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In an effort to cut down on plastic waste, a global movement known as #plasticfreejuly is challenging people to cut out single-use plastics this month. If you're looking for ways to be more environmentally friendly, try swapping your plastic toothbrush for a bamboo one, or using reusable cutlery instead of plastic forks and knives. Swipe for more tips ➡️

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Tens of thousands of mussels have cooked to death along the shores of Northern California, according to researchers at Bodega Marine Reserve. The state experienced a record-breaking heat wave in June, with temperatures in Northern California reaching triple digits. “When I was approaching the field site, I could see right away that hundreds of mussels were dead,” said one research coordinator, who added that she’d never seen anything like it. (📸: Jackie Sones)

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It's about to get a lot hotter in North America, according to new projections. From Los Angeles to New York, cities could see temperatures rise significantly by 2080 if current emissions are not cut and climate change continues. The past five years have already been the hottest on record for the planet, and the new projections published in the journal Nature Communications suggest the warming is likely to continue. Swipe to see more ➡️

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Environmentalists have removed more than 40 tons of plastic from the Pacific Ocean. And while that might seem like a lot — equivalent in weight to about 24 cars — it barely made a dent. Members of the Ocean Voyages Institute said the cleanup mission was the "largest and most successful ocean cleanup to date" in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Located between California and Hawaii, it is the biggest concentration of floating debris in the world. The crew removed trash including detergent bottles, plastic furniture and children's toys, and also collected fishing gear called "ghost nets" — massive nets of nylon or polypropylene that drift and accumulate plastic debris. “What we’ve done out there is small compared to the magnitude of the problem, but it’s scalable and can be spread,” said the founder of the group. It's estimated that 1.15 to 2.41 million tons of plastic enter the ocean each year. (📸: Ocean Voyages Institute)

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New York City will begin officially enforcing its ban on styrofoam beginning Monday. The city, which is the largest US city to ban the environmental unfriendly material, outlawed styrofoam on January 1. Businesses were given a six-month transition period before the crackdown began. Violators will be fined $250 for the first offense, $500 for a second offense and $1,000 for third offenses and beyond. Above, Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a press conference in January about the ban. (📸: Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/Getty Images)

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Current sea temperatures around coastal Alaska are pushing 10 degrees Fahrenheit above seasonal norms, satellite data shows, and the change is affecting residents’ food and jobs. High water temperatures can support algal blooms, which in turn can make the waters toxic to wildlife, according to University of Alaska climate specialist Rick Thoman. It's a mounting crisis for many coastal Alaska towns that depend on fishing to support their economy and feed people who live here. "If people can't get out on the ice to hunt seals or whales, that affects their food security. It is a human crisis of survivability," said one climatologist. (📸: Yuri Smityuk/Getty Images)

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#newyorkcity officials declared a climate emergency in an effort to mobilize local and national responses to stall global warming. It's the largest city in the US, with over 8.62 million inhabitants. The New York City Council passed the legislation Wednesday, calling for an immediate response to the global climate crises. The bill referenced several reports on the state of global warming and its impact, imparting that extreme weather events brought about by rising temperatures demonstrates that the planet is "too hot to be a safe environment." To learn more, click the link in our bio.🗽🌎 #LinkinBio for more ⬆️

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A new report estimates that more than 120 million people could slip into poverty within the next decade because of the climate crisis. As droughts, floods and hurricanes become more frequent, the world's poorest people will be forced to "choose between starvation and migration," the report warned. "We risk a 'climate apartheid' scenario where the wealthy pay to escape overheating, hunger and conflict while the rest of the world is left to suffer," said Philip Alston, the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. (📸: NurPhoto/Getty Images)

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Paris officials are installing mist showers throughout the city, extending hours at public swimming pools and opening cool rooms in designated public buildings as Europe prepares for an exceptional heat wave. Temperatures exceeding 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius) are forecast in a number of major cities across the continent, with meteorologists warning that higher humidity could make it feel even hotter. Heat waves are becoming more frequent and more severe because of the climate crisis, scientists say. The frequency of such events is expected to double by 2050, French weather service Météo-France said. (📸: Chesnot/Getty Images)

