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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange: The east coast of Palawan Island is suffering from significant erosion because more strong storms, due to climate change, are hitting this coastline. In the past, Palawan was almost completely sheltered from typhoons, approaching from the southeast, had to pass over islands, and mountain ranges, to the east which would significantly weaken the storms before reaching Palawan but now, due to a changing climate, the typhoon storm track has begun to move southward, affecting this coastline. San Rafael, Palawan, Philippines. #climatechange #climatecrisis #globalwarming #risingseas #typhoons #warmingseas #philippines #palawan #jameswhitlowdelano

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Photo by Amnon Gutman @gutmanen for #everydayclimatechange. People enjoy a warm spring day in Kiev, Ukraine. In the Carpathian Region (encompassing Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Romania and Serbia), heat wave events have become more frequent, longer, more severe and intense over the period 1961 - 2010, in particular in summer in the Hungarian Plain and in Southern Romania. Cold wave frequency, average duration, severity, and intensity over this period, on the other hand, generally decreased in every season except autumn. In this study, a heat wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily maximum temperature above the long-term 90th percentile of daily maximum temperatures. Similarly, a cold wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily minimum temperatures below the long-term 10th percentile of daily minimum temperatures. The trend analysis shows a general tendency to more frequent, longer, more severe and more intense heat wave events in every season in the entire Carpathian Region. On the other hand, the cold waves show a general tendency to less frequent, shorter, less severe, and less intense events. During 1951-2011, most of the heat wave episodes in Ukraine occurred at stations located in Eastern Ukraine (in this case heat waves being defined as periods of more than 5 consecutive days with daily maximum air temperature ≥5 °C above the mean daily maximum air temperature during June to August for the normal climatic period 1961–1990). The number of heat wave episodes was highest for almost all stations in the decade 2001–2010. For many stations, the longest heat wave duration occurred in the first two decades of August 2010, i.e. in the period of the extremely severe heat wave in Western Russia. #climatechange #globalwarming#climatechangeukraine

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International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples 9 August 2019 In the picture from 2012; Tavolo Community Forest in Papua New Guinea Chairman of Tavolo Eco Forestry Program, Peter Kikele (left) instructs community members in forest management. Individual trees are selected, felled and milled on site using a portable sawmill. It is a collective community effort and with only 2 or 3 trees felled per hectare and with no roads, the environmental impact is very low. The forest provides food, medicine, craft and building materials for the Tavolo community.​Community ecoforestry enterprises have been in place across PNG for many years with varying degrees of success. With the support of local NGO partners such as FORCERT and Foundation for People and Community Development (FPCD), communities have been able to put in place an alternative to industrial logging and SABLs (Special Agriculture Business Leases) and protect their forest for future generations. Threats include;​ On 28 May 2010 PNG’s Parliament amended the​ Environment and Conservation Act, removing the rights of​ indigenous people​ to challenge deals concerning the country’s natural resources. The Tavolo community, like many other indigenous communities are guardians of Papua New Guinea’s forests and protect the advance of agribusiness, extractive industries, roads and dams.​ The world’s rainforests are key to combating deadly climate change by capturing carbon from the atmosphere and keeping it locked away. Concerned scientists agree, that halting deforestation is just as urgent as reducing carbon emissions. 📸 @johnnovis #WeAreIndigenous,​ #IndigenousDay  #WorldIndigenousPeoplesDay​ #globalwarming​ #globalheating #climateemergency #climatechange  #everydayclimatechange​ #climate #climatechangeisreal​ #environment #extinctionrebellion​ #earthlover #toldwithexposure​ #untoldstories​#widenyourworld #Splendid_Earth​#Earthpix#DiscoverLandscape #letsgosomewhere​ #ourplanetdaily #photographerslife​

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Photo By Mette Lampcov @mettelampcov While workers in the background are picking oranges, the “Majordomo” is checking the fruit to make sure it’s ripe in an orange grove in The Central Valley California. Climate change will threaten food security, as farmers are affected by more frequent and severe droughts or floods. Less water will be stored in the Sierra snowpack affecting the availability of water for irrigation and as temperatures rise an increase in pests and invasive species will affect production. Agriculture in the Central Valley depends on a predictable climate and a stable water supply to be able irrigate around 9 million acres of farmland each year. #oranges #food #foodie #calimatechange #california #Californiafood #documentryphotography #canon #californialandscape

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Photo by @jbrussell for @everydayclimatechange Scientists are confident that climate change will cause an increase in extreme weather across the globe. They say that the climate crisis will make summer heatwaves five times more likely and significantly more intense. In late July, the second heat wave of the summer in Europe saw all-time temperature highs in Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium and Paris. During heat waves the air becomes stagnant and despite the deceptively blue skies, it traps emitted pollutants resulting in increased surface ozone pollution, smog and a sharp decline in air quality with serious and costly health consequences for the population. During heat waves and spikes in air pollution cities such as Paris try to limite the number of cars that can circulate, offer free parking and incentives to take public transport as well as longer term initiatives like better infrastructure for bicycles, electric vehicles and clean forms of transport. However, our reliance on fossil fuels for transportation, energy and industrial production will continue to affect our air quality and our health as global temperatures and extreme weather continue to increase. The rapid greening of our cities and our way of life is the only way to combat the nefarious effects of global warming.

