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The lead character in Bob De Schutter's new video game is his 93-year-old grandmother, Bie Verlinden. • "I'm six-foot-eight myself. I'm about 220 pounds and, yeah, she can pretty much pin me down with one arm — which I learned the hard way, obviously," De Schutter, a professor of applied game design at Miami University in Ohio, told As It Happens guest host Nil Köksal. • His new PC game Brukel explores Verlinden's adolescence on a farmhouse in Geel, Belgium, during the Second World War.  It's a first-person exploration game and De Schutter used actual recordings of his grandmother telling her story in her own Flemish language. • He also worked with her closely to recreate the farmhouse as it existed. • De Schutter grew up hearing his grandmother's war stories about living in a home that was intermittently occupied by German and British soldiers. • She'd tell him about getting caught in the crossfire of gun battles and hiding in the basement with her family as explosions rang out nearby. • For De Schutter it was important — now more than ever — to tell a story about war and conflict centred on regular people caught the fray. • "Growing up with my grandmother's stories, I've always felt that ... nobody wants to be in a war zone like that, and that's something that's completely out your control," he said. • For more on what it's like to play Brukel, click the link in the bio. • Photos: brukelgame.com • #videogames #worldwarii #grandma #cbc #cbcradio

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Mike Hodsall (far right) was broke, pushing 40, and ready to give up on his rock-star dreams. Then he learned that Canadian punk pioneers D.O.A. were hiring. • Now, he's rocking the Rebellion Punk Music Festival in a CBC T-shirt. • Prior to landing the D.O.A. gig, the only band that made Mike any money was his AC/DC cover band, which he treated like hard-rock comedy. He played lead guitar, cow suit and all. • It was fun, but eventually it grew tired. Hodsall planned an acoustic tour but it fizzled. • "It was at a very dark low point," said Mike. "I felt like giving up, and that was a first." • That's where Joey Sh*thead comes in. • D.O.A. formed in 1978, initially playing to largely confused fans. Then punk took off. One of their singles, the profanity-laden "Disco Sucks", became a minor sensation and, consequently,  dingy club gigs became big stage shows in front of tens of thousands of people. • As Hodsall was thinking of giving up, D.O.A. had an opening for a bass player. He had never really played bass professionally, so he went to his basement and banged out every D.O.A. song he could — fast. • This landed him the gig as the band's ninth bass player. • And, Mike cracked, "their fifth best." • For more on D.O.A.'s history and Mike's journey, click the link in the bio. • Photo: Tim Kinney, Bob Keating, Mike Hodsall

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The Woodstock Festival was one of the most significant music festivals of all time — but at the time, obviously not everyone knew that. • The Woodstock Festival was supposed to draw 50,000 people — but in a single weekend, Woodstock attracted more than 400,000 and became one of the most important concerts of all time. • It was a gathering of some of the best musicians, a meeting place for peace activists, a place  for illicit drug enthusiasts and a place to experiment. • This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of that famous — and infamous — concert. To mark it, here is some trivia: • #1 It wasn't held in Woodstock. #2 It was on a dairy farm. #3 The neighbours were outraged. #4 Advance tickets cost $6 to $18 — and then nothing. • If you want to learn more facts (and the full stories behind them) click the link in bio to see the complete story. • Photos by: Three Lions/Getty Images, Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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Dogs taking in a performance of Billy Elliot charmed audiences, and the internet, after these paw-sitively adorable photos made their way onto social media. • But this is not a stunt by the Stratford Festival. These are service dogs in training. • "It's important to prepare the dogs for any activity the handler may like to attend," says Laura Mackenzie, owner and head trainer with K-9 Country Inn Working Service Dogs, who led the Stratford Festival outing. • The dogs and their handlers do everything an attendee would do: navigate crowds, travel narrow aisles, fit into bathroom stalls — all while ignoring distractions, including food and other attendees. • The dogs attended one of Stratford's "relaxed performances" for people who need softer lighting and gentler sounds. They're ideal for people who tend to vocalize during performances, or who need to move around. • These performances are part of the festival's accessibility initiatives. • To find out more about it, click the link in bio to see the complete story. • Photos by: Stratford Festival

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Simone Hedley is saving monarch butterflies from her Toronto backyard and has now encouraged her neighbours to do the same. 🐛 "Our whole neighbourhood has noticed an increase in monarch sightings,” said Hedley. “Almost all of the kids in our neighbourhood are now raising monarchs.” 🐛 The 13-year-old, along with the help of her mother Susan, has released 130 monarchs this year alone. 🐛 She raises the butterflies from crawling caterpillar to lift-off inside her home to protect them from natural predators. 🐛 She’s also planted a pollinator garden in her yard to provide fresh milkweed for caterpillars, an essential flower for the threatened species. 🐛 But despite all the hard work, it's worth it. 🐛 The butterflies are a really important pollinator and, when our pollinators go, they're the ones who provide us with food,” she said. 🦋 “Once they go, we are going to be gone shortly after because we are not going to have anything to eat.” • 📻 Hear and read the story story by clicking the link in bio. • 📷 submitted by Susan Hedley. • #butterfly #monarchs #monarchbutterfly #environment #nature #cbc #cbcradio

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Flights are set to resume Tuesday in Hong Kong after four days of anti-government demonstrations forced airport authorities to cancel all flights. • Protester Nicholas Chan says that the thousands of people who effectively shut down the Hong Kong airport were motivated to show up because of what they say is excessive force by police towards protesters. • Weeks of demonstrations were triggered by a bill, now suspended, that would allow suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China to face charges. • Over the weekend, there were reports that police used tear gas and rubber bullets inside a train station. Chan said that although it’s physically and mentally draining, they must continue. • “I think the more that I see more people, I would say, awakened ... the more encouraged that I think I get,” he said. • “I would say, like, we are the chosen generation. And ... when we are chosen, we are responsible for something. So it comes with a cost, but it's totally worthwhile.” 📻 Read more and listen to the whole story by clicking the link in bio. 📷 Photos 1: Protesters occupy the arrival hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 (Anthony Kwan/Getty Images) • Photo 2: A protester who was at the Hong Kong airport on Monday sent this photo to As It Happens of the arrival gate, where thousands of people effectively shut down flights. (Name withheld upon request.) • Photo 3: A protester throws back tear gas fired by riot police on August 11. (Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images.)

