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Angling for a big sturgeon this year? Keep an eye out for reward tags! CDFW currently offers rewards of $50, $100 or $150 per disc tag, although older fish with a $20 tag are sometimes caught. Every year between August and October, CDFW fisheries biologists tag White Sturgeon that are between approximately 3-6 feet in length. The tag is placed at the base of the dorsal fin, and the sturgeon is then released. Information collected from returned disc tags allows CDFW fisheries staff to produce more accurate population metrics. Got a reward tag? It needs to be physically returned to CDFW to be counted and the reward claimed; photographs cannot be accepted, but the tag will be returned to the angler upon request. Anglers will also receive a commendation card with information about the fish, along with the specified reward amount. For more info, including directions on how to return a reward tag, check out our news release (link in profile). #whitesturgeon #sturgeonfishing #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #sturgeon #california

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CDFW is proud to announce the recipient of the 2019 Wildlife Officer of the Year award. Warden Anastasia Norris has worked for our Office of Spill Prevention and Response for almost a decade. In 2015, she was designated the lead investigator on the Plains All-American/Refugio spill in Santa Barbara County, one of the largest and most detrimental oil spills to hit California’s coast in the last 50 years. Norris managed and coordinated the evidence and documentation efforts throughout the investigation, including embarking upon a cross-country drive to ensure chain-of-custody and security of a seized section of pipeline in Ohio. She interviewed dozens of witnesses during the investigation, and the final 118-page report included support documentation that was an additional 13 inches thick. Norris also provided support for the prosecution and was in court every day of the almost four-month duration of the trial. On Sept. 7, 2018, guilty verdicts were reached on nine counts, including eight misdemeanors and one felony. Even while the Refugio investigation was dominating her workload, Norris continued to respond to numerous other petroleum spills. “Warden Norris has spent plenty of time doing traditional wildlife law enforcement work, but her expertise in oil spill investigations and response is where she has shined over the course of her career,” said David Bess, CDFW Deputy Director and Chief of the Law Enforcement Division. “Investigations involving habitat damage from oil and hazardous materials spills are integral to the Law Enforcement Division’s mission. Warden Norris is one of the finest in this regard.” Congratulations, Warden Norris, and thank you for your service and commitment to protecting our state’s natural resources! #wildlifeofficer #wildlifeofficeroftheyear #lawenforcement #ospr #oilspills #habitatconservation #cdfwatwork #fishandwildlife #fish #wildlife #california

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Think illegal marijuana grows are harmless? Think again. Black market marijuana grows on public or private lands are no friend to the environment. From water diversions to toxic chemicals reaching the soil to mounds of trash and poaching, many illegal marijuana grows are responsible for harming California’s native plants, fish and wildlife. Please do not support black market marijuana. Your actions will make a difference. To find out what you can do to help visit wildlife.ca.gov/cannabis or email AskCannabis@wildlife.ca.gov with your questions. #wildlifefriendlycannabis #fishandwildlife #fish #wildlife #cannabis #blackmarketmarijuana #california #californiacannabis

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Leapin’ lizards! August 14 is World Lizard Day, a day we celebrate lizards everywhere, but especially those native to California. These resilient reptilians have existed for hundreds of millions of years and play an invaluable role in local ecosystems. Most eat primarily insects and spiders and are themselves prey to larger animals, while certain species have unique skills that are almost akin to superpowers. Whether it’s the ability to neutralize Lyme disease, detach and regrow appendages, or squirt blood from their eyeballs, California lizards are not lacking in extraordinary talents. Not to mention the impressive displays of strength. You may have seen a lizard scurrying across a yard when suddenly it begins what can only be described as a series of exuberant pushups. These acts of physical prowess are meant to do exactly what one might expect – intimidate rivals and impress potential mates. But despite their incredible abilities, lizards are under threat. Habitat loss, fragmentation and competition with nonnative species are just a few of the obstacles they currently face. So if you see a lizard today, or any day, take a moment to say “thank you” for everything they contribute to California’s diverse environment. Shown here: a Western skink (Plestidon skiltonianus). #fishandwildlife #wildlife #worldlizardday #lizard #california #reptiles #westernskink

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CDFW has completed its Conservation Strategy for the Mohave Ground Squirrel, a species listed as threatened under the California Endangered Species Act. The 129-page document, which is available on CDFW’s website, summarizes the available scientific information on the species and lays the foundation for its conservation and recovery in California. The Mohave ground squirrel, Xerospermophilus mohavensis, is a small day-active rodent endemic to the western Mojave Desert. It has one of the smallest geographic ranges of any North American ground squirrel and spends much of the year in underground burrows to avoid the harsh conditions of its desert environment. It is threatened by climate change, habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, and small population size, among other stressors. CDFW has been engaged in conservation planning for the Mohave ground squirrel since it was listed as Rare in 1971; however, with recent emphasis on development of large-scale renewable energy facilities in California’s desert came recognition that such development could pose additional risks to the species. CDFW finalized the Mohave Ground Squirrel Conservation Strategy to help guide renewable energy and other development projects to ensure they are consistent with the conservation needs of the squirrel. Photo credit: Dr. Philip Leitner. #mohavegroundsquirrel #mojavedesert #wildifeconservation #squirrels #cesa #endangeredspecies #fishandwildlife #wildlife #california

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The last of three summertime Fishing in the City events at Mt. Lassen Hatchery is coming up next Saturday, Aug. 17. Registration opens at 8:45 a.m., and kids can fish from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The pond will be stocked and volunteers will be on hand to help out and answer questions. Free bait and limited loaner tackle will be available! The address is 3 North Old Stage Road, Mt. Shasta. Hope to see you there! #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #mtlassen #california #youthfishing