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Photo by @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange: I remember looking at a photograph made 70 or 80 years ago of a gargantuan log, bigger than the tractor-trailer logging truck that was pulling it down a main street in a Washington State, USA logging town in some parade. I saw this photograph before the Trump administration and thought, thank goodness that era in the United States had ended long ago with the implementation of stronger environmental laws. I fretted about huge rainforest trees, massive reservoirs of sequestered carbon and potential greenhouse gases, in Malaysia or the Congo and Amazon Rainforests I was documenting being pulled down. Now, with President Trump in the White House, a climate change denier and aggressively dismantling US environmental regulations, all bets are off. Forests are nature's best carbon sink on the planet, that constantly filter and clean our air while holding within them more carbon than any other living entity. When forests are cut down, carbon is not only no longer removed from the atmosphere, it is released into the atmosphere, accelerating global warming. Massive rainforest tree in southern Cameroon on its way to a distant sawmill. Logging trucks transport trees cut in the distant rainforest southeast of Kribi stream through the small city 7 days a week. Kribi, Cameroon. #climatecrisis #climatechange #globalwarming #deforestation #africa #warmingplanet #exploitation #congorainforest #rainforest #jameswhitlowdelano

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Image by Sean Gallagher @sean_gallagher_photo Children play in the lagoon at the center of Funafuti atoll, in Tuvalu. ••• Land poor micro-states in the region are some of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts. This has driven many to flee the country, in fear of the potential environmental catastophes their countries are vulnerable to, and also in search of higher incomes through better job opportunities provided by other larger countries. It is estimated nearly 20% of Tuvalu's population have left and reside in other countries such as New Zealand and Australia. Young adults are the most likely to leave, with the older generation most likely to stay. A recent report by The Australian National University estimates by 2050, "47% of Tuvaluan adults (4,900 people)...will want to migrate but [will] be unable to do so", with limiting factors being financial and available places on migration programs to other countries. The future of children in Tuvalu is decidedly uncertain in these times of change for the country. ••• #pacific #pacificislands #polynesia #tuvalu #funafuti #climatechange #migration #everydaymigration #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange @natgeoimagecollection

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@lauren.o.lambert Steve Robichawd, Hand Deck of the Miss Emily out of Scituate Harbor, Mass., grabs the rope to attach to a crate full of iced fish that will be offloaded from the boat. Because of Climate Change, the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than any other body of water in the world. Andrew Pershing Ph.D from the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, thinks the warming puts a little extra freshwater in the Oceans, mostly due to the melting around Greenland, that disrupts the circulation of the North Atlantic. This means the left side of the Atlantic and the right side north of Norway warm up at a much higher rate. The warming has an impact on the local fishing community. But the Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries is developing new approaches to fisheries science and policy that can adapt to the variability the future may bring including collaborating with fishermen and community science volunteers to gather hyper local data. @coastalfisheries @gulfofmaineresearchinstitute @ilcp_photographers @blueearthphoto #thefarmerandthefisherman #fisheries #ocean #climatechange #fisheriesmanigment #gulfofmaine #gulfofmainefisheries #conservationphotography #photojournalisum #documentaryphotography #environmentalphotography #womenphotographer

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Photo by Mette Lampcov @mettelampcov Blanca stands outside her house where boxes of bottles water is stored, as the water in her home is contaminated. Residence relay on the bottled water for drinking and cooking in many small communities in CA. This past week the governor of Californian signed a clean water packet for poor areas to help an estimated 1 million residence who do not have reliable access to clean water. the water contamination is largely concentrated in agricultural area . Water system are contaminated by agricultural run-off such nitrates from pesticides, fertilizer runoff and dairy waste, as well as arsenic, which scientists believe is released into aquifers by overpumping. Cancer-causing chemicals have been found in the groundwater in some places. Demand for water in Californian is connected to climate change. The state relies for up 80% of its water from the snowpack in the sierras, but as California gets hotter this watershed melts faster and more is lost to evaporation all while demand increases due to these rising temperatures. #climateemergency #Californian #water #sanJoaquinvalley #plastic #californialandscape #documentaryphotography #home

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@lauren.o.lambert Aboard the Neptune in New Bedford, Mass., Mark Hufton, survey engineer, replaces the altimeter in a magnetometer which measures the depth of the Ocean from the machines sensors to the seabed. The magnetometer is part of a geologic study with Vineyard Wind which is developing the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind energy project. There is a direct correlation between the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and earths temperature. The levels of atmospheric CO2 measured today is higher than it has been in the past 800,000 years and rising. Carbon free sources of energy is a vital pice of re-stabilizing the earths climate. @vineyardwindma @ilcp_photographers #capecod #newbedford #climatechange #windpower #cleanenergy #unitednations #sdg #sdg2030 #sdg14 #sdg13 #everydayclimatechange #gulfofmaine #ilcp #sealegacy #photojournalism #conservationphotography #environmentalphotography #sciencephotography #massgov #climatescience #recearch #everydayextinction #everydayeverywhere