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In Honour of 🐘 #WorldElephantDay, here is something you maybe didn’t know about the gentle giants. 🐘 Elephants seem to have a capacity that no other animal is known to have. Using odour alone, they can tell whether buckets containing differing amounts of desirable foods contain more or less. 🐘 "Elephants are capable of doing something that a lot of other species are able to do using their eyes," said Joshua Plotnik, lead scientist on the project. 🐘 Plotnik thinks this suggests that, in order to appreciate elephant intelligence, we need to understand how they likely rely on a different primary sense than vision to perceive the world and make decisions. 🐘 Researchers conducted tests using a favourite snack of elephants (sunflower seeds) and buckets. 📻 You can read more about it (or listen to the full interview) by clicking the link in bio. 🐘 The results of the study also have implications for elephant conservation. 🐘 The Asian elephant population has decreased by more than 50 per cent over the last three generations. Habitat loss leading to elephant-human conflicts are a major contributor to this decline. 🐘 📷 by Hoi-Lam Jim. • #elephant #elephants #animalsofinsta #cbcradio #science

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The Beaver Hill Shell station restroom in Lac La Biche, Alta., could win the title of Canada's Best Restroom. • Some customers have remarked that it's "nicer than their house," owner-operator Mo Kabalan said. • "They're pretty clean and fancy. They've got tiles from floor to ceiling. You got granite sinks. We've got handmade wooden doors [on the stalls] for the toilets." • The washroom even has chandeliers hanging from the ceiling. • It was recently named a top-five finalist in the Cintas "Canada's Best Restroom" contest. • As It Happens guest host Piya Chattopadhyay asked Kabalan the question you're probably wondering — why? • "Why not? I don't know. It's just somewhere for people to stop, and so they don't skip us," said Kabalan. • You can hear the full segment by clicking the link in bio. • Photo by: Ashley Kabalan, Beaver Hill Shell/Facebook

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Jamie Bisceglia had to be hospitalized after she was bitten by an octopus she put on her face. • The Fox Island, Wash., woman was participating in a Tacoma fishing derby last weekend and wanted to help her friend get a good picture for the photo contest. • "The suckers weren't, like, strong. They just kind of crept all over my face and my nose and my ears," she told As It Happens guest host Piya Chattopadhyay. • Then, the freshly captured mollusc chomped down. • "When its beak entered my chin, it was the most intense pain," she said. "It felt like ... a barbed hook. If I tried to release it off my face, I knew I was going to tear skin or flesh away." • It was a split-second decision, and one she regrets. Bisceglia is out of the hospital and recovering now. • You can hear the segment by clicking the link in bio. • Photo by: Jamie Bisceglia/Instagram

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Happy Book Lovers Day to all the book worms out there! 📚 🐛 • Do you have a favourite book? Is there one that made you fall in love with reading? Feel free to share in the comments :) • #BookLoversDay #cbcradio #cbc #bookstagram #reading #bookworm #instabook

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Happy #InternationalCatDay ! 🐱 Ever wonder how and why cats purr? 🐱 It’s only recently that the purr has been understood, thanks to neural imaging, says Rebecca Archer, a clinical instructor in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Calgary. 🐱 The sound of the purr begins when a signal is sent from the cat’s brain to the muscles around the larynx. The vibration of those muscles moves the cartilage around the vocal cords, producing the purr. 🐱 But the reason cats purr is a little more complicated. Cats don’t just purr when they’re happy—they also purr when they’re frightened or hurt. The frequency can actually trigger healing in bones and soft tissue. 🐱 And for the cat lovers out there, it has also been suggested that a cat purring is beneficial to human health. Purrrrrfect. 🐈 📻 You can hear the segment by clicking the link in bio. 🐈 Photo by: Cat Video Fest/Facebook Laura Bartlett, Pete Iwanczyk, Kylie Goodyear • • #igers #cats #catsofinstagram #kitty #animals #pets #cute #radio #cbcradio #quirksandquarks

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Pinkerton is taking on .... climate change. • The private security guard and detective agency (at the centre of a lot of crime novels) was formed during the American Wild West Era and hired by the U.S. government to go after train robbers and coal mine looters. • But today it’s pitching services like armed protection during climate disasters and related events. • "Because bottom lines are being affected by extreme weather and by changes in real estate as a result of flooding or wildfires, they're already beginning to act and already beginning to plan and already beginning to think about the worst case scenarios,” said freelance journalist Noah Gallagher Shannon. • Pinkerton, as a company, has been incredibly adaptive to market trends instead of ideology. When the western frontier lacked basic policing, it provided those services and today they’re more concerned with cybersecurity and the effects of climate change. • During the hurricane that struck Puerto Rico in 2017, there was a huge number of calls asking for protection of various companies. • “So in that instance, Pinkerton can basically charge what they compared to Uber surge pricing to fly agents down there and protect warehouses, get employees food and water, and basically be the eyes and ears for that corporation on the ground.” • The final image ➡️ is of Allan Pinkerton (founder of the Pinkerton Detective Agency), Abraham Lincoln, and General McClelland. • You can read and listen to the full story by clicking the link in bio. • 📷 by Carlos Barria/Reuters, Reuters, Everett Collection/Shutterstock. • • #pinkerton #america #climatechange #hurricane #history #cbcradio #day6 #radio