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Glastonbury, Benicassim, Burning Man and Lollapalooza. With some of the world's biggest festivals coming up, months of great music and outdoor partying lie ahead, as well as huge mountains of rubbish and fields littered with plastic. Here are four easy ways to enjoy festival season without trashing the planet. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 1️⃣ Ditch the plastic bottle. Festival-goers in the US produce 53,000 tons of waste each year, but some festivals are pledging to reduce their plastic footprint. The organizers of UK’s Glastonbury Festival are banning single-use plastic bottles and will be selling drinks in recyclable cans instead. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 2️⃣ Sleep in a cardboard tent. One in five tents are left behind at European festivals each year and most end up in landfill, according to the co-founder of A Greener Festival. This year, the Dutch company KarTent will provide almost 15,000 waterproof and recyclable cardboard tents to festivals across Europe. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 3️⃣ Wear bioglitter or none at all. Festival goers love to wear glitter, but it contains micro plastics which pollute our oceans and are eaten by marine wildlife. Switch to a biodegradable glitter instead. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 4️⃣ Take the bus. Transportation accounts for over 80% of the UK festival industry's total carbon emissions, according to a spokesperson for Powerful Thinking. Traveling to a festival by public transportation can drastically slash emissions. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (📸: Matt Cardy/Getty Images) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #glastonbury #benicassim #burningman #lollapalooza

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Sixty-six people were arrested and charged with disorderly conduct outside of The New York Times building in Manhattan on Saturday, according to a New York Police Department spokesman, during a protest to call attention to the way news outlets cover the climate crisis. The protesters were affiliated with a group called Extinction Rebellion, which describes itself as an "international movement" aimed at combating climate change through nonviolent protest and minimizing the "risk of human extinction and ecological collapse.” A spokesperson for the group told CNN that the newspaper "should be treating [the climate crisis] like World War II, where there were headlines every day.” (📸: Julio Cortez/AP)

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Canada will take back tons of garbage it shipped to the Philippines years ago, bringing an end to a situation that has created a diplomatic stink between the two countries. The containers of trash, which arrived in 2013 and 2014, were labeled as recyclable plastics but actually contained heaps of household trash. They've been festering in Philippine ports ever since. This week, the Canadian government said it would cover the cost of the operation and the garbage would be brought back before the end of the month. (📸: Noel Celis/Getty Images)

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A new study involving satellite images found that Himalayan glaciers are melting at an alarming rate, losing almost half a meter of ice each year since the start of this century—double the amount of melting that occurred between 1975 and 2000—according to researchers. The glaciers, which supply around 800 million people with water, are losing about 8 billion tons of water per year, researchers say. (📸: Getty Images)

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“The Black Strat,” which can be heard on @pinkfloyd albums “The Dark Side of the Moon” and “Wish You Were Here,” just sold for $3,975,000, and it’s all going to charity. @davidgilmour, who sang and played guitar 🎸in the British rock band, sold the black Stratocaster along with 125 other instruments for just over $21 million at a New York charity auction Thursday to fight climate change. (📸:Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

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On its maiden voyage, the robotic submersible lovingly monikered "Boaty McBoatface" by popular vote in the UK gathered “unprecedented data” about some of the world's coldest and deepest oceans. "We have been able to collect massive amounts of data that we have never been able to capture before due to the way Boaty is able to move underwater,” said Alberto Naveira Garabato, the lead scientist of the expedition, which involved three missions 500 miles from the Antarctic Peninsula. (📸: National Oceanography Centre)

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This photo, taken by scientist Stefen Olsen, shows a team of sled dogs wading through water on what is normally sea ice in Greenland. Olsen, who is a scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute, was on a mission to retrieve several monitoring tools when he realized he couldn’t find the device because of the flooding. One scientist said that while previous melt periods occurred in 2007, 2020 and 2012, “we didn’t see anything like this prior to the late 1990s.” (📸: Steffen M. Olsen)

