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The Florida Butterfly Orchid (Encyclia tampensis) is typically found on oak trees across southern Florida. However, this particular orchid found a nice spot on a tiny Bald Cypress tree. The flowering season for the Florida Butterfly Orchid is typically form May to August, peaking in June. -Alex, Land Stewardship Intern #audubonfl #audubonsociety #orchid #nativeplants

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Happy 4th of July! The White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) is a small songbird that visitors to Corkscrew may be able to hear consistently when out on the boardwalk. Some of their songs consist of loud, explosive series of notes, such as "chip-a-wheeoo-chip." Don't be surprised to find one scolding you while you're out birding! (This photo was taken today, July 4th, 2019.) -Brian, Research Intern #audubonsociety #birds #birdsofinstagram

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Happy Fourth of July! 📸 @rjwiley_

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Can you spot the Wood Mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus)? When looking for food, these rodents often collect and disperse leaves, twigs and other visually conspicuous objects that serve as landmarks as they explore the area. - Dana, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #mammals #mouse

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Happy Fourth of July! 5 flowers on the “Super” Ghost Orchid. Come on out this holiday weekend. Kids are FREE July 4-7 when accompanied by a parent, grandparent, or guardian. Planning to hit the beach after you visit the swamp? Please remember to share the beach with birds and other wildlife! #audubonfl #audubonsociety #corkscrewswampsanctuary #sharethebeach #orchid

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The Yellow Rat Snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) a nonvenomous snake, is both a burrower and an very good climber. It is found under rocks and debris, and in the trees. This snake feeds primarily on rodents but they will also eat lizards, frogs, and birds as well as their eggs. These snakes do a good job at keeping the rodent populations in check and are an important part of the ecosystem. #audubonsociety #reptiles #snakes #snakesofinstagram

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What’s for lunch? Apparently a frog for this Little Blue Heron who was perusing the North Lettuce Lake buffet. 📸 @rjwiley_

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Next up is the lovable Limpkin (Aramus guarauna)! The outermost flight feather in Limpkins is sickle-shaped but broad at the tip, and is especially pronounced in males. This feather can be used to make a loud buzzing sound called winnowing when the bird flies; it is said to be used to mark territory. -Resource Management Intern, Dana #audubonsociety #limpkin #birdsofinstagram #birds

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Back at you with another Trail Cam Tuesday! First up is the Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus). Vultures are represented in many ancient civilizations. In Ancient Egypt the vulture is the symbol of the goddess Nekhebet who was a protective deity of the Pharaoh and often portrayed with her wings spread above them for protection. -Conservation Intern, Dana #audubonsociety #vulture #birds #birdsofinstagram

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Looking for something to do with the family this week? Bring them out to enjoy the peacefulness of the ancient Bald Cypress forest. Kid's are free for Independence Day Weekend, July 4th -7th. Stop in the Nature Store for a cool drink or a snack afterwards. 239-348-9151 cssnaturestore@audubon.org #corkscrewswampsanctuary

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Check out this evening’s photo of the super ghost. Multiple blooms! Thanks @rjwiley_ for sharing this gorgeous photo!

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The first bloom of Corkscrew’s “Super” Ghost Orchid has arrived! 📸 by Rod Wiley @rjwiley_ was taken Friday June 28th.

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If you are opting for the beach instead of the swamp this weekend, don’t forget to share the beach and follow these tips. #audubonsociety #audubonfl #corkscrewswampsanctuary #savethebirds #sharethebeach

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The Swamp Sunflower (Helianthus angustifolius) is a native Florida plant that grows in low and wet areas. It’s leaves are rough like sandpaper and the golden flowers are produced throughout late summer and fall. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #flnativeplants

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The Harnessed Tiger Moth (Apantesis phalerata) has varying patterns on their hindwings. In male and female specimens from far southern U.S. states, the hindwings are usually more yellowish than reddish with little or no black edging. - Dana, Resource Intern #audubonsociety #moths

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The Swamp Hibiscus (Hibiscus coccineus) plant is native to Florida and can reach a height of five feet. It is most commonly known for its leaves, which look like the unrelated cannabis plant known as marijuana. See if you can spot it off the boardwalk! -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #nativeplants

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The Ornate Bella Moth (Utetheisa ornatrix) is a diurnal (active during the day) species of moth rather than nocturnal. Young larvae of this species feed on the native plant, Crotalaria, that allows them to develop at a fast pace. This food source is toxic to mammals and birds however. A special "Thank you very moth" to Dr. Steve Rannels for inviting me to see his moths! - Dana, Resource Intern #audubonsociety #moths

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Happy World Turtle day! The Florida Softshell Turtle (Apalone ferox) is the largest species of softshell turtle in Florida. This turtle is a powerful swimmer and feeds primarily on snails, insects, fishes, crayfish, and are also known to scavenge. The shell is leathery, covered with skin, having a white or cream underside and is soft around the edges hence the name "softshell". #audubonsociety #audubonfl #corkscrewswampsanctuary #wildlifewednesday