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UNESCO International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem July 26th In the picture: Marismas Nacionales-San Blas mangroves on Mexico's Pacific coast. 📷 @johnnovis Mangroves, salt marshes, and sea grasses form much of the earth’s blue carbon sinks. These coastal vegetations sequester carbon far more effectively (up to 100 times faster) and more permanently than terrestrial forests. Further, studies have shown​ that per hectare, mangrove forests store up to five times more carbon than most other tropical forests around the world. This ability of mangroves and other coastal vegetation to store such large amounts of carbon​ is, in part, due to the deep, organic rich soils in which they thrive. The entangled root systems of mangroves, which anchor the plants into underwater sediment, slow down incoming tidal waters, allowing organic and inorganic material to settle into the sediment surface. The sediments beneath these habitats are characterized by typically low oxygen conditions, slowing down the decay process and rates, resulting in much greater amounts of carbon accumulating in the soil. In fact, mangroves have more carbon in their soil alone than most tropical forests have in all their biomass and soil combined. ​#UNESCO #mangroves #climatechange​#everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange #worldheritage #globalwarming​#climatechange#photography #everydayclimatechange​#climate #climatechangeisreal​#environment #savetheplanet​ #earthlover

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Image by Sean Gallagher @sean_gallagher_photo Fallen trees lie on a beach in Tuvalu as the wavs lap around them. The ebbs and flows of the fragile land are a natural process on coral atoll islands such as those in Tuvalu. As sea levels rise and king tides exacerbate flooding, its easy to see however how climate change and changing weather events may drastically alter these islands. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only a few metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." ••• #pacific #pacificislands #tuvalu #climatechange #dji #djimavicpro2 #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange @natgeoimagecollection

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“Children relieve themselves from the heat at a public fountain in Rome” Summer temperature records are already being broken. Data shows that the European-average temperature for June 2019 was higher than for any other June on record. Average temperatures were more than 2°C above normal and it has become the hottest June ever recorded. Although not as persistent as that of summer 2018, this heat wave, caused by a mass of hot air coming from the Sahara Desert, was intense. The five days of unusually high temperatures followed days with record-breaking temperatures further east in Europe. This led to the month as a whole being around 1°C above the previous record for June, set in 1999, and about 1°C higher than expected from the trend in recent decades. Data provided by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), implemented by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts on behalf of the European Union, show that the global-average temperature for June 2019 was also the highest on record for the month. Although it is difficult to directly attribute this heat wave to climate change, such extreme weather events are expected to become more common as the planet continues to warm under increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Looking at the temperature data from a longer-term perspective reveals the month to be even more unusual. Merging the latest C3S data with datasets that extend further back in time shows that the June 2019 European-average temperature was more than 3°C higher than the average for 1850-1900. Photo by @paolopatrizi for @everydayclimatechange #everydayclimatechange #ECC #actionclimate #climatechangeisreal #climatechange #heatwawe #recordbreakingtemperatures

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Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange . Amazon, Brazil 🇧🇷, July 2019 . Brazil is home to 60% of the Amazon, the largest rainforest in the world, seen as vital to the global fight against climate change. Amazonia lost 18% of the forest area between 1985 and 2017. With the far-right government of Jair Bolsonaro, deforestation has advanced significantly in recent months. In June 2019, the biggest losses occurred since the beginning of the mapping of the forest. . #everydayclimatechange #climatechange #cliamtecrisis #amazon #stressnexus #rainforest

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Photo by Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama for @everydayclimatechange. Port to Prince, Haiti, 2012. 🇭🇹 After two years of the earthquake that devastated Haiti the fight for access to water was still daily in permanent shelters in the capital Port au Prince. Residents of the Cité de Soleil neighborhood struggle to get water from a single faucet. It is estimated that 80% of the Haitian population does not have access to drinking water and electricity. Erupting volcanoes, earthquakes, sandstorms and meteorites that crush against the crust of planet Earth are natural phenomena that can cause climate change and air pollution according to scientists listen by @unenvironment. #haiti #climatic changes #everydayclimatechange #victormoriyama #environment #unenvironment #globalwarming #climatechange @leonardodicapriofdn

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Image by @sean_gallagher_photo Life revolves around the ocean in Tuvalu. This is somewhat inevitable when the country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The world's smallest country has been identified as one of the most vulnerable nations to climate change. With an average elevation of only a few metres above sea level, it is uniquely vulnerable to sea level rise changes. ••• In this image, a boy is seen (centre-right) from above as he rides a wave that is travelling in from the Pacific Ocean onto the Tuvaluan coastline. I saw this boy playing in the breaking waves and decided to fly a drone above him to get this unique perspective. ••• #pacific #pacificislands #tuvalu #climatechange #dji #djimavicpro2 #surfing #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange @natgeoimagecollection