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A recent investigation into a bald eagle’s death showed that sometimes, not everything is as it seems at first glance. Since 2017, a pair of bald eagles has nested near Curtner Elementary School in Milpitas. Over the last few months, the nesting pair was observed raising two offspring. The family of raptors were watched by the kids at school and the local community, and have generated quite a bit of social media chatter from local citizens. On July 13, one of the two eaglets... was found dead near the nest with an obvious wound in the body cavity, generating speculation that it was poached. Our Law Enforcement Division’s Santa Clara County squad began the investigation and determined there were no reported gunshots in the area. They then sought assistance from the UC Santa Cruz Marine Lab and CDFW’s Wildlife Investigations Lab to determine the circumstances of the raptor's death. The UC Santa Cruz lab X-rayed the bird to look for metal bullet fragments; none were detected. The bird was then transferred to the Wildlife Investigations Lab where a full necropsy was completed. Evidence showed that the eagle died by electrocution. It appears the juvenile eagle was nearly -- but not fully -- developed, and inadvertently flew into a power line. Although unfortunate, such events happen on rare occasions. Consultation with wildlife officers who have conducted similar investigations of raptor deaths, combined with the experience of our lab personnel, helped confirm the telltale entry and exit wounds of a fatal electrocution, thus concluding an investigation that generated intense local public interest. We appreciate the great teamwork that helped solve this mystery. Photo: Senior Environmental Scientist and avian specialist Krysta Rogers conducts a necropsy on a bald eagle at the Wildlife Investigations Lab in Rancho Cordova. Her necropsy showed conclusive signs of a fatal electrocution via probable contact with power lines. #baldeagle #wildlifebiology #milpitas #santaclaracounty #wildlifeinvestigations #ucsantacruzmarinesciences #raptors

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The Knoxville Wildlife Area in Napa County will be closed to all public use during the first week of the A Zone general deer season, Aug. 10-16, to accommodate a special lottery draw deer hunt. Deer hunt permit holders will be the only ones allowed on the wildlife area during the first week of the A Zone deer season. No other public use is permitted. The area reopens to all users Saturday, Aug. 17. The special lottery draw deer hunt was initiated for the first time this year to limit the number of hunters on the popular public hunting area for safety purposes and to improve the quality of the hunting experience for permit holders. Anyone not listed specifically on the hunt permit, including non-hunters, helpers and assistants, will not be permitted on the wildlife area during the hunt period. #knoxvillewildlifearea #deerhunting #napacounty #californiahunting #californiadeerhunting

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A 20-year, multiagency effort to find a safe haven for California’s only remaining native crayfish culminated recently with the release of 28 Shasta Crayfish (Pacifastacus fortis) into a restored section of Rock Creek in Shasta County. The Shasta Crayfish has been in decline and under assault for decades from the pervasive, nonnative, invasive Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), which not only outcompetes it for food and habitat but renders Shasta Crayfish females largely infertile through interbreeding. Found only in northeastern California, the Shasta Crayfish was listed as an endangered species by both the state and federal governments in 1988. It was all smiles and optimism for a brighter future July 15, however, with the release of the 28 adult and juvenile Shasta Crayfish into a formerly dry, meadow portion of Rock Creek on property owned by Pacific Gas and Electric Company. That portion of Rock Creek, just six-tenths of a mile long, now flows with a reliable supply of cool, clear water thanks to habitat enhancements that include rock clusters and riparian plantings. Scuba divers collected Shasta Crayfish from the bottom of nearby Crystal Lake in June and quarantined them for 42 days before release into their new home. In their new Rock Creek refuge, the Shasta Crayfish will be closely monitored. The hope is that they can serve as a sustainable, genetically diverse source population for future introductions. #shastcrayfish #shasta #rockcreek #crystallake #crayfish #crawfish #crawdads #californianativespecies #cesa

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Dr. Laura Rogers-Bennett is a senior environmental scientist, specialist with CDFW’s Marine Region. Based in at the Bodega Bay field office at the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory, her main responsibilities are in Marine Invertebrate Fisheries and Conservation Research. Laura works primarily in kelp forest ecosystems throughout the state, with a particular focus on abalone populations. She conducts research to inform the restoration of kelp forest ecosystems, including the fisheries they once supported. These include the recreational red abalone fishery in northern California and the restoration of endangered species in southern California. She says there’s something special and enchanting about the kelp forest ecosystem: “The algal canopy, when viewed from below, looks like a cathedral, and the small beautiful nudibranchs and octopus are so amazing to see.” California’s kelp forests are in trouble now, though, due to impacts by multiple climate-related stresses, such as sea star disease, the marine heat wave and the population explosion of purple sea urchins. One of Laura’s most personally rewarding projects has been the Kelp Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Program, which she developed from scratch in 1999. Learn more about it, and about Laura, at the link in our profile. #fishandwildlife #fish #environmentalscientist #womeninscience #UCdavis #bodegamarinelaboratory #fisheries #marineinvertebrate #kelpforest #california #marine

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CDFW’s Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area has scheduled a cleanup and hunting blind maintenance day on Saturday, Aug. 17 from 7 a.m. to noon – we could use your help! The wildlife area consists of Little Dry Creek and Llano Seco in Butte County and Howard Slough in Glenn County. Volunteers are needed to help clean out and brush up hunting blinds, install and paint area signage and improve mobility-impaired hunting blinds. Volunteers should bring gloves, work boots and sunscreen. Water and insect repellent will be provided, as will a barbecue lunch hosted by the California Waterfowl Association. Volunteers will meet at 7 a.m. at the wildlife area headquarters located at Howard Slough Wildlife Area, 9256 Highway 162, Butte City (95920). For more information, please call (530) 982-2169. #upperbuttebasin #howardslough #glenncounty #buttecounty #littledrycreek #llanoseco #californiawaterfowlassociation #duckhunting #fishandwildlife #wildlife #california

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Hoot Hoot! It’s National Owl Appreciation Day! We’d like to take a moment to share some of our favorite owl species found throughout California: the Great Gray Owl, the Great Horned Owl and the Burrowing Owl! The Great Gray Owl is the largest owl found in North America and one of the rarest to find in California, sticking year-round to the Sierra Nevada from the vicinity of Quincy, Plumas County south to the Yosemite Region. Unlike the Great Gray, the Great Horned Owl is a common resident, found year-round all over the entire state. The Great Horned Owl’s only predators are Golden eagles and humans, but they will compete for food with Cooper’s hawks, American Kestrels and other large owls. While you may look to the trees for nests belonging to the Great Gray or Great Horned owls, you can find Burrowing Owls using the burrows of rodents and other small animals for roosting and nesting cover. Burrowing Owls prefer open, dry grassland and desert habitats where they can find burrows for nesting and perches to thermoregulate. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #owls #owl #greatgrayowl #greathornedowl #burrowingowl #birdsofprey #raptors #nationalowlappreciationday #california