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Magnetic brain stimulation may have potential as a rare treatment for concussion, according to new research. 🐭 It’s a noninvasive form of brain stimulation in which a magnetic field is used to induce an electric current in a specific area of the brain. The technique has shown promise with brain disorders such as depression, anxiety and PTSD. 🧠 Now, associate professor Changiz Taghibiglou and his colleagues have seen it reverse concussion symptoms in mice. 🐭 In the experiment, some of the mice were exposed to low levels of magnetic stimulation — which mimic the way brain waves oscillate — for 20 minutes per day over 3 days. 🧠 Common symptoms of concussion — including loss of balance, memory and cognitive problems, sleep issues and dizziness — all improved in a short period of time. 🐭 The rodent's ability to walk in a straight line, navigate a maze, run on a wheel and remember new objects improved every day. 🧠 Mice that didn't get the treatment did not show the same improvement. • 📻To learn more about their findings, you can read or listen to the Quirks & Quarks story by following the link in bio. 📷Photos by Changiz Taghibiglou.

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A theology summer course at Concordia University in Montreal is all about pilgrimage. • The class involves a very special practical element: a 36-km walk from the Old City of Montreal to the Mohawk territory of Kahnawake, on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River. • Although the journey wouldn’t take long by car, on foot it’s another story. • For the small class making the trip, arriving in Kahnawake is a meditative experience that connects them with Indigenous culture and Canadian history they might have otherwise never been exposed to. • Neda Abbasi came to Canada from Iran. She was moved to take the pilgrimage because Indigenous culture wasn't a part of her initial understanding of Canada. • “This is really helping me, knowing this country from the very beginning,” she said. • “All these things that I'm hearing here are kind of reconnecting me back to my own roots and things that I had deep in me… There are many things that you cannot learn from just books and universities; [rather by] simply from interacting with other people.” • 📻 Hear more about the journey and the other folks who were part of it on Tapestry. • 📷 The 1st, 3rd and 4th photos were submitted by Matthew Anderson. The 2nd photo is by Amanda Klang/CBC.

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Ing Wong-Ward was an impassioned disability rights advocate, CBC Radio journalist, mother and wife. • On the morning of Saturday, July 6, she died from cancer complications. • Wong-Ward, who lived with spinal muscular atrophy, was diagnosed with incurable colon cancer more than two years ago. • She made the decision to forego medically-assisted death, opting to live out her days in palliative care. • "I didn't want my end to come at the end of a pointy, poison syringe," she told Anna Maria Tremonti during a 2018 interview on The Current. • "For me, that is terrifying, I can't do that. For me, the end should be a mystery." • She said she knows her bluntness on the topic made some people uncomfortable. But that never stopped her from speaking out. • The term "dying with dignity" implies that death is a better option, Wong-Ward said. • In a Facebook post, the advocate wrote "a compromised life is still worth living.” • "One thing we've had to learn to live with, as a family, is a certain amount of uncertainty.” • She said she chose to live as long as possible for her family, in order to enjoy each remaining moment with them by her side. • 📻 Hear the moving 2018 conversation by following the link in our bio. • 📷 All images submitted by Ing Wong-Ward.

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There’s something abuzz in Alabama. 🐝 These wasp "super nests" are popping up all over the state and scientists believe the phenomenon is linked to warming temperatures. 🐝 Usually, wasp nests *only* grow to about the size of a volleyball, but super nests can get as big as a Volkswagen Beetle and contain upwards of 15,000 wasps or yellow jackets. 🐝 Wasps typically freeze or starve to death in the winter but if the weather doesn’t get cold enough, the wasp colonies survive. • "Rather than having a single queen start the spring, they all start with 35 to 150 queens and each one of those queens can produce, in her lifetime, 20,000 eggs," says researcher Charles Ray. • While some local residents are worried about getting stung by particularly aggressive yellow jackets, Ray says to leave them be. • "The large nests are surprisingly docile, and I’ll use that word, because they don’t seem to care if you’re there or not." 📻Learn more about wasp super nests on As It Happens. Link in bio. 📷Photos 1,3,4,5 by Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Photo 2 by Charles Ray/Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

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Day 6's Brent Bambury paid a visit to Canada's only DeLorean repair shop. • Run by Justin Sookraj, the Milton, Ont. shop is a lifeline for owners of the estimated couple hundred DeLoreans across the country. • The DeLorean DMC-12 sports car, with its distinctive silver exterior and gull-wing doors, became a pop culture icon after its role as Doc Brown's time machine in the 1985 film Back to The Future - which premiered 34 years ago on this day. • The movie sparked Sookraj's own interest in the car. He now owns two DeLoreans. • Even if the customer base for his business is small, the shop is doing well. • "Every single vehicle, no matter how nice, is on what I call a restoration schedule because they all need something," Sookraj said. • 📻Learn more about the repair shop and 🎬watch the video of Bambury and Sookraj taking a ride in a DeLorean by following the link in bio. 📷Photos by Jason Vermes/CBC.