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Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange . Amazon, Brazil 🇧🇷 . Yesterday I flew over part of the Amazon and saw how the current Brazilian government is against environmental policies. The National Institute of Space Research detected an increase of 88% in Amazon deforestation comparing June 2019 to June 2018. Since the beginning of the extreme right-wing government of President Jair Bolsonaro, there is an expansion of economic activities in the region that clear the forest for mining, agricultural expansion and livestock. #everydayclimatechange #climatecrisis #brazil #amazon #rainforest #stressnexus #leicam10

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Photo by Amnon Gutman @gutmanen for #everydayclimatechange. A view of frozen river in E. Ukraine, during a cold winter day. In the Carpathian Region (encompassing Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Romania and Serbia), heat wave events have become more frequent, longer, more severe and intense over the period 1961 - 2010, in particular in summer in the Hungarian Plain and in Southern Romania. Cold wave frequency, average duration, severity, and intensity over this period, on the other hand, generally decreased in every season except autumn. In this study, a heat wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily maximum temperature above the long-term 90th percentile of daily maximum temperatures. Similarly, a cold wave was defined as at least five consecutive days with daily minimum temperatures below the long-term 10th percentile of daily minimum temperatures. The trend analysis shows a general tendency to more frequent, longer, more severe and more intense heat wave events in every season in the entire Carpathian Region. On the other hand, the cold waves show a general tendency to less frequent, shorter, less severe, and less intense events. During 1951-2011, most of the heat wave episodes in Ukraine occurred at stations located in Eastern Ukraine (in this case heat waves being defined as periods of more than 5 consecutive days with daily maximum air temperature ≥5 °C above the mean daily maximum air temperature during June to August for the normal climatic period 1961–1990). The number of heat wave episodes was highest for almost all stations in the decade 2001–2010. For many stations, the longest heat wave duration occurred in the first two decades of August 2010, i.e. in the period of the extremely severe heat wave in Western Russia. #climatechange #globalwarming#climatechangeukraine

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The EverydayClimateChange exhibition opens tonight at @ImagOrbetello in Orbetello, Tuscany, Italy. I’ll, @jameswhitlowdelano be there. If you’re in the area, please check out this exhibition made by dedicated photographers from around the world. Information on the announcement. #climatechange #climatecrisis #globalwarming #documentaryphotography #orbetello #tuscany #toscana #italy #everydayclimatechange

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Chennai’s ongoing water problem: Photo Pablo Bartholomew @pablobartholomew for @everydayclimatechange . Water is what we all need and it is the natural resource that we most abuse. Time is running out and we are now facing huge issues however much we are in denial. . This is my last and the 12th post of the Chennai water crisis images. All the photographs I took for this water story on assignment for Geo France, shot in the year 2006. After 13 years this story still is contemporary and relevant. Many of the photos reflect the frustration, the toil and the everyday grind and I can’t imagine how much the problems have magnified and grown, especially since it is not just the poor but now the middle class and the rich that have also been affected and need the tanker truck delivery. With the government with already stretched resources, partly because of bad planning, everyone is at the mercy of private tanker supplies. This obviously works to someones profit. Connect the dots for me please… . I would like to thank Sylvie Rebbot the then legendary Director of Photography at Geo for getting to to shoot this and now to James Whitlow Delano ( @jameswhitlowdelano) to agreeing to let me jump back into my archive and bring it out again. . #climatechange #climatecrisis #climatevisuals @climatevisuals #globalwarming #drought #water #chennai #india #instagoodˇ #everydayeverywhere #lensculture @leonardodicaprio #pablobartholomew @pablobartholomew #chennaimetrowater #groundwater #desalination #everydayclimatechange #tamilnadu #kilpauk #kilpaukpumpingstation #CMWSSB

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Chennai’s ongoing water problem: Photo Pablo Bartholomew @pablobartholomew for @everydayclimatechange . Exterior view of Kilpauk water treatment plant and pumping station is Chennai’s first and oldest and originated during the British period. Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board known as CMWSSB provides Water supply and sewage treatment to the city of Chennai and areas around it. . To quote from Wikipedia some interesting information “Chennai is one of the metros in India which is dependent mostly on ground water supply. Ground water in Chennai is replenished by rain water and average rainfall in Chennai is 1276 mm.Chennai receives about 985 million liters per day (mld) from various sources against the required amount of 1200 mld and the demand is expected to rise to 2100 mld by 2031. The newly constructed Minjur desalination plant adds another 100 mlds to the city's growing demand. . As of 2012, Chennai Metrowater supplies about 830 million litres of water every day to residents and commercial establishments.” Link:http://bit.ly/CMWSSB1 . And those really interested in the water management of Chennai more info at http://bit.ly/CWMSB2 . #climatechange #climatecrisis #climatevisuals @climatevisuals #globalwarming #drought #water #chennai #india #instagoodˇ #everydayeverywhere #lensculture @leonardodicaprio #pablobartholomew @pablobartholomew #chennaimetrowater #groundwater #desalination #everydayclimatechange #tamilnadu #kilpauk #kilpaukpumpingstation #CMWSSB

