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doctorswithoutborders

More than 50,000 migrants and refugees from countries such as Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq arrived in Greece in 2018. We continue to provide medical and mental healthcare to migrants on the Greek islands and the mainland. In mainland Greece, thousands of migrants are forced to live in camps, temporary shelters set up by NGOs, occupied houses or on the streets. Since the so-called EU-Turkey deal in March 2016, migrants, asylum seekers and refugees who were in transit through the Greek islands have been trapped waiting for their status to be determined. Consequently, they spend long periods in inadequate reception centers, with poor access to healthcare and the fear of being sent back to Turkey, which exacerbates their medical and mental health problems.⁣ ⁣ Swiss artist @caroleisler visited some of our projects in Greece in Athens and the island of Chios in 2019, where she sketched portraits of people and MSF staff. Back in Switzerland, she transformed these sketches into aquarelles.⁣ ⁣ "When asked what event makes you laugh, a 19-year-old Cameroonian replied that Barcelona had won against Paris in football. This shows how much interest can be the same everywhere in the world, among young and old alike. We all live on the same planet and we as human beings should be more united with each other. Here in Switzerland, we have the abundance and privilege of education and security. It is a bit contradictory to be here again now and to know that people are in this camp where the circumstances are simply not human. And we are here, simply because we were lucky enough to be born in Switzerland and to have a Swiss passport."⁣ - Artist Carole Isler ⁣ #WorldRefugeeDay #WRD2019 #StandWithRefugees #ForcedFromHome #Greece #drawing #portrait #aquarelle #migration #art

doctorswithoutborders

Being human: "Having a loving heart, not doing things to others which you would not want happening to you, having empathy." -Nicolas⁣ ⁣ Carole Isler, a Swiss artist, visited our projects in Athens and on the island of Chios to sketch portraits of refugees, migrants and MSF staff and share their stories. In a time when a lot of rhetoric around refugees is dehumanizing, Carole asked what it means to be human, and what are the passions and dreams of people forced from home.⁣ ⁣ @forcedfromhome⁣ #WorldRefugeeDay #WRD2019 #StandWithRefugees #Human #doctorswithoutborders #Greece #drawing #art #portrait #msf #refugees #empathy #forcedfromhome

doctorswithoutborders

"I used to do taekwondo, but that’s not allowed for women in Afghanistan. I would love to be a lawyer for women’s rights...I always try to help whoever needs help. I don’t understand jealousy. I never feel jealous of others. If I can help people, I just help." - Roya⁣ ⁣ These are the thoughts, hopes and passions that asylum seekers, refugees and migrants shared with artist Carole Isler. They crossed the Mediterranean seeking a better, safer life only to find themselves trapped in Greece, unable to move forward. It's World Refugee Day, and there are now 70.8 million people forced from home around the world—more than at any time in modern history.⁣ ⁣ #standwithrefugees #wrd2019 #worldrefugeeday #Afghanistan #Greece #human #artist #drawing #sketch #portrait #refugees #asylumseeker #asylum #seekingsafetyisnotacrime⁣

doctorswithoutborders

“My big dream is to get my PhD and go back to @doctorswithoutborders in Amman and work as [a] psychologist. I want to work with trauma victims and other people going through difficult times. I think I know how to help others with similar experiences—that is my new dream.”⁣ ⁣ This week Qusay flew to New York and attended the premiere of Open My Eyes, an MSF film about his journey as a survivor, a patient, an Iraqi refugee, a student, and an advocate. (watch the documentary in our bio and click this image again).⁣ ⁣ In Iraq in 2007, after his injury left him blind, Qusay said he could not find support for people with disabilities. For two years Qusay didn’t leave his house. He slept through the days in pain and spent the nights by the fire with his father, who told vivid stories about people overcoming obstacles. When we was resettled in Texas in 2012, "It was difficult at first...thank God He gave me the patience. I found the love, the help, the support. I found people who believed in me. There are some mean people, but there are a lot of wonderful people trying to help."⁣ ⁣ Qusay has given motivational talks all over the world. Early last year he traveled to Romania to talk to teenagers who were orphaned at a young age. Shortly afterward he went to Iraq to speak to people with disabilities with an organization that focuses on advocacy for women and children. He has also traveled around the US—including to Washington, D.C., Florida, California, and Oklahoma. Recently, after giving a talk at ACC, two women approached him and said that he changed their lives; he was the reason they had the confidence and motivation to register for classes.⁣ ⁣ He's now a first-year student at the University of Texas @utaustintx ⁣ ⁣ Photo: Britta Olson⁣ ______⁣ ⁣ #doctorswithoutborders #standwithrefugees #refugees #worldrefugeeday #psychology #universityoftexas #Austin #Iraq #Mosul #blind #disabilityawareness #refugeeswelcome #openmyeyes #Amman @msfarabic

