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First Person: What I saw in Paris made me rethink my job as an influencer — I stood in the most romantic place on Earth when it hit me: I didn’t want to be here any more. . I had left for Europe with a goal. Armed with a bag full of camera gear, heavily dog-eared books about writing, a list of blog posts to be written and images to shoot, I set out to “get great content.” I work as a creative entrepreneur in the food industry creating visual and written content for companies, I teach clients how to create their own work, I take some sponsored posts and have been paid to write blogs. What came next was the idea to expand this to the travel industry. As a former expat with a lifelong affliction of wanderlust, it was a no-brainer. I studied how to position myself as a travel influencer and felt a new sense of purpose, poised to tackle this next big thing on my forever growing bucket list. . And then I landed in Paris. . I was surrounded by bloggers, wannabe bloggers, influencers and “ask me how I quit my 9-to-5" nomads. The scenes that unfolded around me were heartbreaking and soul-crushing. No longer was it acceptable to take a quick snap in front of a landmark or a scene that catches your eye. No, you must be wearing a perfectly co-ordinated outfit, with black Chanel purse in hand, a matching branded shopping bag in the other, perfectly positioned so the logos are visible with your neck outstretched into the infinite beyond, creating an image of inspirational wonder and awe. #Doyoutravel? . I saw women walking whimsically, an arm outstretched behind them, their floor-length pink skirts billowing in the wind. Their boyfriends took their phones and snapped away. Different angles. Different heights. Different vantage points. The same photo again and again and again. She would review the images and after some frustrated words, take her next pose and the process would start over again. A bag full of discarded clothes lay outside of the frame and, after a quick costume change, the scene would repeat as if stuck in some infinite loop or glitch in the matrix. — Follow the link in our bio for the full column by Jennifer Hulley Illustration by Jamie Bennett

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When #Raptors’ Kawhi Leonard hit the buzzer-beater to win game 7 over the Philadelphia 76ers, @raptors fans went wild. Watch a supercut of fan reactions to #theshot 🏀 Where would you rank #Kawhi's shot among Toronto’s greatest sporting moments? Here's a short-list compiled by The Canadian Press: 🏒 1951, Bill Barilko's Stanley Cup Winner - Barilko’s diving backhander in overtime of Game 5 beat the Montreal #Canadiens to give the @mapleleafs a 3-2 win. 🥅 1993, Nikolia Borschevsky's Deflection - In overtime of Game 7 of a first-round series against the Detroit Red Wings Borschevsky headed to the net. Doug Gilmour fed a pass to Bob Rouse, whose shot was tipped past Red Wings goalie Tim Cheveldae by the diminutive Russian rookie to give #mapleleafs the upset. ⚾️ 1993, Joe Carter's World Series Walk-Off - With Philadelphia Phillies closer Mitch Williams on the mound, two men on and the @bluejays trailing by one, the stage was set for Carter’s heroics in Game 6 of the World Series. On a 2-2 pitch, Carter connected, drilling it over the left-field fence for a championship-winning shot. ⚾️ 2015, Jose Bautista Bat-Flip - In what is considered one of the wildest innings in baseball history, @joeybats19 notched the crushing blow for the #bluejays in the fifth and final game of an AL division series against the Texas Rangers. Bautista’s three-run homer off Rangers’ Sam Dyson in the seventh inning broke a 3-3 tie, sending the Jays on to victory. ⚾️ 2016, Edwin Encarnacion's Wild-Card Walk-Off - In the bottom of the 11th, @encadwin crushed a Ubaldo Jimenez offering way over the wall in left to give #Toronto a 5-2 win over the Baltimore Orioles. ⚽️ 2017, Jozy Altidore's #MLS Cup Goal - Two of @torontofc big-name players hooked up for what turned out to be the winner. @sebagiovincoofficial split the defence with a pass & @jozyaltidore chipped the ball over an onrushing Stefan Frei to give Toronto a 1-0 lead in the 67th minute. Toronto added another goal in injury time to seal its first MLS title in franchise history. 🙌🏻 Video by @meltait Fans featured: @baginsses @ney2 @murphyslamz @madebybenitez @sportslogosnet @simonmarcusno1 @aylawson @heidikurien @dave_cher #wethenorth #rtz

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Onex Corp. is buying WestJet Airlines Ltd. for $5-billion, including debt, in a friendly deal announced on Monday morning. . In a joint statement, the companies said Onex will pay $31 a share for Calgary-based WestJet, a 67-per-cent premium over Friday’s closing price. . Toronto-based Onex will make the airline a privately held company, and retain its headquarters in Calgary, according to the press release. . Founded in 1996, WestJet employs 14,000 people and has a fleet of about 180 planes that fly to more than 1000 destinations. . “Onex’ aerospace experience, history of positive employee relations and long-term orientation makes it an ideal partner for WestJetters, and I am excited about our future,“Clive Beddoe, WestJet’s founder and chairman, said in the statement. . The deal was announced before markets opened on Monday. WestJet shares closed on Friday at $18.52 in Toronto. . WestJet is Canada’s second-biggest airline, competing with Air Canada. . WestJet’s stock price is down by 17 per cent in the past 12 months amid rising fuel costs and soft revenues. . The airline formed a special committee of independent directors to review a takeover offer Onex made in March. The committee recommends shareholders vote in favour of the deal, which is subject to regulatory approval, at an upcoming meeting. . WestJet last week posted a 33-per-cent increase in first-quarter profit of $45-million, even as its 13 Boeing 737 Max planes are grounded amid safety concerns about the new jets. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Eric Atkins Photo by Ben Nelms / Reuters . . @westjet

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The accidental city: For scores of Rohingya refugees, a safe camp is hardly a home _ Hundreds of thousands of refugees from Myanmar are busy setting up their lives in a corner of Bangladesh. They have escaped brutal repression and any talk of being repatriated is dismissed: the Rohingya simply do not trust the regime in the country they fled. But no one knows where they will settle for good, and finding hope for the future feels impossible for many. Read Nathan VanderKlippe’s report from Cox’s Bazar via the link in our profile. Photography by Mohammad Ponir Hossain ( @mponir)

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Opinion: Kawhi Leonard delivers on Toronto’s gamble with series-winning shot over 76ers – When the Toronto Raptors traded for Kawhi Leonard last summer, they created a series of minimum expectations. First, that Mr. Leonard would agree to a three-day sleigh ride north to play in Canada. Second, that he wouldn’t treat the season like a sabbatical before he left for L.A. or wherever. Third, that he was still a top-five player in the league. Finally, and most importantly, that the team would become something it hadn’t been before. That it would be more than an on-paper contender. Well then, mission accomplished. After beating the Philadelphia 76ers 92-90 in Sunday’s Game 7, the Raptors are among the NBA’s final four. They’ll play Milwaukee next. – Read Cathal Kelly’s full column on the Raptors win via the link in our profile. Photography by Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press #raptors #nba #kawhileonard #wethenorth

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Strangely, it turns out that cancer and motherhood have quite a lot in common. Each changes our lives and sets us on a course that will never be exactly the same. … Having cancer is like living with a difficult teenager – you’re often worried about what he will do next. With my diagnosis, I became a frightened hostage inside a body with a will of its own, and that sense of powerlessness was never more obvious than in my relationship with my children, now all grown up. “Please get a grip,” my eldest son, who is 33, said to me. It was the day after the first consultation with the surgeon, and I was being inundated with calls about appointments for scans – of my heart, my bones, my abdomen, my lungs, my pelvis. Surely, this meant the doctors were thinking the cancer was more gruesome than first thought, I fretted. This son is a doctor, which made my diagnosis and treatment more emotionally challenging for him but easier for me as he insisted on being closely involved. He explained that this was normal work-up so doctors can assess whether the cancer has spread and if my heart was strong enough for chemo. The nurse had said the same thing, but comments fly in one ear and out the other when you’re overwhelmed by a crisis. “And this is not just about you,” he said gently. “It involves all of us.” I went upstairs to my room, closed the door and lay down on my bed, left to contemplate my behaviour. – In September, 2017, Sarah Hampson was diagnosed with breast cancer. Read her full story via the link in our profile. Here, she embraces her sons Tait, left, Luke and Nick, in this photo by Fred Lum ( @2manycameras)

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More than $7-billion in dirty money was washed through British Columbia’s economy last year, driving up the cost of buying a home by at least 5 per cent, according to reports released by the B.C. government. . The distorting effects of illicit proceeds of criminal activities being laundered through real estate, gambling and luxury goods are felt throughout the Canadian economy, and the most serious failures in law, regulations and enforcement that have allowed this to happen will require federal changes to tackle, according to the reports from Peter German, a former RCMP deputy commissioner, and law professor Maureen Maloney, the chair of B.C.’s expert panel on money laundering in real estate. . In fact, Maloney’s investigation found that Ontario, Alberta and the Prairies had an even bigger problem. . “Clearly this is a national issue,” B.C. Attorney-General David Eby said. Eby described the scale of money-laundering uncovered in the reports as shocking, and noted that, using only publicly accessible data, the two reviews still uncovered thousands of properties and transactions at high risk for money laundering or tax evasion. . B.C. Finance Minister Carole James told reporters that British Columbians have paid a price, with home prices spiralling out of reach in major markets. “Money laundering in our housing market is not a victim-less crime,” she said. . The report says real estate accounted for, in a cautious estimate, $5-billion of the total amount of money believed to have been laundered through B.C. in 2018. The province estimates based on this that money laundering boosted the benchmark price of a typical home (including detached houses, condos and townhouses) in the Vancouver region by $50,000. However, the authors of the reports said on Thursday that it may be higher. . According to Maloney’s report, B.C. ranks fourth among Canada’s regions for the amount of dirty money being laundered, behind Alberta, Ontario and the Prairies. The total amount of money laundered in Canada last year, her task force estimates, exceeds $40-billion. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Justine Hunter & Mike Hager Photos by Ben Nelms/The Globe and Mail

