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These poor baby salamanders picked the wrong plant to hang out in. • This is believed to be the first documented case in North America of a vertebrate-eating pitcher plant. • Alex Smith, a University of Guelph biologist, discovered the salamander while doing field work with his students. • Smith shared his discovery with a fellow scientist, Patrick Moldowan, who then searched through hundreds of plants in the wetlands in August and September, when thousands of newly metamorphosed salamanders had come out of a nearby lake. • 1 in 5 plants had juvenile amphibians that were trapped and dying, Moldowan discovered. • There are several reasons why salamanders end up as pitcher plant dinner. It could be that they fall into the plants, or that they seek out the moist and dark space to hide from predators. Or it's possible that the amphibians are lured to the plant on the promise of food. • Whatever the cause, the outcome is a slow death: it could take anywhere from 3 to 19 days for salamanders to perish. • 📻Hear the full story on As It Happens by following the link in bio. 📷Photos 1-3 by Patrick D. Moldowan. Photo 4 by Alex Smith. Video by Patrick David Moldowan/Algonquin Wildlife Research Station @algonquin_wrs.

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This photographer illustrated the diversity of Vancouver's Chinatown a century ago. • Yucho Chow came to Canada before 1910, and spent decades capturing hundreds of portraits of people from marginalized communities in Vancouver: Chinese immigrants, members of the black and Sikh communities, mixed-race couples, Polish and Ukranian families. • His legacy might have been forgotten if not for Catherine Clement, a curator and designer who tracked down Chow's photos from people's drawers, dusty boxes and even Value Village. • Clement first came across Chow's signature silver seal 9 years ago, marked on photograph after photograph of the Chinese-Canadian WWII veterans she'd set out to interview for her latest project. • "I never realized what this would turn into, but it started me on a journey to find ... his work and learn more about him, and it became much more complex and interesting than I could have ever imagined," Clement said. • She displayed Chow's work in a hugely popular exhibit at the Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Vancouver, Chinatown Through a Wide Lens: the Hidden Photographs of Yucho Chow. • Clement is now compiling Chow's photos into a book that's expected to come out this fall. • 📻Hear more about Chow's work on The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Yucho Chow, submitted by Catherine Clement.

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If you were told you had a tapeworm in your brain you probably wouldn’t consider it good news. (❗️Warning: 3rd photo may be disturbing for some viewers) • But that is exactly what happened to Rachel Palma. • Doctors at Mount Sinai hospital in New York City thought she might have a deadly brain tumour, and were performing surgery to find out if what they thought was a tumor was malignant or benign. • But as they were dissecting the brain tissue to reach the lesion, Dr Jonathan Rasouli says they found something "unlike any brain tumour we have ever seen before." • "It was virtually the same size, same shape and same firmness as a quail egg that you would buy in a store," Rasouli said. "And once we cut into it, a baby tapeworm came out." • Neither the doctors nor Palma know how she got the parasite, which is called Taenia solium and is extremely uncommon in North America. 📻To hear more about how the parasite was affecting Palma, click the link in our bio. 📷Mount Sinai Health System, Jonathan Rasouli, Mount Sinai Health System

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Samira Mohyeddin bought a book, a collection of photos from the Iranian Revolution of 1979 by noted photojournalist David Burnett (shown here in photos 4 and 5). • She was flipping through the pages and all of a sudden she saw a photo of her mom, Zarrin Mohyeddin (shown in photos 1, 2, 3 and 6). • Neither Samira, nor her mother had any idea she was in 44 Days: Iran and the Remaking of the World. • The photo was taken at an anti-revolution protest inside a sports stadium on January 24, 1979, and it was taken 100 days before Zarrin fled Iran for good. • Zarrin was anti-revolutionary, when people who were even suspected of being anti-revolutionary in Iran were often beat up and harassed. As the revolution went on, they were killed. • "I just couldn't believe that people thought they were going to get freedom with this type of revolution, led by cleric," said Zarrin bitterly when Samira asked her about it just recently. • 📻Find out more about the story, and how Zarrin got out of Iran by clicking the link in our bio. 📷Photos: 1, 4, 5 by David Burnett, 2,3,6 submitted by Samira Mohyeddin.

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Chasing foul balls in a baseball game isn't just for the boys - and Corinne Mullane proved that, when she became the very first Balldudette in 1993, at 67 years old. • She is the official Balldudette for the San Francisco Giants, a feat that has been recognized by the Baseball Hall of Fame. • It all started in 1993 with a new Giants' program that recruited senior citizens to be their ball boys as a way to engage with the older fans. • Mullane was recently retired as a juvenile hall teacher when she read about the program in Sports Illustrated. • "She wrote [the Giants] a letter and said, 'Hey, you know, you guys you need women to be doing this,'" explained Mullane's daughter, Molly Mullane-Cavagnaro, who is currently in her 19th season as a Balldudette. • Mullane retired from being a Balldudette back in 2010 after chasing balls for 17 years. • "It's probably the most fun job I ever had," said Mullane. • 📻Learn more about the original San Francisco Giants' Balldudette on Day 6. Link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Molly Mullane-Cavagnaro.