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CDFW is now accepting applications from landowners for the California Waterfowl Habitat Program (CWHP). The CWHP provides technical guidance and economic incentives to private landowners who agree to manage their properties in accordance with a wetland management plan developed cooperatively by CDFW biologists and participating landowners. The program is designed to contribute to large-scale conservation objectives by helping private landowners overcome many of the challenges associated with wetland management in California. Approximately two-thirds of the managed wetlands in the Central Valley are privately owned, and many of these landowners are not trained in the science, policy or regulation of wetland management. In addition to guidance offered by CDFW biologists, landowners also receive an incentive payment following the successful implementation of work plans. The program offers $30 per acre for the management of seasonal wetlands ($60/acre in the Tulare basin) and $60 per acre for the management of semi-permanent wetlands statewide. Landowners have until Aug. 30 to apply. For more information, or to submit an application, please visit the CWHP page on our website (see link in profile). #waterfowl #waterfowlhunting #wetlands #wetlandmanagement #californiawaterfowlhunting

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Bee helpful! CDFW is seeking information relevant to a proposal to list the Crotch bumble bee, Franklin’s bumble bee, Western bumble bee and Suckley cuckoo bumble bee as endangered species. In October 2018, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Defenders of Wildlife and the Center for Food Safety submitted a petition to the California Fish and Game Commission to formally list these four species as endangered under the California Endangered Species Act. The listing petition and CDFW’s petition evaluation described several threats to the survival of the four bumble bee species in California, including direct and indirect impacts associated with habitat loss and alteration, disease, pesticides, competition and small population sizes. CDFW is now conducting status reviews to inform the Commission’s ultimate decision whether to list the species. We are looking for information regarding the bumble bees’ ecology, genetics, life history, distribution, abundance, habitat, the degree and immediacy of threats to reproduction or survival, adequacy of existing management and recommendations for management of the species. Comments, data and other information can be submitted in writing to California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Attn: David Wright, 1812 Ninth St., Sacramento, CA 95811, or email wildlifemgt@wildlife.ca.gov (please include “Bumble Bees” in the subject heading). Comments received by Aug. 16 will be evaluated prior to the submittal of CDFW’s final status review reports to the Commission. (Crotch bumble bee photo by Liam O’Brien.) #fishandwildlife #wildlife #bee #bumblebee #crotchbumblebee #bees #endangeredspecies

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California Fish and Game is CDFW's official, quarterly, peer-reviewed scientific journal devoted to the conservation and understanding of the flora and fauna of California and surrounding areas, and the eastern Pacific Ocean. Our latest issue, Vol. 105, Issue 2, features scientific papers on the butterfish (Pepridus medius), the Rio Grande leopard frog, the serum chemistry of free-ranging mountain lions in the eastern Sierra Nevada, and a book review on “Path of the Puma – the remarkable resilience of the mountain lion.” This issue is now available for download on our website at no charge. Browse and download articles from past issues, too! #scientificjournal #californiafishandgame #mountainlions #pumaconcolor #butterfish #riograndeleopardfrog #fishandwildlife #wildlife #california

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CDFW is encouraging citizen scientists to venture outdoors between July 27 and Aug. 4, to help efforts to conserve the monarch butterfly. During this nine-day period, the public is asked to keep an eye out in gardens, parks and green areas for monarchs and the milkweed plants upon which they depend. Sightings can be easily reported online, and the data collected will help researchers identify priority areas for monarch conservation actions. For more information about the data collection and easy instructions on how you can help, please visit the 2019 Monarch Monitoring Blitz website (see link in our profile). USFWS photo by Brett Billings. #monarchs #monarchbutterfly #monarchbutterflies #milkweed #butterflyconservation #monarchmonitoring #xercessociety #fishandwildlife #wildlife #california #butterflies

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It’s a beautiful day and the coast is calling … Go Fish! But if you’re new to the sport (or just rusty!), be sure you brush up on the regulations. What’s the best way to plan ahead for a good day offshore ? The annual Ocean Sport Fishing Regulations booklet is always the go-to reference booklet to avoid anything illegal. In the back of the book you’ll find a table that guides you to regulations (bag limits, size limits, etc.) for specific fish species. In the front of the booklet are summary tables for groundfish, a group of over 60 fish species managed by the federal government, including rockfish. We strongly encourage to download the book in PDF form from the CDFW website (see the link in our profile), and put it on your phone so you’ll have it as long as your phone is with you. Hardcopy booklets are also available wherever sport fishing licenses are sold and at your local CDFW office. And quick reference summaries for open/closed seasons and regulation information can be found on CDFW’s website. #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #oceanfishing #sportfishing #fishcalifornia #california #californiafishing

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· How much do you know about California’ state fish? The California Golden trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita) was first described by fish biologists in 1892. This native fish earned its name because of its brilliant golden yellow body color. Its coloration is spectacularly bright: the belly, opercula, lower jaws, and lateral line are a vivid red to red-orange, while the back is a deep olive-green, fading to bright gold on the sides of the fish. Body spots are large, round, dark and concentrated near the caudal peduncle and on the dorsal and caudal fins. Long recognized for its unparalleled beauty, the Golden Trout was designated as the official state freshwater fish of California in 1947. Interested in learning more about this beautiful fish and our efforts to conserve it? Check out the link in our profile! We also encourage you to establish a goal to see Golden Trout with your own eyes in its natural habitat. (Hint: it may require you to hike to a high elevation stream!) #californiagoldentrout #fishcalifornia #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #california