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“I was homeless for six weeks,” says Manal Khader, who in 2017 lost a Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) tribunal challenge to one of Mr. Wang’s eviction orders. “I had my [stuff] in storage while I was relying on friends to support me.” . It is a little understood loophole in Ontario tenancy laws, but one so potent that it can put tenants out on the street with little recourse. Called an N12, it allows a landlord to evict a tenant simply by stating the owner or an immediate family member intends to move in. . And in tight rental markets such as Toronto’s, where demand far outstrips the city’s supply of available units, it’s a tool that a growing number of landlords appear to be using to flip units back into the market and charge higher rents. . Toronto landlord Ke (David) Wang used the N12 loophole to evict renters from at least four apartments in two of his properties in the space of just over a year, claiming that the units were needed for family members. . When one tenant fought back, Mr. Wang told the province’s LTB that his mother needed another apartment because her dog had a difficult time climbing the stairs from a basement unit in the same building – a unit whose tenant Mr. Wang had sent an N12 notice to just months earlier. . The number of N12 evictions disputed before the LTB has almost doubled since 2012, according to data reviewed by The Globe and Mail. In 2012, N12s were used for 1,542 eviction applications. By 2018, that number soared, to 2,919. . Under an N12, individual landlords (not corporate property owners), can take back apartments for an immediate family member – defined as a parent, child or spouse – who pledges to live there for at least 12 months. If a tenant applies for and wins a case alleging a “bad-faith” eviction – one in which there was no genuine intention to move into the unit -- the fine to the landlord can be as high as $25,000, plus financial relief in the form of rent-subsidy payments. . However, the data shows that bad-faith findings at the Landlord Tenant Board are exceedingly rare. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Shane Dingman Photo by Marta Iwanek / The Globe and Mail @martaiwanek

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Why one Nova Scotia boy is being treated with drugs that cost $6-million a year despite a better, cheaper alternative — When it comes to publicly paid prescription-drug bills, Callum Guthrie might be one of the most expensive patients in Canada. . His parents estimate that the wheelbarrow full of intravenous medications they pick up every two weeks to control their 10-year-old son’s severe hemophilia cost as much as $6-million a year, all of it paid for by Canadian Blood Services (CBS). . The drugs don’t even work terribly well: Despite being tethered to an IV pump at his Ketch Harbour, N.S., home for more than two hours every day, Callum still suffers relentless internal bleeds. . If he extends his left arm the wrong way, blood pools in his elbow joint, causing a vise-like pressure that only hospital-grade painkillers can relieve. . On his fourth day of primary school, he stretched in gym class and blood seeped into his quadriceps. He spent the next four months in a wheelchair. . “The pain is just so insidious,” said Michelle Howell, Callum’s mother. “It impacts him in ways you can’t imagine.” . Last summer, Health Canada approved a drug called Hemlibra that has the potential to change Callum’s life, and the lives of about 90 other Canadians who are resistant to infusions of clotting Factor VIII, the conventional treatment for hemophilia A. . In an unusual twist for a breakthrough drug for a rare disease, Hemlibra is significantly cheaper than the medications Callum takes today, despite Hemlibra’s otherwise stratospheric sticker price of $668,685 a year for the average adult patient. . Yet Hemlibra still has not been added to Canadian Blood Services’ roster of drugs. Callum and his family want it desperately, and can’t get it. . The final decision rests with provincial and territorial governments, but PEI, which is currently chairing the Provincial Territorial Blood Liaison Committee, declined to explain the holdup. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Kelly Grant Photos by Darren Calabrese / The Globe and Mail / @dbcalabrese

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Opinion: The silencing of journalists is an attempt to silence us all — You don’t have to like journalists, or respect them, or have warm feelings about them. Those of us who chronicle and analyze the ugly events of the day, and who sometimes dig up stories that people in authority don’t want told, are rarely going to be popular or beloved figures. . But you ought to be concerned about what is being done to journalists, more than ever, by people in power, and by the violent figures who hear their messages. There have always been those who seek to silence the messengers; what is measurably different today, as the latest data from organizations such as Reporters Without Borders show, is that the people who want to kill or silence journalists are increasingly empowered by political leaders in otherwise democratic countries. . Physical violence against journalists, and against any citizens who use journalistic techniques to document and investigate abuses around them, has become a direct consequence of the new, angry populist politics that targets “elites” and “the mainstream media” as enemies of the people. . “We can draw a direct connection between these politicians who campaign against journalists, and the physical attacks on journalists,” says Christophe Deloire, secretary-general of the Paris-based Reporters sans frontières, the international media-watchdog group. . “What these leaders say leads to action.” . The 2019 edition of his organization’s annual World Press Freedom Index, which carefully chronicles acts against journalists and threats to their ability to work (and improvements where they occur) in 200 countries, was released last week and recorded a record-breaking decline in the number of countries registered as “safe,” and a very prominent increase in the number of nominally democratic countries where journalists have been killed or faced threats to their lives. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Doug Saunders Illustration by Istvan Banyai

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Marie Colvin died showing the world the brutal toll of war. Her legacy cannot be silenced — Marie Colvin’s last assignment was in February, 2012, in a ravaged war zone in Syria. She operated from what she called “a media centre” in Baba Amr, a district in the city of Homs, Syria, crouched with a few other journalists in a small building in narrow streets. . Now, on a Wednesday morning in the early hours, the American-born foreign correspondent who worked for decades for The Sunday Times of London awakened to the convulsions of rockets and shells around her. . With her was photographer Paul Conroy, fraught with anxiety because he was certain Ms. Colvin’s insistence on returning to Baba Amr could end in catastrophe. But Ms. Colvin was there to record it all: “Snipers on the rooftops of al-Baath University … shoot any civilian who comes into their sight. … It is a city of the cold and the hungry, echoing to exploding shells and bursts of gunfire.” There was, of course, no telephone or electricity. Freezing rain filled potholes and snow drifted through the windows during the coldest winter anyone in Baba Amr could remember. “Many of the dead and injured are those that risked their lives foraging for food,” Ms. Colvin wrote. . Targeted by Bashar al-Assad, her last column was filed on Feb. 19, 2012, from Homs and told the story of a veterinarian using his knowledge of sheep anatomy to treat the life-threatening wounds of thousands fleeing the genocide, which now has claimed more than 500,000 lives and displaced millions. This past January, a U.S. judge found that Mr. al-Assad’s regime deliberately targeted Ms. Colvin, and ordered them to pay over US$300-million to her family. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Marie Brenner, a writer-at-large for Vanity Fair. Her books include A Private War: Marie Colvin and Other Tales of Heroes, Scoundrels, and Renegades, from which this essay is adapted. . Picture of photographer Paul Conroy and Marie Colvin in Libya. Paul Conroy / The Canadian Press

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For nearly four decades, Lu Guang trained his camera on the soot and sorrows of modern China, a view of the country its censors commonly excise from the country’s press. But Mr. Lu’s images travelled the world, earning him photography’s highest honours, including three World Press Photo awards. . But six months ago, Mr. Lu vanished in China’s western Xinjiang, where authorities conducting a years-long anti-radicalization campaign have transformed a region containing a sixth of the country’s landmass into a militarized zone with frequent check stops and a pervasive security presence. In early December, it was reported that police had arrested Mr. Lu. . Mr. Lu, who at the time of his arrest made his home in New York, is a former factory worker who has documented China’s stained environments and the ravaged bodies of its AIDS victims, many of whom contracted the disease through tainted blood. . “He’s one of the very few photographers in China who is independent, who investigates and who digs deep,” said Robert Pledge, co-founder of picture agency Contact Press Images, and a friend of Mr. Lu. China has jailed at least 47 journalists, and is ranked two steps above North Korea in the Reporters Without Borders World Press Freedom Index. . “Until shown otherwise, I take this to mean that the application of law to independent journalists has become extremely arbitrary and capricious,” said Steven Butler, Asia program co-ordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists. . As for Mr. Lu, “you need people like him,” Mr. Pledge said. He is a person whose work has brought issues “to the forefront, to get local or national authorities to act upon them –because he thinks it’s in the best interests of all in the long-term.” . Images: Coal is sorted by hand in the Shizuishan coal mining area, Ningxia province, September 13, 2010. Pollution from the mine is reportedly impacting the health of villagers in the area and their crops. #worldpressfreedomday . Photography by Lu Guang, Contact Press Images