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Eunice Kim was born in South Korea and is fluent in Korean — but recently, she stumbled upon an unfamiliar word: han. • "It's this emotion that is internalized and it's this feeling of anger, grief, resentment," Kim writes. • She read an article that explained that Han really has no English translation. It's a feeling so powerful, some believe you can die from it. To many Koreans, han is part of the cultural DNA, present in movies, TV and music. • Scholars say it stems out of the country's long history of invasion, oppression and suffering. • As she learned more about han, Eunice wondered if her family had it. And if they did, could it get passed down to her? What was this thing supposedly so intrinsic to her own culture, and how is her life shaped by it? • Speaking with her grandmother, parents and even Korean scholars, Kim felt like she could finally understand something that had always been a part of her life —even though it was largely nameless. • "It’s liberating to be able to put a name to the emotions I’ve felt all these years." • 📻Hear Kim's documentary on The Doc Project by following the link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Eunice Kim @yaseunice.

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You've heard of James Watson and Francis Crick. But do you know June Lindsey? • In 1948, the young Canadian physicist's crystallography work in a British laboratory helped Watson and Crick discover the famous double-helix structure of DNA. • The two men became household names and won Nobel Prizes, but June, now 96, and her incredible contributions to modern science have largely been unheralded and even forgotten. • Now, a group of Ottawa scientists want to finally change that. • "It's like discovering the fifth Beatle is living next to you," said Ottawa physician and molecular geneticist Alex MacKenzie (2nd photo). • Alex met June a few years ago at an Ottawa seniors home at his mother-in-law's 90th birthday party. June mentioned her work and he was immediately curious. • He found out that in 1948, June was using X-ray crystallography to figure out the structures of adenine and guanine, two of the four nucleobases that contribute to the structure of DNA. In 1951, she published an article explaining her findings. • Alex says it was through reading her PhD thesis that Watson and Crick first realized how DNA is structured. He wants her work to be recognized while she is still alive. • 📻Learn more about Lindsey's research on The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷1 & 2 photos: David Gutnick/CBC. 3rd photo submitted by June Lindsey.

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In one year, this woman has picked up 2 tonnes of plastic ocean trash. • Karen Jenner hits the beaches on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia 2-3 times a week to pick up trash. • She fills five-gallon buckets with everything from fishing garbage, such as rope and lobster bands, to household items, including bottle caps, plastic cutlery and plastic bottles. • She takes the buckets home, sorts through the day's haul, and takes photos of the items. She then posts them to her Facebook Page. • While most of what she collects is the "same old garbage," Jenner finds pleasure in making new discoveries, like a commemorative plastic bag that is over 40 years old. • Jenner hopes her example can inspire others to join in the cleanup:"You don't need to go and come back with 100 pounds, or 100 things. All you need to do is, if you see something where it shouldn't be, pick it up." • 📻Hear the full story on @cbcnowornever by following the link in bio. 📷Photos by Moira Donovan/CBC and Nova Scotia Beach Garbage Awareness (Facebook).

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When Brendon Meister suffered a drug overdose and was left unable to walk, a group of goats gave him his life back. • Three years ago, Meister overdosed on what was suspected to be opioid-laced crystal meth. After a six-week coma caused a brain injury that knocked out his motor skills, he was left without much motivation. • As part of his recovery, he moved back in with some family in Nova Scotia and they decided to buy some goats in hopes of getting Meister up out of bed in the mornings. • But it’s become much more than just a wake-up call. Brendon is in charge of the daily care of the goats, milking them and even helps make the soaps that he and his family sell online and in local stores. • Not even 2 years into the goat project, the family has seen an amazing change in Meister’s behaviour and the goats have given him back his purpose. • “They help me a lot. They do give me something to talk about with people. Because before, I wasn’t working, so I just slept for the most part. But now I’m actually doing stuff with them.” • 📻To hear more about Meister's goats, listen to the Tapestry story by clicking the link in bio. 📷Photos by Mary-Catherine McIntosh/CBC.

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Toronto drag queen Michelle DuBarry says it's wonderful that RuPaul’s Drag Race is giving queens a launch pad for their careers — but its mainstream popularity is a far cry from when she started out. • "The general public didn't know anything about it, period," said DuBarry, who at 87 has been performing in drag for more than 50 years. • DuBarry, whose real name is Russell Alldread, explained that she used to perform in underground shows that tried to stay out of sight. • They were often raided by police who would "pick on us for being dressed up," she added. • Hear more about what 3 drag queens — from ages 10 to 87 — think about RuPaul's Drag Race by clicking the link in our bio. • Photos 1-2 by David Hawe, 3-5 submitted by Vince Ciarlo.