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Chennai’s ongoing water problem: Photo Pablo Bartholomew @pablobartholomew for @everydayclimatechange . Inside the 100 or more years old the Kilpauk water treatment plant and pumping station is Chennai’s first and oldest and originated during the British period. To quote from The New Indian Express’s 16th Dec. 2017 story “The 66 acres where the plant was conceived by J W Madley, who was the brain behind the project in 1914 has all the remnants of British era and most of the machinery are considered an engineering marvel. Regulated water supply system to Chennai City was put in place in 1872 on commissioning of the scheme formulated by British era engineer James Fraser for “Piped Water Supply System”.” Read the full story here http://bit.ly/kilpauk More recently there is news that the big hall in the photograph is going to be turned into a Water Museum. Hopefully before that is put into place, the water problems of Chennai are sorted out. http://bit.ly/watermuseu . #climatechange #climatecrisis #climatevisuals @climatevisuals #globalwarming #drought #water #chennai #india #instagoodˇ #everydayeverywhere #lensculture @leonardodicaprio #pablobartholomew @pablobartholomew #chennaimetrowater #groundwater #desalination #everydayclimatechange #tamilnadu #kilpauk #kilpaukpumpingstation

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Chennai’s ongoing water problem: Photo Pablo Bartholomew @pablobartholomew for @everydayclimatechange . A Farmers opens a pipe to allow water from a bore well to irrigate his banana plantation. This plantation is in Tiruvallur District about 40 kilometres away from Chennai has many natural and man made water tanks and lakes and the area tends to have good round water. Many farmers profit better by selling their wells and ground water to truckers to take it to the cities. This leaves their farms and plantations without cultivation creating an imbalance in their traditional lifestyle and with surplus income and no work, creates social issues and leads to higher consumption of alcohol. . #climatechange #climatecrisis #climatevisuals @climatevisuals #globalwarming #drought #water #chennai #india #instagoodˇ #everydayeverywhere #lensculture @leonardodicaprio #pablobartholomew @pablobartholomew #groundwater #AndhraPradesh #TamilNadu #poondi #canal #teleguganga #farmer #bananaplantation #banana #tiruvallur #everydayclimatechange

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Chennai’s ongoing water problem: Photo Pablo Bartholomew @pablobartholomew for @everydayclimatechange . At Zero Point, where the Krishna water enters from Andhra Pradesh state into Tamil Nadu, locals catch fish in the shallow canal waters and sell it to passersby’s. . Tamil Nadu and Chennai in particular have always been dependent on it neighbouring states for water. From Andhra Pradesh, the the Telegu Ganga, a canal project flagged off in the early 80s brought water to Tamil Nadu 20 years later from the Krishna Basin. And with the state of Karnataka there has been a long standing legal battle to gets its share of water as the Kaveri river and its tributaries flow between the southern states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Puducherry and Kerala. . Both both Andhra and Karnataka have reluctantly provided water to Tamil Nadu and and its state capital, Chennai often leading to water famine. . And for this rather complex and mired issues please read: Andhra – Tamil Nadu (Chennai) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telugu_Ganga_project . Karnataka – Tamil Nadu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaveri_River_water_dispute . #climatechange #climatecrisis #climatevisuals @climatevisuals #globalwarming #drought #water #chennai #india #instagoodˇ #everydayeverywhere #lensculture @leonardodicaprio #pablobartholomew @pablobartholomew #chennaimetrowater #groundwater #desalination #everydayclimatechange #TeleguGanga #AndhraPradesh, #TamilNadu #Poondi #canal #teleguganga #zeropoint

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Photo by Marcio Pimenta @marpimenta for @everydayclimatechange . Anamã, Amazon, Brazil. . The first flood occurred in 2009, but everyone thought it was an exception. But every year the flood increased. Climate change has changed the micro-climate of the region and the city has changed all its architecture (the houses have been suspended). Today, ten years later, the city is known as "the Venice of the Amazon". Anamã, Amazônia, Brazil, 2019. . . #climatechange #globalwarning #brazil #everydayclimatechange #climatecrisis #flood #stresnexus

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Chennai’s ongoing water problem: Photo Pablo Bartholomew @pablobartholomew for @everydayclimatechange . Garbage dumped around natural water bodies that link the backwaters to the sea on the outskirts of Chennai towards Mahabalipuram which now houses the IT corridor. This massive construction of area houses some of the largest high rise office blocks blocking the backwaters that form essential water bodies of Chennai. This misuse of land has created an unplanned imbalance in the name of development. in 2015 when it rained abnormally, one of the reasons of the flooding in the city was due to over construction and the excess rain water not being able to drain out into the sea. . A study by the Anna University has found that Chennai has lost over 33 per cent of its wetlands in the last one decade due to massive construction. During the same period, Chennai lost 24 per cent agricultural land crucial for improving groundwater table. With the city growing and extending its boundaries, large amounts of farming lands have been acquired by greedy builders. The Centre for Climate Change that conducted the study blamed road construction, highways and flyovers, airports and high-rises for depleting water resources in Chennai. . Chennai the capital of Tamil Nadu State is the sixth largest city in India. The growth of the city which started in 17th century was developed rapidly and the present area of this Metropolitan city is 170 sq.km with a population of about 9.1 million. The nucleus of the water supply to Chennai city was laid in 1812 and it was gradually expanded over the years. . Read: What a disaster could look like when climate change and ill-advised land-use change collide. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-41144776 . #climatechange #climatecrisis #climatevisuals @climatevisuals #everydayclimatechange #globalwarming #drought #water #chennai #india #instagoodˇ #everydayeverywhere #lensculture @leonardodicaprio #pablobartholomew @pablobartholomew #chennaimetrowater #groundwater #desalination #everydayclimatechange