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What do we lose when journalists aren’t free? A letter by Editor-in-Chief David Walmsley for World Press Freedom Day. _ Press freedom is often taken for granted in countries where it exists, and is often not considered a priority in countries where it has never existed. In Canada, effective laws, hard won, now exist to protect journalists and their confidential sources when they are acting in the public interest, of which there is a clear legal test. And it is to the credit of the federal government that it has joined with Britain to launch a global initiative aimed at defending press freedom and protecting journalists. Among the proposals raised ahead of a London summit in July, is the idea of legislation that would make targeting a journalist an internationally prosecuted crime, regardless of which country the threat took place in. . A long time ago, as a young reporter with The Belfast Telegraph, I covered the violence in Northern Ireland. Petrol bombs, paint tins and loose nails all rained down. Snooker balls make a terrible din when they hit bone, concrete and steel. Each sound, though, is different. Occasionally, I heard gunfire in the distance. . It was many things, but it was never fun, and I sometimes wondered what was the point. Was this really news? Why was I giving attention to a minority of attention-seeking troublemakers? But I always returned to the same conclusion: It was a story, and it was my job to tell it. It could not be ignored. That will have been why, late last month, the young journalist Lyra McKee was covering a single-street riot in Derry City. She, too, had worked at “The Tele” and was sharing in real time what she was witnessing. Her coverage ended with her life, taken by a bullet to her head. . To reduce the issue of press freedom to a single individual with all her life in front of her seems apt. The collective experience that journalists impart to you, the reader, is only as strong as the sum of its parts. . Ms. McKee will never again type a word or be allowed to bring wider meaning to the stories she so intelligently investigated. The loss of press freedom, in all its guises, hurts us all. . Illustration by Istvan Banyai

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Before and after images show the scale of devastation in flooded parts of Quebec — Greater Montreal has been among the regions most affected by this year’s spring floods, which also wreaked havoc in other parts of Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick. . Neighbourhoods along major rivers were inundated and evacuated, often for the second time in recent memory. . Although many municipalities seemed better prepared than they had been during the last major floods in 2017, the extent and frequency of the recurring damage has government officials rethinking how flood-prone land should be used. . Meanwhile, the financial strain on government disaster relief programs has prompted proposals to cap aid to homeowners and discourage rebuilding in certain areas. Life in some vulnerable neighbourhoods just became more uncertain. . The Globe and Mail obtained these recent satellite images of extensively flooded neighbourhoods from Maxar Technologies, a major imagery provider. Cloud-free imagery of many affected areas across Eastern Canada was unavailable. — First image pair: Swaths of Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac flooded after a dike breached on April 27, resulting in the evacuation of thousands of homes. . Second image pair: Another neighbourhood in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, dry in September 2017 and flooded on April 30. . Third image pair: Another flooded area in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac on April 30, partly darkened by cloud cover. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Matthew McClearn and Mason Wright Satellite images by Maxar Technologies

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Tree rings show human effect on climate goes back more than a century — In 1896, Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius made a prescient calculation that showed the vast quantities of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by burning coal and other fossil fuels would eventually cause the planet to get warmer. . Little did he realize that the effect he described was already under way and being dutifully recorded by a ready-made monitoring system distributed around the globe in the form of trees. . Now, scientists have tapped into that record and demonstrated that the human effect on Earth’s climate can be traced back to the turn of the last century, when it began leaving its indelible mark on the growth patterns of tree rings. What the tree rings reveal matches what climate models predict should have happened given the basic properties of greenhouse gases and the amount of energy the sun supplies to the atmosphere. . “The models are saying that we should see the fingerprint of human-forced climate change in the early 20th century, and the tree rings confirm that,” said Kate Marvel, a climate scientist with NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, and lead author on the analysis, published Wednesday in the journal Nature. . The result is significant for two reasons, Dr. Marvel and her colleagues say. First, because it provides an alternative way to gauge how greenhouse gases and other industrial pollutants have influenced drought patterns over time. And second, because it raises confidence levels in what models are projecting for the future as climate change becomes more pronounced, including extremes of temperature and precipitation that translate into more severe droughts and floods than would otherwise have occurred. . And while the basic fact of climate change is not in doubt among experts, the study offers additional evidence that these effects are primarily the result of human activity. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Ivan Semeniuk Graphic by Trish McAlaster / The Globe and Mail

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Mother whose son died of the flu says she’s become a target of anti-vaccine groups on Facebook — A Canadian who became a vaccination advocate after the death of her son says she has been subjected to hundreds of online attacks in recent days from an anti-vaccination Facebook group, highlighting what she says is the social-media giant’s failure to curb false and dangerous information about immunization. . Jill Promoli started the advocacy group For Jude, For Everyone after her two-year-old son Jude died as a result of the flu in 2016. Last week, Ms. Promoli created a post on the group’s Facebook page to mark the start of National Immunization Awareness Week. In the post, she explained that her son received a flu shot, but failed to develop immunity and died after contracting the virus. She wrote that if more people were vaccinated, it would reduce the incidence and spread of such illnesses. The post was shared on an anti-vaccination Facebook group, and the For Jude, For Everyone page was inundated with posts that blamed Ms. Promoli for the death of her child and claimed that she was lying about the cause of his death. . “It was very aggressive,” said Ms. Promoli, who lives in Mississauga. “It became sort of a mob mentality.” . The case shows that groups can still spread false messages and attack vaccine advocates despite efforts by social-media companies to shut them down. Vaccination opponents have even used Facebook’s mechanism for reporting objectionable material to have Ms. Promoli’s page blocked. . The attacks seemed to come from members of a closed anti-vaccination Facebook group called Vaccine Education Network: Natural Health Anti-Vaxx Community. The group has a public page and a closed group that only members can view. A member of the closed group told Ms. Promoli her Facebook post was shared on that page and to expect negative comments. The administrator of the public group did not respond to a request for comment. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Carly Weeks Photo by Galit Rodan / The Globe and Mail / @galit_r

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Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido on Tuesday called for a military uprising to oust President Nicolas Maduro and violence broke out at anti-government protests as the country hit a new crisis point after years of political and economic chaos. . Several dozen armed troops accompanying Guaido clashed with soldiers supporting Maduro at a rally outside the La Carlota air base in Caracas, but the incident fizzled out and did not appear to be part of an immediate attempt by the opposition to take power through military force. . Guaido, in a video posted on Twitter earlier on Tuesday, wrote that he had begun the “final phase” of his campaign to topple Maduro, calling on Venezuelans and the armed forces to back him ahead of May Day mass street protests planned for Wednesday. . Protests broke out on Tuesday. A National Guard armoured car slammed into anti-Maduro protesters who were throwing stones and hitting the vehicle in Caracas, television images showed. . Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino called the latest instability a “coup movement” but several hours after Guaido’s announcement there was no sign of any other anti-Maduro military activity and no immediate reports of casualties. . Guaido later left a rally he was holding with military supporters at the air base. Repeated opposition attempts to force Maduro, a socialist, from power through huge protests and calls on the military to act have so far failed. . Maduro said on Tuesday he had spoken with military leaders and that they had shown him “their total loyalty.” . “Nerves of steel!” Maduro wrote on Twitter. “I call for maximum popular mobilization to assure the victory of peace. We will win!” . The move was Guaido’s boldest effort yet to persuade the military to rise up against Maduro. If it fails, it could be seen as evidence that he lacks the support he says he has. It might also encourage the authorities, who have already stripped him of parliamentary immunity and opened multiple investigations into him, to arrest him. — Photos by Carlos Garcia Rawlins, Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters, Boris Vergara, Fernando Llano / AP, Yuri Cortez, Federico Parra, Edilzon Gamez / AFP / Getty Images

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Fourteen years ago, Javier Luque was a geology student wrapping up a day of field work in his native Colombia when he swung his hammer at a section of rock and opened a window into the past. . The layer where the rock had split yielded a trove of small, well-preserved marine fossils dating back some 90 million years. Among them was something he couldn’t recognize. . “It looked like a spider – a really weird spider – with flattened legs and big eyes,” he said. “Then I noticed it had claws.” . Fast-forward to 2019 and Dr. Luque, who recently earned his PhD at the University of Alberta based on his study of the fossil, is finally able to say what it is he found. The unusual creature is a type of crab – but one that apparently abandoned the crab’s classic body shape and scuttling walk to evolve into a full-time swimmer that propelled itself through the water by using its flattened legs as paddles and employed its big eyes to hunt down tiny prey. . “We’re dealing with something completely new that no one has seen before, dead or alive,” said Luque. . His detailed study of the creature is based on 70 individual specimens and is co-authored by experts in four countries. The result sheds new light on how the machinery of evolution works in response to ecological opportunities. . Today, crabs are among the most successful marine invertebrates in the world, with approximately 7,000 species known. Many have a similar appearance, despite being only distantly related – a sign that evolution has repeatedly pushed crabs toward the same type of body plan based on their role in ecosystems. . It was a different story in the mid-Cretaceous period, when dinosaurs were the dominant life forms on land. At that time, crabs underwent a frenzy of diversification, possibly driven by the emergence of coral reefs that were proliferating in the warm, shallow seas of the period. . Yet even relative to that time, his find is a mysterious outlier in the fossil record, as reflected in its scientific name, Callichimaera perplexa, which means “perplexing beautiful chimera.” . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Ivan Semeniuk 🖼 Oksana Vernygora, Uof A/ 📸 Daniel Campo/Vencejo Films