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Dayton Wilson is one of many fentanyl overdose survivors in need of better support, and advocates say these people are being overlooked. • In his youth, Wilson was a free spirit, an aspiring rap artist with a burgeoning talent at playing the electric guitar. • That all changed in September 2016, when a fentanyl overdose left him with brain damage. • Wilson's speech and balance were most greatly affected after the overdose. Today it takes the 24-year-old a few moments to find the words he wants to say. • His movements are as slow and deliberate as the way he talks. He's likely permanently lost the dexterity that allowed him to play the guitar. • "Yes, he's there, but he's not the son that I had before the brain injury. He's certainly not the son I had before he started using drugs," Dayton's mother Valerie Wilson said. • Advocates say Canada needs to do better to help overdose survivors amidst the current opioid crisis. • While most news headlines centre on the thousands of deaths that have resulted from opioid-related overdoses, those who survive, like Wilson, are largely forgotten, even as they're left struggling to deal with the life-changing aftermath. • 📻Hear more in White Coat, Black Art's special episode, After the Overdose. Link in bio. 📸Photos 1, 5 by Murray Mitchell. Photos 2, 3, 4 submitted by Valerie Wilson.

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Jeff Douglas signs off on As It Happens for the last time today. • The Truro, N.S. native is returning to the East Coast to host the @cbcns weekday afternoon radio show, Mainstreet. • Watch our Stories throughout the day for a special As It Happens behind-the-scenes Instagram takeover!

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Can you tell how many posts on your Instagram feed are ads? • The New Sell is a Day 6 series that delves into the modern rules of marketing, from the rise of social media influencers to AI-driven shopping. • More and more brands come to rely on consumers to do the marketing for them. Influencers' power over brands comes from the very idea that their sales pitch to consumers doesn't look like a sales pitch at all. • "You just see it as a friend recommending something," writer Paris Martineau said. • Meanwhile, influencers can charge anywhere from $5,000 for an Instagram post, according to one entrepreneur. • 📻Hear this story and other parts of The New Sell series on Day 6 by following the link in bio. 🎨Illustrations by Ben Shannon @shoontz.

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Scottish artist and medical researcher Mark Gilbert draws portraits of dementia patients and their caregivers in hopes of inspiring compassion among medical students, and the public, for people living with the disease. • As Gilbert sketches his subjects, his goal is not likeness, but "making sure that the marks you're making are as honest a response to who's in front of you as possible." • His latest portraits depict Margaret and David Quinlivan-Hall of Lower Sackville, N.S. David was diagnosed with dementia at the age of 59, and his wife Margaret is his caregiver. • When Margaret looks at Gilbert's portrait of her (seen in 3rd photo), she notices a down-turned mouth and sorrowful eyes. She notices the same in her husband, and that the disease has made him look older. • "I thought when I looked at them, you know, I need to do more things to make me smile," she said. "And also that I needed more help." • 📻Learn more about Gilbert's work and its impact in this documentary for The Current. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Mary-Catherine McIntosh/CBC.

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This rare cardinal is what scientists call a gynandromorph — an organism that displays both male and female sex characteristics. • The red side is male, while the yellow side is female. • Gynandromorphs are especially noticeable in bird species that display sexual dimorphism, where female and male birds look drastically different. • It all comes down to chromosomes. Female birds have a single copy each of a Z and W chromosome, while males have ZZ. • This cardinal was likely the result of a female egg cell that developed with two nuclei — one with a Z and one with a W — which was then "double fertilized" by two Z-carrying sperms. • The result is a single cardinal that is literally split down the middle, both in colour and in chromosomes. • 📻Learn more about this rare bird on As It Happens by following the link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Shirley Caldwell, who spotted the cardinal in Erie, Penn.

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Happy Lunar New Year to all those celebrating! #yearofthepig 🐷 • • #lunarnewyear #2019 🎨Illustration by @shoontz

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Grace Richards has a roof over her head, but she still considers herself to be homeless. • A 2016 study released by Statistics Canada reported that nearly one in 10 Canadians experience hidden homelessness at some point in their lives. • The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness defined hidden homelessness as having temporary, insecure accommodation that can include couch surfing, staying with family and friends or sleeping in cars. • For the past five years, Richards has been living in a small trailer in Conklin, Alta., squatting on a family member's land. • Her shack, as she calls it, has limited heat. Richards gets electricity from her neighbour using an extension cord. • "It is very hard living," she said. "I have lived in Fort McMurray. I was a homeowner over there. I took for granted the use of running water, electricity, and heat on a daily basis." • 📻Learn more about Canadians who have experienced hidden homelessness on Out in the Open. Link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Grace Richards.

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Fifty years ago, after 10 months of Sir George Williams University's— now Concordia University —refusal to act on allegations of racial discrimination, Rodney John and hundreds of other students barricaded themselves in the computer room on the ninth floor of the university's Hall Building. • This was the start of a standoff that would last 13 days. • The Sir George Williams riot made headlines around the world and transformed Montreal's black community. • One author called the Sir George Williams riot "probably the most important student protest in Canada in the 1960s, and one of the most important global student protests." • John is 77 now, but he believes there is still a lot of work to be done. "We have not yet reached where the society should be. Therefore, do not rest on your laurels." • 📻Learn more about the Sir George Williams riot in this Sunday Edition documentary. Link in bio. 📷All photos are from Concordia University Records Management and Archive (1074-02-037)