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For the last 21 years, Marilynn-Leigh Francis has dropped her lobster traps near Digby, N.S. • According to Francis, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has seized several of her traps, because they said the traps fall outside of Canadian fishing regulations. • Francis maintains she has a right to fish there as a Mi'kmaw woman in Canada. • "I fish solely under my inherent right given to me through my parents and my grandparents," Francis said. "If I lose my right, I have nothing" • For Francis, fishing means independence and autonomy. Treaties, she explained, were made for Indigenous folks to live off their own resources. • Over time, as systems were corrupted and bylaws put in place, she said it became impossible for people to be self-sufficient. • DFO responded to Unreserved's request for comment with the following statement: "Fisheries and Oceans Canada remains committed to working collaboratively with Indigenous communities and stakeholders to ensure a sustainable fishery for all Canadians. DFO's focus is on ensuring the compliance of all harvesters with the law. Consistent with Departmental policy, no further comment or details will be provided." • 📻Hear the full story on Unreserved by following the link in bio. 📷Photos by Zoe Tennant/CBC.

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🇨🇦 HAPPY CANADA DAY! 🇨🇦 • From all of us at CBC Radio to all of you from coast to coast to coast. • 📷 by Adrian Wyld / Canadian Press. • • #canadaday #canadaday2019 #cbc #cbcradio #canada #july1

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Alain Derbez was born in Mexico, spent his formative years in France, then moved to Canada. • He says that being part of three different cultures confused his sense of identity growing up. • “I was always 'other,’” he explained. • But then, at age 32, Alain read a book called Third Culture Kid. It made him feel less alone and more in-tune with his diverse background. • “I'm Canadian… I'm trilingual, I'm multicultural,” he said. • 📻 Hear more about Alain’s story and what it’s like to grow up connected to multiple countries on Out in The Open. Link in bio. • 📷 1st and 2nd photos submitted by Alain Derbez. 3rd photo by Robert Short/CBC.

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As a kid growing up in Winnipeg, Darcy Belanger bounced from foster home to foster home. He never felt connected to his birth family. • "I grew up with a lot of abuse, negligence and poverty," he said. "I was always told I was an outsider. I never belonged.” • So he looked for acceptance, and found it with the Indian Posse, one of Canada's largest street gangs. He was 11 years old. • His violent involvement in the gang put him behind bars more than once. It was his second stint in prison that caused Belanger to reflect on his life choices. • "My girlfriend at the time was pregnant with our daughter," he recalled. "I was like, 'Man, I have to really, really motivate myself to change." • Now the 30-year-old is on a different path. But getting here wasn’t easy — or safe. • 📻 Hear how Belanger changed his own life, from getting his driver’s license (2nd photo) to finding a father figure in mentor Mitch Bourbonniere (3rd photo) on Now or Never. Link in bio. • 📷 1st photo submitted by Darcy Belanger. 2nd photo submitted by Mitch Bourbonniere. 3rd photo by Ify Chiwetelu/CBC.

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Meet Ken Lyotier, the award-winning "dumpster diver." • CBC Ideas host Paul Kennedy first met Lyotier on an internet chat room, but the relationship quickly grew when the two met up in Vancouver’s struggling Downtown Eastside in 2005. • Kennedy made a documentary about Lyotier's life on the street and his groundbreaking ideas on recycling. • Lyotier has spent 30 years helping his community, and is the recipient of many awards and an honorary doctorate for establishing a social enterprise project for people living on the margins in Vancouver. • The documentary made such an impression on Kennedy that he decided to revisit Vancouver with Lyotier again in 2019. • “Our journey proved to be an eye-opening, if not mind-blowing experience for me, and I hope that translates to you,” Kennedy said. • 📻Hear the documentary to learn more about Ken Lyotier’s work with United We Can. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Anne Penman/CBC.

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The @cbcbecausenews team is taking over our Instagram stories tonight. • They’ll take you behind the scenes as they tape their final episode of the season in front of a live audience. • Tune in to our stories at 6 p.m. ET to see what goes into making Canada’s funniest news quiz. 📰 • Host Gavin Crawford will make games out of the headlines, along with special guests: Jennifer Whalen from CBC’s Baroness Von Sketch; writer, actor and comedian Craig Lauzon; and Rob Norman, host of the Personal Best podcast. • From left to right, the Because News team is: host Gavin Crawford, senior producer Elizabeth Bowie, digital producer Philip Leung and producer David Carroll.

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These hand chimes help people from all walk of life create a sense of community while making music together. • About once a month, retired teacher Diane Martello hosts a communal bell-ringing in memory of her late mother, Maureen. • She uses bells — or hand chimes, if you want to be technical — to help people with little or no musical background to make music together. • Some are friends. Some are strangers. There are younger and much older folks from all walks of life in 'Maureen's Bells,’ the group named after Diane's mother who passed away at the age of 94 in 2016. • "My mother was a fantastic person who really loved music. In her last couple of years, she had dementia and we were able to communicate with her through music," said Martello. • "One of my ideas with Maureen's Bells is to recognize people's loneliness, and to bring people together to bring joy," she said. "So we ring in memory of my mother and we ring joy." • 📻Learn more about the bell-ringing group in the "Ring Joy" documentary on The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Pete Morey/CBC.