doctorswithoutborders

"I needed to go to a country that believes in me. When people think 'refugee', I'm one of them. [But] people don't identify me, I identify myself." Qusay landed in Austin with absolutely no idea where he was going. Blinded by a suicide bombing in Iraq in 2006, he was eager to try somehow to make a better life in the United States. We first met Qusay a few years after the attack in Mosul. ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ He spent three years at the @doctorswithoutborders hospital in Amman undergoing multiple surgeries and receiving rehabilitative care. Dr. Albustanji worked with a team of orthopedic and plastic surgeons to repair the injuries left untended in Iraq. ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ The metal plates that were fixated to the right side of Qusay’s face years earlier had become infected. Now that his bones had healed, they could be removed. This meant that Qusay no longer needed someone to help shower him and wash his hair. He underwent multiple surgeries to try and restore his ability to breathe through his nose. MSF doctors also replaced the skin on his nose. (An earlier transplant had used skin from his scalp, so every morning Qusay had to shave the thick black hair that grew where it shouldn’t.)⁣ ⁣ ⁣ The surgical team also rebuilt his top lip, lifted up his eyelids, implanted prosthetic eyes, and took cartilage from his ears to reshape part of his forehead. ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ Qusay jokes that he was particularly pleased with that surgery as it made his ears smaller. “He likes to make jokes to make people around laugh,” said Dr. Albustanji. “When you visit him in the morning after surgery, he has a sense of humor. And [people] were surprised how this young man with this misery can laugh.”⁣ ⁣ ⁣ Check out more of Qusay's inspiring story by clicking the link in bio and clicking the photo again.⁣ ⁣ Photo @neginallam⁣ ——————⁣ ⁣ #doctorswithoutborders #standwithrefugees #surgery #plasticsurgery #injury #inspiration #healing #mentalhealth #rebuild #portrait #Iraq #Mosul #refugee #blind #disabilityawareness #prosthetic⁣

doctorswithoutborders

3/3) Phumeza ( @ptisile), from Khayelitsha in South Africa, was diagnosed with TB in 2010, and her diagnosis later changed to multi-drug resistant TB, and finally extensively drug-resistant TB. ____ Because of her treatment, Phumeza lost her hearing. She eventually received two cochlear implants, paid for by privately-raised funds. Having regained her hearing, Phumeza is committed to raising awareness around the harshness of drug-resistant TB treatment and the need for shorter, less toxic alternatives. ____ “I like to promote the idea that often the most meaningful thing you can do as a survivor of TB is share your experience directly with someone who has TB, helping to keep them positive on what remains a very difficult journey." ___ © @jellekrings #rp @msf_southernafrica ___ #msf #doctorswithoutborders #tb #tuberculosis #medicalaid #healthcare #humanity #picoftheday #breakthestigma

doctorswithoutborders

(2/3) Eldest son of Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, Prince Nhlanganiso Zulu was diagnosed with TB in 2010. He spent three months in a Durban hospital before having one of his lungs removed. When telling his story, the Prince touches on the importance of educating men in his community on health and wellness. ____ “Many of us Zulu men are trapped in this habit of avoiding health facilities when we do not feel well – it’s an old mind-set and for this to change men are going to have to step forward to set a new example. My ambition is to start this movement.” ____ As a TB survivor the prince devotes much of his time to social and health advocacy. He is passionate about raising TB awareness, and in his capacity as National TB Ambassador he has been visiting many male-only, predominantly Zulu hostels in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng. Head to the link in our bio for more. ____ Photo © @jellekrings #rp @msf_southernafrica ____ #msf #doctorswithoutborders #tb #tuberculosis #stigma #breakthestigma #activist #treatment #medical #humanitarian #picoftheday #zulu #prince

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(1/3) This weekend we’re profiling “TB Leaders” - people whose lives have been touched by TB or drug-resistant TB, aiming to empower a new generation of TB activists to join the fight for better TB treatment and care. ___ Miss South Africa 2018 @tamaryngreen was diagnosed with TB while at University and believes her studies might well have been interrupted if it wasn’t for the support of her parents. “TB is not only a physical disease but an emotional and mental one, too, and for that a support structure is critical. Another big issue is stigma – a lot of TB carriers don’t come forward due to fear of what others will think and say, and many stop taking treatment for the same reason. Many treat TB sufferers poorly out of fear that they will become infected.” ___ To address this, Tamaryn launched the #BreakTheStigma campaign in 2018 to contribute to broader TB awareness. Head to the link in our bio to learn more. ___ Photo © @jellekrings #rp @msf_southernafrica ____ #msf #doctorswithoutborders #tb #tuberculosis #stigma #breakthestigma #activist #treatment #medical #humanitarian #picoftheday #MissSouthAfrica

doctorswithoutborders

This week on @doctorswithoutborders, we’ll be talking about one of the worst man-made man humanitarian crises of our time. Yemen is in the grip of war. It is also one of the poorest countries in the world.  Since March 2015, forces loyal to President Hadi, backed by a Saudi and Emirati-led coalition, have been fighting anti-government Ansar Allah forces, resulting in bombing, gun battles and widespread destruction. Fast forward to 2019 - hospitals across the country have been destroyed, thousands of Yemenis have been killed and millions more displaced or forced to flee. The remaining population have faced outbreaks of deadly diseases like cholera and diphtheria, while struggling to make ends meet. Since the conflict began in March 2015, we’ve treated more than one million patients in our emergency rooms and provided over 80,000 surgical interventions. Check out our Instagram story tomorrow for more background on the conflict and our work on the ground in Yemen. Photo credits: 1-2: Sebastiano Tomada ( @sebastianotomadaphoto), 3: Agnes Varraine-Leca (@agnesvarraineleca), 4-6: Rawan Shaif ( @rawanssa), 7: Guillaume Binet (@_g_binet_), 8: Ehab Zawati, 9: Agnes Varraine-Leca #Yemen #MSF #doctorswithoutborders #emergency #displacedpeople #refugee #crisis #medicalcare #humanitarian #Aden #Mocha #Haydan