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Next up on Trailcam Tuesday, we have a very curious Tricolored Heron (Egretta tricolor). Tricolored Herons are slender birds, with long bills, necks, and legs. Both parents help feed the young, which can fly at about 5 weeks. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #birds #birdsofinstagram

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Welcome to another Trailcam Tuesday! First up we have an Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis). Eastern Gray Squirrels often feed on the ground, as seen here, and can remember the location of thousands of food caches. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #mammals

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The Swamp Lily (Crinum americanum) has leaves that can be up to 3 feet long and 3 inches wide. It is a beautiful flower that can be seen off Corkscrew's boardwalk right now! -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #nativeplants

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The Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) is a storm-adapted species. It increases in fertility and rapidly disperses during and after hurricanes and other tropical storms. Due to these frogs having continuous fertility and no selectivity in mate choice, their breeding season lasts almost the entirety of the year in Florida. -Dana, Resource Intern #audubonsociety

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The Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) inhabits shallow freshwater wetlands and are one of the only amphibians that can also inhabit brackish marshes. Urbanization, loss of habitat, and water pollution have reduced or eliminated some local populations of southern leopard frogs. These frogs however are adaptable, and they thrive where ever they can find a healthy and clean water source. - Dana, Resource Intern #audubonsociety #frogs #amphibians

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Thanks to @cocacola and @seaworld for supporting restoration of wet prairies and marshes, leading to amazing scenes of foraging birds like this! #audubonsociety #birds #birdsofinstagram #restoration

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Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) are cavity nesting ducks, they cannot create their own nesting cavity. They build nests in abandoned woodpecker holes or natural tree cavities caused by disease, fire or lightning. They typically choose a tree more than 1-2 feet in diameter, with a cavity anywhere from 2–60 feet high with higher sites being preferred. #audubonsociety #birds #birdsofinstagram #ducks

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Next up on Trail Cam Tuesday is the mascot of the National Audubon Society, the Great Egret (Ardea Alba). This beautiful bird becomes even more pristine during the breeding season. The patch of skin on their face turns neon green, and long plumes called aigrettes grow from their backs. -Dana, Resource Intern #audubonsociety #birds #birdsofinstagram

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First up on Trail Cam Tuesday are Black Bellied Whistling Ducks (Dendrocygna autumnalis)! These ducks form lifelong pair bonds during the winter, and breed within the first year of their lives. Their courtship rituals include stretching out their necks, dipping their bills, and flicking water on their desired mate's back. -Dana, Resource Intern #audubonsociety #birds #birdsofinstagram #ducks

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Lemon Bacopa or Blue Waterhyssop (Bacopa caroliniana) is a native Florida herb common in fresh and brackish waters. This plant is recognizable by its hairy upper stem, blue flowers, and the lemony scent it gives off when its leaves are crushed. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #flplants #nativeplants

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Cooters (Genus name Pseudemys) include large herbivorous freshwater turtles of the Southeastern United States. Recent evidence suggests the Florida Cooter (P. floridana) and the River Cooter (P. concinna) belong to the same species. These turtles are also in close relation to the Peninsula Cooter (P. peninsularis). - Resource Intern, Dana #audubonsociety #flwildlife #turtles

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Painted-Leaf (Poinsettia cyathophora) is a native Florida plant related to Christmas Poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima). The flowers are very reduced and the stems and leaves release a poisonous, milky sap. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #nativeplants #plantnative

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The diet of the Florida Softshell Turtle (Apalone ferox) mainly consists of snails and fish. They are also known to eat waterfowl such as ducks and even herons. Resource Intern -Dana #audubonsociety #flwildlife

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Its that time of year again for Wildlife Wednesday! Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes (Crotalus adamanteus) give live birth to 7-21 young, typically in late summer through early fall. Rattlesnakes have a heavy triangular head and elliptical eyes like a cat's. If you see a rattlesnake you should not harass it and give the snake its space. #audubonsociety #rattlesnake #flwildlife

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This weeks Trail Cam Tuesday starts off with the North American River Otter (Lantra canadensis)! The North American River Otter is capable of closing their nostrils during long dives! That's "otterly" amazing! Resource Intern, -Dana #audubonsociety #mammals #flwildlife #otters

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It is the time of the year to give your yard and gardens some TLC! The Nature Store has some wonderful bird statues, wind chimes and stuff for the birds. Stop in and have a look! Our contact information is 239-348-9151 or cssnaturestore@audubon.org #audubonsociety #naturestore #gifts

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New arrivals this week are these beautiful hand painted ornaments! They are painted on the inside of the globe with miniature curved and bent-shafted brushes. Stop in the Nature Store and grab one of these unique treasures before they are gone. To contact us you may call 239-348-9151 or email us at Cssnaturestore@audubon.org #audubonsociety #audubonfl #naturecenter