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A "zombie disease" is killing some of the world's largest starfish, and warmer ocean waters are likely to blame, scientists say. • Scientists first noticed the disease affecting sunflower starfish on the Pacific coast when the colourful creatures had just started to sprout white lesions on their bodies. • But things rapidly took a turn for the worse. • "They're walking around and arms are falling off them. Ones that are in a greater progression of the disease, they're just kind of melting into piles of ossicles," said Joseph Gaydos, who is the science director of the SeaDoc Society at the University of California, Davis. • In 2013, scientists began noticing populations of the species rapidly declining between 80 and 100% in deep and shallow waters off the west coast of North America (Think: There's only a 3-week difference between 2nd and 3rd photo). • The demise of the starfish has already disrupted the marine ecosystem. The once-bountiful population feeds on sea urchins, which themselves feed on kelp — a major source of food and habitat for other ocean life. Once the starfish are gone, the sea urchin populations exploded, which made kelp scarce. • 📻Learn more on As It Happens. Link in bio. 📷1st photo: Janna Nichols/University of California Davis via Associated Press, 2nd and 3rd photos: Neil McDaniel/UC Davis

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Ontario law, passed in 2016, gave equal rights to same-sex parents and multi-parent families like Matthew (1st picture, far left), Karin (second from right) and their respective partners. • Matthew Pearson had always wanted to be a dad, but was waiting for the right partner. One day, his friend Karin — who, like Pearson, identifies as queer — brought up the idea of having a child together. • Some time later, Karin met Janette, and Matthew met Alain. The four of them embarked on this co-parenting adventure together. • Soon after, baby Zora was born. Her birth certificate lists all four as parents. • "We had to learn to communicate clearly, to compromise, and to trust that we were in this together,” said Pearson. “We were family now.” • The family is now expecting their second child. • 📻Learn more about multi-parent families in Pearson's documentary for The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Matthew Pearson/CBC.

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If you ever find yourself near Ruby Mountains in Nevada, you'll probably come across a charming little city of Elko. It's got old-timey saloons, lots of ranches, and... cowboy poets. 🤠 • Elko is home to the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, which brings together bards from all over North America. • Sid Marty, a cowboy poet from Pincher Creek, Alberta, is a regular at the Cowboy Poetry Gathering, and will be performing in Elko again this year. • Like many cowboy poets, Marty started writing verse while horseback riding, and horses inspire a lot of his work. • "The kind of poetry that I am interested in is tied to the physical world," Marty said. "It's a world of doing. It's a world of people who have mastered a lot of physical skills, and that's reflected in the poetry that they're writing about." • 📻Learn more about cowboy poetry on q. Link in bio. 🎨Illustration by @shoontz based on a photo submitted by Sid Marty.

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These are some of #MyHospitalFood meals you shared with us last week. • It's not uncommon for people to complain about bland, unappetizing hospital food. • But a growing number of hospitals in Canada are pushing back against this stereotype, overhauling menus to be locally sourced and delicious. • Chef and Take Back The Tray food activist Joshna Maharaj helped to transform the patient menu at two GTA hospitals. • Maharaj solicited recipe ideas from food service staff at the hospital, resulting in more diverse dishes, such as congee, a popular Asian porridge, and rice and daal, a staple in India. • "This is what convalescing food is in these cultures, so we rebuilt the menu with no end to painstaking detail," she said. • 📻Hear more from the people making hospital food more salubrious and appetizing on White Coat, Black Art. Link in bio. 📷Thanks to Twitter users nrubnik, callibbbbb, Takurua and Jeannie Lee for the photos.

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The National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas, is a native plant botanical garden populated with host and nectar species that support butterflies, particularly the migratory monarch butterflies. • But Mission will soon be home to an entirely different kind of structure: a 10-metre wall separating the U.S. from Mexico. • The concrete and steel structure will put more than half of the Center's privately-owned, 40 hectare property behind a wall. • And it's not just the butterflies who would suffer from this loss of habitat. Coyotes, tortoises, birds — including some that won't be able to fly over the wall — lizards and javelenas all call the National Butterfly Center's grounds home. • "For some wildlife, it's going to be a quick death with the bulldozers, and for a lot of others is going to be a slow death," said Luciano Guerra, an education coordinator at the Center. • The National Butterfly Center filed a lawsuit, but the Supreme Court ruled in favour of the federal government last month. • 📻Hear more about what the border wall would mean for the Butterfly Center on Day 6 by following the link in bio. 📷1st and 3rd photos submitted by Luciano Guerra. 2nd photo: Edgard Garrido/Reuters.

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Ever heard the phrase ‘beauty is more than skin deep’? For the city of Paris, nothing could be truer. The City of Light is all thanks to what’s below the surface: the sewers. • The Paris we recognize today is the result of a massive overhaul in the middle of the 19th century. • This modern metropolis was really only possible because of a better understanding of how disease was transmitted, and of the public good. • The rebuilding of Paris in the 1850’s worked from the underground waterways to the surface above. • Today, the Paris Sewer Museum is a common tourist attraction that features the still-functioning sewer, where, in the 19th century, you could dine while taking a boat tour along the system. • 📻Go underground and learn more about the sewers of Paris on Ideas. Link in bio. 📷1st and 2nd photo: Philip Coulter/CBC, 3rd and 4th photo: Traumrune/Wikimedia Commons.