doctorswithoutborders

(3/3) “My job includes going door to door and visiting bottle stores and brothels where I meet sex workers and provide them with information related to HIV testing and how they can take care of their health,” says Margaret, a community health worker. “For those who agree to be tested for HIV we set up a home visit. With these services, I feel more empowered than before and I can negotiate protection with my clients. I know how to put a condom on properly, and we now have lubricant which prevents accidents. While some people used to look at us as animals, things have changed. . . Today, the perception that people have towards sex workers is improved. Today, people understand that HIV affects everyone. And if we are to deal with HIV once and for all, the first step is to accept and recognise that, despite being different, we are all human beings.” . . . Photo credit: @isabelcorthier #msf #HVAD #doctorswithoutborders #HIV #sexworkers #Malawi #medicalcare #communityhealth #sexworkiswork

doctorswithoutborders

(2/3) “In the past, most sex workers shied away from visiting health centres for fear of discrimination and stigma, especially if they were found HIV positive,” says Alice, an MSF community health worker. “Sex workers need healthcare in their daily lives: if a condom bursts, if they have an STI, or need to be screened for cervical cancer. If women needed post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) – a treatment that prevents HIV if taken within 72 hours of exposure – they just didn’t go to the hospital because they knew they wouldn’t be helped. . . . Photo credit: @isabelcorthier #msf #HVAD #doctorswithoutborders #HIV #sexworkers #Malawi #medicalcare #communityhealth #sexworkiswork

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(1/3) “I started having sex in exchange for things as my grandparents were not able to provide for me,” says Bernadette. “This is how I got pregnant and dropped out of school. When I became a sex worker I didn’t know anything about contraception. I had heard of HIV but never thought about contracting it myself. This was the first time I was given information on issues like HIV testing and sexual health. I saw it as an amazing opportunity that could help me to be healthy, no matter my circumstances.” Bernadette has just received a health education session from Emily – an MSF community health worker –at the bar where Bernadette lives and works. . . Emily listened closely to what Bernadette had to say, because she too was a sex worker. She knew where Bernadette came from and what she was facing every day. Click the link in our bio for more. . . In southern Malawi, an MSF project is helping thousands of women who earn their living from sex work to overcome barriers in accessing healthcare – partly by training and employing some as community health workers. . . Many of the community health workers are often shunned by their families and communities, facing abuse and hostility because of what they do. . . Recognising these gaps, MSF has been working with the Ministry of Health to provide services that meet the specific needs of sex workers. . . Photo credit: @isabelcorthier #msf #HVAD #doctorswithoutborders #HIV #sexworkers #Malawi #medicalcare #communityhealth #sexworkiswork

doctorswithoutborders

(3/3) The burden of caring for the injured – who are overwhelmingly men – has fallen mostly on their wives and mothers. . . “My wife is tired too,” says Ahmed. “She keeps asking when I will be better. She wants to live a normal life of course, she’s human. She said she wants to go back to her family, but I need her for so many things.” He describes the pure frustration of being unable to wear trousers, to go shopping, to lift his children for fear of the pain. “If there wasn’t the internet, you would die,” he says of his year of boredom. “Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, they let you see another world.” . . . . “I wish that my leg had been cut off, so that at least now I wouldn’t have any pain”, he says. A year on from his injury, no one can tell him when that pain might end. . . . Photo credit: @mohmdabed #doctorswithoutborders #MSF #Gaza #May14 #Palestine #protests #medicalcare #humanitarian #GreatMarchofReturn

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(2/3) A farmer from the far south of the Strip, Ahmed delights in describing the animals he looked after, the plants he grew, the yoghurt and cheese he made – all impossible now, with a leg still missing three centimetres of bone even after multiple operations. “I just want to sleep, to take medication, that’s all I can do,” Ahmed says. . . . This week marks one year since the deadliest week of protests at the Israel – Gaza border. The hopes of injured Palestinians to find adequate treatment are fading, and people are stuck in painful limbo while the effects of their injuries take an ever greater toll on them and their loved ones. . . . Photo credit: @mohmdabed #doctorswithoutborders #MSF #Gaza #May14 #Palestine #protests #medicalcare #humanitarian #GreatMarchofReturn

doctorswithoutborders

(1/3) “I went peacefully, as a citizen,” explains Ahmed, 38, who was shot while protesting at the Israel – Gaza border on 14 May last year. “Since 2000 there have been three wars, all of Gaza under fire, 13 years of the blockade, two separate states in the West Bank and Gaza. We are oppressed.” . . . . . On 14 May 2018, the Israeli army shot more than 1,300 Palestinians, killing 60 people, during the bloodiest day of the weekly protests by the fence between Gaza and Israel. A year later, many injured citizens are still struggling with the devastating consequences of their wounds. . . . Photo credit: @mohmdabed #doctorswithoutborders #MSF #Gaza #May14 #Palestine #protests #medicalcare #humanitarian #GreatMarchofReturn

