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Tomorrow, July 19th, is the last day to see Gordon Parks: Selections from the Dean Collection at the Cooper Gallery! Come experience the world through the eyes of Gordon Parks, as he used his camera to combat the social injustices he saw in the world. Our exhibition will close at 6 pm, Friday.⠀ ⠀ Photo Courtesy of Melissa Blakall

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“These images serve as a testament to the collective resilience of African-American people and are integral to the larger narrative of the African-American experience.”⠀ ⠀ Thank you, Jewels Dodson, for your review on “Gordon Parks: Selections from the Dean Collection”, co-organized by The Gordon Parks Foundation. Your review provides valuable insight into how the Dean Collection is changing the world of art collecting by being a “gatekeeper of the African-American experience”. ⠀ ⠀ Invisible Man Retreat, Harlem, New York, 1952⠀ Gelatin Silver Print

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In 1956, Gordon Parks published a photo essay for LIFE Magazine, entitled, “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” Parks’ photos documented the day to day experiences of the Thornton family living in Alabama under Jim Crow segregation. In this photo, young members of the family observe a playground reserved for white children through the holes of a chain link fence. This photo and others from Gordon Parks’ photo essay document the implicit and explicit marks of racism that were present in the segregated South. These photographs and others are on display now as part of our Gordon Parks exhibit until July 19th. ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ Outside Looking In, Mobile, Alabama, 1956⠀ Archival Pigment Print

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"I’ve seen Parks’s work before, and often. I’ve been struck by his humanity, his precision, the way his eye could shift from gaudy drama to intimate, stolen moments. But I’ve never seen this."⠀ ⠀ Thank you, Murray Whyte, for your stellar review of Gordon Parks: Selections from the Dean Collection, co-organized by The Gordon Parks Foundation! https://buff.ly/31gjg15

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Our #FeatureFriday this week highlights Gordon Parks's 1966-1970 photographs of Muhammad Ali. Parks first began photographing Ali on assignment for Life Magazine, and the two maintained a friendship thereafter. Parks' photographs were published at a time when Ali was criticized heavily for not serving in the Vietnam War due to conscientious objection via religious beliefs. Parks is often praised for capturing the boxer's grace and humanity in his photographs.⠀ ⠀ Image description: Left: Gordon Parks. "Untitled, London, England, 1966." Courtesy of the Gordon Parks Foundation.⠀ Center: Gordon Parks. "Muhammad Ali, Miami, Florida, 1966." Courtesy of the Gordon Parks Foundation.⠀ Right: Gordon Parks. "Untitled, London, England, 1966." Courtesy of Getty Images.

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Gordon Parks was one of the most impactful photojournalists and filmmakers of the 20th century. He is known for capturing iconic moments and images from the civil rights movement, and the African-American experience in the country from the 40’s to the 70’s. As a LIFE Magazine photojournalist, Parks photographed some of Muhammad Ali's most iconic portraits. This untitled photograph was taken in Miami in 1966 during a training session. The Gallery's show on the work of Gordon Parks will feature this photograph in a section dedicated to Ali. Find Ali among the many lives that Parks encountered and captured for us to see. ⠀ ⠀ Untitled, Miami, Florida, 1966⠀ Gelatin Silver Print

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Thank you to @aliciakeys, @therealswizzz, @gordonparksfoundation, @thedeancollection and all of our friends who made the opening reception of our exhibition "Gordon Parks: Selections from the Dean Collection" a success! Stop by and see the collection for yourself, now open Monday through Friday 11-6

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The Cooper Gallery would like to wish a very happy birthday to Carrie Mae Weems! The Gallery showcased her photographs during our Fall 2016 show, “I Once Knew A Girl.” We hope that this next year brings a great adventure Carrie’s way! @carriemaeweems View images from her exhibition at the Gallery here: https://buff.ly/2VCuvNY.

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A week from today is the opening reception for our next show on Gordon Parks. Join us at 6:00 pm, Friday, April 26th, at the Cooper Gallery and be among the first to see the collection. ⠀ ⠀ Image Description: Gordon Parks. "The Invisible Man, Harlem, New York, 1952." Gelatin Silver Print . 34 x 34”. Courtesy of the Gordon Parks Foundation

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A career-spanning exhibition of Gordon Parks photographs from the Dean Collection will debut this spring at The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art at the Hutchins Center, Harvard University. ⠀ ⠀ On view April 26th, 2019 through July 19th, 2019, the exhibition is co-organized by The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art at the Hutchins Center, Harvard University and The Gordon Parks Foundation, in cooperation with consulting curator, Dr. Maurice Berger. ⠀ ⠀ Join us for our opening reception at 6 pm, Friday, April 26th!