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Black-and-White Warblers (Mniotilta varia) make their nests closer to the ground in hidden locations. These could be at the bases of rocks, boulders, fallen logs, or even under bush-like plants. Some times they build their nests atop a tree stump or in rock crevices. Resource Intern, -Dana #audubonsociety #birdsofinstagram #birds

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Leafless Beaked Orchid (Sacoila lanceolata var. lanceolata) is a plant that flowers without any leaves. It flowers in Florida from April to June and is easily recognizable on several Florida's highways and interstates. It can have population sizes of 200-400 plants. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #flplants

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Today is Audubon Day! John James Audubon was born on April 26th, 1785 and was an ornithologist, naturalist, and painter noted for his detailed illustrations of different bird species including many species that can be seen right here at Corkscrew. To learn more about corkscrew’s history, please visit: corkscrew.audubon.org/about/sanctuary #audubonsociety #audubonfl #history #johnjamesaudubon

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Fakahatchee grass (Tripsacum dactyloides) is a native Florida clumping grass. These clumps are between four and six feet tall and wide. The flowers can be rust colored and appear in late spring on stout spikes that rise above the leaves. Fun fact: Fakahatchee grass is the larval food plant for the Byssus Skipper butterfly. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #nativeplants

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The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an ectothermic species meaning they can only control their body temperature externally. They do this by means of sunbathing, absorbing the heat from the sun with the help of the dark pigmentation of their armored skin. Resource Intern -Dana #audubonsociety #flwildlife #wildflorida

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As I leave Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary this week, I wanted to share a few of my favorite pictures and sightings from my time here. I have lost count of how many times I’ve walked the boardwalk, but every experience is different and the walk never gets old. You never know what wildlife you’ll encounter, so take a little extra time on the boardwalk or visit at a different time of day, you may just notice something you hadn’t before! -Amy, Education Intern #audubonsociety #educationintern

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Next up on Trailcam Tuesday, we have a Limpkin (Aramus guarauna). Limpkins eat mostly large apple snails but in Florida, they will also eat other kinds of snails and mussels and sometimes insects, crustaceans, worms, frogs, and lizards. They forage by walking in shallow water and by probing in mud and among floating vegetation. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #limpkin #birds #birdsofinstagram

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First up on Trailcam Tuesday this week is the Florida Black Bear (Ursus americanus floridanus). Florida Black Bears have acute senses. They are believed to see in color and have great up close eyesight. They have great hearing that is about twice as sensitive as humans, and their sense of smell is the strongest, being able to pick up a scent from over a mile away. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #flblackbear #bears

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Didn’t get the family out to Corkscrew Today? Come on out tomorrow or Monday to celebrate. Children 18 and under are FREE tomorrow and Monday with a paying adult. #celebratenature #earthday #corkscrewswampsanctuary #audubonfl #audubonsociety

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On #VolunteerRecognitionDay2019 we’d like to recognize Phil Nye, a fixture at Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary since he first joined as a volunteer in February 1996. Since moving to Naples from Ohio, Phil has been a regular boardwalk naturalist, serving on both the Tuesday and Friday teams, with more than 13,000 career hours. Thanks, Phil! #corkscrewswampsanctuary #audubonfl #audubonaocisty #volunteer

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Leavenworth’s Tickseed (Coreopsis leavenworthii) is a member of the genus designated as the state wildflower of Florida. This species flowers all year in South Florida and will reseed itself. It has bright yellow flowers with a dark brown center as shown in the picture below. See if you can find them around Corkscrew! -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #flnativeplants #coreopsis

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The Eastern Lubber Grasshopper (Romalea microptera) is quite clumsy and slow moving. It mostly travels by walking and crawling slowly over the ground. “Lubber” is derived from an old English word “lobre” which means lazy or clumsy which appropriately describes this grasshopper. -Resource Intern, Dana #audubonsociety

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Alligator Flag (Thalia geniculata) is a large emersed plant that grows in swamps and wet ditches. It got its name from the Alligators that live below its leaves. It is thought that when an Alligator swims below, the leaves sway like a flag. -Kendall, Conservation Intern #audubonsociety #nativeplants

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The Barred Owl (Strix varia) is active during the day, and although the females and males have similar plumage patterns, females are 30 percent heavier than the males. -Resource Intern, Dana #audubonsociety #birdsofinstagram #owls #owlsofinstagram

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Last week I had the amazing opportunity to assist the Corkscrew research team with their monthly Wood Stork flights. The purpose of these flights is to monitor nesting of Wood Storks and other wading birds in various known colony locations in Lee and Collier counties, including at Corkscrew. It was a truly incredible experience to see the beautiful landscape of the Western Everglades from a bird’s eye view. Learn more about research at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary and check in for periodic updates on our website: http://corkscrew.audubon.org/conservation/western-everglades-science -Amy, Education Intern #audubonsociety #research