doctorswithoutborders

Why I became a nurse: My name is Thok Johnson Gony. I was born in Bor, in the greater upper Nile region of what was then Sudan. As a child refugee, I almost lost my life to measles. Living today is itself a miracle. My eyes become teary whenever I remember my childhood. It was filled with distress, misery and hopelessness in the refugee camp. • Finding my purpose: I cleared my mind of the anguish that was consuming me. As a result, I started excelling in school, one educational level after another.  Growing up seeing medical professionals saving lives in the refugee camp, including my own, deeply moved me. Their empathy inspired me a lot. The burning desire to directly help people in need of medical care became my greatest motivation, and I got my bachelor's in nursing. • Since 2012, I have been undertaking assignments in different @doctorswithoutborders projects around the world.  My experience in all the countries I have worked is a true manifestation that South Sudan is full of professionals who can work in any part of the world. From a child refugee to an international medical coordinator. Isn’t it a great journey? • Photo: Dirk Jan van der Poel #SouthSudan #NursesWeek #Nurses #NursesDay #aidworker #internationalnursesday #Sudan #inspiration #standwithrefugees #refugee #forcedfromhome

doctorswithoutborders

"I’ve wanted to be a nurse since childhood. My mother is a midwife, and she’s an inspiration to me. I came to work in the @doctorswithoutborders's Naga project because I wanted to be close to the patients, to work with them in their villages and to provide medical care directly. My family is probably tired of hearing about my work all the time! ⁣ ⁣ Here in Naga, there is little health education and people don’t trust strangers easily. Not everyone realizes that they can come to the MSF mobile clinics for treatment. Because of that, we work a lot with village administrators – they help to introduce us to communities, build trust, and explain our services. The challenges we face as a team bring us closer together. " - Nurse Ma May Sandi Aung in Myanmar⁣ ⁣ Photo: Scott Hamilton⁣ (@s_cottham) ⁣ #doctorswithoutborders #nursesweek #nursesday #nurse💉 #portrait #care #Myanmar #nurselife

doctorswithoutborders

“Last December, I was run over by a van [a shared taxi] on my way to school. “The driver was going too fast and he didn’t see me when I crossed the street. As soon as he realised he had driven over me, he stopped. He was really shocked. He asked all the men in the van to get out and drove me straight to the hospital. My legs were badly hurt. I was taken directly to the emergency room and operated on. At first, the doctors told my dad and I that I would probably lose my legs. I was so scared. “But then another doctor came who said he would do all he could to save them. I had four more operations then and I’ve had another eight since I arrived here at this hospital back in January. To pass the time, I brought my books from school and I study every day. I also like to play dominos with the psychologist; I’m very good at it and I always beat her. “I’ve also become friends with some of the boys here, but we cannot spend a lot of time together or get too close to each other; most of us have bacteria and wear a green gown. I am impatient to get rid of this wheelchair. I won’t be accepted at school if I arrive in it. The doctors promised me crutches. And they told me that I could get out of the hospital as soon as I can stand again on my feet.” Salim is 11 and is one of our many child patients at our post-operative facility in Mosul. MSF has been providing lifesaving services for people caught up in the violence in and around Mosul since late 2016. Throughout 2017 and 2018, MSF ran several trauma stabilisation posts in East and West Mosul, and ran a range of services, including emergency and intensive care, surgery and maternal healthcare in four hospitals and mental health services in three primary healthcare centres. In April 2018, MSF opened a comprehensive post-operative care facility in East Mosul. Photo credit: Elisa Fourt #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Iraq #AMR #antibioticresistance #Mosul #healthcare #survivors

doctorswithoutborders

“Last year, I had to have an operation because there was a problem with my kidneys. “During my surgery, the doctors accidentally cut my leg. After that, it started to get infected. My mum and I went to various hospitals; we spent most of the year trying to find ways to heal my leg. Last month, we finally came here [to the MSF post-operative hospital] and I had two more operations. “During my first days here, I cried a lot. I was scared, and I didn’t know anyone at this hospital. But the psychologist and the health promotion team made me feel better. They come to see me every day. They are very nice with me. I wrote each of their names on the wall in my room. When I look at them, it makes me smile.” Marwa is 9 and is one of our many child patients at our post-operative facility in Mosul. Photo credit: Elisa Fourt #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Iraq #AMR #antibioticresistance #Mosul #healthcare #survivors

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“One day last summer, I was walking in the street with my little brother. Suddenly, I heard a big explosion and my brother screamed like he never had before. I turned around and couldn’t see him anymore. Another explosion happened. This time it was my turn to fall. My brother died on the spot; a piece of shrapnel had pierced his heart. I was struck in the eye, leg and hand. We were taken to the hospital. “The doctors tried to save my leg, but they couldn’t. After the hospital, my dad had to pay for all my physiotherapy sessions. It was expensive, and he didn’t really have the money. The doctors had given me a crutch to help me stand up, so I decided that I would learn to walk with it by myself. I’m super-fast now I’m used to it.” “Then I came here [to the MSF post-operative hospital]. The MSF doctors told me that I have something called ‘antibiotic resistance’. That’s why everything was taking so long to get better. Every day, the doctors come see me and then I do an hour of physiotherapy. I hope I can get a prosthetic leg soon, and that I’ll be able to go back to school. I have some friends here, but we can’t really play together. Sometimes I feel alone. But then I take my crutch and I walk fast with it. It reminds me that I am strong.” Abdallah is 12 years old and is one of our patients at our post-operative care facility in Mosul. Photo credit: Elisa Fourt #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Iraq #AMR #antibioticresistance #Mosul #healthcare #survivors