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When reports first emerged that U.S. and Canadian diplomats in Havana were suffering brain impairment after a so-called 'sonic attack' in 2017, some doubted the story. • But the accounts rang true to Jay Taylor, who spent three years as the head of the U.S. diplomatic mission in Cuba in the late 1980s. • “During Christmas time of 1987, my family was visiting. They were there for Christmas,” said Taylor. • “There were about four or five or six of us in the library. A butler came with a tray of mojitos. And my brother-in-law David and I got a glass, and raised them and said ‘salud.’" • “And just as he raised his glass, it broke in his hands. I've never seen anything like it before. And all the mojito fell on the floor; that mojito was totally wasted.” • And then, a few days, later another incident happened. • 📻Listen to find out what happened next by clicking the link in our bio. 📷Photos: 1& 2 Jay Taylor, photo of the U.S. embassy in Havana, Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty

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When her husband Gerald suffered a brain hemorrhage, Rose Andrews says doctors told her to take him off life support. • They stood around offering condolences, but Rose told them there was no need for that. Gerald would not be dying then. • "I said, 'Oh no, don't be sorry.' 'We're not going nowhere,' I said, 'I'm bringing him out of this,'" Andrews said. And she made good on that promise. • Andrews had worked in long-term care for many years, she knew rehabilitating Gerald would be a long journey —including everything from reciting the alphabet, to teaching him how to walk again at the local pool. • The couple accomplished all of that, together. For the past 20 years and to this day, Rose has been helping her husband recover. • She knows she's ready for whatever life throws at her. "And with both hands," she added. 📻Listen to the full story on Tapestry. Link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Duane Andrews.

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In 2013, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope was released on DVD dubbed in Navajo. • Five years later, the Navajo-language cast reunited at Indigenous Comic Con in Albuquerque, N.M. to screen the film and sign DVD copies for Star Wars fans. • For James Bilagody (left, 2nd photo), who played Grand Moff Tarkin — originally played by Peter Cushing — Star Wars dubbed in Navajo is an important tool to help preserve the language. • "When you get stopped by a policeman, you're speaking English. When you go to court, you're speaking English. When you tell someone you love them, you're speaking English. When you're singing a song, it's English … everything is [in] English." • "Star Wars made it possible to open a world of speaking Navajo." • 📻Hear more about the third annual Indigenous Comic Con on Unreserved. Link in bio. 📷1st photo: Wayward Nerd ; 2nd and 3rd photo: Kyle Muzyka/CBC

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Fjalldrapi and Nikulas are two beautiful creatures. Fjalldrapi is described as having strong, sculpted muscles rippling along his back, and Nikulas is said to be "tall and respectful." • No, your eyes do not deceive you—that's them in the pictures. They are, indeed, rams. • These are just a few of the eligible bachelors profiled in the Ram Registry, a highly anticipated annual catalogue of rams available for breeding in Iceland published by the Icelandic Agricultural Advisory Centre. • "The publishing of this catalog is always very exciting for Icelandic sheep farmers," Snaedis Anna Thorhallsdottir (Snædís Anna Þórhallsdóttir) a farmer from Borgarfjordur. • The 52-page publication features profiles and coloured photographs of 44 meticulously chosen rams. • 📻Listen to Thorhallsdottir's interview on As It Happens. Link in bio. 🎬Photos by the Ram Registry.

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In the new season of CBC’s investigative podcast Uncover: Bomb On Board, hosts Ian Hanomansing and Johanna Wagstaffe investigate the crash site of CP Flight 21. • Amazingly, 53 years later, large portions of the plane remain intact. • The crash site just west of 100 Mile House deep in the woods of the B.C. Interior. • In 1995, family members of the victims gathered here for the first time to mark the 30th anniversary of CP 21. Most of them had never been to the site before. • "It's one thing to read about way the plane hit the ground... but it’s sobering to see just how deep some of this wreckage was driven into the forest floor," Hanomansing says. • 🎧Listen to the podcast by following the link in bio.

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When she was a little girl playing video games and reading comics, Elizabeth LaPensée didn't see herself reflected, so she resolved to change that. • LaPensée, who is Anishinaabe and Métis, is a professor in the department of media and information at Michigan State University. She makes video games, comics and edits anthologies to promote the work of other Indigenous creators. • "English became a real wall for me, in how I wanted to express myself," she recalled. So she turned to comics as a way to better portray herself, she says. • Her latest project is called When Rivers Were Trails, and it is an educational adventure game that follows an Anishinaabeg in the 1890s who is displaced from Fond du Lac in Minnesota to California. • 📻To hear more about the game, click the link in our bio. 📷Red Works and Elizabeth LaPensée

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This week, civil rights activist Viola Desmond will replace John A. MacDonald on the $10 bill. Desmond is pictured on the left in the second photo in this carousel. • Behind her portrait on the bill is a map of Halifax's north end — home to one of Canada's oldest black communities — where Desmond owned a thriving hair salon and beauty product business. • "There were so many prominent black people here, homeowners, business owners, families," said Rodney Small, who runs a grassroots group focused on community engagement in the north end. • But the neighbourhood is changing - and new businesses and new people are moving in and gentrifying the area. • "In fact, we don't have a single black business operating in our community now. It's sad, and it speaks to a sense of displacement," said Small. • 📻To hear more about Halifax’s north end click the link in our bio. 📷Nova Scotia Archives and Darren Calabrese/Canadian Press

