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#SundayThoughts

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Multifaceted and versatile, our speakers are the powerhouses of talent and skill. They don multiple hats, break stereotypes, and change the status quo #ForbesIndia30U30

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#SaturdayThoughts

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India’s #monsoon has always been a dichotomy. While several states battle #drought year after year, there are others that suffer a heavy loss of life and property due to floods. A look at deaths caused by #floods since 2016 in #India

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Mangarajpur is lush green. Located on the eastern side of coastal Odisha, it comprises five villages and borders the Bay of Bengal. Its greenery, though, camouflages an acute water crisis: Its groundwater is brackish because of its proximity to the bay while the government’s piped water has high iron content. “Can I please finish cooking the rice before we begin talking, or else it’ll go bad,” says Purnima Tripathi, the sarpanch of Mangarajpur panchayat who uses moderately saline water for cooking, which results in food going waste from time to time. Access to clean freshwater has been a long-standing problem for the villagers. It is especially problematic for women—responsible for fetching it—who need freshwater for cooking, cleaning and taking care of their cattle. “To counter the high iron content in the water, we fill a handi with some sand, make a small hole at the bottom, fill it with water and hang it from a height. The water gets filtered through the sand and drips out, and is collected in another vessel,” says Tripathi. “Many women are forced to use this unsustainable method to get some clean water. I myself have to harvest rainwater on my terrace and use it for cooking.” • By @namratasahoo #MissionPaani #WaterCrisis

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@priyankachopra and @virat.kohli feature on @hopper_hq’s Instagram Rich List. How much do they charge per promotional post? Take a look #PriyankaChopra #ViratKohli #Instagram #RichList #HopperHQ #KylieJenner #christinoronaldo #arianagrande #celebrity

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#FridayThoughts

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What bananas cost around the world: Rahul Bose shared a now-viral image of two bananas costing Rs 442.50 at a JW Marriott hotel, prompting a larger conversation on hotel mark-ups, and a Twitter trend on similar experiences

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#Comic | Aaj ki taaza khabar #BreakingNews | By @sanitarypanels

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In the 1980s the nomadic tribal community of Bawariya—traditionally known to make and sell local liquor illegally—owned land in Sadawton, a village in Rajasthan’s Jodhpur district, but never settled there. As the village was located in a hilly area, rainwater would flow down its slopes, making the region arid and farming impossible. Around 10 years ago, Gramin Vikas Vigyan Samiti (Gravis), an NGO, decided to work on food and water security in Sadawton by “going back to the basics”; it meant tweaking designs of traditional structures instead of reinventing the wheel. For a region that receives less than 200 mm of rainfall a year, the NGO decided to start by getting the community to save as much water as possible through watershed management. Step one was to build khadins (embankments to collect surface runoffs for farming) on every farm. “As part of the food-for-work programme, we brought the community together to make small khadins for individual farms,” says Rajendra Kumar, senior programme coordinator, Gravis. Khadins help accumulate rainwater and replenishes groundwater. The proof of the pudding lies in the five-odd hectare green patch that flanks the newly built brick home of Mansukh Ram Bawari, who decided to take up farming around the time Gravis began its project in the region. “A year ago, there was nothing here,” says Kumar. Officials from Gravis say there is no one-size-fits-all solution to solve the water crisis. Every village, even in the same region, has to be treated differently | By @nainithaker95; Image: Getty Images • #MissionPaani

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As the Man Booker longlist for 2019 is revealed, here’s a quick look at the gender distribution of the winners over the years #ManBookerPrize

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#Budget2019 From tax deduction to customs exemption and a reduction in #GST on electric vehicles, here are all the measures announced to boost #EV sales #BudgetWithForbesIndia

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Take a look at everything FM @nsitharaman said about #education in #Budget2019 #BudgetWithForbesIndia

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What the #Budget2019 proposes for entrepreneurs and artisans of India #BudgetWithForbesIndia #UnionBudget2019