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Quebec and New Brunswick brace for new reality of perennial floods – Owners of homes and cottages in the southern region of New Brunswick were suffering déjà vu Wednesday with the province shuttering local roads and a portion of the Trans-Canada Highway as it braced for yet another round of record flooding. . Water levels on Wednesday were already hovering near the historic highs that produced mass devastation in 2018; they are forecast to continue climbing over the next several days, according to the province’s Emergency Measures Organization (EMO). . “I’m hoping this is just a fluke,” said Janie Pilmer, a bookkeeper who has lived in her lakefront house for 25 years. It has only flooded once during that time – last year. The effects were devastating. . “We lost almost everything we owned,” she said. Renovations on the main floor meant most of the family’s belongings were stored in their basement, which flooded. “It was awful. We just got a dumpster and filled it full of our life,” she said. While she spoke, friends filled sandbags in her driveway to shore up a berm built earlier this week by army soldiers. . “Last year was supposed to be once in a lifetime,” Ms. Pilmer said. “But here we are again.” . Her lament was heard in several communities across Quebec, as flooding returned in what has become a nearly perennial springtime phenomenon. For the second time in three years, homeowners in the province faced flooded basements, Armed Forces personnel heaved sandbags and politicians toured flood zones in billy boots and offered support. . In New Brunswick, Greg MacCallum, director of the N.B. EMO, urged New Brunswickers to “be mindful of the stresses that ar¬e on other people as well as yourself.” He urged patience at an afternoon update on river conditions and suggested people in Fredericton, where several streets have been flooded out, to work from home or stagger work areas to decrease congestion. . He said: “This is a multiple-day event and it is going to continue for a number of days more.” . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Jessica Leeder and Ingrid Peritz Photos by Darren Calabrese / The Globe and Mail @dbcalabrese

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Block gas-powered cars from parts of Vancouver, city planners and engineers recommend — In a major new effort to tackle what it’s calling a climate-change emergency, Vancouver is looking at blocking gas-powered cars from certain parts of the city, discouraging builders from dedicating so much space to concrete-intensive basements, and adding 500 electric bikes to the city’s bike-share program. City planners and engineers have recommended those measures and dozens of others as possible ways of meeting an aggressive effort to drastically cut Vancouver’s greenhouse-gas emissions by 2030. “We know there’s a lot of concern about climate change. We’re trying to signal that we can move on those challenges,” said Matt Horne, the city’s climate policy manager. Vancouver is one of several cities in North America and Europe, including London, England, Los Angeles, Berkeley, Victoria, Richmond, B.C., Hamilton and Montreal, to have declared a climate-change emergency. The vote in January on that declaration was the trigger for this week’s report on how to accelerate changes. It also follows the October, 2018, report from the International Panel on Climate Change, saying the world’s citizens only have 12 years to keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5 C higher than pre-industrial levels. City staff acknowledge measures recommended in the report are ambitious and may generate some negative consequences. City councillors vote Wednesday on whether to ask staff to draft a detailed plan by fall 2020 on how to proceed on the recommendations. “This will push the limits of what staff think can be accomplished in the next decade and staff realize that there will likely be political, financial and ‘pace-of-change’ challenges to their implementation,” the report said. But, according to councillors and staff, it’s worth trying to push the boundaries to show other cities and countries what can be done about climate change. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Frances Bula Photo by Darryl Dyck / The Globe and Mail / @darryldyck

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Hot Docs 2019: In Drag Kids, parents cheer as children slay gender norms — A drag queen sashaying to Lady Gaga’s 2011 hit Born This Way is nothing new, but when the performers are barely older than the song itself, that changes the equation. Last year, at Fierté Montréal, four preteens − three boys and one girl − took to the stage to a cheering crowd. . The queens had travelled from British Columbia, Missouri and Spain for the group performance. The Montreal Pride celebration was their first time meeting other children who did drag. The significance of like-minded peers wasn’t lost on their parents: “To not have to explain why he’s wearing lipstick or nail polish,” one mother explains. “To hang out with kids who totally get each other.” . This is a scene from Drag Kids, the new Canadian documentary having its world premiere on April 28 at Hot Docs in Toronto. Directed by Megan Wennberg, the film follows the preparation behind this one-off performance, observing the children − Bracken, Jason, Nemis and Stephan − carving out niches in an art form usually performed by adults. . The documentary is about the children, but also the parents, who may not fully understand why their children want to perform drag but support them unrelentingly. Nemis’s mother patiently colours his hair to a brilliant fuchsia. Stephan’s parents curate comments on social media to protect him from cruelty on the internet. Jason’s father teaches him to catwalk, a rebuttal to the homophobic and racist family life his father knew from the Bible Belt. — Image 1: Nine-year-old Nemis Melancon – a.k.a. Queen Lactatia – practising his makeup skills. . Image 2: From left: Queen Lactatia, 9, Laddy GaGa, 9, Suzan Bee Anthony, 12, and Bracken Hanke, 12, perform at Fierte Montreal Pride 2018. . Image 3: Nemis Melancon – a.k.a. Quuen Lactatia – performs on stage at Fierte Montreal Pride 2018. . Image 4: Twelve-year-old Bracken Hanke can spend more than two hours achieving her signature look. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Jaime Woo, author of Meet Grindr and an editor of Feel Your Fantasy, a fanzine about RuPaul’s Drag Race. . All images courtesy Hot Docs.

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Opinion: The Leafs have plenty of perspective, but with all their improvements, they still don’t have ‘it’ — Only nine months since he signed for the Toronto Maple Leafs, John Tavares already sounds like he’s been doing his bid here for 10 years. . “At some point, you’re going to have to lick your wounds, look yourself in the mirror and find ways to improve,” he said after another Game 7 loss on Tuesday night. . That’s a lot of metaphors and it doesn’t make any sense, but the Toronto jersey turns good hockey players into bad philosophers. . “Ways to improve”? They had it and they blew it. There’s no drill for that. It’s a matter of ‘it’. You have ‘it’ or you don’t. Despite all their improvements, the Leafs still don’t. . This team does one thing at a league-best level – get perspective. There’s always a lot of perspective to go around when it comes to the Leafs, which is a funny way of explaining that performing poorly at hockey can be a moral victory. You just have to have the right perspective. . Toronto got perspective when they lost in 2017 to Washington. That was a hopeful loss. That was a sign of better things to come. . They did it last year when the Leafs lost to the Bruins. That was a reminder that the club needed to add one more major piece. Tavares was it. . What’s the perspective on this one? It’s getting harder to figure. . The coach has had four years of runway. In real terms, the team is no further ahead. That’s very little return on a substantial investment of money and, far more importantly, uncritical faith. . “I thought we played pretty good,” Babcock said afterward. “They shot the puck in the net.” . That is some world-class perspective right there. — Follow the link in our bio for the full column by Cathal Kelly (for subscribers) . Game photos by Maddie Meyer / Getty, fan photo by Christopher Katsarov / The Canadian Press . . @mapleleafs @nhl #mapleleafs @nhlbruins

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A year ago, ten people were killed and 16 more injured in an attack by a man driving a rented van along a busy stretch of sidewalk on Yonge street in Toronto’s midtown. . These portraits by Heather Buchanan document those who were killed (left to right from top row): . Anne Marie D’Amico . Dorothy Sewell . Geraldine Brady . Chul Min (Eddie) Kang . So He Chung . Beutis Renuka Amarasinghe . Munir Najjar . Andrea Bradden . Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Forsyth . Ji Hun Kim . Alek Minassian, 26, is charged with ten counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder in the attack. He is set to face trial next February. . The original watercolour paintings of these portraits were distributed to the victim’s families after some reached out after publication. The front page of The Globe that featured these illustrations was recognized with two awards from the Society for News Design’s annual Best of News Design Competition. — @heatherbuchanan

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What does Steve Bannon want with this Italian monastery? Inside his fledgling school for populism — In the early 13th century, when the reclusive Carthusian monks chose to build a monastery on the Italian peninsula, they went big and they went remote. . Their Certosa di Trisulti monastery, as it’s called, is in the middle of nowhere by jam-packed Italian standards. It’s plastered on a high slope – 825 metres above sea level – in central Italy’s Ernici mountains, about two hours by car southeast of Rome. The nearest town, Collepardo, is a 15-minute grind down the mountain. From the monastery itself, all I could see was forest and snow-capped mountaintops. . The enormous structure, whose construction was sponsored by the formidable Pope Innocent III, was once home to about 100 monks and workers. Today, its last full-time residents are a chef-gardener, an 83-year-old priest who still says a mass every day and a couple of dozen feral cats. . Welcome to the site for Steve Bannon’s new school of populism, formally called the Academy for the Judeo-Christian West. It is here that Mr. Bannon, who was Donald Trump’s campaign manager and chief strategist, is building his next populist, nationalist, anti-establishment, Judeo-Christian propaganda machine. . While the school’s launch was planned before populist parties formed the Italian government last year, their victory has convinced Mr. Bannon that his concept is arriving at the right place at the right time. The school will be a key component in spreading his hoped-for populist revolution across Europe, not just now, but for decades. His effort already includes The Movement, his Brussels group that provides data and advice to populist parties ahead the European Union’s parliamentary elections in May. . Mr. Bannon has found inspiration in the success of Italy’s populist parties, which operate both cheaply and efficiently while garnering votes. He is hoping the Italian example can spread itself across Europe, boosting the number of staunchly conservative thinkers there. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Eric Reguly Photos by Liana Miuccio / The Globe And Mail / @lianamiuccio Bannon photo by Brynn Anderson / AP