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Halo-halo, a traditional Filipino shaved ice dessert, is the perfect way to cool down a hot summer day. • "Halo" means "mix" in Tagalog, so the name describes the proper way to eat the dessert by mixing all of its various ingredients together. • Some of the traditional ingredients include mung beans, palm seed, nata de coco, macapuno and many more - all served with shaved ice. • 🎬Learn how to make halo-halo with CBC Radio host Piya Chattopadhyay @piyachatto and food journalist Nastasha Alli @nastashaalli. Link in bio. • • • #halohalo #filipinofood #filipinocuisine #pinoyfood #whattoeatph #halohalo🍧 #filipinodessert

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Dog owners know this look too well. It's the "You missed treat time" look. Or maybe the "Don't make me go out in this rain" look. 🐶 Researchers say that the domestic canines' expressive faces are a result of selective breeding by humans. 🐶 New research suggests that the puppy dog eyes that we find so irresistible are made possible by muscles that have evolved in dogs since they separated from wolves. 🐶 Dogs and wolves had similar facial anatomy around the mouth and ears, but not the eyes. 🐶 Dogs can raise their inner eyebrows thanks to well-developed facial muscles, which makes their eyes appear larger and gives them a forlorn look that humans read as sadness. 🐶 Researchers also observed that dogs were found to raise their inner eyebrows more frequently and at a higher intensity when in the presence of a human. 🐶 They don't know yet whether dogs also make these expressions around other dogs as well. 📻Learn more about puppy eyes on Quirks & Quarks by following the link in bio. 📷1st photo and 2nd photo: Anne Burrows. 3rd photo: Juliane Kaminski.

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For 4 months, Gerri Corcoran spent nearly every day wrapped her prayer shawl while undergoing treatment for leukemia. • Prayer shawls are made for people going through difficult times. As the shawl is being made, the knitter offers prayers of comfort, healing and love for the person who will receive it. • Corcoran's shawl was a gift from her friend Pat, who asked Teresa Hennebery from the Our Lady of Assumption Prayer Shawl Ministry in Stratford, P.E.I. for help. • Hennebery received what she calls a "gentle nudge" to create prayer shawls while on vacation in 2014. "I happened to wander into a used bookstore, and the first book that I put my hand on was 'How to make a prayer shawl'. So I thought that was a pretty strong message." • The church holds a special annual "Blessing of the Shawls" service, where the colourful creations are displayed on the altar and even hung from the rafters. The shawls are blessed by the parish priest. • Since March 2016, the Our Lady of Assumption Prayers Shawl Ministry has given out 290 prayer shawls. And they continue to offer comfort for people like Corcoran. • "The whole thing around my shoulders was like a big prayer because I know it was made by these women with love and prayers." • 📻Learn more about prayer shawls on Tapestry by following the link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Sarah Keaveny Vos.

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Brian Petersen is finally getting a high school diploma — at 56 years old. • Petersen quit school when he was just 16 because of relentless bullying that started years earlier. • After school, he got a job as a dance teacher when he was 19, and continues to teach competitive ballroom dance today. • After he got married and had a son, he needed to supplement his income so he got a job as a courier, until four years ago when he was in a car accident. • Then he lost his job after the accident, and couldn’t find another, without a high school diploma. • He became homeless, had a mental breakdown, and attempted suicide. After a four-month stay in a medical facility, his community mental health worker suggested he go back to school. • "I feel different as a person, which has allowed me to make friends, allowed me to see the world in a different way than I did before," said Petersen, who has done so well in school that his teachers have encouraged him to pursue university. • He’ll start at the University of Winnipeg in the fall. • 📻To hear Brian and Now or Never host Ify Chiwetelu’s emotional moment together, click the link in our bio. 📷Brian Petersen and Bridget Forbes, CBC

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This mask is made from Nike Air Jordans and human hair. • Artist Brian Jungen says cutting up Air Jordans is strikingly similar to gutting salmon. • "I kind of got a bit of an illicit thrill out of cutting them up," Jungen said. "They may not have sold them to me if I told them I was going to cut them up." • The sneakers are some of the favorite materials for this B.C. artist from Doig River First Nation. He reassembles the cut-up Air Jordans into new objects, like Indigenous masks and headdresses. • The idea first came to Jungen on a trip to New York City in the '90s, when he saw some sneakers displayed behind glass in a store - similar, he thought, to how Indigenous artwork is often put in "museum-like display cases." • "Seeing how ... those objects became fetishized and held up as specimens of nature rather than being put in an art museum, that got me thinking about how other objects are treated in a very different way — like putting sneakers behind glass." • Starting Thursday, Jungen's life's work will be on display at @agotoronto in a new exhibit, Brian Jungen: Friendship Centre. • 📻Learn more about Jungen's art on As It Happens. Link in bio. 📷1st photo: Trevor Millis/Vancouver Art Gallery via AGO. 2nd photo: Jason Wyche/Art Gallery of Ontario. 3rd photo: Sinisa Jolic/CBC. • • • #indigenousart #indigenous #nationalindigenouspeoplesday

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After 17 seasons hosting The Current, Anna Maria Tremonti signs off. • 📻Listen to the final show Tremonti hosted in front of a live audience at CBC Toronto. Link in bio. 📷Photo by Andrew Nguyen/CBC. • • #ThanksAMT

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Canada's national animal is being observed in new places - and that's got some wildlife experts worried. • Recently, more beavers have been observed swimming and building their dams in saltwater bodies. • This new choice of habitat is a cause for concern for some. • Breanne Glinnum has seen beavers with saltwater poisoning at the Critter Care Wildlife Society in Langley, B.C. The beavers come in severely dehydrated and disoriented, and some die in their care. • Glinnum thinks the beavers are ending up in saltwater because of decreasing freshwater habitats. • Wildlife biologist David Bailey (seen in 3,4 photos) has looked at how beavers living in saltwater have been adapting in Tulalip, Wash. • He says beaver dams in saltwater disappear under the water at high tide. They are built lower than a normal dam to stop the power of the tide from breaking them apart. The doors to their lodges are also at different heights to accommodate the rise and ebb of the water. • 📻To hear more about saltwater beavers, click the link in bio to listen to The Current documentary. 📷1st photo by Critter Care Wildlife Society @critter_care_wildlife, photos by Jessica Linzey/CBC.