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Image by @sean_gallagher_photo A boy plays on a beach, on the island of Fongafale in Funafuti, Tuvalu. The world's fourth smallest country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. As sea levels rise, the king tides regularly flood parts of the island and will likely increase in severity in the future, potentially making large parts of the nation uninhabitable. --- From Sean Gallagher's new series, 'Tuvalu: Beneath the Rising Tide' ---- #pacific #pacificislands #polynesia #tuvalu #funafuti #dji #djimavicpro2 #climatechange #everydayeverywhere #everydayclimatechange @natgeoimagecollection

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Photos by @mettelampcov Mike found the one thing that had kept him going, sifting thought the rubble and the remains of his burnt out home- he found his wedding ring. He knew he had left it on the kitchen counter, and he just kept looking in that section of the debris where he is standing. They left with really no belongings as they ran from their burning house after trying in vain to save it from the Woolsey fire in Malibu CA. California fire officials no longer believe there is a "fire season", rather it is now fire season year around - due to climate change In 2018 there were 58,083 wildfires in California - From January 1 to June 10, 2019 there were 16,361 wildfires #climatechange #climatemergency #california #fire #Malibu #woolseyfire #home #weddingring #hope #love #californialandscape #calfire #woolseyfires

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Photos by @edkashi Philippines, 1999⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ From THREE, published in 2009. Photos by @edkashi @viiphoto ⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Some believe the massive eruption of ant Ounatubo was caused by oil and gas exploration on the mountain. This eruption spewed so much ash into the atmosphere it changed the earth’s climate 1-2 degrees. #threebook #edkashi #viiphoto #fromthearchives #triptych #documentary #documentaryphotography #photojournalism #aerial #aerialphotography #crater #nature #aetas #philippines #volcano

everydayclimatechange

Here is @victormoriyama for the @everydayclimatechange and I am wrapping up my take over this week. I hope you have enjoyed the published images that denounce deforestation in the Amazon and alert to the new catastrophic policies for the climate and the environment of President Jair Bolsonaro. To see more stories about the Amazon, please follow the @historiasamazonicas project. To see more images about the environmental conflicts in Brazil, follow my personal account at @victormoriyama Aerial view of a tributary of the Amazon River in the Brazilian state of Amapá. The Amazon Rainforest has been under threat for decades. In 2018, almost 1.6 million hectares of native forest were lost only in Brazil. Animal husbandry, mining and soybean planting were the commercial activities that contributed most to this loss. The Amazon rainforest is a reserve of about 80 billion tons of carbon - equivalent to almost a third of the world's stock and plays a key role in reducing climate change because it helps absorb excess carbon emissions from the atmosphere, according to @globalforests data. #deforestation #suruí #rondonia #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. The Apã and Japaita brothers are responsible for feeding the village where they live with 15 more people of the indigenous Wajãpi ethnic group. In addition to hunting and fishing, the brothers also monitor their territory against the presence of illegal miners. "Sometimes men appear wanting to overthrow the trees but we expel them from our territory" says Apã. The Wajãpi people lives in the state of Amapá in an area of great mining interest. In September 2017, then Brazilian President Michel Temer created a bill (PL 1610) aimed at withdrawing 49% of its territory of 6,000km² for large-scale ore exploration. The resistance of environmentalists and civil society combined with the articulation of indigenous peoples was strong enough to stop the project. With the new government of President Jair Bolsonaro all the indigenous ethnicities of the Amazonian forest are threatened. Bolsnoaro made numerous public statements in favor of exploring ores in the Amazon region. "My supermarket is the forest, if the forest is gone as I live?" asks the cacique Kasiripina. Although the Wajãpi people lived in Brazil since before the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500, only in 1996 they managed to demarcate their land legally with the government. They organize themselves in small villages distributed around the borders of their lands so as to watch the entrance of loggers and prospectors. Indigenous peoples are the true guardians of the forest and represent a strong resistance against the mining and deforestation projects of the Amazon. #deforestation #wajapi #amapa #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas @natgeobrasil