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Indian #economy is 6th largest in the world today, with $3 trillion economy #Budget2019 #BudgetWithForbesIndia

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As @nsitharaman arrives at the Parliament with other senior cabinet ministers, here’s a quick look at her background and achievements #Budget2019 #BudgetWithForbesIndia

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On Thursday, the #EconomicSurvey proposed an increase in the retirement age for men and women in India. Here’s the current retirement age in other countries, including India

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Representing an association of businesspeople in the Baddi-Barotiwala-Nalagarh (BBN) region—the state’s largest industrial township, located in the Solan district—Aggarwal requested Gadkari to fast-track the four-laning of the Pinjore-Nalagarh stretch of the National Highway 21A. The minister, in 2017, had laid the foundation stone for the project that was meant to improve connectivity to and from the BBN region, but it has been in limbo since. What has made matters worse is the fact that the industrial belt—it has over 2,000 factories, including some of India’s biggest pharmaceutical and consumer companies—does not have a fully-functioning railway network. The rail project connecting Baddi with Pinjore, approved by the central government in 2017, has come to a standstill. Gadkari, however, simply blamed the Himachal Pradesh government for the delays. The National Highway Authority of India officials were not agreeing to the high compensation rate for land acquisition that the HP government (reportedly around ₹9 crore per hectare) has fixed for the four-laning project. “He [Gadkari] asked me to first check what my state government is doing about this,” Aggarwal recalls. The state government, on the other hand, claims they are helpless as the Centre is not being more proactive with the project | By @divyajshekhar; Image: Rajendra Mehra for Forbes India #Budget2019

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#Comic: The 'Spirit of #Mumbai' | By @sanitarypanels #MumbaiRains #MumbaiMonsoons

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The government releases the #EconomicSurvey a day before the budget every year. What is the Economic Survey and why is it so important? #Budget2019 #BudgetWithForbesIndia #EconomicSurvey2019

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#Budget2019 | From direct tax to fiscal deficit, brush up on 12 common terms; know your financial definitions before @nsitharaman’s big speech tomorrow #BudgetWithForbesIndia

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Ask Us Anything: This is your chance to ask Forbes India's senior editors any #Budget2019 related questions that you have. We will pick the best ones and answer them tomorrow, July 5. #StayTuned for our very first #AMA Use #BudgetWithForbesIndia to share your queries

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#ThursdayThoughts

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | In the corridors of India’s Supreme Court, Menaka Guruswamy, 44, has a reputation for being a fearless fighter. As one of the lawyers who argued against Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, she was instrumental in the scrapping of the law that made homosexuality a crime. Guruswamy had appeared on behalf of petitioners from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. Guruswamy developed a passion for Constitutional Rights as a student at the National Law School of India University. She went to Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, where she completed her PhD. Since then, she has been consulting with the United Nations, and has supported the drafting of the constitution in Nepal. Since her return to India, she has worked on several high-profile cases, including the 2G spectrum scam and AgustaWestland bribery scandal | By Manu Balachandran

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#FoodExchange | The MD of Radico Khaitan, Abhishek Khaitan has stepped into the world of restaurants, while bringing his celebrated whisky home to the Indian market. Khaitan invested in Gurugram’s TCK (The China Kitchen) this year. Khaitan had entered Radico Khaitan, his family’s distilling business, in 1997 as a 23-year-old at a time of transition from making bulk products to establishing their own brands. Until then, Rampur Distillery and Chemical Company, as Radico Khaitan was then called, produced alcohol for other liquor companies such as Shaw Wallace, United Breweries and Mohan Meakins | By @anoothivishal