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Have you seen the latest issue of Outdoor California, CDFW’s magazine that showcases our natural resources conservation work? The May/June issue welcomes summer with “Pipevine & Pipevine Swallowtail: A Double Portrait,” a feature on the state’s most recognizable butterfly and its life-giving host plant. Following the floating butterfly is just the beginning. Also, in this issue: “Bringing Back the Brookies” tells how a team of CDFW researchers are working to restore the trophy-sized wild brook trout fishery to Kirman Lake of Mono County. “Sport Fishing’s Heritage of Innovation” explores how the discoveries of three men from California in the decades during and after World War II ultimately changed the sport of fly-fishing. “Great Basin Getaway” highlights a place to camp the high desert where you can escape the urban grind or go to hunt during the right season. And of course, there’s the third round of the 2019 Wildlife Photo of the Year Contest. See the top contenders as they move closer to a final decision later this year! Subscribe to Outdoor California for $15 a year. See the link in our profile for details. #californiaoutdoors #pipevineswallowtail #pipevine #pipevineswallowtailbutterfly #kirmanlake #brooktrout #brooktroutfishing #flyfishing #greatbasin

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California is home to an array of unique plants and wildlife, including many threatened and endangered species found nowhere else in the world. Protecting these precious resources is at the heart of CDFW. Like many agricultural crops, cannabis cultivation has the potential to impact fish and wildlife. To help cultivators and other farmers reduce environmental impacts, CDFW is offering wildlife friendly tips for those engaged in farming activities. From bat boxes to companion planting, your actions can make a difference. Learn more at the link in bio. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #cannabis #cannabiscultivation #californiacannabis #california

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Would you know what to do if you found a young fawn or other small wild animal, possibly abandoned? It’s a common occurrence this time of year. CDFW strongly discourages anyone from picking up young wildlife that they perceive to be orphaned. Often, the mother is foraging for food and will return. Please start by contacting your nearest wildlife rehabilitation organization (a list can be found on CDFW’s website; see link in profile). These organizations operate under an agreement with CDFW to take in and treat injured, sick or orphaned wildlife. They know what to do and can advise you of appropriate actions, depending on the circumstances of your find. Please remember it is NOT legal for an untrained, unauthorized private citizen to possess naturally occurring, wild mammals or birds. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #keepmewild #wildanimals #fawn #deer #california #youngwildlife #wildliferehab

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CDFW recently completed its 2019 stocking of fingerling Kokanee and landlocked Chinook Salmon, planting more than 1.45 million of the popular sport fish into inland waters where they will provide recreational angling opportunities in two to three years after growing to catchable size. This year’s stocking consisted of releasing 792,942 fingerling Kokanee Salmon into 16 waters and 672,734 sterile, fingerling Chinook salmon into eight waters. Additional allotments of the sterile – or “triploid” – Chinook Salmon are scheduled to be released later this fall into northern California’s Lake Oroville, Lake Shasta and Trinity Lake. The 2- to 4-inch fish are stocked into landlocked, inland waters to provide a diverse fishing experience where natural reproduction is insufficient to provide a high-quality angling experience. Anglers can expect excellent opportunities in these waters in two to three years when these fingerlings reach catchable size. Stocking fingerling-sized fish is a very cost-effective way to maintain these popular, inland recreational fisheries. CDFW would like to thank volunteers from the California Inland Fisheries Foundation, Inc. and Kokanee Power for their continued cooperation assisting with the Landlocked Salmon Program. The careful planning, coordination and funding provided by these two organizations have contributed to the success of this program. #chinooksalmon #kokaneesalmon #fishstocking #fishcalifornia #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #californiafishing

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The fungus that causes White-nose Syndrome, a deadly disease of bats, has been detected in low levels in California for the first time. Fungal DNA of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) was detected in samples collected this spring from bats on private land in the Plumas County town of Chester. CDFW and the US Fish and Wildlife Service have been preparing for possible detection of the fungus with partner organizations since 2009. While there is currently no indication the disease itself is affecting bat populations in California, the lab tests suggest Pd is here. White-nose Syndrome awakens bats during hibernation, causing them to use energy reserves needed to survive winter, when insects they rely upon for food are not available. The fungus was first detected in New York in 2006 and spread incrementally. Bats that have contracted the disease have now been confirmed in 33 states and seven Canadian provinces. Including the recent California discovery, the fungus alone has now been detected in a total of five states. WNS has killed millions of bats in the U.S., including more than 90 percent of the bats in some hibernation colonies. For more information, please see the link in our profile. #whitenosesyndrome #plumascounty #wildlifeveterinarian (Bat photos courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service.) #fishandwildlife #wildlife #bat #whitenosesyndrome #bats #fungus #california

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Go fishing with a friend this Saturday on Free Fishing Day! On Free Fishing Day, anyone can try their hand at angling – no fishing license is required. CDFW offers two Free Fishing Days each year – usually around the Fourth of July and Labor Day weekend – when it’s legal to fish without either an annual or one-day license. This year, the first of the two Free Fishing Days falls on July 6, the Saturday of Independence Day weekend. The second will be on Saturday, Aug. 31. On Free Fishing Day, all fishing regulations, such as bag and size limits, gear restrictions, report card requirements, fishing hours and stream closures remain in effect. Every angler must have an appropriate report card if they are fishing for steelhead or sturgeon anywhere in the state, or salmon in the Smith and Klamath-Trinity river systems. Anglers can review the sport fishing regulations on our website (see link in profile). If you would like to fish the rest of the year, you can purchase a basic annual resident sport fishing license for $49.94 (or a one-day sport fishing license, which costs just $16.20). Fish on! #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #freefishingday #california #californiafishing

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Did you know that colonies of migratory bats live under the Yolo Causeway during the summer? Join the Yolo Basin Foundation for a summertime Bat Talk and Walk event and learn all about these amazing and beneficial mammals. Following a 45 minute indoor presentation on bat natural history, the group will carpool out to the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area to watch the “flyout” of the largest colony of Mexican free-tailed bats in California. The bats emerge in long ribbons as they head out to hunt for insects for the night. This a family friendly event that requires a little bit of walking. Those in wheelchairs or unable to walk may view the bats by car. Tickets are $14 for adults; kids 15 and under are free. Bat Walk and Talk events begin mid-June and run to mid-September. Please reserve early at the link in our profile … these tours do fill quickly! #fishandwildlife #wildlife #bats #yolobasin #yolobypass #mexicanfreetailedbats