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Long before ballet shoes came in brown or bronze, and long before the famous Misty Copeland, there was Raven Wilkinson (right) — credited as being the first black woman to dance for a major classical ballet company. • Wilkinson is toured with Ballet Russe in the 1950s, despite experiencing racism —including terrifying encounters with the KKK — in the U.S.’s deep south. • Leda Schubert wrote Trailblazer: The Story of Ballerina Raven Wilkinson, a children's book about what the ballet dancer faced. • One time, suspected clan members ran up to the stage shouting, “Where’s the Negro?” and Wilkinson was circled by the white dancers in the troupe. “But imagine the courage that that took, to stay on the stage,” Shubert said. • Another time in Montgomery, Ala., she saw a cross burning across from the hotel. • As a light-skinned woman, she was encouraged to pass for white, but she refused. • Wilkinson ended up dancing for the Dutch National Ballet, before kings and queens. • 📻Learn more on The Current. Link in bio. 📷Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images.

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Lilia is Listening is Sara Brooke Curtis' story for her daughter, who died three days after she was born. "I imagine our home beating like a heart, transmitting a frequency just for you." • Sara tries to capture what everyday life sounds like in their house, the household where Lilia would have been the first daughter and an older sister to Sara’s son, Eligh (pictured here with his mother). • The story explores Sara's connection to both children as she listens to the sounds of her family and grieves for the sounds that are missing. • 📻Hear more on Love Me. Link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Sara Brooke Curtis.

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Lesly Adamson (left) and Cara Duncan are roommates. There's a 70-year age gap between the two. • The roommates met through Symbiosis, a co-housing project run by the school of graduate studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. The project hooks up students in need of safe, affordable housing and neighbourhood seniors in need of companionship. • Adamson's daughter Samantha (far left in 2nd photo) lives in Toronto, about 80 kilometres away from Lesly. When she and her siblings heard about Symbiosis, they thought it might help them deal with the challenges of having an older parent living alone. • "We were nervous about leaving her in the house alone. She would fall. Sometimes we didn't know," she said. "And she was lonely. So she wasn't having that interaction with someone. Everyone has their own lives and their own families." • Adamson and Duncan have been living together for almost a year. "Now I think of you as a daughter," Adamson told Duncan. • 📻Hear the whole story on White Coat, Black Art. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Jeff Goodes/CBC.

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A sketch found in 2012 has been authenticated as an original artwork by the celebrated British sculptor Henry Moore. • Switzerland's Museum of Fine Art in Bern took possession of the work in 2012 after it was found in the home of Cornelius​ Gurlitt, the son of Nazi art collector Hildebrand Gurlitt. • The museum feared the sketch had been looted by the Nazis during the Second World War and therefore not rightfully theirs to show. • But research by the BBC program Fake or Fortune found the work was not stolen, but instead likely secretly purchased by Gurlitt in an effort to keep it from being destroyed for its exotic imagery. • 📻Listen to this story on As It Happens. Link in bio. 📷Photos by BBC/Kunstmuseum Bern, Hulton Archive/Getty Images and Chris Ware/Keystone Features/Getty Images.

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Our garbage, our selves. • Dana Mount, Assistant Professor of English at Cape Breton University, has done a lot of trash talking—that is, her past work has explored how writers use the concept of garbage to discuss the issues of class and the environment. • This time, Mount wanted to look at real-world garbage—specifically, the items that wash up on Cape Breton beaches in Nova Scotia. She wondered how beach debris differs region to region. • Mount and two of her students surveyed 10 local beaches, gathering some 1,000 pieces of trash. • Their collection included everything from discarded T-shirts and fishing gear to beer cans and shotgun shells. • For Mount, this project didn't take away from the beauty of local beaches. "All in all, when we were done at the end of the day, all we wanted to do was jump in those waters and lay on that sand," she said. 📻Listen to this interview on Information Morning - Cape Breton. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Kassidy Harris.

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How do you like them apples? 🍎 Turns out Red Delicious is no longer the fan favorite - at least not in the United States, where this apple variety was dethroned by Gala apples. 🍎 Many describe Red Delicious apple flavour as tasteless and disappointing, but food writer Simon Thibault says this is just what the apple has become over years of breeding. 🍎 "It actually was, according to records of the time, pleasantly sweet," Thibault explained. "But through some little bit of breeding, a little bit of time, the apple became redder in colour. But by doing that, we actually lost the flavour, and the texture of it was lost as well." 🍎 Red Delicious enjoyed the title of the country's best-selling apple for over five decades. 📻This story originally aired on As It Happens. Link in bio. 📷Photo by Jeff T. Green/GettyImages