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. The young Masakão Wajãpi carries a wooden log found knocked into the Wajãpi Territory. The wood will be used to build your family home. With the new government of President Jair Bolsonaro all the indigenous ethnicities of the Amazonian forest are threatened. Bolsnoaro made numerous public statements in favor of exploring ores in the Amazon region. "My supermarket is the forest, if the forest is gone as I live?" asks the cacique Kasiripina. Although the Wajãpi people lived in Brazil since before the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500, only in 1996 they managed to demarcate their land legally with the government. They organize themselves in small villages distributed around the borders of their lands so as to watch the entrance of loggers and prospectors. Indigenous peoples are the true guardians of the forest and represent a strong resistance against the mining and deforestation projects of the Amazon. #deforestation #wajapi #amapa #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. Aerial view of the Ocas, houses built with wood and dry straw, where the Wajãpi indigenous community lives. The Wajãpi people lives in the state of Amapá in an area of great mining interest. In September 2017, then Brazilian President Michel Temer created a bill (PL 1610) aimed at withdrawing 49% of its territory of 6,000km² for large-scale ore exploration. The resistance of environmentalists and civil society combined with the articulation of indigenous peoples was strong enough to stop the project. With the new government of President Jair Bolsonaro all the indigenous ethnicities of the Amazonian forest are threatened. Bolsnoaro made numerous public statements in favor of exploring ores in the Amazon region. "My supermarket is the forest, if the forest is gone as I live?" asks the cacique Kasiripina. Although the Wajãpi people lived in Brazil since before the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500, only in 1996 they managed to demarcate their land legally with the government. They organize themselves in small villages distributed around the borders of their lands so as to watch the entrance of loggers and prospectors. Indigenous peoples are the true guardians of the forest and represent a strong resistance against the mining and deforestation projects of the Amazon. #deforestation #wajapi #amapa #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas #isa #socioambiental

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. Cacique Seremeté, from indigenous ethnic group Wajãpi, and his wife cross an area dominated by illegal gold miners who exploit gold within the territory of the Wajãpi group. The Wajãpi people lives in the state of Amapá in an area of great mining interest. In September 2017, then Brazilian President Michel Temer created a bill (PL 1610) aimed at withdrawing 49% of its territory of 6,000km² for large-scale ore exploration. The resistance of environmentalists and civil society combined with the articulation of indigenous peoples was strong enough to stop the project. With the new government of President Jair Bolsonaro all the indigenous ethnicities of the Amazonian forest are threatened. Bolsnoaro made numerous public statements in favor of exploring ores in the Amazon region. "My supermarket is the forest, if the forest is gone as I live?" asks the cacique Kasiripina. Although the Wajãpi people lived in Brazil since before the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500, only in 1996 they managed to demarcate their land legally with the government. They organize themselves in small villages distributed around the borders of their lands so as to watch the entrance of loggers and prospectors. Indigenous peoples are the true guardians of the forest and represent a strong resistance against the mining and deforestation projects of the Amazon. #deforestation #wajapi #amapa #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas #isa #socioambiental

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. The Wajãpi people lives in the state of Amapá in an area of great mining interest. In September 2017, then Brazilian President Michel Temer created a bill (PL 1610) aimed at withdrawing 49% of its territory of 6,000km² for large-scale ore exploration. The resistance of environmentalists and civil society combined with the articulation of indigenous peoples was strong enough to stop the project. With the new government of President Jair Bolsonaro all the indigenous ethnicities of the Amazonian forest are threatened. Bolsnoaro made numerous public statements in favor of exploring ores in the Amazon region. "My supermarket is the forest, if the forest is gone as I live?" asks the cacique Kasiripina. Although the Wajãpi people lived in Brazil since before the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500, only in 1996 they managed to demarcate their land legally with the government. They organize themselves in small villages distributed around the borders of their lands so as to watch the entrance of loggers and prospectors. Indigenous peoples are the true guardians of the forest and represent a strong resistance against the mining and deforestation projects of the Amazon. #deforestation #wajapi #amapa #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas #isa #socioambiental

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. A young indigenous from Wajãpi ethnic group walks through the forest looking for ilegal loggers on their territory. I documented the daily life of the Wajãpi Indigenous group for 20 days in September 2017. The Wajãpi people lives in the state of Amapá in an area of great mining interest. In September 2017, then Brazilian President Michel Temer created a bill (PL 1610) aimed at withdrawing 49% of its territory of 6,000km² for large-scale ore exploration. The resistance of environmentalists and civil society combined with the articulation of indigenous peoples was strong enough to stop the project. With the new government of President Jair Bolsonaro all the indigenous ethnicities of the Amazonian forest are threatened. Bolsnoaro made numerous public statements in favor of exploring ores in the Amazon region. "My supermarket is the forest, if the forest is gone as I live?" asks the cacique Kasiripina. Although the Wajãpi people lived in Brazil since before the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500, only in 1996 they managed to demarcate their land legally with the government. They organize themselves in small villages distributed around the borders of their lands so as to watch the entrance of loggers and prospectors. Indigenous peoples are the true guardians of the forest and represent a strong resistance against the mining and deforestation projects of the Amazon. #deforestation #wajapi #amapa #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas #isa #socioambiental