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Did you miss last month’s Fishing in the City event at Mt. Lassen Hatchery? There’s another one coming up this Saturday, July 6! Registration opens at 8:45 a.m., and kids can fish from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The pond will be stocked and volunteers will be on hand to help out and answer questions. Free bait and limited loaner tackle will be available! Can't make it this weekend either? Mark your calendar for next month’s event on Aug. 17. The address is 3 North Old Stage Road, Mt. Shasta. Hope to see you there! #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #california

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The 2019-20 California Mammal Hunting Regulations booklet is now available for download online! You can find it on the CDFW website (see the link in our profile). Limited copies are also available at CDFW license sales offices and from authorized license sales agents. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #hunting #mammals #huntingregulations #californiahunting #california

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Have you checked out our SHARE hunts? Seventy-two SHARE elk tags -- including six reserved for junior hunters -- will be available during 47 elk hunts offered through the Shared Habitat Alliance for Recreational Enhancement program this fall. These SHARE elk hunts will occur at various times between Aug. 15 and Dec. 24, 2019 on 31 select properties in Colusa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Shasta and Siskiyou counties. Applications are now available for purchase; an $11 non-refundable application fee (plus handling fees) will be charged for each hunt choice. Specific details can be found on our website (see link in profile). #fishandwildlife #wildlife #hunting #elkhunting #elk #SHARE #californiahunting #california

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It's a great time of year to get outside and go fish ... or learn how to fish! Recently CDFW partnered with the Plumas Unified School District’s Outdoor Core program and the Almanor Fishing Association to host a series of kid’s fishing days. In the Outdoor Core program, kids study fish throughout their fourth grade year. CDFW scheduled four separate fish plants in waters close to each of the four participating Plumas County elementary schools to wrap up their year of studying... fish: Snake Lake for Quincy Elementary School, Round Valley Reservoir for Greenville Elementary School, the North Fork Feather River for Chester Elementary, and Lake Davis for C Roy Carmichael Elementary School. The kids got to help plant the fish from the truck into the water at each location, followed by an opportunity to fish for them. Many of the kids had never fished before, and some even limited out! The fish were provided by American River Hatchery, Crystal Lake Hatchery and Darrah Springs Hatchery. The fishing poles were borrowed from the CFDW Fishing in the City Program. Many volunteers were on hand, including members of the Almanor Fishing Association, local fishing guides, the Plumas County Fish and Game Commission, local businesses, teachers and parents. This was truly a rewarding experience for everyone, and we hope that it sparked a love for fishing and the outdoors for all of the kids involved! #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #plumasunified #almanorfishingassociation #kidsfishing #youthfishing #california

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Say hello to P75, the newest mountain lion to join the National Park Service’s study of mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains. The young, 50-pound female was discovered up a tree Monday morning in a Pacific Palisades (Los Angeles County) trailer park. The Los Angeles Police Department secured the scene and the lion was safely tranquilized and removed by CDFW wildlife officers and biologists. In a coordinated effort, CDFW and the National Park Service outfitted the young lion with a GPS tracking collar and identification tag in her ear. After the tranquilizer wore off, the lion was safely released into the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, where she becomes the 75th lion to join the study overall and the 10th active, collared mountain lion in the Santa Monica Mountains presently. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #mountainlion #puma #nationalparkservice #santamonica #pacificpalisades #losangelescounty #california @nationalparkservice

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The Hot Creek Hatchery Trout Fest is Saturday, June 29 -- just a few days away! CDFW invites everyone to celebrate our state’s fishery resources at this fun family event. Kids can try out their fishing skills and catch a “whopper” … even toddlers can touch a fish in the Trout Touch Pool, feed fish and learn what trout eat when they’re at the hatchery. There are activities for the grownups, too: Local fly fishing groups will provide individual fly-casting lessons and demonstrate the art of fly-tying and catch-and-release techniques. CDFW wildlife officers will also be on hand to answer your wildlife-related questions. Hot Creek Hatchery is located at 121 Hot Creek Hatchery Road, Mammoth Lakes (93546), to the east of Highway 395. Hours for all events are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Parking, admission and activities are all free. Gear and tackle will be provided (fishing is for kids 15 years and under only). No outside gear is allowed. Hope to see you there! Questions? Email troutfest@wildlife.ca.gov. #hotcreekhatchery #troutfest #mammothlakes #mammothlakesca

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Jennifer Carlson is an environmental scientist with the Wildlife Management Program in CDFW’s Northern Region. Based out of Redding, she is one of two unit biologists covering Shasta and Trinity counties. This fall, she’ll embark upon an elk project that will take place primarily in Shasta County (east of Interstate 5) and possibly Trinity County. “The goal of the elk study is to estimate abundance, which is difficult with a wide-ranging species that often uses locations that hinder traditional survey methods,” she explains. Jennifer’s team will capture and collar cow elk in several different herds to learn their movement patterns and apply two different survey techniques to help estimate abundance. “The primary technique will be using a helicopter to survey the different herds and count all individuals sighted in each group – both collared and uncollared. Using this data, you can create a ‘sight ability’ model to estimate how elk many you missed and calculate the population size. The other technique would involve extracting DNA from fecal pellets to identify unique individuals and estimate number of individuals in the population. The satellite radio collars will also give us valuable data on habitat use, resource selection, behavior, disease and cause-specific mortality. This will allow the department to develop a long-term elk monitoring program that our recently released Elk Management Plan outlines for the Northern Region.” In addition to working with elk, Jennifer oversees CDFW’s work with the Sierra Nevada red fox, a state-threatened species, in the Lassen Peak Region, and she is a member of the long-standing Sierra Nevada Red Fox Working Group. Jennifer is a graduate of Humboldt State University (Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management with a minor in Statistics) and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (Master of Science in Forestry). We’re glad to have her on the CDFW team! #cdfwatwork #humboldtstate #calpolyproud #elkmanagement #shastacounty #trinitycounty #wildlifemanagement