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Raymond Antrobus performs his poem Two Guns in the Sky for Daniel Harris. • The British-Jamaican poet is taking the literary world by storm. • In his work, Antrobus explores his heritage, his complicated relationship with his father, and his experience growing up deaf. • 📻Hear the interview with Antrobus on Writers & Company by following the link in bio. 🎬Video by Andrew Nguyen/CBC. • • • #poetry #poetrygram #poetryslam #poetrylovers #poem

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In an age of rapidly advancing technology, should humans still travel to space? 🚀 This was the question at the heart of a live debate, hosted by Quirks & Quarks host Bob McDonald and featuring retired astronaut Chris Hadfield, cosmologist Renée Hložek, planetary scientist Marianne Mader and space flight historian Amy Shira Teitel. 👩‍🚀 The discussion consisted of four mini-debates, each focusing on a different aspect of space travel: the Space Race; the Golden Era of robotics in space; commercial space flight and tourism; and the moral implications of human space travel. 👨‍🚀 🎬Watch the full debate by clicking the link in bio. 🎨Sketch drawn live by Kimberley Whitchurch @draw.she.said.

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Stephanie Williams, 32, and Celestian Rince, 30, want to retire at 35. • The Vancouver couple is on track to leave their jobs within three years, even living in one of the country's most expensive cities. • They share a tiny 400-square-foot apartment, and cuts costs at every opportunity. That means no meals out at restaurants, no car, no cable television or smartphones, and a monthly grocery bill of only $250. • The only luxury Williams and Rince allow themselves is travel, something the pair makes a priority of throughout the year. • They've managed to accumulate $400,000 in retirement savings. In the next three years, they hope to have $700,000 in total. • 📷Listen to them talk about their journey by clicking the link in our bio 📷Submitted by Celestian Rince

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Journalist Omar Dabaghi-Pacheco decided to take a stab at stand-up comedy after he saw a Facebook ad from a local comedian that promised to give anyone a shot at doing a standup set, onstage, in front of a live comedy club audience. • Even though Omar talks for a living - he’s a TV anchor - he says that stand-up scared him. But he wanted to join the class. • Then he met Rae-Ann Kublick (in the sweater dress) and Ron Porteous (in the blue shirt). Ron is a tech guy for Canada Post. Rae-Ann is an analyst for the government. • Omar makes them a deal: “Let me tell your story, and during that final performance, I'll go up on stage and do a comedy routine as well. Sink or swim, we're in it together,” he says. • 📻Click the link in our bio to find out how it went and watch video of Omar performing onstage. 📷Photos: Michel Aspirot/CBC @cbcottawa

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These poor baby salamanders picked the wrong plant to hang out in. • This is believed to be the first documented case in North America of a vertebrate-eating pitcher plant. • Alex Smith, a University of Guelph biologist, discovered the salamander while doing field work with his students. • Smith shared his discovery with a fellow scientist, Patrick Moldowan, who then searched through hundreds of plants in the wetlands in August and September, when thousands of newly metamorphosed salamanders had come out of a nearby lake. • 1 in 5 plants had juvenile amphibians that were trapped and dying, Moldowan discovered. • There are several reasons why salamanders end up as pitcher plant dinner. It could be that they fall into the plants, or that they seek out the moist and dark space to hide from predators. Or it's possible that the amphibians are lured to the plant on the promise of food. • Whatever the cause, the outcome is a slow death: it could take anywhere from 3 to 19 days for salamanders to perish. • 📻Hear the full story on As It Happens by following the link in bio. 📷Photos 1-3 by Patrick D. Moldowan. Photo 4 by Alex Smith. Video by Patrick David Moldowan/Algonquin Wildlife Research Station @algonquin_wrs.

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This photographer illustrated the diversity of Vancouver's Chinatown a century ago. • Yucho Chow came to Canada before 1910, and spent decades capturing hundreds of portraits of people from marginalized communities in Vancouver: Chinese immigrants, members of the black and Sikh communities, mixed-race couples, Polish and Ukranian families. • His legacy might have been forgotten if not for Catherine Clement, a curator and designer who tracked down Chow's photos from people's drawers, dusty boxes and even Value Village. • Clement first came across Chow's signature silver seal 9 years ago, marked on photograph after photograph of the Chinese-Canadian WWII veterans she'd set out to interview for her latest project. • "I never realized what this would turn into, but it started me on a journey to find ... his work and learn more about him, and it became much more complex and interesting than I could have ever imagined," Clement said. • She displayed Chow's work in a hugely popular exhibit at the Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Vancouver, Chinatown Through a Wide Lens: the Hidden Photographs of Yucho Chow. • Clement is now compiling Chow's photos into a book that's expected to come out this fall. • 📻Hear more about Chow's work on The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Yucho Chow, submitted by Catherine Clement.