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This is an #AppreciationPost for our wonderful vinyl text artist, Bob, who installs all wall text for our exhibitions. Bob is currently in the middle of installing for our upcoming show, to be announced soon!

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Congrats to @ChanelThervil and @ASmithStudios for making the #ARTery25 -- 25 millennials of color recognized for their contributions to the local Boston arts scene. Both artists were recently featured in our last exhibition, "Nine Moments For Now." We can't wait to see what they do next!⠀ ⠀ Read more about the #ARTery25 at https://buff.ly/2JB4tt0⠀ ⠀ Image description: Chanel Thervil, "Pity Party: Selfies at the Start of the Trump Era," 2017. Acrylic on wood with pleated flag. 74 x 61". Courtesy of the artist.

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The Cooper Gallery would like to congratulate Joy Buolamwini for winning the HUBweek award for Best in Art, Science, and Tech! Her winning piece, AI, Ain't I a Woman was featured in our Fall show, Nine Moments for Now. Congratulations Joy!

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Recently featured in the Cooper Gallery's display window, these Ms. Merri Macks have greeted many individuals passing by Mount Auburn St. in Cambridge. During the de-installation process, they are reunited with each other and carefully packed away.

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“Nine Moments for Now” brings together contemporary art and modernist approaches to the question of how artists engage in political speech. As with all cultural transformations, artists have been at the forefront of creating meaningful and complex responses to social engagement and civic discourse. Vote for 'Nine Moments for Now' at The Cooper Gallery at the 2019 HUBweek Art Awards! https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4805852/2019-HUBweek-Art-Awards?fbclid=IwAR1JiWNELDKRcpby49RnH_8cWOkfDwYZVK9GHbGkUp1NdBuV8sH1Gyq_F5g

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As the Cooper Gallery is busy de-installing #NineMomentsForNow, check out some of behind-the-scenes shots of the hard work our install crew puts in to make us shine! This is the deinstallation of Magdalena Campos-Pons' multimedia work, SugarBittersweet.

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Happy Presidents Day. As we take the holiday to reflect on the values of our nation, we also remember legacy of past Presidents who have contributed to U.S history. As a country, we must push for the principles we would like to see improve and transform our country in the future. Widely known for his Hope (2008) campaign poster which portrays a portrait of then-presidential candidate Barack Obama in red, white, and blue, Shepard Fairey is an American graphic artist and social activist who blurs the boundary between traditional and commercial art through type and image, communicating his brand of social critique via prints, murals, stickers, and posters in public spaces. In 2017, the artist also created a series of three posters— featuring portraits of culturally diverse women in red, white, and blue. Image Description: Shepherd Fairey, "Change [Barack Obama, U.S. Presidential Campaign Poster]," 2008. Poster. 26 x 40 ½” Part of the Hutchins Center Permanent Collection.

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Thank You to the Boston Globe for a shoutout in their recent article, "The Ticket: What’s happening in the local arts world". Come check out our latest exhibit NINE MOMENTS FOR NOW! where "Dell Marie Hamilton curates this examination of art’s intersection with politics. The show is part of For Freedoms, a nationwide campaign exploring Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s four tenets of human rights, famously depicted by Norman Rockwell. Through Jan. 21."⠀ SOURCE: https://buff.ly/2zpnM0i⠀ ⠀ “BlackSunsetComing" ⠀ Marlon Forrester ⠀ 2018 ⠀ Courtesy of the artist

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Have you voted yet? ⠀ Ten years ago, this nation elected its first black president. Today, we once again have an opportunity and a responsibility to make our voices heard. Your vote matters. GO VOTE! ⠀ This bronze bust gifted by Carrie Mae Weems ( @carriemaeweems) is part of the Cooper Gallery exhibit #NineMomentsforNow in conjunction with @forfreedoms #50stateinitiative.