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CDFW is developing regulations to implement a retrieval program for lost or abandoned commercial Dungeness crab gear. A public hearing will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, June 25 at the CDFW Monterey Office at 20 Lower Ragsdale Drive, Monterey. At the initial public hearing in Santa Rosa on April 2, CDFW proposed modifications to the program. A supplemental public comment period began May 10 and will run through June 24. Under existing law (Fish and Game Code Section 8276(d)), all commercial Dungeness crab traps must be removed from the water by 11:59 p.m. on the last day of the commercial Dungeness crab season. Under the proposed program, qualified entities (Retrieval Permittees) and their designated agents can retrieve lost or abandoned commercial Dungeness crab gear remaining in the water after the close of the season. Retrieval Permittees must contact the Dungeness crab vessel permitholder and offer to return the gear in exchange for reasonable compensation. If reasonable compensation is not provided, CDFW will reimburse the Retrieval Permittee and levy fees against the vessel permitholder. The program is expected to reduce the amount of lost or abandoned commercial trap gear in ocean waters, which pose entanglement risk to marine life and navigational hazards to other boaters. Interested individuals are encouraged to review the proposed regulations (see link in our profile) and to submit written comments prior to the close of the supplemental public comment period (5 p.m. on June 24) or give oral comments at the public hearing on June 25. #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #crabfishing #dungenesscrab #california

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Did you know? The rainbow trout used for the aerial stocking of backcountry waters are a special strain bred and raised for their hard-fighting ability and wild nature that allows them to thrive in the most remote regions of California and provide a thrill for anglers who catch them. The Kamloops rainbow trout, a hard-fighting strain originally from the Kamloops region of British Columbia, are raised at Junction Reservoir in Mono County. The 20-acre lake sits on a private cattle ranch off-limits to fishing. It provides a secluded setting for the brood stock, whose progeny are used almost exclusively for the aerial stocking of backcountry waters throughout the state. “We try to keep them raised in a more wild condition so they do better in the wild,” said Hot Creek Trout Hatchery Manager Mike Escallier. “They are a really fun fish to catch. They jump a lot. They will jump 3 feet out of the water when you hook one.” Read more about the Kamloops and how they’re raised in our latest Science Spotlight (link in profile). #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #kamloops #kamloopsrainbowtrout #rainbowtrout #trout

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The CDFW Law Enforcement Division Honor Guard, wildlife officers, and cadets attended the California Peace Officer Memorial Ceremony today in Sacramento. The annual ceremony serves to formally enroll peace officers who have died in the line of duty the preceding year, pay tribute to the more than 1,500 officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice since California became a state, and to honor the families left behind. In 2018, California lost eight heroes who were killed in the line of duty. Their sacrifice and families were honored today. Two other officers who were killed in the line of duty in 1913 and 1937 were honored and added to the memorial as well. Law enforcement officers across the nation face an ever-present threat to their lives whether it be from violent criminals, dangerous search and rescue missions, or deadly incidents from any of the multitude of vehicles they rely upon to keep citizens safe. Wildlife officers are not immune. On Friday, April 19, 2019, Minnesota Conservation Officer (Wildlife Officer) Eugene Wynn drowned in Cross Lake after being thrown from a boat in the evening hours during a search and rescue mission. Officer Wynn and a Pine County sheriff's deputy were responding to a report of a possible body floating in the lake. They had just left the boat launch when they were both thrown out of the boat into the frigid waters. Deputies on the shore attempted to reach them in a rowboat but Officer Wynn slipped below the surface and did not resurface. They were able to rescue the deputy, who was treated at a local hospital. Officer Wynn had served with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for 18 years. He is survived by his wife and two children. CDFW's Lt. Rod Buckler and Warden Bobby Wardlow attended the memorial service for Conservation Officer Wynn along with hundreds of local officers and several honor guard representatives from wildlife law enforcement agencies across the nation. #thingreenline #wildlifeofficer #peaceofficersmemorial #californiapeaceofficersmemorial #honorguard

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Know any kids who enjoy art, and care about California’s natural resources? Encourage them to enter CDFW’s California Invasive Species Youth Art Contest! The entry deadline has been extended to Wednesday, May 15. This year’s theme is “Say No to Nutria.” Nutria are large, semi-aquatic rodents from South America that have been found in California’s Central Valley and southern Delta. Nutria cause extensive damage to wetland habitats, agricultural crops, streambanks and levees. Contest entries should feature nutria, in keeping with the 2019 theme. All types of media are welcome and encouraged, including (but not limited to) drawings, paintings, animations, comic strips, videos and public service announcements. There are three age divisions, for youths in grades 2-4, 5-8 and 9-12. The top three winners in each division will receive awards and have their entries displayed on CDFW’s Invasive Species Action Week webpage. Entry form and more information can be found on CDFW’s Invasive Species Action Week webpage. Shown here is the work of one of last year’s contest winners, Kira Mermer of Oakhills Elementary School in Granite Bay. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #california #invasivespecies #artcontest #youthartcontest #nutria #rodents

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On Sunday, April 28, a concerned angler called in a tip about a man who had been fishing the trout opener near Antelope Lake in remote eastern Plumas County. The reporting party described seeing an angler who appeared to have been catching and retaining more than the legal limit of five trout. The reporting party provided the wildlife officer with a vehicle description and a partial license plate number of the suspect’s vehicle. One of the two responding officers spotted a ve...hicle that matched the description leaving the area at a high rate of speed. The officer followed and observed several vehicle code violations. He had to drive about 1.5 miles with his emergency lights on to close the distance and conduct a vehicle stop. When the officer made contact with the driver, he saw fishing gear and ice chests inside the vehicle. Once the other officer arrived on scene, they searched the vehicle together. Despite the suspect’s claims of only having five trout in his possession, the two officers located a total of 54 trout -- many times over the daily bag limit of 5 trout per day, and 10 in possession. The trout averaged 2-3 pounds each. The officers cited the man for a gross overlimit of trout. The case would not have been possible without a tip from an honest angler. If you witness a poaching or polluting incident or any fish and wildlife violation, or have information about such a violation, immediately dial the toll free CalTIP number 1 888 334-CALTIP (888 334-2258), 24 hours a day, seven days a week. #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #poaching #poachers #trout #california #californiafishing #lawenforcement #wildlifeofficer

