this work focuses on a more recent Trans Day of Action organized against the unjust sentencing and incarceration of hate-crime survivor and trans activist CeCe McDonald. #NobodyPromisedYouTomorrow #Stonewall50⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Tuesday Smillie (American, born 1981). WE CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT OUR LIVES, 2012. Watercolor on paper, collage on board. Private collection. © Tuesday Smillie⁠⠀

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Happy Birthday to the visionary artist #JudyChicago! 🎆 We love celebrating the birthday of this feminist art icon. For her 75th she treated Brooklyn to a spectacular fireworks show taking the form of a butterfly. This year, in honor of the artist's 80th birthday, as well as the upcoming 40th anniversary of #TheDinnerParty, we’re selling limited edition cupcakes inspired by Emily Dickinson’s place setting in our Café. Stop by in the next two weeks and try one while they last, then spend time exploring one of the most important artworks of the 20th century. ⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Judy Chicago, A Butterfly for Brooklyn, 2014, fireworks, flares and LED lights, Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY. © Judy Chicago and PyroSpectaculars⁠⠀

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#PierreCardin, a fashion designer known for his futuristic creations, said “the cosmos has always attracted me, even before the Space Age… I always imagined that man would one day walk on the moon.” On July 20, 1969, Cardin was on the Champs-Elysées, surrounded by thousands of anxious and excited people watching the Apollo 11 footage, “waiting for the dream to become a reality.” Just a few months after this momentous event, Cardin toured the @NASA Manned Space Center in Houston where he had the privilege of trying on an astronaut’s pressure suit. This was a moment that Cardin later said is his most beautiful memory. Opening today on the #Apollo50th anniversary, #PierreCardinBKM encapsulates the excitement surrounding the moon landing with a retrospective of designs envisioning a bold Space Age future. See it now through January 5, 2020.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Pierre Cardin wearing Apollo 11 space suit, 1969. (Photo: Courtesy of Archives Pierre Cardin. © Archives Pierre Cardin)⁠

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In March 1964, #GarryWinogrand received his first John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in Photography, to make “photographic studies of American life.” The prestigious grant allowed him to travel across the country that summer. The grant also provided the means to buy and process more color film. Of the 550 rolls of film he used, 100 were Kodachrome. For Winogrand, color film, widely used by commercial and amateur photographers, perfectly documented the industrially manufactured colors of clothes, automobiles, and other consumer goods in postwar American life. #WinograndColor

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On July 19, 1937, the Nazi-organized exhibition Degenerate Art opened in Munich. This infamous and very well-attended show was meant to demonstrate to the public that avant garde art was the product of corrupt and deranged minds, was dangerous to German society, and worthy only of ridicule. Beginning in 1933, the Nazis removed from state-owned museums more than 20,000 abstract and expressionistic artworks, hundreds of which were included in the 1937 exhibition. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Christian Rohlfs, and other artists currently on view in #BKMWorksOnPaper were among those whose works were displayed and condemned by the Third Reich as "degenerate."⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Christian Rohlfs (German, 1849-1939). Death as Juggler (Revolution) (Tod als Jongleur [Revolution]), 1918-1919. Color woodcut in yellow, red, and black on heavy wove paper. Brooklyn Museum, A. Augustus Healy Fund, 65.23.6⁠ ⇨ Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (German, 1880-1938). Milliner with Hat (Modistin mit Hut), 1910. Lithograph on wove paper, Image). #BrooklynMuseum, Carll H. de Silver Fund, 57.194.1 ⁠#bkmeuropeanart

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#JulianaHuxtable is known as much for her boundary-pushing work as a DJ and nightlife host as for her incisive performances, poetry, and mixed-media artworks. Huxtable's dizzying, digitally collaged satires of political posters and DIY buttons, overlaid on images of the artist’s paintings, parody the language of oversaturated conversations about identity politics and conspiracy theories. #NobodyPromisedYouTomorrow #Stonewall50⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Juliana Huxtable (American, born 1987). The Feminist Scam, 2017. Inkjet print, vinyl, magnets on metal sheet. Courtesy of the artist and Reena Spaulings Fine Art, NY/LA. © Juliana Huxtable. (Photo: Joerg Lohse)

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Last year, #LizJohnsonArtur began photographing and interviewing the Ghanaian photographer #JamesBarnor, who first opened a studio in Accra, the capital of Ghana, in the 1950s. After Ghana gained independence from Great Britain in 1957, Barnor moved to London, where he continued working for the South Africa–based magazine Drum, helping to bring Black models into mainstream British media. Barnor returned to Ghana in the early 1970s to open the first color processing studio in the country. He has been based in London since 1993. “For me, meeting James Barnor was a dream come true,” says Johnson Artur. “On my two visits, I had the great pleasure to listen to his stories about Ghana, arriving in England in the 1960s, and about the people he photographed. He had a story for every picture he showed.”⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Liz Johnson Artur (born Bulgaria, 1964). James Barnor, 2018. Silver gelatin fiber-based photograph. Courtesy of the artist. © Liz Johnson Artur⁠