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Duncan and Cathy Gillis had no idea that their typical day at the beach would turn them into internet celebrities. • Cathy Gillis didn't want her illness or her oxygen tank to get in the way of her favourite activity: going to Government Wharf Beach. So her husband Duncan helped them find the perfect spot on the beach using a two-chair technique to keep Cathy from tiring out. • Unbeknownst to them, one woman was so moved by this display of teamwork and affection that she filmed the couple and shared the video on Facebook. Before long, the video had over 37,000 views. • The roughly four-minute video would become one of the only mementos Duncan has of Cathy at the beach, one of her favourite places. She died in 2018 after struggling with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. • "I think it's going to remind me of all the good times Cathy and I had together," Duncan said. 📻Learn more about what happened when Duncan Gillis met the woman who took the video, and the surprising connection they shared. Link to the original Doc Project documentary in bio. 📷Photos by Emma Smith/CBC

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These orange berries are helping some immigrants in Ontario get a taste of home. 🍊 Sea buckthorn is a tart berry that's often used in juices, jellies, even salsas in Europe and Asia. Marlenea Wynnyk’s sea buckthorn orchard near Teeswater, Ont., is one of few places where you can find the berry in the province. 🍊 When you arrive at the orchard, the orange is blinding: there are orange stools to sit on while you are picking the bright orange berries, orange clothing, and even orange lawnmowers. 🍊 Wynnyk has many helpers for this year's bountiful harvest. Pickers help separate the berries from branches. “It’s like a meditation," one of the pickers shared. "You just kind of get into it.” 🍊 📻 Hear more sounds from the harvest on Ontario Morning. Link in bio. 📷 Photos, video and original storytelling by CBC Radio's Ontario reporter Haydn Watters.

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“When is it going to go away again?” • This is the thought that has haunted Sara Cress since Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Houston, Texas, in August 2017. • When Cress saw her home for the first time days after the storm, it was covered in "a fine film of filth." Her belongings were destroyed. • The 41-year-old writer left her job from the stress of the Category 4 hurricane and her mental health has suffered. Storms have become an emotional trigger for Cress. She sleeps a lot, and on stormy days has trouble getting out of bed. • Cress and her husband have begun the process of tearing apart their water-damaged home in order to rebuild. Their insurance payout only covered interior renovations and it was too costly to raise their home above the floodplain. The next storm could wipe out their hard work once more. • “You're trying to grieve while you're trying to rebuild ... and while you're trying to hold down a job," Cress said. "It just became really overwhelming to me." 📻 This story originally aired on Day 6. Link in bio. 📷 Photos submitted by Sara Cress.

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When Helen Leask was 19, she backpacked around Europe with her boyfriend, and took a train that paused in Ljubljana. • Years later, she was at a party, and she met Tony. They discovered they had both been in Ljubljana on the same day. • It became an inside joke in their relationship, joking about meeting that fateful day. • So when Helen turned 50, she decided to recreate that voyage. • This time, when she got off the train, Tony was waiting for her. • They shared an ice cream together in the train station in Ljubljana (second photo). 📻:Hear about their romantics voyage on The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷: Helen Leask

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“You are a mountain and a pillow.” • Anya Yurchyshyn felt relief when her parents died. • She never had a strong relationship with either her mother or father. Yurchyshyn said her father was so strict, his manner of talking to her sometimes bordered on emotional abuse. Her mother never stood up to him. • The distance between mother and daughter grew larger after Anya's father's death. Her mother took the loss hard, turning to alcohol to cope. She died in her sleep from complications related to alcoholism when Yurchyshyn was 32. • While cleaning out her mother's house after her death, Yurchyshyn found love letters her parents had written each other. Those letters turned her world upside down. • “I looked at these letters and I read them, and I re-read them and I just thought, 'What happened? How did these people become the people that I knew?'" • 📻 Listen to the full story of Yurchyshyn's parents' letters on Out in the Open. Link in bio. 📸All images submitted by Anya Yurchyshyn.

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@TheShadowsCBC, a podcast by Kaitlin Prest of @theheartradio, is the first audio fiction from CBC Podcasts. It explores the anatomy of a romantic relationship — from a crush to an end. 〰️ The story centres on a young artist named Kaitlin, as she struggles to make great work and find great love in the fictional city of MontYuron. Kaitlin believes that the love depicted in Hollywood movies is real and that she will be one of the lucky ones to find it. When she falls for someone who challenges her romantic ideal, she is faced with an impossible choice — and a decision that can't be unmade. 〰️ 📻 All 6 episodes will be available on your favourite podcast app Sept. 25, 2018. 🖌📸 Original art by Adriana Komura. Photo by Evan Aagaard.

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Jessica Allen (pictured here with her husband and their children) decided she wanted to be a surrogate 'to bless someone with a child.' • Allen signed up to be gestational surrogate, and carried a baby made from the egg and sperm of a couple from China, the intended parents. • Allen agreed to have one embryo implanted, and the first scan showed that the pregnancy had taken. But a follow-up scan showed two embryos. Allen was told the first must have split into two — meaning she was carrying identical twins. • About a month after the twins were born, the mom started texting Allen pictures of the babies, questioning whether the babies looked the same to her. • Allen agreed the babies did not look identical in any of the photos. The intended parents are from China. Allen is white and her husband is black. • DNA tests soon showed that one of the babies was not in fact related to the Chinese parents at all. The baby was Allen's biological son. • But the DNA test wasn't enough to have Allen recognized as her son's legal parent. This marked the beginning of a gruelling custody battle - the first of its kind in the world - that is still underway. • 📻 This story originally aired on The Current. Link in bio. 📸 Photo by Alison Motluk/CBC.