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Congrats to CDFW Assistant Chief John Baker, who was recently selected as the 2018 Shikar-Safari Club International Wildlife Officer of the Year. Asst. Chief Baker, who began his wildlife career as a student assistant with the CDFW Law Enforcement Division, has served the people of California and its incredible natural resources for over 30 years. He has distinguished himself through his successful enforcement work, commitment to public service, progressive thinking and strong leadership skills. Upon completion of the Wildlife Officer Academy in 1992, Warden Baker started his long career with a field assignment in Santa Barbara County, eventually moving into an assignment in the San Joaquin Valley. Over the years, he has demonstrated exceptional investigation skills in traditional poaching cases, but also the more complicated natural resource related crimes such as pollution and water theft. Another one of his career-long projects has been leading the transition from handwritten to electronic recordkeeping by field officers statewide. The data generated by those electronic records has helped the Law Enforcement Division secure and defend overtime allotments, justify new positions and position movements and answer countless questions from legislators and policymakers about poaching and pollution trends. His other notable accomplishments include helping to develop and modernize illegal cannabis cultivation enforcement work; targeted public outreach efforts to the Hmong hunting and fishing communities; and an ongoing commitment to the annual “Battle of the Badges” blood drive, a friendly competition that pits law enforcement officers against firefighters to see which team can donate the most blood. #fishandwildlife #fish #wildlife #wildlifeofficer #lawenforcement #cdfwatwork #california #shikarsafari #wildlifeofficeroftheyear

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All this rain has been good news for drought-weary Californians – but the vegetation growth that follows can lead to booming rodent populations that some people try to control with poisons. Please remember that rodenticide use can have the unintended consequence of killing non-target wildlife, and even pets and children. Raptors and snakes actually do a good job of keeping native rodent populations in check. An important part of the natural food web, these populations drop back to normal levels after a boom due to increased predation and the return to typical food supplies. To keep native rodent species from overwhelming your home and garden in the meantime, use habitat modification as an effective, safe and inexpensive way to reduce the number of native voles, deer mice and squirrels on your property. For example, voles like tall grass for cover. Mowing your grass to no more than two inches tall makes it less appealing to them. Like most animals, rodents go where food is available and they feel safe. The easiest way to discourage rodents, both native and non-native, in and around homes and businesses is to remove or modify anything that could make them comfortable. For other tips, please see the link to the news release in our profile. (Owl photo by Dries Gaerdelen) #fishandwildlife #wildlife #owl #raptor #rodents #california

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The April 30 deadline to turn in California spiny lobster report cards is fast approaching – and CDFW needs your catch data! The information collected from these is enormously helpful to CDFW scientists who monitor the harvest, amount of fishing effort and the gear used in the recreational fishery. The cost for this year’s spiny lobster season report cards was $9.27. Report cards are available in most places where sport fishing licenses are sold, including tackle shops and sporting goods stores, or can be purchased online. The funds raised by the sale of lobster cards are earmarked for CDFW projects, including those specifically focused on the lobster fishery. CDFW would like recreational users to enjoy this resource. The number of recreational participants is not restricted, and hoop nets and diving are both very effective methods of recreational take. Finally, there are large productive areas that are closed to commercial lobster fishing but open to recreational lobster fishing, such as Santa Monica Bay, San Pedro Bay, San Diego Bay, the lee side of Catalina Island and many bays and jetties. #fishandwildlife #fish #fishing #spinylobster #lobster #lobsterfishing #california #marine

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Merry Fishmas from Crowley Lake on the opening day of California’s 2019 general trout season! Crowley veterans used to cold, windy, winter-like conditions were instead greeted with a cloudless, sun-splashed, calm day with temperatures surpassing 80 degrees by the early afternoon. Crowley’s fertile waters attract every type of trout angler from destinations far and wide in addition to locals from nearby Bishop. The trout grow large in Crowley and the chance to catch three species of trophy trout – rainbows, Lahontan cutthroats, and browns -- both wild and hatchery-spawned has been drawing anglers to Crowley for generations. The spectacular opening-day weather contributed to the smiles and the festive atmosphere, even though several Crowley veterans said it made the fishing more challenging. #trout #troutfishing #merryfishmas #fishcalifornia #californiafishing #crowleylake

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Edgar “Ed” W. Roberts III is an environmental scientist in CDFW’s Eureka office. As the lead for the California Recreational Fisheries Survey (CRFS) in Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino counties, Ed is responsible for all aspects of the CRFS on the north coast, from training new staff, to creating sampling schedules, to making sure sampling goals are met. CRFS samplers intercept saltwater sportfishers at the completion of their fishing trips, ask them some questions about that trip and their fishing habits and collect biological data from their catch. The data we collect are then used to create estimates of saltwater sport catch and effort. CRFS samplers observe many unusual occurrences in the course of their work, and Ed is currently working to publish some of those findings. A recent issue of California Fish and Game, CDFW’s scientific journal, includes a note from Ed about a California scorpionfish he tagged back in 2004, which was recaptured in 2017! A native of Oceanside and graduate of Humboldt State University, Ed says that his passion for fishing and stewardship of the environment was instilled in him by his father and grandfather. On a day off, or even after work, you might find him fishing the south jetty at Humboldt Bay! #cdfwatwork #marinebiologist #fisheriesscience #fishcalifornia #californiamarine #fisheriessurvey

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Travis Tanaka is an environmental scientist with nearly two decades of experience working for CDFW. As a marine scientist with the Marine Region based out of the Monterey office, his primary responsibilities include monitoring the California halibut and Pacific hagfish fisheries, as well as collecting data to help manage their take. He says his career choice was greatly influenced by his father, who taught him to be a hunter and responsible gun owner at a young age, and his grandfather, a commercial fisherman who taught Travis to appreciate our ocean’s resources. Travis has created several fishing tutorial videos for CDFW, on topics including recreational crabbing and rockfish and lingcod fishing. Check them out on our website (link in profile) … they have nearly 40,000 views! #cdfwatwork #californiafishing #fishcalifornia #oceanfishing #californiahalibut #learntofish #crabbing #rockfishing #lingcodfishing