doctorswithoutborders

“The most important impact is that we're now able to treat more patients quicker and better at the same time, right at the bedside. The other is that it democratizes medical care. It allows our staff from every country, and especially the country we work in, to be able to improve their own skill.” -Adi Nadimpalli, former MSF-USA Board Vice President and physician⁣⁣ ⁣ Photo by Adi Nadimpalli/MSF⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ #doctorswithoutborders #POCUS #ultrasound #medicalaid #medicaltraining #southsudan

doctorswithoutborders

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a revolutionary diagnostic tool that can help save lives. MSF launched a POCUS project in South Sudan in early 2017 to see how we could use the newer, more portable, and more affordable ultrasound machines in the field. Hospitals in the field lack sophisticated diagnostic tests and machinery. Training our local staff members to use ultrasound helps them to make more accurate diagnoses and allows them to be even more confident in their expertise.⁣ ⁣ Photo by Adi Nadimpalli/MSF⁣ ⁣ #doctorswithoutborders #POCUS #ultrasound #medicalaid #medicaltraining #southsudan

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On Wednesday this week we distributed soap and a chlorine solution that families can use to purify their drinking water in the town of Buzi, Mozambique. Following the destruction of Cyclone Idai, The MSF team first reached those stranded in Buzi by helicopter on 25 March and immediately sent teams to support the health centre, which was badly damaged by the cyclone, and start water and sanitation activities as well as rehabilitate the hospital. . Click the link in our bio for more on our Cyclone Idai response. . Photo © MSF/@pgarrigos027 . #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Mozambique #Buzi #CycloneIdai #Idai #cyclone #chlorine #waterandsanitation #watsan #relief #aid

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An MSF doctor tests a patient for malaria in one of the MSF health clinics in Bili, Democratic Republic of Congo. This #NationalDoctorsDay, we’d like to thank all our medical staff across the movement who help keep our work going each day. Being out in the field can bring its challenges, but our staff stay resilient, passionate and positive throughout it all. To find out more about our work, and how you can support us, click the link in our bio. Photo © Vincenzo Livieri #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #NationalDoctorsDay #DRC #Malaria #medical #doctors #refugees #Bili #frontline

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MSF doctors and nurses are seen during an emergency case at the trauma center, a department of the Mother and Child Hospital. Taiz Houban, Yemen, 2018. This #NationalDoctorsDay, we’d like to thank all our medical staff across the movement who help keep our work going each day. Being out in the field can bring its challenges, but our staff stay resilient, passionate and positive throughout it all. To find out more about our work, and how you can support us, click the link in our bio. Photo © Matteo Bastianelli #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #NationalDoctorsDay #Yemen #traumacentre #medical #doctors #refugees #Taiz #frontline

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A Congolese refugee diagnosed with cholera receives care at the Medecins Sans Frontieres / Doctors Without Borders cholera treatment centre in Sebagoro, Uganda. This #NationalDoctorsDay, we’d like to thank all our medical staff across the movement who help keep our work going each day. Being out in the field can bring its challenges, but our staff stay resilient, passionate and positive throughout it all. To find out more about our work, and how you can support us, click the link in our bio. Photo credit © Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #NationalDoctorsDay #Congo #Cholera #medical #doctors #refugees # Uganda #frontline

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Our emergency teams on the ground in Beira, Mozambique, have started to set up mobile clinics for survivors of Cyclone Idai on the outskirts of the city. Flood levels have slightly receded in some areas, meaning emergency mobile medical teams can reach Centro de Saude Marocanne, a key health centre in the region. As the centre itself is entirely destroyed, the team have been providing primary healthcare consultations door to door in the community, ensuring everyone can access a degree of healthcare and support. The team are mainly treating small wounds, stomach issues and respiratory tract infections. To find out more on what we’re doing to support people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe affected by #CycloneIdai, click the link in our bio. Photo credit: Caitlin Ryan #CycloneIdai #Mozambique #Cyclone #Flooding #Beira #medicalsupport #MSFAction #healthcare #emergencyresponse #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders

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An MSF team walk on foot to access a village cut off by damage caused by Cyclone Idai in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe. Cyclone Idai has caused significant flooding to the district of Chimanimani. With many roads and vital bridges connecting the district to outside resources washed away for several kilometres, the only way to reach some communities now is by foot. Two of our outreach teams are working inside the district. We are trying to access as many of Chimanimani’s 20 health clinics and surrounding settlements as possible, to assess health needs and distribute medicines to clinics and village health workers. This is the first time many parts have been accessed from outside since the cyclone hit. In some parts of Chimanimani, the flooding washed away entire homes, shops and factories. Many lost their livelihoods as well as chronic medication. A fixed team is also working with health ministry staff out of the main Chimanimani hospital. To find out more on what we’re doing to support people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe affected by #CycloneIdai, click the link in our bio. Photo credit: MSF #CycloneIdai #Zimbabwe #Cyclone #Flooding #medicalsupport #Chimanimani #MSFAction #healthcare #emergencyresponse #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders