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#ForbesLife | In the 1950s, Jamshed Bhabha, noted philanthropist and the younger brother of Homi Bhabha, the father of India’s nuclear programme, sought 8 acres from the Maharashtra government to set up a centre for performing arts. Word has it that he was taken to land’s end at Nariman Point and jokingly told, “Do you want the sea?” “Thank you very much, I’ll take it,” he is known to have shot back. True to his word, Bhabha took a part of the Arabian Sea and laboriously filled it up for eight years. On that reclaimed plot stands the National Centre for Performing Arts (NCPA), striding into its 50th year as one of India’s premier institutions to foster art and culture. Khushroo Suntook, once a confidant of Bhabha and who took over as NCPA chairman in 2007 after his death, speaks to Forbes India about its journey | By @kathakali_chanda

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | Open water swimmer Bhakti Sharma ( @bhaktisharma4) and her mother, Leena, have battled gender stereotypes and and weathered the society’s wrath excel in a sport of their liking: open water swimming. Water has been Sharma’s best friend since Leena pushed her into the deep end in a 12-metre swimming pool at the age of two. By 25, she had achieved the rare distinction of becoming the first Asian woman, and youngest in the world, to complete open swimming in the 1°C Antarctic waters, in a record time of 41.14 minutes (2.3 km). With it, she built an enviable résumé of having swum in all the five oceans in the world. Fluctuating weather, strong currents and non-linear paths are among the many challenges one encounters in the open sea. Besides, swimming is a lonely sport. But that’s where Sharma evolves as a person. “For long durations, it’s just you and the water… you and your thoughts. Rarely do people get to spend so much time with themselves,” says Sharma | By @kunaljp

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | Beena Kannan ( @beenaseematti) is no ordinary fashionista. The 59-year-old has a very strong grip on the saris—encompassing the entire range from daily wear ones to bridal—that women across Kerala wear. Kannan, the owner of Seematti, one of Kerala’s oldest and largest textile outlets, took over the reins of the 109-year-old company in 2000 and has ensured that it remains relevant to the masses even today. Kannan credits her undying love for saris for the success she has found over the past few years. | By Manu Balachandran

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#InternationalWomensDay | Shakti, a non-partisan collective, is targeting the general #elections for equal representation of #women in Parliament, but the road to gender-just politics is tricky to traverse. “Political parties do not see representation of women as priority. They are not accountable to citizens and function like they are outside of the system,” says Tara Krishnaswamy of Shakti. Shakti is a work in progress that will continue even if parties do not give more tickets to women this time around. Detractors have often asked her how voting for women is different from voting for, say, a certain caste or religion. “Democracy is first about representation, then about merit. Somebody who is meritorious but not representative of me, cannot fully understand or solve my problems,” says Krishnaswamy | By @divyajshekhar #ForbesIndiaPollVault

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | Dr Seema Rao ( @commandowoman), India’s first female combat trainer, has trained the Indian armed forces for 20 years, and is now equipping women with self-defense skills and inspiring them with her journey. Rao has spent the last two decades training, without any compensation, over 20,000 soldiers of India’s elite armed forces in close quarter battle (CQB), which is armed and unarmed battle within 30 yards. She has received three Army Chief Citations, a US President’s Volunteer Service Award and a World Peace Diplomat Award for her service. Despite being a doctor by training, Rao decided to give up the financial stability that comes with practicing medicine and instead dedicated her life to train the armed forces. Her ability to innovate upon traditional combat methods, and her physical and mental strength, have paved the way for more women to enter the male-dominated #military | By @chicasha #InternationalWomensDay

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | Wishing all our readers a very Happy Women's Day, from the women (and men, not in photo!) who power Forbes India ☺️ #InternationalWomensDay

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#ForbesIndiaWpower | During their four-year journey at the Indian Institute of Crafts & Design (IICD), the product designer duo of Nidhi Kamath ( @nidhijkamath), 29, and Keya Vaswani (@keya.vaswani), 28, realised that city dwellers like them had a preconceived notion about India. Kamath and Vaswani were concerned that India’s centuries-old tradition of craft has been forgotten and undervalued. In 2013, the duo trained in Hard Material Application, deviated from the normal course in their graduation project. Instead of creating products, they worked on a short film called Threads of Banaras, which focussed on the crisis in the traditional silk craft sector of Banaras. The film marked the beginning of their journey to showcase the crafts of India via films. Soon after graduation, Kamath and Vaswani launched their filmmaking career with Storyloom Films | By @transcend0518