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At least 190 people were killed and hundreds more hospitalized with injuries from eight blasts that rocked churches and hotels in and just outside of Sri Lanka’s capital on Easter Sunday, officials said, the worst violence to hit the South Asian country since its civil war ended a decade ago. . With a curfew imposed, police conducted a search operation on the outskirts of Colombo, where the latest of eight blasts took place. After police moved into Dematagoda, at least two more blasts occurred, with the occupants of a safehouse apparently blasting explosives to prevent arrest. . Several suspects have been arrested, Sri Lankan officials say. . The foreign minister says at least 27 foreigners were among those killed and that two police officers were killed during an operation to capture suspects from the safehouse. . Defence Minister Ruwan Wijewardena described the attacks as a terrorist incident, and blamed religious extremists. Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe said he feared the violence could trigger instability in the country and its economy. . Since the end of the country’s 26-year civil war, in which the Tamil Tigers, a rebel insurgency from the ethnic Tamil minority, sought independence from ethnic Sinhala Buddhist majority Sri Lanka, there has been sporadic ethnic and religious violence. . But the scale of Sunday’s bloodshed recalled the worst days of the war, when Tigers and other rebels set off explosions at Sri Lanka’s Central Bank in downtown Colombo, at a busy shopping mall, an important Buddhist temple and tourist hotels. — Follow the link in our bio for more Reporting by Krishan Francis Photos by Lakruwan Wanniarachchi, Ishara S. Kodikara / AFP / Getty, Dinuka Liyanawatte / Reuters

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As donations pour in, rebuilding Notre-Dame turns political — As people across Paris prepare for Easter celebrations without Notre-Dame Cathedral, many are feeling hopeful that their national symbol will rise again, but there’s also growing trepidation about who will shape its renewal. . The charred hulk of the 850-year-old iconic landmark remains cut off from worshippers as investigators continue to assess how last Monday’s fire started and who, if anyone, is to blame. Most of the cathedral’s Holy Week services have been moved to the nearby Saint-Sulpice Basilica, which has been overflowing with adherents eager to share in the collective grief at the near-loss of Notre-Dame and determined to see it resurrected. . “Notre-Dame is our heart, for Christians and for everyone,” said Alexandra Fourrier as she stood with hundreds of people in a square outside Saint-Sulpice to watch a mass on a giant television screen. “We have to pray for Notre-Dame.” . But even as the prayers and hymns for the cathedral continue to ring out across the city, an unease is building over the future of the church and the role wealthy families and big corporations are playing in its destiny. . So far roughly €1-billion ($1.5-billion) has been donated to restore Notre-Dame, with most of the money coming from France’s wealthiest families, who own such luxury brands as Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Yves Saint Laurent. Other donations have poured in from Apple Inc., energy giant Total SA and Walt Disney Co., which made a feel-good cartoon version of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame in 1996. The exorbitant donations have struck a nerve in a country where a fierce debate over inequality has been raging for months and fuelling the yellow-vest protests. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Paul Waldie in Paris Photo by Stephane de Sakutin / AFF / Getty

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The timeless, powerful appeal of Bach — The hall is packed, and the stage, too, with Toronto’s Tafelmusik orchestra and choir divided into two groups, plus a children’s chorus in the balcony. Masaaki Suzuki, one of the greatest living interpreters of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, raises his arms, and – yes! – those dark, powerful, throbbing chords that open the St. Matthew Passion. Then voices, calling us to mourn the suffering and death of Christ. . Behold—What?—behold his patience… . Behold—Where?—on our guilt… . The opening chorus of the Great Passion, as the Bach family called what may be his masterpiece, lasts for eight minutes, even at the brisk speed that Mr. Suzuki prefers. The end leaves you drained. And there is more than three hours of music still to come. . “It must have been very special to him,” Mr. Suzuki said in an interview before the performance. In its length, its complexity, its emotional reach, the Passion transcends anything Bach wrote, with the possible exception of the Mass in B minor. . Bach died in relative obscurity in 1750, and he remained obscure until Felix Mendelssohn discovered and then conducted the St. Matthew Passion in 1829, introducing perhaps the greatest composer who ever lived to the world, and setting off a mad scramble to locate manuscripts. Much of his music is lost, including another Passion. . Sometimes, a friend or colleague will ask for an introduction to classical music – a dozen recordings, say, that I think they should listen to. I always include Bach, and over the years I have heard the same thing again and again. People may or may not warm to Beethoven or Brahms. They rarely like Mozart to start. But “those cello suites by Bach…“, “that keyboard music by Bach...” Something about him grabs the listener like no other composer. — Follow the link in our bio for more by John Ibbitson Photos by Mark Blinch / The Globe and Mail / @mblinch . . #classicalmusic

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Brad and Dad, part 7 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — On a cold Friday in Edmonton, Brad and his dad go through their evening routine. They go skating, make snacks, shave together, eat dinner. Brad does a Lego kit, some math problems, a colouring page. It’s a long way from where Brad has been. From the group home where he broke a window and was tackled by four men and sedated. From the hospital where he was restrained, guarded by security. “All he needs is something to do,” Mark pleaded with the nurses then, and he wrote sentences on a piece of paper so his son could copy the shapes. Brad’s parents fought to get him into a day home, believing every person has a right to leave their house and be out in the world. They fight for his work, believing every person has a right to do something meaningful. The Made By Brad video continues to circulate, and Mark shares Brad’s jobs and progress on Facebook, where supporters cheer his accomplishment. Mark says people contact him regularly from all over the world, especially families of other children with autism who are inspired by what Brad has been able to do, and the thought of what their own children could maybe achieve. Mark says his son’s success has inspired him, too. “I thought having an autistic child was the worst thing that could happen,” he says. “And now I would say, ‘Well, actually it’s the best, for me.’ It’s amazing what he’s done for me.”

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Brad and Dad, part 6 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — Brad’s parents say he makes more eye contact now, and is more attentive to the things and people around him. He used to be afraid of animals, but now that he’s sometimes around them at work, he’s started to like cats, and dogs don’t scare him as much as they did. Away from work, he’s happier, too. He no longer punches holes in the walls of his group home, and he doesn’t hit himself like he used to. There hasn’t been a serious incident in more than a year. “He’s done 1,000 different jobs, and it’s like he’s had 1,000 different therapists,” Mark says. Each one teaching Brad something, making him more adaptable, more social, building up his confidence and his skill. Sometimes while he’s working he smiles and smirks, obviously proud of what he’s doing, obviously enjoying the people around him marvelling at his skill. Brad is also developing in ways his parents did not expect. As he enters his thirties, he’s learned to identify some colours, and Mark figured out how to teach Brad math using techniques he developed himself. 5 x _ = 35 8 x _=72 54 + _= 75 Brad stares at the equations for a moment before entering his answers on a children’s calculator app. He’s right every time. “I was always so desperate every day when he was young, because I thought the learning window was so narrow,” Mark says. “But it didn’t turn out to be true.”

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Brad and Dad, part 5 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — So far, Brad has done more than 1,000 jobs. He’s assembled wardrobes and dressers and bookshelves, gazebos and closet systems and entire kitchens. There hasn’t been a job he couldn’t do. “It’s quite common that I won’t understand and he will,” says Mark, a pilot. “As far as putting things together, he’s the best.” Brad earns about $400 a month, which is allowed under the funding he receives from AISH, Alberta’s funding for the severely disabled. A portion helps pay for sign-language lessons at his group home and contributes to the purchase of his models and kits, and the rest is saved for Brad. Most jobs range between $25 and $40, but the work is more valuable than the money, and Mark tries to make sure there is always work coming in. Brad slips easily into routines that can become oppressive. If he does something the same way a couple of times, it will almost have to be that way forever, and any change can prompt an explosive reaction. But the jobs are, by nature, different. Each one a new challenge, a new environment, new people.

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Brad and Dad, part 4 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — At work, as in all other parts of Brad’s life, there is an unchangeable routine. At his clients’ house, Brad drinks water, eats dry cereal, has an apple. Then he packs up his garbage, and visits the washroom for the first of what will be three visits. His behaviour can be disconcerting, so Ms. Almonia sits nearby, explaining the routines, the things Brad is doing and why. Though one online reviewer specifically criticized the Erik filing cabinet, as “very difficult to assemble,” it’s easy for Brad. He’s done much harder projects. He doesn’t even open the instruction book, but silently surveys the pieces around him, calculating where they go. “There is no day that this guy doesn’t amaze me all the time,” Ms. Almonia says. “I just watch him in awe.” When the homeowner picks up the manual out of curiosity, Brad takes it from her hands and puts it aside. Although he can’t speak, his meaning is clear. I know what to do. And he does. The cabinet comes together, solid and perfectly assembled. Brad tries the drawers and the lock, and he’s finished. “I don’t even check it any more,” Ms. Almonia tells the client. “He puts it together, and it’s always right.”