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You've probably heard that elephants are afraid of mice, but did you know that they can be scared off by bees? 🐘❗️🐝 • Scientists are using beehive alarm pheromones (swipe to image 2 to see an example of bee pheromones in a sock) to try to reduce harmful human-elephant conflicts in Africa. • In countries like Kenya and Ghana, elephants roam freely, ending up in farmlands and neighbourhoods where they can destroy infrastructure like pipes and fences. The notoriously destructive animals can even knock down whole trees. • So it's easy to imagine how elephants that wreck people's property end up facing angry people, which can pose a threat to the elephants and make conservation more difficult. • Bee pheromones are useful elephant deterrents, because elephants hate being stung in their sensitive parts — like their trunks, ears, and eyes — and quickly learn to avoid the risk of a sting. As a result, they learn to avoid signals of angry hives. • 📻 This story originally aired on Quirks & Quarks. Link in bio. 📸 Photos by Mark Wright/University of Hawaii

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After being diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer, Eskasoni artist Lauren Sylliboy turned to face painting and photography to help her through chemotherapy. • Sylliboy was referred to a program called the Art of Living Project, which pairs patients with artists to work together to develop a project that represents the patient's experience. • Now, two years after being diagnosed, Sylliboy is out of treatment, but still being closely monitored. • In this photo, Sylliboy captures the pain of the past with the darker colours while looking forward to a more positive future, as represented by the yellows and the pinks. • 📻 This story first aired on Unreserved. Link in bio. 📸 Image by Lauren Sylliboy.

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Your rooftop could be sprinkled with cosmic dust that's billions of years old. • Turns out tiny sparkly particles, otherwise known as micrometeorites, fall down to Earth all the time. They're samples of asteroids dating back as far as 4.5 billion years. Thanks to these micrometeorites, we have a unique record of the formation of our early solar system. • Scientists weren't aware of this phenomenon until 8 years ago, when Jon Larsen, a jazz musician from Norway, contacted a scientist about some curious shiny dust. • Larsen was sitting at a table when a shiny speck of metallic dust landed in front of him. That was enough to spark his interest and to start his search for more particles, which he suspected could be extraterrestrial in origin. • Until Mr. Larsen and Dr. Genge published their paper in the journal Geology about their discovery of urban micrometeorites, nobody thought it would be possible to find cosmic dust on urban rooftops. • 📻 This story first aired on Quirks & Quarks. Link in bio. 📸 Images by Jon Larsen.

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The claws are definitely out in the world of competitive cat shows. • It looked like Bobby, a Turkish Angora (pictured with his human Kim Langille on the left), was set to be crowned top cat last year - until Oh La La, a fluffy Red Persian (and her owner Shirley McCollow, right), came out of retirement and upended the competition. • Winners of cat shows don't take home money or prizes - just bragging rights. But this doesn't make the feline competition any less fierce. • The majority of the competitors are women, coming from all walks of life. • "The one thing that they have in common is this passion for the cats," said Michael McNamara, who shares director credit on a @cbcdocs documentary about the world of cat competitions. • 🎬Head on over to @cbcdocs to watch the full documentary, Catwalk: Tales From The Cat Show Circuit 📻 This story first aired on The Current. Link in bio. 📸 Image by Markham Street Films.

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This U.K. grocery store chain is making shopping more tolerable for people with autism. • Every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Morrisons stores will dim the lights, turn off music and announcements and turn down checkout beeps and other electronic noises. • Billie-Jade Fox (pictured in 2nd photo), who has autism and shares her experiences on her blog, Girl on the Spectrum, says this innovation will "make a huge difference" in reducing the amount of anxiety shoppers with autism might otherwise face inside a grocery store. • Morrisons' initiative is in collaboration with the U.K.'s National Autistic Society. • Fox hopes other grocery stores and other businesses will follow suit. • 📻 This story first aired on Day 6. Link in bio. 📸 Image 1: Lefteris Pitarakis/Associated Press // Image 2: Submitted by Billie-Jade Fox // Image 3: Peter Nicholls/Reuters

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When UD was four, doctors found a golf-ball-size tumour in his brain. By the age of six, he was suffering from more than 30 seizures a day. After several failed treatments, doctors turned to their last resort: removing a major piece of the brain. • But now, years later, the boy — identified by scientists only as UD — is fine. And the case study is now changing what we know about how the brain can fix itself. • Usually, the right hemisphere of the brain specializes in facial recognition, but the part that is responsible for that function was removed from UD's brain. You can see this in the graphic that shows which part of his brain was removed. • When that surgery is performed on adults, they develop what is known as face blindness — the inability to recognize someone's face. But in UD's case, he was young enough that his brain was still developing that skill, so it just re-assigned the task to a different part of the brain instead. 📻 This story originally aired on Quirks & Quarks. Link in bio. 📸 Images: Carnegie Mellon University