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If you were told you had a tapeworm in your brain you probably wouldn’t consider it good news. (❗️Warning: 3rd photo may be disturbing for some viewers) • But that is exactly what happened to Rachel Palma. • Doctors at Mount Sinai hospital in New York City thought she might have a deadly brain tumour, and were performing surgery to find out if what they thought was a tumor was malignant or benign. • But as they were dissecting the brain tissue to reach the lesion, Dr Jonathan Rasouli says they found something "unlike any brain tumour we have ever seen before." • "It was virtually the same size, same shape and same firmness as a quail egg that you would buy in a store," Rasouli said. "And once we cut into it, a baby tapeworm came out." • Neither the doctors nor Palma know how she got the parasite, which is called Taenia solium and is extremely uncommon in North America. 📻To hear more about how the parasite was affecting Palma, click the link in our bio. 📷Mount Sinai Health System, Jonathan Rasouli, Mount Sinai Health System

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Samira Mohyeddin bought a book, a collection of photos from the Iranian Revolution of 1979 by noted photojournalist David Burnett (shown here in photos 4 and 5). • She was flipping through the pages and all of a sudden she saw a photo of her mom, Zarrin Mohyeddin (shown in photos 1, 2, 3 and 6). • Neither Samira, nor her mother had any idea she was in 44 Days: Iran and the Remaking of the World. • The photo was taken at an anti-revolution protest inside a sports stadium on January 24, 1979, and it was taken 100 days before Zarrin fled Iran for good. • Zarrin was anti-revolutionary, when people who were even suspected of being anti-revolutionary in Iran were often beat up and harassed. As the revolution went on, they were killed. • "I just couldn't believe that people thought they were going to get freedom with this type of revolution, led by cleric," said Zarrin bitterly when Samira asked her about it just recently. • 📻Find out more about the story, and how Zarrin got out of Iran by clicking the link in our bio. 📷Photos: 1, 4, 5 by David Burnett, 2,3,6 submitted by Samira Mohyeddin.

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Chasing foul balls in a baseball game isn't just for the boys - and Corinne Mullane proved that, when she became the very first Balldudette in 1993, at 67 years old. • She is the official Balldudette for the San Francisco Giants, a feat that has been recognized by the Baseball Hall of Fame. • It all started in 1993 with a new Giants' program that recruited senior citizens to be their ball boys as a way to engage with the older fans. • Mullane was recently retired as a juvenile hall teacher when she read about the program in Sports Illustrated. • "She wrote [the Giants] a letter and said, 'Hey, you know, you guys you need women to be doing this,'" explained Mullane's daughter, Molly Mullane-Cavagnaro, who is currently in her 19th season as a Balldudette. • Mullane retired from being a Balldudette back in 2010 after chasing balls for 17 years. • "It's probably the most fun job I ever had," said Mullane. • 📻Learn more about the original San Francisco Giants' Balldudette on Day 6. Link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Molly Mullane-Cavagnaro.

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Eunice Kim was born in South Korea and is fluent in Korean — but recently, she stumbled upon an unfamiliar word: han. • "It's this emotion that is internalized and it's this feeling of anger, grief, resentment," Kim writes. • She read an article that explained that Han really has no English translation. It's a feeling so powerful, some believe you can die from it. To many Koreans, han is part of the cultural DNA, present in movies, TV and music. • Scholars say it stems out of the country's long history of invasion, oppression and suffering. • As she learned more about han, Eunice wondered if her family had it. And if they did, could it get passed down to her? What was this thing supposedly so intrinsic to her own culture, and how is her life shaped by it? • Speaking with her grandmother, parents and even Korean scholars, Kim felt like she could finally understand something that had always been a part of her life —even though it was largely nameless. • "It’s liberating to be able to put a name to the emotions I’ve felt all these years." • 📻Hear Kim's documentary on The Doc Project by following the link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Eunice Kim @yaseunice.

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You've heard of James Watson and Francis Crick. But do you know June Lindsey? • In 1948, the young Canadian physicist's crystallography work in a British laboratory helped Watson and Crick discover the famous double-helix structure of DNA. • The two men became household names and won Nobel Prizes, but June, now 96, and her incredible contributions to modern science have largely been unheralded and even forgotten. • Now, a group of Ottawa scientists want to finally change that. • "It's like discovering the fifth Beatle is living next to you," said Ottawa physician and molecular geneticist Alex MacKenzie (2nd photo). • Alex met June a few years ago at an Ottawa seniors home at his mother-in-law's 90th birthday party. June mentioned her work and he was immediately curious. • He found out that in 1948, June was using X-ray crystallography to figure out the structures of adenine and guanine, two of the four nucleobases that contribute to the structure of DNA. In 1951, she published an article explaining her findings. • Alex says it was through reading her PhD thesis that Watson and Crick first realized how DNA is structured. He wants her work to be recognized while she is still alive. • 📻Learn more about Lindsey's research on The Sunday Edition. Link in bio. 📷1 & 2 photos: David Gutnick/CBC. 3rd photo submitted by June Lindsey.

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In one year, this woman has picked up 2 tonnes of plastic ocean trash. • Karen Jenner hits the beaches on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia 2-3 times a week to pick up trash. • She fills five-gallon buckets with everything from fishing garbage, such as rope and lobster bands, to household items, including bottle caps, plastic cutlery and plastic bottles. • She takes the buckets home, sorts through the day's haul, and takes photos of the items. She then posts them to her Facebook Page. • While most of what she collects is the "same old garbage," Jenner finds pleasure in making new discoveries, like a commemorative plastic bag that is over 40 years old. • Jenner hopes her example can inspire others to join in the cleanup:"You don't need to go and come back with 100 pounds, or 100 things. All you need to do is, if you see something where it shouldn't be, pick it up." • 📻Hear the full story on @cbcnowornever by following the link in bio. 📷Photos by Moira Donovan/CBC and Nova Scotia Beach Garbage Awareness (Facebook).