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. A Pater Suruí indigenous group bush truck abandoned by illegal loggers who knock down trees in the Suruí's land in the state of Rondonia, in Brazil. When enforcement arrives it is common for illegal loggers to abandon their tools and vehicles and run into the forest. In order to clear down trees in the forest, logging companies must carry out a management plan that provides for the planting of new species in a cyclical way. However, in Brazil, supervision of these activities is purposely low. As a consequence of this low control over the origin of the felled trees there is a growth of the illegal practice called "wood heating" that implies in the felling of trees outside the allowed reserve, and therefore illegal, and classification with free trade label for export. #deforestation #suruí #rondonia #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas

everydayclimatechange

This is brazilian based photographer Victor Moriyama @victormoriyama taking over the @everydayclimatechange account and this week I’ll share some pictures of my work about the deforestation in the Amazon Forest. A log of wood abandoned in the forest by illegal loggers is found inside the indigenous land of the Pater Suruí group in the state of Rondônia. In order to clear down trees in the forest, logging companies must carry out a management plan that provides for the planting of new species in a cyclical way. However, in Brazil, supervision of these activities is purposely low. As a consequence of this low control over the origin of the felled trees there is a growth of the illegal practice called "wood heating" that implies in the felling of trees outside the allowed reserve, and therefore illegal, and classification with free trade label for export. The Amazon Rainforest has been under threat for decades. In 2018, almost 1.6 million hectares of native forest were lost only in Brazil. Animal husbandry, mining and soybean planting were the commercial activities that contributed most to this loss. The Amazon rainforest is a reserve of about 80 billion tons of carbon - equivalent to almost a third of the world's stock and plays a key role in reducing climate change because it helps absorb excess carbon emissions from the atmosphere, according to @globalforests data. #deforestation #suruí #rondonia #amazon #indigenous #timber #forest #climatechange #globalwarming #stopbolsonaro #conservation #nature #historiasamazonicas @historiasamazonicas

everydayclimatechange

Photo by @edkashi A dramatic smoke-filled sky in São Paulo State #Brazil, which is also called The Emerald Sea. It represents the heart of Brazil’s sugar cane industry, the largest in the world. Cane burning has been reduced significantly in the past decade, but it’s still sometimes deployed. #southamerica #sugarcane #sugar #latinamerica #farmland #rural #smoke #burning #sky #pollution #airpollution #agriculture #noorderlicht @viiphoto

everydayclimatechange

Timber Transport in Cameroon 📸 @johnnovis Undercover photo shot at Douala Port, Cameroon shows lorries transporting huge logs for timber shipping export. The rich lumber is felled to make way for​ palm oil projects in the north of the country and will find its way to clients in Europe and East Asia.​ The so called ‘projects’ are destroying some of the key remaining forests in the West African nation and threaten species-rich reserves. The surviving forest area is a vital collector of CO2 , however if the forests are felled and the land is converted to palm oil projects and sale of timber, as has been widely practiced for the past 30 years in south-east Asia, then the forest conversion emits vast quantities of CO2 and intensifies climate change. #doualaport #logging #climatechange​  #climatechangeisreal #everydayclimatechange #change #climateaction #globalwarming #savethelungsofafrica #everydayeverwhere #lensculture #deforestation #biodiversity #extinctionrebellion #fridaysforfuture #gretathunberg #rebelforlife #climatejustice #systemchange #thereisnoplanetb #climatestrike #bethechange @greenpeace

everydayclimatechange

Wadi Showka, Sharjah Emirate, United Arab Emirates. This stretch of a couple 100 meters is one of only a handful of permanently flowing streams left in the UAE. And with that I'm ending my ECC takeover. Many thanks for following! This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Alluvial Plane, Dubai Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #dubaidesert #dubailandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains #largeformat #largeformatphotography

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Fujeirah Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Shariah Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Fujeirah Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Fujeirah Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Dubai Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Umm Al Quwain Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Fujairah Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains

everydayclimatechange

Extinct river, Ras AL Khaimah Emirate, United Arab Emirates This is Richard Allenby-Pratt @allenbypratt taking over the @everydayclimatechange instagram account for the week and sharing my project on extinct rivers in the United Arab Emirates. As recently as 12,000 years ago the United Arab Emirates had a lush fertile landscape that probably resembled the East African, Sub-Saharan Savannahs of today.  Fossil remains show similar species that you see in East Africa, like cheetah, giraffe, hippo and crocodile. And etched into the desert and mountain landscapes of today are the fluvial features that reveal where rivers once flowed and these animals lived. The climate change after the last glacial period, unlike the present one, was not caused by human activity. And nobody denies that climate change is a process that has occurred throughout the planet’s history, caused by many different factors. But only in the present day have vast reserves of carbon, sequestered over billions of years by bacteria and plants, been liberated into the atmosphere, threatening our existence and triggering the latest great mass extinction which is already well underway. The arid landscape and extinct rivers of the UAE may not be the result of modern, human-created, climate change, but they do give us an insight into how a landscape can change; how the familiar verdant scene outside our windows in the temperate parts of the world could be altered by climate change. And, in the coming century, landscapes that are currently semi-arid, could begin to look like the United Arab Emirates. My rivers project was commissioned by @ffotogallery and sponsored by @britishcouncil. It will be part of the group exhibition ‘A Place Called Home’, touring the UK and GCC this winter. #climatechange #globalwarming #myriversproject #ffotogallery #britishcouncil #aplacecalled #emiratilandscape #emiratidesert #hajarmountains