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Brad and Dad, part 3 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — Mark got the idea for a business in part because Brad could build so much, so fast, that it was impossible to keep buying him new projects. Brad built almost every piece of furniture in their home, and his models and Lego kits collected in a room in the basement. But Mark thought about how companies such as IKEA sell so much that has to be assembled, and how many people dislike putting things together or find it hard. He knew that, with support, Brad could perform a valuable service, and interact with the world in way that was positive and productive. When an online ad yielded only two responses, Mark started working with an Edmonton think tank with experience developing programming for people with disabilities. Together, they figured out a plan for a business, Made By Brad, and in 2013 produced a video that showed who Brad was, and what he could do. The video went online, and soon Mark started to get messages from people who wanted to hire his son.

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Brad and Dad, part 2 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — Brad lives with severe autism. He can say only two words – “Brad” and “Dad” – and those just barely. He can’t read, write or communicate outside a few basic hand signals. He can’t navigate finding a public bathroom. He can’t cross a street alone. But through his work, Brad has become a source of inspiration for people around the world, and especially families of others with autism, an example of what can be achieved with proper supports. “There is hope,” his mother, Deb Fremmerlid, says. “Even when you don’t think there is.” As a child, Brad seemed to his parents to be in his own world, an “unguided missile” moving through their lives, unreachable, unstoppable. He would get up early and stay up late, fuelled by a wild energy that could only be contained if he was kept constantly busy – and otherwise left him unmanageable and screaming, sometimes violent. He was diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder as a toddler, and later, with autism. “I put almost all my energy into trying to change Brad,” his father, Mark Fremmerlid, remembers. For years, the couple tried desperately to make a connection with their son, but nothing seemed to work. At worst, Mark says, it seemed like failure. At best, it felt as if they were only coping. But while Brad struggled so much in many areas, he also had great strengths. In particular, Mark noticed how easily Brad could put things together, as though his brain naturally understood how a series of pieces could be assembled into something whole. In Brad’s teen years, they started building: complex die-cast cars, model airplanes, furniture, Lego sets with thousands of pieces and instruction books as thick as novels, it didn’t matter. Brad could do it, often without even looking at the instructions. “He’ll put everything into order, that’s what he does,” Mark says. “He puts things into order.”

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Brad and Dad, part 1 of 7, by @jana_pruden and @photobracken. — Brad Fremmerlid walks into a client’s house in northeastern Edmonton on a cold Friday morning and heads straight downstairs. He is 30 years old, tall, with dark hair and bright-blue eyes. He likes skating and biking and making music, but it’s his work that has changed his life. In his client’s newly renovated basement, Brad opens a box containing an Erik filing cabinet from IKEA and spreads 25 pieces and 16 screws around him on the floor. He stares at the ceiling. He paces to the bathroom. He spins and spins through the hallway, nearly hitting his head on the ceiling. He groans and hums. The booklet of assembly instructions sits unopened nearby. “And he can do this?” his client asks, somewhat tentatively. “Oh yes,” says Herbie Almonia, a community support worker who has gone with Brad to hundreds such jobs. “Brad can put together anything.”

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Analysis: When partisan dust settles, Mueller’s key finding may be security of presidential election process — “Game over,” Donald Trump insisted. We’re going into overtime, the Democrats seemed to say. . The Republican President and his partisan rivals have agreed on almost nothing since the one-time real estate and casino tycoon moved into the White House and rearranged all the furniture of American civic life. So it was little surprise − indeed it was completely predictable − that the report on possible campaign collusion with Russia prepared by special counsel Robert Mueller would prompt swift, passionate and deeply partisan reactions. . Indeed, Thursday’s competing furious responses to the Mueller report were but the latest affirmation of Miles’s Law, named for a bureaucrat in the Truman administration who provided perhaps the only reliable guiding principle of American politics. “Where you stand,” Rufus Miles posited three-quarters of a century ago, “depends on where you sit.” . The Republicans will stand with their President. The Democrats will not sit still for a report that didn’t reach a conclusion on whether Mr. Trump obstructed justice, the sole connective tissue between the 1974 House judiciary committee’s impeachment resolution against Richard Nixon and the 1998 House impeachment of Bill Clinton. And, because Mr. Mueller wrote that “we were unable” to clear Mr. Trump of the obstruction charge, it now is the most likely point of departure for new inquiries by newly empowered Democratic House committee chairs. . When the partisan dust settles − and that may take years − the most significant finding may not be on the conduct of the President but instead on the security of the process that the United States uses to choose its president. The Mueller verdict is blunt and, had it been issued a generation ago, would have been a startling statement that would have given a new, deep and dangerous chill to the Cold War. “The Russian government,” the report states flatly, “interfered in the 2016 presidential election in sweeping and systematic fashion.” — Check the link in our bio for more by David Shribman Photo by Jon Elswick / AP

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Alberta election 2019: NDP seat count cut by more than half as Notley’s historic run comes to an end — Alberta’s New Democrats have made history in defeat, becoming the first one-term government in the province and breaking with the succession of decades-long political dynasties that have governed it since its creation. . Over four years of NDP rule, Rachel Notley ushered in one of the most dramatic periods of change Alberta has seen in decades, including new rules on climate and taxation. However, her premiership coincided with a period of profound economic struggle that sowed provincewide frustration and undermined her bid for re-election. . In her upbeat concession speech, Notley acknowledged her party’s difficult circumstances, but stressed no regrets. . “My friends, four years ago Albertans hired us to do a very big job, at a very difficult time,” she said. . “We did that job with purpose. And we did it with integrity.” . The NDP was easily eclipsed by Jason Kenney and his United Conservative Party on Tuesday night, with its seat total in the legislature cut by more than half. And the party’s popular vote total has fallen by roughly eight percentage points to 33 per cent, with a majority of polls reporting. . Still, Ms. Notley made it clear she would not resign and will instead serve as official opposition leader. Despite a bruising, negative campaign, she urged her supporters to embrace the new task of opposing Mr. Kenney’s government while supporting his right to form it. . “I wish him and his government well. We all do, we must. Because we all love Alberta.” . Mr. Kenney, her incoming successor, is a former federal cabinet minister who returned to Alberta and helped unite the province’s two main right-wing parties. He has promised to undo many of Ms. Notley’s legislative changes. Mr. Kenney has vowed to focus on cutting taxes and regulations in a bid to create jobs in Alberta’s energy-dominated economy and rebuild from the deep recession that dominated the first half of the NDP’s time in government. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Justin Giovannetti Maps by Murat Yukselir / The Globe and Mail

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Aftermath of the fire that devastated Notre-Dame in Paris. — French investigators probing the devastating blaze at Notre-Dame Cathedral questioned workers who were renovating the monument on April 16, as hundreds of millions of euros were pledged to restore the historic masterpiece. . As firefighters put out the last smouldering embers, a host of French billionaires and companies stepped forward with offers of cash worth around 600 million euros ($680 million) to remake the iconic structure. — Follow the link in our bio for more . Photos by Ludovic Marin / AFP / Getty Images, Philippe Wojazer / Reuters, Christophe Petit Tesson / AP, Gonzalo Fuentes / Reuters

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Built by thousands, beloved by millions: Rebuilding Notre-Dame is an undertaking worthy of its history — A building can have many lives if it is properly loved, and Paris’s great cathedral has proved this rule for 850 years. This week, the great structure and French society together face a new test. . Notre-Dame – one of the grandest works of European architecture and a beloved Paris landmark – smoulders. \ . After surviving the Franco-Prussian War and the bullets of the Second World War, the cathedral is now badly damaged, its spire and its ancient wooden roof — called “the Forest” — in ash. . Dedicated to worship, it was the work of many human hands: thousands of workers over more than a century, who manipulated great masses of limestone into its walls and buttresses and more than 1,300 logs into its great, 60-metre-long ceiling. A great array of carvings – angels, apostles, saints, gargoyles, chimera – captured the artistry of the 12th, 13th and 19th centuries. . Built between 1160 and 1260, Notre-Dame was one of the first churches built in the Gothic style. The sheer size and grandeur of the space was a revelation to the medieval French eye. In the 13th century, the cathedral was strengthened by the invention of the flying buttress. This innovation took the weight of the roof and spread it out; rather than send these forces into thick stone walls, the buttresses took some of the lateral force outward into massive, separate columns of stone. . In Paris, what’s clear right now is that the cathedral’s spire has fallen. But, incredibly, much of the interior appears to be intact. A devout Christian might call it a miracle. But this is certainly the work of human hands: those of the hundreds of firefighters who managed to tame the blaze. . What comes next will be a tremendous project in itself: French President Emmanuel Macron is pledging to rebuild the cathedral. The story of this place, it appears, will continue for decades or centuries to come. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Alex Bozikovic Video by Reuters, photos by Lionel Bonaventure / AFP, Benoit Tessier, Yves Herman and Charles Platiau / Reuters