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CDFW is now accepting applications for a limited number of deer and pig hunting permits for the opening weekend of the A Zone general deer season, Aug. 10-11, 2019. This is not a special hunt, but rather a drawing to control the number of hunters on popular public land in the area on opening weekend only. The locations for these hunts include Upper and Lower Cottonwood Creek and the San Luis Reservoir wildlife areas. Reservations are required to access the wildlife areas during opening weekend and only 30 permits will be issued for each day. Hunters can download the application on our website or by calling the CDFW Los Banos office at (209) 826-0463. Only official applications will be accepted and must be received before 4:30 p.m. on July 5. Reservations will be selected by a drawing on July 8. Good luck! #fishandwildlife #wildlife #hunting #california #californiahunting #deer #pig #deerhunting #pighunting

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Not long ago, Mono County's Kirman Lake was one of the premier trophy brook trout fisheries in the entire state. The backcountry water near Bridgeport was a destination where anglers could potentially catch the biggest brook trout of their lives – a football-shaped brookie measured in pounds rather than inches. Although fertile and food-rich, Kirman lacks spawning habitat and is dependent on fish plants to maintain the recreational fishery over time. After a hiatus, CDFW fisheries biologists have once again begun stocking Kirman – this time with wild brook trout taken from a nearby creek -- in an effort to return the lake to its former glory as a trophy trout fishery. Read more about this developing opportunity at the link in our profile! #fishandwildlife #fish #brooktrout #trout #fishing #kirmanlake #california

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With sequoia forests, beautiful coastal views, inland deserts and unique fish, wildlife and plants, California is truly one of a kind. CDFW has a responsibility to conserve these natural resources, but we cannot do it alone. We all have a responsibility to be environmentally conscious. Cannabis cultivation activities have the potential to harm our fish and wildlife through water diversions, pesticide use and land clearing. If you are a cultivator and want to learn what you can do to limit environmental impacts and protect our state’s wildlife, please email AskCannabis@wildlife.ca.gov or visit the link in our profile to learn more. #wildlifefriendlycannabis #420 #420growers #cannabisgrowers #cannabisgrower #cannabisgrow #californiacannabis

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It’s time to get ready for the upcoming hunting seasons in California! You can now purchase your 2019-20 hunting license and apply for the 2019 Big Game Drawing online. Hunts, tag quotas, season dates and the Big Game Drawing information can be found in the 2019 California Big Game Hunting Digest (see link in profile). The deadline to apply for the drawing is June 2, 2019. And keep in mind, we are always looking for good photos from the field to include in upcoming issues of the Digest. Images must be high resolution TIFF or JPEG files, or prints that have been produced by a commercial quality photo processor. For big game photos, the animal must be in a natural setting (not in the bed of a pickup, for example) and properly tagged. Photos of non-tagged animals will not be considered. Here’s to a great 2019-2020 season! #fishandwildlife #wildlife #hunting #biggamehunting #huntcalifornia #california

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The largest raptor poaching case in known California history has ended in a conviction in Lassen County. Richard Parker, 68, of Standish pled guilty to crimes associated with poaching in excess of 150 raptors and other wildlife on his rural Lassen County property. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail and given a $75,000 fine and five years of probation. Probation terms include full search authority, prohibitions on possessing firearms, hunting and fishing, and a requirement to obey all laws. The two firearms used during the commission of the crimes were ordered destroyed by the court. The case dates back to March 2018, when Lassen County wildlife officers received an anonymous tip from someone who reportedly witnessed a man killing a hawk near the town of Standish. The responding wildlife officer conducted covert surveillance of the suspect, then visited the private property and discovered nine dead raptors. Later, a search warrant was issued and officers discovered more than 150 carcasses of protected birds and other wildlife in various states of decay, along with spent rifle casings. Most of the birds were red-tailed hawks, but several other species of hawks, other nongame birds and an owl were found. Four of the birds were migratory ferruginous hawks, which are uncommon in the area. Officers also located two dead bobcats and one taxidermied mountain lion, all of which were suspected to be unlawfully taken. “We are pleased to work with the California Attorney General’s Office, as well as CDFW’s Office of General Counsel, to put this egregious poacher out of business,” said David Bess, CDFW Deputy Director and Chief of the Law Enforcement Division. “The case came together as a result of collaboration of our local wildlife officers and laboratory and wildlife biology staff from the state and federal governments.” #fishandwildlife #wildlife #raptors #poaching #poachers #birds #california #lassencounty

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These photos are all kinds of wrong … especially considering they were snapped near Lake Tahoe, in prime black bear country. California’s bears are just starting to wake up from their winter downtime, and they’re hungry. If you live in or visit areas near bear habitat, please take the extra steps to store food and dispose of garbage properly. Bears have a highly specialized sense of smell, which can lead them straight to an overflowing garbage can or someone’s leftover hamburger and French fries. The public can help bears stay out of human settlements and stick to their natural diet by properly disposing of leftover food and garbage. If a bin is already overflowing, please don’t pile your leftover food and garbage on top – take it to another location. Use bear-resistant coolers or lockers at campsites. And never, ever feed wildlife. #fishandwildlife #wildlife #bear #bears #bearaware #laketahoe #california

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Love the desert tortoise? So do we! In fact, Gopherus agassizii is not only California’s only native tortoise, but also our California state reptile. It is listed as threatened under both the state and federal Endangered Species Acts. As with most endangered species, habitat loss and degradation has led to their decline. In addition, desert tortoise populations have been severely impacted by Upper Respiratory Tract Disease, which is contracted through contact with people. The best thing you can do to help conserve our desert tortoises is leave them alone, unless you see one trying to cross a road. In that case, you can help by gently moving it to the side of the road in the direction it was going. As with our native pond turtles, don’t ever remove a tortoise from the wild, and never release one that has been a “pet” into the wild. It also helps to dispose of all trash in appropriate receptacles because if left lying around, it attracts animals that eat small tortoises and turtles. This week happens to be Desert Tortoise Week, and there are all sorts of events, hikes and lectures happening across the Coachella Valley to celebrate California’s state reptile. Check out the US Fish and Wildlife Service news release link in our bio! (CDFW photos by Melanie Day.) #fishandwildlife #wildlife #tortoise #deserttortoise #california #endangeredspecies