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When Brendon Meister suffered a drug overdose and was left unable to walk, a group of goats gave him his life back. • Three years ago, Meister overdosed on what was suspected to be opioid-laced crystal meth. After a six-week coma caused a brain injury that knocked out his motor skills, he was left without much motivation. • As part of his recovery, he moved back in with some family in Nova Scotia and they decided to buy some goats in hopes of getting Meister up out of bed in the mornings. • But it’s become much more than just a wake-up call. Brendon is in charge of the daily care of the goats, milking them and even helps make the soaps that he and his family sell online and in local stores. • Not even 2 years into the goat project, the family has seen an amazing change in Meister’s behaviour and the goats have given him back his purpose. • “They help me a lot. They do give me something to talk about with people. Because before, I wasn’t working, so I just slept for the most part. But now I’m actually doing stuff with them.” • 📻To hear more about Meister's goats, listen to the Tapestry story by clicking the link in bio. 📷Photos by Mary-Catherine McIntosh/CBC.

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Toronto drag queen Michelle DuBarry says it's wonderful that RuPaul’s Drag Race is giving queens a launch pad for their careers — but its mainstream popularity is a far cry from when she started out. • "The general public didn't know anything about it, period," said DuBarry, who at 87 has been performing in drag for more than 50 years. • DuBarry, whose real name is Russell Alldread, explained that she used to perform in underground shows that tried to stay out of sight. • They were often raided by police who would "pick on us for being dressed up," she added. • Hear more about what 3 drag queens — from ages 10 to 87 — think about RuPaul's Drag Race by clicking the link in our bio. • Photos 1-2 by David Hawe, 3-5 submitted by Vince Ciarlo.

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Dayton Wilson is one of many fentanyl overdose survivors in need of better support, and advocates say these people are being overlooked. • In his youth, Wilson was a free spirit, an aspiring rap artist with a burgeoning talent at playing the electric guitar. • That all changed in September 2016, when a fentanyl overdose left him with brain damage. • Wilson's speech and balance were most greatly affected after the overdose. Today it takes the 24-year-old a few moments to find the words he wants to say. • His movements are as slow and deliberate as the way he talks. He's likely permanently lost the dexterity that allowed him to play the guitar. • "Yes, he's there, but he's not the son that I had before the brain injury. He's certainly not the son I had before he started using drugs," Dayton's mother Valerie Wilson said. • Advocates say Canada needs to do better to help overdose survivors amidst the current opioid crisis. • While most news headlines centre on the thousands of deaths that have resulted from opioid-related overdoses, those who survive, like Wilson, are largely forgotten, even as they're left struggling to deal with the life-changing aftermath. • 📻Hear more in White Coat, Black Art's special episode, After the Overdose. Link in bio. 📸Photos 1, 5 by Murray Mitchell. Photos 2, 3, 4 submitted by Valerie Wilson.

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Jeff Douglas signs off on As It Happens for the last time today. • The Truro, N.S. native is returning to the East Coast to host the @cbcns weekday afternoon radio show, Mainstreet. • Watch our Stories throughout the day for a special As It Happens behind-the-scenes Instagram takeover!

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Can you tell how many posts on your Instagram feed are ads? • The New Sell is a Day 6 series that delves into the modern rules of marketing, from the rise of social media influencers to AI-driven shopping. • More and more brands come to rely on consumers to do the marketing for them. Influencers' power over brands comes from the very idea that their sales pitch to consumers doesn't look like a sales pitch at all. • "You just see it as a friend recommending something," writer Paris Martineau said. • Meanwhile, influencers can charge anywhere from $5,000 for an Instagram post, according to one entrepreneur. • 📻Hear this story and other parts of The New Sell series on Day 6 by following the link in bio. 🎨Illustrations by Ben Shannon @shoontz.

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Scottish artist and medical researcher Mark Gilbert draws portraits of dementia patients and their caregivers in hopes of inspiring compassion among medical students, and the public, for people living with the disease. • As Gilbert sketches his subjects, his goal is not likeness, but "making sure that the marks you're making are as honest a response to who's in front of you as possible." • His latest portraits depict Margaret and David Quinlivan-Hall of Lower Sackville, N.S. David was diagnosed with dementia at the age of 59, and his wife Margaret is his caregiver. • When Margaret looks at Gilbert's portrait of her (seen in 3rd photo), she notices a down-turned mouth and sorrowful eyes. She notices the same in her husband, and that the disease has made him look older. • "I thought when I looked at them, you know, I need to do more things to make me smile," she said. "And also that I needed more help." • 📻Learn more about Gilbert's work and its impact in this documentary for The Current. Link in bio. 📷Photos by Mary-Catherine McIntosh/CBC.

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This rare cardinal is what scientists call a gynandromorph — an organism that displays both male and female sex characteristics. • The red side is male, while the yellow side is female. • Gynandromorphs are especially noticeable in bird species that display sexual dimorphism, where female and male birds look drastically different. • It all comes down to chromosomes. Female birds have a single copy each of a Z and W chromosome, while males have ZZ. • This cardinal was likely the result of a female egg cell that developed with two nuclei — one with a Z and one with a W — which was then "double fertilized" by two Z-carrying sperms. • The result is a single cardinal that is literally split down the middle, both in colour and in chromosomes. • 📻Learn more about this rare bird on As It Happens by following the link in bio. 📷Photos submitted by Shirley Caldwell, who spotted the cardinal in Erie, Penn.