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With a looming aging crisis, who is helping the caregivers? — For 16 hours a day, Sherri Ferguson races. . At the North Vancouver, B.C. home she shares with her ailing, elderly parents and teenage son, Ms. Ferguson begins her work day at the computer at 6 a.m. She walks the dog, returning by 8 a.m. to deliver coffee to her 77-year-old father, who has chronic pain, and her 76-year-old mother, who is diabetic and in the early stage of Alzheimer’s. The daughter checks her mom’s blood sugar, gives her medications and transfers her to a wheelchair for breakfast. . By 9 a.m., Ms. Ferguson drives her son, who was recently diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder, to school. She then heads to work at Simon Fraser University, where she is director of the environmental medicine and physiology unit. The home-care workers Ms. Ferguson has arranged come midday and make lunch for her parents. After work, she cooks the family a healthy dinner, walks the dog again, dresses her mother for bed, records her blood sugar and gives her insulin. And then, the finish line: cleaning up and laundry duty. . Ms. Ferguson is part of a vast army of Canadians who feel stretched thin looking after their elderly relatives while juggling the demands of daily life. “I feel very stressed to meet my own expectations of how well I care for them,” said Ms. Ferguson, 50. . Nearly half the population has cared for an aging, ill or disabled family member or friend at some point, according to the latest data from Statistics Canada. Informal caregivers contributed $26-billion in free labour to the health-care system annually, a 2009 study found. More than half of Canadian carers nursed a loved one for more than four years and many of them faced substantial out-of-pocket expenses while struggling in their careers: 43 per cent missed work, 15 per cent cut down their hours and 10 per cent passed up a promotion or new job, according to Statistics Canada. Women particularly face this challenge, since more of the daily tasks of giving care still fall to them. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Zosia Bielski Photos by Jackie Dives / The Globe and Mail / @jackiedivesphoto

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Fire breaks out at medieval Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris — Notre-Dame Cathedral went up in flames on Monday in a roaring blaze that devastated the Parisian landmark, one of France’s most visited places. . Flames burst through the roof of the centuries-old cathedral and quickly engulfed the spire, which collapsed. . A huge plume of smoke wafted across the city and ash fell over a large area. . “Everything is collapsing,” a police officer near the scene said as the entire roof of the cathedral continued to burn. . Firefighters cleared the area around the cathedral, which marks the very center of Paris. Buildings around were evacuated. . President Emmanuel Macron canceled an address to the nation that he had been due to give later on Monday evening. A presidential official said Macron was to go to the scene of the blaze. . “A terrible fire is under way at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris,” Mayor Anne Hidalgo said on Twitter. . France 2 television reported that police were treating the incident as an accident. . The cathedral, which dates back to the 12th century, features in Victor Hugo’s classic novel “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame.” It attracts millions of tourists every year. . Notre-Dame was in the midst of renovations, with some sections under scaffolding and bronze statues were removed last week for works. — Reporting by Sybille De La Hamaide / Reuters Photos by Charles Platiau / Reuters, Aurore Mesenge / AFP, Benoit Tessier / Reuters, Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt / AFP, Francois Guillot / Getty

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Opinion: He’s back: The remarkable fall and rise of Tiger Woods, Masters champion once again — During his decade in the wilderness, Tiger Woods appeared to give up on golf several times. . “There’s nothing I can look forward to, nothing I can build towards,” Mr. Woods said as his back problems worsened in 2015. . At the annual Masters champions dinner a couple of years ago, he apparently told colleagues, “I’m done. I won’t play golf again.” . Perhaps the most recognizable athlete of this century, Mr. Woods, 43, had become more famous for projecting misery than anything he’d won. It was getting hard to remember when he’d last looked happy. . Until Sunday. . In what may be the most unlikely career arc in sports history, Mr. Woods won golf’s most prestigious event, the Masters, for the fifth time. It had been 14 years since he’d last won in Augusta, Ga. It’s been 11 years since he’d taken one of golf’s major tournaments. . When former champion Patrick Reed put the winner’s traditional green jacket on him, Mr. Woods burst out with, “Fits!” . Like the many millions of us who’d been watching, he also seemed surprised by how the day was ending. . Some at-risk pro athletes ride roller coasters. Mr. Woods has spent many years on a burrowing machine. . Since last winning a major, his personal life imploded. His back began to disintegrate. He entered rehab for addiction to prescription painkillers. He had surgeries, plural. What he didn’t do a whole lot of was golf. . In middle age, Mr. Woods had become a human branding exercise – not good enough to compete with the best, but still too successful a product salesman to give up. . On Sunday, we saw flashes of the old Mr. Woods, but one leavened by age. The fist pumps are fewer; the smiles rarer; the highlight moments less awesome. . This was Mr. Woods playing the Masters like an old gunfighter, knowing other men would begin drawing too quickly and accidentally shooting themselves as it went on. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Cathal Kelly Photo by David J. Phillip / AP

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With Game of Thrones wrapping this season, here’s a survey of some shows that have attempted – or are planning – on capitalizing on a cultural appetite for all things nerdy that Game of Thrones did much to cultivate. . 1. Lord of the Rings Prequel Series (Amazon Prime Video): In a way, the success of Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings film trilogy (and the more modest success of his follow-up Hobbit film trilogy) tested the market for a large-scale epic like Game of Thrones. Fitting, then, that viewers will be returning, post-Thrones, to the world of Middle Earth with Amazon Prime Video’s as-yet-untitled streaming series. . 2. Outlander (Starz): Based on Diana Gabaldon’s popular historical time-travel novels, and shepherded to the small screen by Ronald D. Moore (of Battlestar Galactica reboot fame), Outlander remixes the Thrones formula in interesting ways. Equal parts Downton Abbey, Doctor Who and Highlander, Outlander stars Caitriona Balfe as Claire Randall, a Second World War nurse swept back to 18th-century Scotland. . 3. Westworld (HBO): It may trade in crossbows and scheming siblings for six-shooters and machinating robots, but a series like Westworld feels inconceivable without the groundwork laid by Game of Thrones. . 4. The Expanse (Syfy, Amazon Prime Video): The proverbial elevator pitch for The Expanse seems straightforward enough: “It’s Game of Thrones…in space!” Set in a distant future where our solar system has been colonized, it’s less Star Trek-styled hard-sci-fi and more expansive space opera . 5. Vikings (History Channel): It’s little surprise that Thrones’ success inaugurated a wave of gritty, violent, historical-ish dramas steeped in real-world mythologies. Leading the charge was Vikings, adapted from the Old Norse story of Ragnar Lothbrok, a historically-dubious figure heralded in Scandinavian lore for his raids against the Anglo-Saxons of early medieval England. — Follow the link in our bio for more by John Semley (for subscribers) Illustration by Trish McAlaster . . @gameofthrones @hbocanada #gameofthrones #got

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Opinion: Doug Ford plays with fire at the pumps, and Ontario ends up burned — Recently, Ontario’s Conservative politicians were photographed filling up their tanks at gas stations, with all the natural enthusiasm of hostages in ransom videos. . In particular, I felt sympathy for the Attorney-General, Caroline Mulroney, a promising newcomer to the political scene who has been reduced to a prop in one of the foolish, most dangerous battles this government has picked – which is saying something, because they’ve picked a few. . Stage 2 in the great gas-station war of ’19 is a propaganda campaign featuring stickers on gas pumps, which I would find hilarious if it were an item in The Beaverton. Alas, it is not. With great pomp – and, yes, two cabinet ministers at the pumps – the stickers were revealed at a news conference. At an untold cost, these stickers will be placed on gas pumps across the province, reminding motorists that they will be asked to pay a tiny bit more for the gas that they put in their cars – gas that will turn into emissions that exacerbate our climate-change problem. Oddly, the stickers do not mention the rebate the federal government will be delivering at tax time. . This is a propaganda war that the Ford government is going to lose. It is a war that people in this province and across the country are already losing, as we fail to meaningfully address the climate-change crisis. You know who has better propaganda than any government? Mother Nature. Her campaign takes the form of increasing wildfires, droughts, flooding and extreme weather events that are already happening across the country, and will get worse if we keep on our path of short-sighted, miserly, future-sacrificing retail politics. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Elizabeth Renzetti (for subscribers) Illustration by Hanna Barczyk / @hannabarczyk

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This is what a black hole looks like: Researchers photograph an abyss larger than our solar system — As an idea, black holes have been with us for more than a century. By degrees they have been imagined, sensed, measured and even heard. Yet not until now have scientists been able to lay claim to the ultimate form of proof. . For the first time, a black hole has been seen. . The jaw-dropping result – less impressive, perhaps, to non-experts for its appearance than for what it means – is as close as humanity has ever come to visualizing one of the dark behemoths churning away in distant corners of the universe. . And while decades of theory and observation have consistently pointed to the conclusion that black holes exist, the fact that one has only now been glimpsed puts the phenomenon at centre stage in all its fascinating weirdness. . “For me, seeing the thing makes it real in a way that knowing can’t,” said Avery Broderick, a researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and the University of Waterloo, a member of the team behind the image, who was on hand for its release at a Wednesday morning news conference in Washington. . The “thing” that Dr. Broderick and his colleagues have now revealed to the world is monstrous even by black hole standards, buried in the heart of a distant galaxy called M87. . Measurement of the image, which shows a glowing orange ring wrapped around an impenetrably dark centre, confirms that the black hole is larger than our solar system and contains the mass of more than six billion stars. . By definition, black holes do not emit light, so the image is essentially a silhouette, with the black hole viewed in contrast against the surrounding glow of hot gas swirling near its rim. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Ivan Semeniuk Image by the Event Horizon Telescope . . #blackhole #science #astronomy