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On Sunday night (24 March), we sent three chartered flights packed with emergency supplies from Ostend, Belgium to Beira, Mozambique, where an emergency response is underway after #CycloneIdai and subsequent flooding devastated the area. The shipment (part of which is pictured) weighed a total of 43.3 tons and included medical kits, water and sanitation supplies, logistical equipment and other items needed for our emergency response operations on the ground in Mozambique. Cyclone Idai left a trail of destruction and catastrophic flooding in its wake after it made landfall at the port city of Beira on the night of 14 March. With all road access to the affected area cut, the response has been significantly hampered. We sent in our first emergency assessment team on 18 March, and on 21 March we began initial medical response activities. But the needs are enormous, and more supplies are needed to scale up the response. To find out more on what we’re doing to support people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe affected by #CycloneIdai, click the link in our bio. Photo credit: @albertmasias #CycloneIdai #Mozambique #Cyclone #Flooding #Beira #medicalsupport #MSFAction #healthcare #emergencyresponse #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders

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Our mobile clinic team travels down the Phow River in South Sudan, a tributary of the White Nile, to reach patients. There are no roads to access these communities. They can only get there by boat. The trip takes two hours to reach the village of Diehl, where patients await our team’s care.⁣ ⁣ ⁣ To find out more about our work in South Sudan, and our innovations there, click the link in our bio and select this image again.⁣ ⁣⁣ Photo by @FredericNoy⁣ December 2017⁣ ⁣⁣ #SouthSudan #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Boat #Nile #MedicalAid ⁣

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At nighttime, in Old Fangak, South Sudan, this young mother brought her malaria-afflicted daughter to the emergency ward of our hospital. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Four million people, a third of the population of South Sudan, have been displaced by years of conflict. One of the biggest tragedies in South Sudan is that many of the diseases we see are preventable and treatable. Access to healthcare remains a major challenge and life or death can hinge on how soon a patient reaches a clinic.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ To find out more about our work in South Sudan, click the link in our bio.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Photo by @FredericNoy⁣⁣ December 2017 ⁣⁣ #SouthSudan #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Malaria #MotherAndChild #MedicalAid #PreventableDiseases

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MSF physiotherapist Pierre Moreau puts a transparent 3D printed mask, specially designed to compress scars, on burn patient Noor’s face. Noor wears her mask every day, in the hope that her skin will start to soften. Every day, it slowly heals. The 3D printing project in our Amman hospital aims to evaluate new technologies to give access to specific care such as prosthetics and orthotics for neglected people. Launched in March 2017, MSF provides cheap, adapted, lighter, in-house prosthetics services based on 3D technology for patients from the whole Middle East region. Photo credit: Hussein Amri / @pthussein #msf #amman #meditech #prosthetics #doctorswithoutborders #dwb #msf #healthcare #physio #inthefield

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Originally from Fallujah in Iraq, Noor, 7, was burned in a bombing three years ago. Accompanied by her brother Salah, she came to the MSF hospital in Jordan for several surgeries and skin transplants. The latter required skin expanders for nearly three months. The 3D printing project in our Amman hospital aims to evaluate new technologies to give access to specific care such as prosthetics and orthotics for neglected people. Launched in March 2017, MSF provides cheap, adapted, lighter, in-house prosthetics services based on 3D technology for patients from the whole Middle East region. Photo credit: Hussein Amri / @pthussein #msf #amman #meditech #prosthetics #doctorswithoutborders #dwb #msf #healthcare #physio #inthefield

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Noor, 7, is from Fallujah, Iraq. Burned in the face after an explosion three years ago, she arrived at our Amman Hospital in Jordan in August 2018. Noor's various facial surgeries were a real challenge for our team. A transparent mask adapted to compress the scars on Noor’s face was delivered to her on October 30, 2018. Since then, Noor wears her mask every day and her skin has begun to soften. For continuity of care, when Noor returns to Iraq, the team trained her brother, Salah, to massage his little sister with ointment. Noor is pictured here with her brother Salah, 27, and MSF physiotherapist Pierre Moreau . The 3D printing project in our Amman hospital aims to evaluate new technologies to give access to specific care, such as prosthetics and orthotics for neglected people. Launched in March 2017, MSF provides cheap, adapted, lighter, in-house prosthetics services based on 3D technology for patients from the whole Middle East region. Photo credit: Hussein Amri / @pthussein #msf #amman #meditech #prosthetics #doctorswithoutborders #dwb #msf #healthcare #physio #inthefield

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Silvia Márquez is the mental health activity manager of MSF in Yambio, South Sudan. Across South Sudan, children have been used as soldiers. ⁣ —— “In communities where the conflict had a major impact, some children have experienced rejection and fear they will never be accepted.” —— MSF has been working since February 2018 alongside other organisations to support the reintegration of these children into their communities. The team does medical screenings to assist any medical condition related to the armed conflict, including cases of sexual violence, and provides mental healthcare to help them overcome their experiences during their time as soldiers. ⁣ Over the past year alone, MSF has provided more than 1,430 medical consultations and 911 mental health sessions for demobilised children. To find out more about our work in South Sudan, click the link in our bio. Photo credit: @alex.mcbride⁣ ⁣ #doctorswithoutborders #MSF #eastafrica #displaced #southsudan #resilience #rehabilitation #community #support⁣

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Through various activities like door to door information dissemination, puppet shows, group discussions and street plays, MSF health educators work tirelessly to raise awareness on domestic and sexual violence in the community and wider society, so the victims seek timely treatment. @msfindia first opened the Umeed Ki Kiran clinic in November 2015 to respond to the medical needs of people affected by domestic and sexual violence. The clinic, located in the Jahangirpuri area of North Delhi, remains open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week providing all services in a friendly and confidential environment, through a team of trained and qualified doctors, nurses and counsellors. The services include treatment of injuries, prevention of HIV/AIDS, unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and psychosocial support. To find out more about our work with survivors sexual and gender-based violence, head to the link in our bio. Photo by Showkat Nanda #endsbgv #womensday #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #India #Delhi