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COME JOIN US IN OUR OPENING RECEPTION! In conjunction with the For Freedoms/50 States Initiative founded by Eric Gottesman and Hank Willis Thomas, this upcoming exhibition “Nine Moments for Now” brings together contemporary art and modernist approaches to the question of how artists engage in political speech. In other words, what do freedom and liberation look like in the wake of Black Lives Matter and the astounding uncertainties of the Trump era? As with all cultural transformations, artists have been at the forefront of creating meaningful and complex responses to social engagement and civic discourse. Join us for our opening reception! Free and open to the public. Curated by: @dellmhamilton

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El Anatsui is one of Ghana’s most recognized artists. Anatsui’s sculptures are conceived to be flexible and add a malleable and unique presence to every exhibition. The Cooper Gallery featured El Anatsui’s piece titled "Delta" (2014) during our Woven Arc exhibition (Summer 2016). This flexibility speaks to the abstraction of African art in the modern art world and reflects on the different functions of everyday objects in the form of their destruction, transformation, and regeneration. His broader use of discarded liquor bottle caps represents the story of colonial and post-colonial economic and cultural exchange in Africa.

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Our Summer 2017 show focused on the works of Juan Roberto Diago. This Cuban artist gathers his materials from his surroundings, using what he finds on the streets around his home and transforming them into pieces that call out the exclusionary history of Cuba. A predominant theme in his artwork is the colonial history of Cuba and how that seeps into the present.

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Abigail DeVille ( @victoriouspurple) is this week’s featured artist. The Gallery was fortunate to feature her piece Sarcophagus Blue during our Harlem: Found Ways exhibition in the Summer of 2017. DeVille is a native New Yorker whose art reflects the phrase “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” because she sources her materials from the area in which she is exhibiting. You will often find that DeVille’s sculptures comment on displacement and marginalized communities. Her immersive pieces bring to light these forgotten stories and remind us that there is always so much more below the surface.

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As part of our Up Close with our Permanent Collection series we are featuring this close up of one of Nick Cave’s Soundsuits (Woven Arc, Summer 2016). These performance sculptures are mixed media masterpieces. Their meanings are shaped by the environment they are presented in. These Soundsuits have some semblance of the African ceremonial costumes and might remind you of the Irunmole Series by Moyo Okediji that we featured during our Fall 2017 show. Find out more about our permanent collection on our website https://buff.ly/2rHp5Ud

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Our featured artist this week is Carrie Mae Weems ( @carriemaeweems), to whom we dedicated our Fall 2016 show to. Weems is one of the most influential artists of her time. She has dedicated her career to exploring the themes of familial relationship, race, class, and the consequences of power. Although she is best known for her photography, Weems is also creating art using textiles, film, text, and audio. She was the first African-American woman to be given a solo exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City.

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One of our favorite pieces from our Permanent Collection is Yinka Shonibare’s ( @shonibarestudio) Food Faerie, which was featured during our Woven Arc show (Summer 2016). Shonibare’s work often comments on the globalizing world and the issues of colonialism. The use of the Dutch Wax cloth with “African” patterns heavily criticizes the colonization of Africa and how African art and artists are represented in the contemporary world. This particular sculpture features a faerie carrying mangoes in a strap net leather bag. Shonibare is responding to the inconsistencies of food production and the issue of the inequality of access to food. Find out more about our permanent collection on our website https://buff.ly/2rHp5Ud

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In addition to the art we display, the Cooper Gallery strives to engage with our shows and artists in a multitude of ways. During our Wole Soyinka exhibit we were also reading Americanah by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. This book touches upon the themes of race and identity, much like our show ReSignifications did. What are you reading this summer?

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Our last show, ReSignifications, dealt with the theme of black bodies, black beauty, and their representations in art throughout history. This week on Cooper Lit we are featuring Voyage of the Sable Venus, by Harvard’s own Robin Coste Lewis. This epic poem follows the voice of a woman exploring her own image and beauty and questions where ideas of feminine black beauty began in history. The poems are a critique of the self and society as Lewis delves into her personal history to explore her identity and how beautiful, yet terrible, her experiences can be.

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https://buff.ly/2HS57RT Check out the latest review of ReSignifications by our very own Gallery Attendant, Anais!

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Today is the final day to visit #ReSignifications at the Cooper Gallery! Stop by to say hello at our Open House, 10-5, or to say goodbye to these guys.⠀ #blackamoor #art #hutchinscenter #cambridgeart #Italianart⠀⠀ ⠀ Shown: Blackamoor Statues, probably 20th C. Courtesy of Cork Hetherington⠀ Photo: melissablackallphotography.com

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Join us tomorrow 5/5 as we celebrate the final day of #ReSignifications at the Cooper Gallery! Curated by Awam Amkpa, ReSignifications links classical and popular representations of African bodies in European art, culture and history as it interrogates and intervenes in the “Blackamoor” trope in Florence, Italy, and beyond. Open 10-5. #africanart #italianart #blackamoors