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | The #MeToo movement has opened up conversation on sexual and other forms of harassment that were otherwise brushed under the carpet. While Tarana Burke, 45, can be credited for starting the movement in America in 2006, it gathered steam only in 2017 when several public figures in the US were shamed. India was quick to follow suit, with crusaders standing up to their oppressors, and helping others do the same. Writer-comic Mahima Kukreja ( @agirlofherwords), 28, created a furore in late 2018 when she called out comedian Utsav Chakraborty on Twitter for sending explicit photos to her and other women, apart from asking for nudes. Immediately after, journalist Sandhya Menon ( @therestlessquill), 39, spoke up about the sexual harassment she was subjected to by senior editors, encouraging others to speak up. Journalist Rituparna Chatterjee ( @rituparnachatterjee), 38, has even created a Twitter account. The challenge now, the trio admits, is to collectively keep the issue relevant | By @naandika_

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | Mangte Chungneijang Mary Kom (@mcmary.kom) is India’s most accomplished #sportspersons in recent times. Olympic medallist, six times World Champion (the most for a woman boxer, and tied with Cuban male boxer Felix Savon), the first woman to win the AIBA (International Boxing Association) Legends Award, and the No 1 women’s boxer in the association’s rankings released in January, Kom has ticked quite a few boxes. Today, Kom could well choose to hang up her gloves, for she already owns a part of the country’s sporting history. If not just for her personal glories—an incredible journey from an impoverished family in a remote Manipur village—she could very well be credited with opening up a conversation about a sport that wasn’t even part of public consciousness in a cricket-obsessed country, or an Olympic discipline till 2012.But Kom isn’t done yet. 2019 is a key year for Olympic qualifications and is a stepping stone towards her ultimate goal of winning a gold at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 | By @kathakali_chanda

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#ForbesIndiaWPower | From Surat to Silicon Valley, Komal Mangtani has had a bumpy ride to success. Now senior director, and head of engineering and business intelligence at Uber (@uber_india), Mangtani is one of the small but growing group of women leaders in the global technology world. She was on the @forbes list of ‘The World’s Top 50 Women in Tech 2018’, and works extensively with communities such as Women Who Code and Girls Who Code, in order to encourage more female participation in technology | By @panktimehta

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Here’s your last chance to nominate your finest projects at #ForbesIndiaDesignAwards 2019! Log onto - http://www.forbesindia.com/designawards/ and participate now. #DesignAwards #DesignAndInnovation #IndianArchitecture #InnovativeDesign @stonexindia @morphogenesis.official @stonelamsurface

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#FamilyBusinessSpecial | The Nilkamal brand (@nilkamal_ltd) has emerged to be synonymous with plastics be they chairs, tables, office furniture or industrial crates, with enviable growth in a segment where there are zero barriers to entry. In 1980s-1990s, thanks to high density polyethylene available in India, metal buckets and foldable chairs were replaced with lighter plastic ones. Alongside, the Parekh family-run Nilkamal brand was charting its own growth trajectory | By Samar Srivastava

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#FamilyBusinessSpecial | Borosil ( @borosilandyou) CEO Shreevar Kheruka has all the qualities that are possibly must-haves in a man running a 50-year old family business through transformation he believes was long overdue. Borosil was a B2B company, and it started taking advantage of its brand only 5 years ago. Kheruka is moulding the glassware company into a consumer-focussed firm, looking beyond only glass in kitchenware to cross the Rs 1,000-crore sales mark | By Sayan Chakraborty

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In November 2018, Garima Arora ( @arorgarima) became the first Indian woman to get a Michelin star for her restaurant GAA (@restaurant_gaa) in Bangkok