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“He would come home drunk, beat me, urinate on my face and threaten to abuse me in worse ways.” This is Kamla’s story. A victim of child marriage, she was subject to sexual, emotional, physical and verbal abuse by her husband for over 15 years. Like many women, Kamla felt unable to share her story with anyone, thinking it was a private family matter. Seeking medical care wasn’t something she considered at all. Through its patient-centered approach, the Umeed ki Kiran clinic pictured here in Delhi not only provides medical and psychosocial help, but also educates the community on sexual and gender-based violence and the need for timely medical help. In other words, this year’s #IWD2019 theme of #BalanceForBetter is exactly what the clinic is about. Photo by Showkat Nanda To hear more about Kamla’s story, head to the link in our bio. #endsbgv #womensday #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #India #Delhi

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Shanti is the youngest in her team of health educators who work tirelessly in the Jahangirpuri community - walking around looking for groups of men, women and children to educate them about sexual and domestic violence. Sexually based gender violence is an invisible medical emergency, and a major public health issue. Global estimates indicate that 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. @msfindia's Umeed ki Kiran Clinic, where Shanti works, encourages victims of domestic and sexual violence to seek medical care it provides. This year’s #IWD2019 theme of #BalanceForBetter is exactly what the clinic is about. Through education and awareness raising the team work hard to help the community unlearn the shame and taboo associated with sexual violence and teach them that caring for their physical and mental health is a priority. To find out more about our work ending sexually based gender violence, head to the link in our bio. Photo by Showkat Nanda #endsbgv #womensday #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #India #Delhi

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“You have to laugh sometimes if you don’t want to get stuck.” Leonid, 53, is from Minsk. He spends his days and nights alone in a locked room in the intensive care unit of the city’s Republican TB Institute. He has been on TB treatment since 2003, and is currently in isolation as the disease is currently infectious. He suffers from nightmares, so the doctors are concerned about his mental condition and think he may be dangerous to other patients. - Leonid is convinced that his nightmares are caused by loneliness. He has a daughter and grandchildren but has not seen them since he got sick in 2003. Leonid has little to entertain himself with but still, despite the loneliness and the boredom, he is constantly cracking jokes and is determined to keep his spirits up. - MSF’s psychosocial team in Belarus works to help patients with tuberculosis (TB) overcome various challenges on their way to recovery. One of the team’s tasks is to keep the patients company and let them vent their fears and concerns or simply speak about whatever is important to them. - Photo credit: Viviane Dalles / @vivianedalles - #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Belarus #TB #Tuberculosis #Minsk #Loneliness

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“When I wake up in the morning, I don’t want to live. Then I get up, the pain slowly subsides, and little by little I want to live again.”⁣ ⁣ Lida, left, and Yulia, right, are inpatients in the Republican TB Institute in Minsk. They are both living with diagnoses of drug resistant TB, and Yulia is coping with drug addiction and is currently on methadone replacement therapy.⁣ Lida, who at 79 is the oldest patient in the hospital, does not know when she will be able to return home. Doctors have recommended that she stay indoors, so she spends most of her time reading with a magnifying glass. Yulia, who shares a room with Lida, keeps her company throughout the long days in the hospital. They get along very well and support each other. They can often be found throwing breadcrumbs out of the window to feed the pigeons, who they treat as pets. ⁣ ⁣ MSF’s psychosocial team in Belarus works to help patients with tuberculosis (TB) overcome various challenges on their way to recovery. One of the team’s tasks is to keep patients company, and to let them vent their fears and concerns or simply speak about whatever is important to them. ⁣ ⁣ Photo credit: Viviane Dalles ⁣ #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Belarus #TB #Tuberculosis #Minsk #Loneliness #MentalHealth

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“He couldn’t bear to hear nice things said about him – he wasn’t used to warmth.” Dmitry is one of the many patients who struggles with the loneliness and stigma a TB (tuberculosis) diagnosis can bring. ⁣ ⁣ He is being treated for drug-resistant tuberculosis in the Republican TB Institute in the Belarusian capital, Minsk. The TB drugs that he took previously caused one of his kidneys to collapse, so he will have to spend a long time in the hospital. He has three children living in Italy – they were adopted by an Italian family after his parental rights were taken away. “I haven’t seen my son since 2005. My children love me. I’m in touch with them, they write to me.” Separated from those close to them, many patients find solace in memories of their loved ones and in companionship with other patients. In TB wards, it is clear that those who have been deprived of company really understand the value of friendship. ⁣ ⁣ MSF’s psychosocial team in Belarus works to help patients with tuberculosis (TB) overcome various challenges on their way to recovery. One of the team’s tasks is to keep patients company, and to let them vent their fears and concerns or simply speak about whatever is important to them. ⁣ ⁣ Photo credit: Viviane Dalles ⁣ #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Belarus #TB #Tuberculosis #Minsk #Loneliness #MentalHealth