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Jason Kenney sees enemies everywhere, both inside and outside Alberta. . There is his main opponent in next week’s provincial election, NDP Leader Rachel Notley. Though perhaps even higher on the list is Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. . There are also the “foreign-funded” environmentalists. First Nations that oppose new pipelines. The governments of British Columbia and Quebec. Oil executives who’ve supported carbon taxes. International banks that have stepped away from funding oil development. . And his United Conservative Party’s campaign has been about building up the province’s defences in preparation for war with all of them. . “I think a lot of Albertans feel like they’re under siege,” Mr. Kenney said in an interview. . He has spent the campaign and much of the past three years creating the narrative of a province facing an existential threat, under attack from many sides by forces that want to impede, or destroy, Alberta’s oil sector. . He has tapped into – and done his part to inflame – a level of grievance and regional alienation that the province hasn’t seen in decades. And if he wins, a UCP government under Mr. Kenney could further alter how Albertans see their place in the country – and how the rest of the Canada sees Alberta – with a combative stand that would echo the energy wars of the 1980s and Ralph Klein’s bellicose premiership of the 1990s. — Follow the link in our bio for more by James Keller Photos by Todd Korol / The Globe and Mail / @toddkorol

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The challenges facing Rachel Notley as she seeks to convince a sour electorate to give her a second mandate are substantial. . Her personal popularity rating is high, she’s considered likeable, smart and hard-working. Her handling of a bruising recession gets a passing grade. And yet, her party is widely disliked, so she began this election campaign behind her opponent and is expected to lose. . As an Alberta New Democrat, she shrugs off being an underdog. “You know what, I’m fine with it,” she told The Globe and Mail. “My whole career in politics has been fighting from that position, and we’ve had some successes from there. So, I’m quite comfortable with it. I don’t feel the level of worry that you see reflected in the media. Yeah, we’re starting a little behind – that’s totally cool, that’s what campaigns are for.” . After four years in power, she’s facing a largely unified right after the creation of the United Conservative Party in 2017. Led by former federal cabinet minister Jason Kenney, the UCP has adopted a populist brand of politics that builds off the PC dynasty that ran Alberta for 44 years before Notley’s win. . The NDP’s support is also far behind that of Notley herself, according to pollsters. More than two weeks into the election, they are facing a difficult campaign. It’s been an ugly election so far, and the NDP has been pressing the attack on Kenney’s background since day one. Voters will decide on April 16 whether the orange wave that swept Alberta in 2015 will wash back and leave the province conservative blue again – or whether the NDP will prove it was not an “accidental government,” as Kenney and his supporters often say dismissively. . Now Notley says she has been freed of the constraints of decorum placed on a sitting premier. Driving to a party rally in Calgary, she’s happy to engage in bare-knuckle politics on the campaign trail. . “I’m focused on getting re-elected and watching how Jason Kenney reacts when he wakes up and his declaration of premiership went unheard,” she said. . Follow the link in our bio for the full feature by Justin Giovannetti Photos by Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail @toddkorol

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Joanne Kuzoff was as nervous as any other rookie during her first NHL game. She told herself what she was about to do was nothing new, that she had done this thousands of times before. Butterflies remained, even though she had driven a Zamboni in municipal arenas in Ontario for a decade. . “I took a deep breath and tried not to vomit,” says Ms. Kuzoff, who operates one of the machines for the Calgary Flames. “You are not flooding the ice for 20 people, you are flooding it for 20,000. . “Your heart starts to race. Suddenly it hits you. You are in the show now.” . One of only two women who drive a Zamboni full-time in the NHL, Kuzoff will make her playoff debut at the Scotiabank Saddledome this week when the Colorado Avalanche and Flames meet in their first-round series. She is part of a four-person rotation and will drive during the second game on Saturday night. The opener is on Thursday. . “I am very excited,” she says. “We are all hoping for hockey until June.” . She joined the team on Feb. 6 and drove in her first NHL game two weeks later. The only other woman that drives a Zamboni in the league full-time is Alison Murdock of the Tampa Bay Lightning. “It is nice to do what I love and to represent that it doesn’t matter if you are a male or a female,” says Ms. Kuzoff, 48. “It can be a boys club, but it doesn’t have to be.” . The hulking vehicles that clean and resurface ice in the NHL weigh more than four tonnes and are not easy to operate. . The ice is flooded every three hours leading up to the puck drop on the day of a game. It is resurfaced before pregame warm-ups and immediately afterward, and then during intermissions between periods. The crew often stays into the wee hours after a game repairing the surface. . “This is the highest level of hockey that there is,” Kuzoff says. “As such, we want to give them the best sheet of ice that we can. . “The number of people that see it, and the amount of money the surface makes, is amazing. It is our product and we care about it. We take it to heart.” . Follow the link in our bio for the full feature by Marty Klinkenberg Photos by Jeff McIntosh/The Globe and Mail @jeffmcintoshpix

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Stratford’s swan parade crowded out by expanding theatre industry — If they had any idea their celebrity had waned, the swans weren’t showing it. Instead, they jostled for prime position by the gate, bobbing up and down and grunting anxiously. As soon as the bagpipers began to play – and after a moment of stunned silence as the door swung open – Nick and Lacey were the first out of the gate. Lacey, with her persimmon-coloured beak, led the parade strutting proudly past the cameraphone-wielding crowds. “Oh, hi babies,” a woman cooed as they passed. “I’ve missed you guys.” In Stratford, Ont., about a two-hour drive west of Toronto, the annual swan parade has evolved into one of the small city’s most beloved events. Each year, the 20 swans make their annual pilgrimage from the city’s winter “swan house,” toward the Avon River to nest. But this year’s edition, held on Sunday, was a dramatically scaled-back affair – crowded out, in part, by Stratford’s expanding theatre industry. What used to be a days-long event was reduced to a 10-minute parade. And what used to be the site of the swan festival’s additional programming – where there used to be food trucks and jugglers and performers – this year was a boarded-up construction site: the future home of the new $100-million arts centre at the Stratford Festival, one of North America’s leading repertory theatre companies. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Ann Hui Photos by Geoff Robins / The Globe and Mail / @geoff.robins

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Female executives are still scarce in Corporate Canada. The few who made it are fed up — As a final act after 26 years with KPMG Canada, Beth Wilson fired off an e-mail to her female colleagues, clearing the air on what prompted her to pack up and leave. . “I reached for the top rung and failed,” she wrote in a heartfelt exit note in 2017. “Yes, I just used the F-word and I am okay with that.” . The year before, she’d put herself in the running to be the firm’s next chief executive, the first woman to ever do so, but ultimately lost to a man. Because she felt worthy of being a CEO, Ms. Wilson left the firm with nowhere to go. But she wanted women in the ranks below to know that moving on was her choice – and that they should never settle, either. . “I had a lot of boxes ‘checked’ on the competency and experience checklist and I still didn’t make it – that is all the more reason why you should push, and push hard,” she wrote. . The wait was worth it. A few months later, Ms. Wilson was named Canada CEO of Dentons, a global giant in corporate law. . The anecdote is one of many powerful stories in a new book, The Collective Wisdom of High-Performing Women, co-written by those who have made it to the highest echelons of Canadian business. Many are graduates of an annual leadership retreat known as The Judy Project, named after the late Microsoft Canada executive Judy Elder, who helped women embrace their ambition. . Yet, for all their success, the women remain frustrated that there aren’t more of them around. Their advancement in business has been promised since the 1980s, but three decades later, the numbers remain dismal. . In 2018, only 15.8 per cent of executive officer positions in Canada were held by women, according to regulatory filings from 630 companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange. That number has barely changed in four years. At the board level, almost one-third of companies that disclosed still do not have a single female director. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Tim Kiladze Photo by Tim Fraser / The Globe and Mail From left: Jane E. Kinney, Janet Kestin, Beth Wilson and Colleen Moorehead

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False promises: How foreign workers fall prey to bait-and-switch tactics in Canada — These newcomers to Canada say they were misled to spend up to $18,000 each for courses at Solomon College in Edmonton. They thought it would get them closer to long-term work permits. But that was never possible. Now some are suing the college, and the immigration consultant who brought them there. . Their case is one of several @globeandmail looked at in a four-month investigation of job recruiters and consultants who've amassed scores of complaints, lawsuits and charges. Forty-five recruiters stand accused of exploiting at least 2,300 people in recent years for their money, labour or both. . Some newcomers, promised a better life, end up working under intolerable conditions for meager pay. Cleaning hotel rooms. Picking mushrooms. Crammed into wretched temporary housing. Holding a useless career-college diploma, and no work permit. Toiling away at odd jobs, under the table, for cash. Fearing and facing deportation. . It's illegal to make anyone pay for a job in Canada. Even so, recruits paid as much as $40,000 each in exchange for false promises of a decent job or a place in a career college. It is a lucrative business for those bringing the workers here, because there is no limit on the amount of money licensed consultants can charge. Recruits say the huge fees come later, ostensibly for “immigration services.” . Ottawa, meanwhile, has done nothing to stop the proliferation of unscrupulous recruiters, who mislead people into thinking Canada is a country with open arms and opportunities aplenty. . Pictured are Jonah Falgui, Edelina Agoncillo, Jerwin Palmero, Elena Timofeeva, Melanie Gallardo, Elizabeth Santos, Joel Labongray, Connie Monana, Novilyn Ebbes and Rina Natividad. — Follow the link in our bio for Kathy Tomlinson's full story. . Reporting: Kathy Tomlinson Photos: Amber Bracken @photobracken