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#FamilyBusinessSpecial | Legend has it that Rabindranath Tagore, when once gifted rosogollas, had asked if it was from Nobin Das’s shop in north Kolkata. When told it wasn’t, he is known to have said, “If you must feed me rosogollas, make sure it’s from Nobin’s.” Perhaps it’s only fair that what the discerning tastes of Bengal’s most celebrated litterateur certified over a century ago has come to represent to the rest of the country the state’s abiding sweet tooth. Nobin’s experiment of rolling balls of chhana (curdled milk) and boiling them in sugar syrup, arguably the first one to do so, is now peddled by the fifth-generation scions under the brand name KC Das (named after Nobin’s son Krisha Charan). With Rs 25 crore annual turnover and 25 outlets across the country, the company is one of the market leaders in the Bengali sweetmeats industry that is highly fragmented and unorganised | By @kathakali_chanda

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Best, most #luxurious things money can buy: A Jaeger-LeCoultre timepiece with white gold case, blue guilloché enamel or silver grained dial; Corneliani’s new and perky range of Made in Italy sneakers called Athletic Glance; A Bergere armchair from Cipriani Homood—based in Pisa, Italy The all-new Émonda ALR range from Trek Bicycles #luxury

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#FamilyBusinessSpecial | Metro Shoes - The challenge for the third generation of 70-year-old Metro Brands is clear-cut: To mimic the brick-and-mortar growth online. Rafique Malik's [chairman of Metro Brands] four daughters grew up listening to shop talk at the lunch table with their grandfather Malik Tejani. Starting out in the ‘malia’ or loft, he worked his way up—or, perhaps in this case it should be that he worked his way ‘down’. And when he finally wanted to start his own store in 1969, Malik switched to morning college to keep in line with Tejani’s diktat that you could not have a store that was not owner-managed; and that you could not do retail if you were not in the shop 12 hours a day. Metro has grown from the two stores in 1969 to 208 stores in 117 cities in India today, sourcing from 180 vendors, both national and international, from Dharavi to Brazil. Now, the third generation [his daughters Farah and Alisha] have helped in diversifying into other brands and verticals, including online. | By Monica Bathija

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The shea tree, indigenous to western Africa, grows naturally, unlike plantation crops grown in humid high forest zones, like palm oil, rubber and cocoa. The fact that shea trees take between 15 and 20 years to grow fully, and bear fruit, makes them financially difficult to farm. The fruit of the tree—comprising a thin tart pulp, and a large oil-rich seed—has been traditionally gathered by rural women to make shea butter, which they sell in local markets, and use themselves, either as a cooking medium or to moisturise their dry skin against the heat and dryness of sub-Saharan Africa. The meagre earnings from its sale supplement the earnings from farming, which sees only one harvest a year in the tropical country. The growing demand for shea butter in the food and cosmetics industries indicates its worth to these sectors, which are now increasingly becoming interested in sustainability efforts to ensure the availability of the product over the long term | By Jasodhara Banerjee

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The big-ticket Indian #wedding is in a league of its own, which involves buyouts of entire hotel inventories at destinations or even cruise ships, flying down chefs and artists from all over the world, and setting up massive sets that resemble cities. Where costs might start at ₹1 crore to ₹1.5 crore, with no upper limit. Weddings have been family affairs, a time for the entire joint family to get together, where various people are put to work and given specific tasks. But when the logistics involve booking 500 cars and artists such as Jennifer Lopez, it’s no longer a job for an uncle or a nephew. Weddings are recession-proof, more so when the clients are billionaires. But they don’t seem to be policy-proof. While policy changes like demonetisation (in 2016) and Goods and Services Tax (GST, implemented a year later) didn’t have a direct effect on the business, with liquidity becoming a problem, it made people more careful about their spending. Things started to scale down | By Monica Bathija & @nainithaker95