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“Most of our burn patients are children who are running around the kitchen and sustain burns from oil, water, or hot food spills. If the burn is severe, it is a serious emergency. First and foremost, you have to carry out resuscitation care and then fight against infections, which can be life-threatening. The first few days to a few weeks are crucial for the patient’s survival, but they also affect what kind of long-term consequences patients will endure.” Marine, MSF Physiotherapist . Photo by Spencer Platt in Haiti @gettyimages #burn #physiotherapy #haiti #medicalaid #doctorswithoutborders #msf

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For some patients, “This second phase of burn recovery is the longest. [The patient] is no longer at risk of dying, but the consequences that occur can seriously handicap him. The [scarred] skin loses its elasticity, becomes thicker, and, if the skin is too stiff, too thick, it will no longer allow movement,” says Marine, an MSF Physiotherapist. In a few weeks, a patient's own skin will become like a straightjacket that can prevent him or her from opening their hand, stretching out their elbow, standing up, or walking properly. It’s then that physiotherapy is essential. With the help of special tight clothing, custom splints, and specific exercises, the skin is stretched and softened to maintain its [elasticity]. For one to two years, burn survivors have to wear their compression garments day and night, exercising daily. ⁣ ⁣ Photo by @plattys1 in Haiti @gettyimages ⁣ #burn #physiotherapy #haiti #medicalaid #doctorswithoutborders #survivors #msf

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“I had originally come on this trip to Haiti to cover Carnival, a joyous celebration of Haitian history and culture. I found myself at the MSF clinic covering a very different aspect of Haitian life." Getty Photographer @plattys1 went to Port-au-Prince, where MSF runs Drouillard Hospital, the only specialized burn treatment center in the country. Severe burns are a widespread problem linked to dire living conditions in areas around the capitol. At Drouillard he met Maxim Alexson, who was burned from a fire on his work site. . Photo by Spencer Platt in Haiti @gettyimages #burn #physiotherapy #haiti #medicalaid #doctorswithoutborders #burnsurvivor #msf

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“In Congo...paranoia around the measles vaccine is far less common [than in the US and Europe]. Outbreaks there are frequent enough that the communities most susceptible to measles have memories of the toll the virus can take on them and urgently want their children to be vaccinated. They understand what a real measles epidemic means.” - Dr Natalie Roberts, Emergency Operations Coordinator. Click the link in bio and select this image for the full @washingtonpost article. . Photo by Juliette Muller #measles #drc #vaccineswork #epidemic #doctorswithoutborders

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Since 2006, we have vaccinated nearly 26 million children against measles. Measles remains one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide. It’s especially fatal for children living in crowded conditions, who are malnourished, or HIV positive. Vaccination is the best protection against measles. . Photo by Markel Redondo #measles #DRC #vaccineswork #pediatrics #doctorswithoutborders #medicalaid #epidemic #vaccination

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Our teams in Democratic Republic of Congo are responding to a major measles outbreak, conducting mass vaccination campaigns and using mobile clinics to reach children living in the worst affected areas. To reach remote communities, we use motorbikes, ferries and canoes, to get where even four-wheel drive vehicles can’t go. There are tremendous challenges in transporting large quantities of medicines, vaccines, or therapeutic foods to treat malnutrition. . Photos by Bérengére Guais and Narcisse Mukeme Muzabula #measles #DRC #vaccineswork #logistics #doctorswithoutborders #vaccinations

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Views of the fish market in Aden - Last December, Photographer Agnes Varraine-Leca captured daily life inside the district of Crater in southern Yemen. Like in other parts of the country, the devaluation of the Yemeni riyal contributes to higher prices for food, fuel, and agricultural inputs, which hampers food security. MSF first started working in Yemen in 1986. Today, Yemen is one of our largest projects with around 1900 staff. We’ve repeatedly insisted on the need for a wider reopening of sea ports and airports for commercial goods. • Photos © Agnes Varraine-Leca #doctorswithoutborders #dailylife #Aden #Yemen #market #streetlife #fish #citylife #conflict

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Part of the MSF team at the entrance of our trauma hospital in Aden - guards Houda and Malik have been with us since the hospital opened in 2012. In 2015, while the city was under siege, this was one of the very few functioning surgical hospitals in the region. Now, complex cases or cases requiring specific surgical care from Mocha and Hodeidah are frequently referred here. These cities are 6-8 hours away. • Yemenis trying to reach a functioning health care facility may face checkpoints, land mines, or snipers en route. Many people have to choose between using scarce funds to pay for medicine or food to feed their families. Head to our link in bio and click the image again to find out more about our work in Yemen. 👨🏽‍⚕️👩🏾‍⚕️ • Photo © Agnes Varraine-Leca #doctorswithoutborders #Aden #Mocha #Hodeidah #Yemen #trauma #hospital #surgery #team

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In December 2018, photographer Agnes Varraine-Leca captured photos along the sea road leading to Crater, one of the districts of Aden in southern Yemen. On the right in the first photo and in the second photo, buildings that were destroyed during fighting in 2015. The last photo is from July 2015, at the height of fighting in Aden that left civilians trapped - Access to health care was extremely difficult because of airstrikes, shellings, road blockages and snipers... in 2015 MSF started running an advanced emergency post in Crater, as well as an Emergency Surgical Hospital to treat the war-wounded. • Photos © Agnes Varraine-Leca and Guillaume Binet/MYOP #doctorswithoutborders #Yemen #Aden #surgery #doctor #photography #dailylife