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Last week, Greenland lost an estimated 2 billion tons of ice in a single day—an unusually large melt for the middle of June, researchers said. Greenland's "melting season" began a month earlier than usual this year, and “all signs seem to be pointing to a large melt season,” said James Mote, a research scientist. While such a sudden spike in melting is not unprecedented, he said, "we've seen a sequence of these large melt seasons, starting in 2007, that would have been unprecedented earlier in the record." (📸: Brice Lane/CNN)

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"The psychological responses to climate change such as conflict avoidance, fatalism, fear, helplessness and resignation are growing," said Susan Clayton, a psychology professor at the College of Wooster and author of a new report about mental health and climate change. Clayton warns that while climate anxiety is normal, these feelings can keep people from “addressing the core causes of and solutions for our changing climate.” Click the link in our bio to learn more.

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One company’s trash is another’s alternative fuel source. UPS is buying 170 million gallons of renewable natural gas – a fuel that is produced naturally from sources like landfills, dairy farms and wastewater treatment facilities. The purchase, which the company says is the largest of its kind in US history, may help UPS reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from its ground fleet 12% by 2025. “The idea is to use energy that’s already being created, instead of wasting it,” said the director of fleet procurement at UPS. (📸: UPS)

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Hundreds of thousands of students walked out of classes on Friday to raise the alarm over #climatechange 🌍 Protests were planned in more than 125 countries and organizers expected more than 1.6 million people who take part. The movement was inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist @gretathunberg who last year began skipping school to protest outside the Swedish parliament. Above, students protest in Auckland, New Zealand; Kiev, Ukraine; Bordeaux, France; Madrid; Berlin; Frankfurt and Delhi. (📸: Hannah Peters, NurPhoto, Juan Pelegrín Corbacho, Picture Alliance/Getty Images, Charansh Juneja)

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In an effort to curb ocean pollution, officials in England are banning plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds, aka Q-Tips, starting in April 2020. The government estimates that about 4.7 billion plastic straws, 316 million plastic stirrers and 1.8 billion plastic-stemmed cotton buds are used in England each year. “Urgent and decisive action is needed to tackle plastic pollution and protect our environment,” said Environment Secretary Michael Gove. The governments of Scotland and Wales are considering similar measures. (📸: Phatthanit/Shutterstock) #plasticstraws #oceanplastic

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Washington just became the first state to legalize the composting of human bodies as an alternative to burial or cremation. In composting, which advocates say is an environmentally friendly process, a body is "covered in natural materials, like straw or wood chips, and over the course of about three to seven weeks...it breaks down into soil," says Katrina Spade, CEO of the human composting company Recompose. Above, Spade is pictured in a Seattle cemetery holding a sample of compost material left from the decomposition of a cow. (📸: Elaine Thompson/AP)

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Watch as Carmelo Isgro sorts through several pounds of plastic waste that were recovered from the stomach of a young sperm whale after it washed ashore in Sicily. Isgro, who works at the University of Messina's natural history museum and was involved in the procedure, said the whale was so young that "her teeth haven't come out yet," and that the plastic probably created a block that didn't let the food in. "I'm still shocked because her belly was completely full, swollen with plastic," Isgro said. (📸: Greenpeace Italy)

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Burger King’s national rollout of the Impossible Whopper marks a pivotal development in the effort to combat climate change and save forests, write Tim Searchinger and Richard Waite for CNN Opinion. "Beef uses roughly 20 times more land and releases 20 times more greenhouse gases for the same amount of protein as common plant proteins such as beans…” To read their full op-ed, click the link in our bio. (📸: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

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Swipe through ➡️ if you’ve ever wondered what happens to your plastic when you recycle it ♻️

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“Nature's rhythm is dying because we're killing the Earth,” @gratefuldead drummer @mickeyhart wrote in an op-ed for CNN. Hart is performing at Earth’s Call concert in Aspen, Colorado, this weekend, which will raise money to fight #climatechange. Hit the link in our bio to read more. #Gratefuldead #Earthscall #aspenco