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Kerala's Narippatta Raju shows village theatre is alive as ever. Completing more than four decades in an unforgiving profession is an achievement. For sexagenarian Narippatta Raju, stalwart of Kerala theatre, it has been a journey that has placed great demands on his creative and personal resources, with equally gratifying pay-offs. Known for his work in the countryside—quite literally the grassroots—Raju’s directorial output remains as prolific as ever. This year will see the release of a volume of writings on his career, as well as the inauguration of a theatre school for younger actors in his name. Both these endeavours will take place under the aegis of Natyasasthra, the theatre group in the hamlet of Katampazhipuram, which has been his stamping ground for some 20 years now | By Jasodhara Banerjee

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Forbes India Exclusive: @bira91beer makes play for mass market. To launch new sub brand 'Boom' with two extra strong offerings to tap into the vast strong beer market in India. Strong beer accounts for 80% of the beer market. Founder and CEO Ankur Jain says the extra strong 'Boom' beers will "compete against Kingfisher Strong and Tuborg Strong". At about Rs 130 to Rs 185 for a 650 ml bottle, it pitches directly against competition. Read more: Link in Bio #Beer #CraftBeer #bira91 #StrongBeer

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#Oscars2019: Surprises and standout moments 1. Big wins: Best Actor Rami Malek, Best Actress Olivia Colman, Best Supporting Actress Regina King and Best Supporting Actor Mahershala Ali, pose with their Academy awards backstage. Mike Segar / REUTERS 2. Alfonso Cuarón of Mexico wins Best Director, Best Foreign Language Film and Best Cinematography awards for Roma, signaling that Netflix is ready to conquer Hollywood. Mike Segar / REUTERS 3. Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper perform an electric rendition of ‘Shallow’, the marquee song from A Star Is Born. Gaga took home an Oscar for Best Original Song for the track, along with her co-writers. Mike Blake / REUTERS 4. A film about menstruation in rural India brought home a poignant win: Rayka Zehtabchi and Melissa Berton accept the Best Documentary Short Subject award for Period. End Of Sentence. Mike Blake / REUTERS 5. Spike Lee (L) embraces presenter Samuel L. Jackson as he wins the Best Adapted Screenplay award for the biographical film, BlacKkKlansman. Mike Blake / REUTERS 6. Peter Farrelly accepts the Best Picture award for Green Book, in a win that shocked fans who expected Black Panther or Roma to score. Mike Blake / REUTERS 7. Charlize Theron wore a backless Christian Dior gown on the red carpet. Mario Anzuoni / REUTERS 8. Jennifer Hudson performs ‘I'll Fight’ from the documentary RBG, to mixed reviews. Many fans thought her usual pitch-perfect vocals were scratchy, perhaps due to nerves. Mike Blake / REUTERS 9. Billy Porter stole the show in a velvet tuxedo-gown, an empowered statement owning his queer identity. “When you’re black and you’re gay, one’s masculinity is in question,” Porter said to Vogue. The outfit helped him set free. Danny Moloshok / REUTERS

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Going by the growth numbers of Oyo, the hotel chain which Ritesh Agarwal founded in May 2013, the 24-year-old is being unduly modest. With his company’s valuation rocketing to around $5 billion from $850 million in less than a year, it seems only a matter of time before the CEO of India’s latest unicorn, with an estimated net worth of over ₹4,400 crore, makes it to the #ForbesIndiaRichList | By @gangalism

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#ForbesIndiaRichList | Lakshmi Niwas Mittal (Rank #3) 68, rarely gives up without a good fight. He’s a veteran of many acquisition battles, most notably the six-month campaign he and son Aditya Mittal waged in the summer of 2006 to acquire Arcelor. The fight for Essar proved to be no different with three parties keeping their eye firmly on the prize over the past few months—Essar Steel’s 10 million tonne integrated steel plant in India, the world’s fastest growing steel market

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The Ryder Cup offers players a rare opportunity to play as a team for their country/continent, as opposed to individual competition in other tournaments. No wonder it was being closely followed by the likes of tennis legend Stefan Edberg, French tennis player Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and the Prince of Monaco from the Rolex hospitality box at the venue. | By @kunaljp