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Hot-dog harmony: How a Thunder Bay diner and its Coney sauce comfort a divided city – The smell of coffee, cumin and hot-dog water fills the Coney as Jake MacLaurin contemplates an important question: What is it about this place? . How did Coney Island Westfort, a 70-year-old diner in a working-class part of Thunder Bay, become as much a haven as a restaurant? . Jake thinks about it while he jokes with a waitress about his belly. He thinks about it some more while he eats. He’s having two dogs and a burger with everything, everything being diced onions, yellow mustard and a mysterious red chili called Coney sauce that is the house specialty and an essential local dish. . There’s a lot to think about. Conflict is baked into everything in Thunder Bay, which is among the country’s per capita leaders in murders and hate crimes. . But conflict passes over the Coney. Amid its cramped booths and rickety lunch-counter stools, letter-board menus and out-of-date Pepsi signs, an oasis of racial harmony has emerged. . It starts with the fact that people are crazy about the place. More important, the Coney is a place where people “lay down their swords,” said Damien Lee, Jake’s brother and fellow member of the neighbouring Fort William First Nation. . Coney Island Westfort is in its own league. It tidily represents and, at times, transcends its hometown – showing what Thunder Bay could be. . Most Coney spots in Thunder Bay are still run by Greek families. That includes the Coney Island Westfort and the woman who has run it for the past 52 years, Victoria (Effie) Saites. Stooped but energetic, with chestnut hair and a gold crucifix around her neck, she still takes short orders in the kitchen and reveals her playful streak by threatening picky eaters with a wooden spoon. Effie is especially beloved on the reserve, where some people call her Mom. The affection is mutual. “That’s my friends up there, all of them,” she said. . Follow the bio link for the full story by Eric Andrew Gee Images by Melissa Tait/The Globe and Mail @meltait

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Federal Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion says Prime Minister Justin Trudeau contravened a section of the Conflict of Interest Act by using his position of authority over then-attorney-general Jody Wilson-Raybould to get her to overrule the Director of Public Prosecution’s decision to not negotiate a deal with SNC-Lavalin that would avoid criminal prosecution. . Mr. Dion’s report, released Wednesday morning, reveals that the Prime Minister “directed his staff to find a solution that would safeguard SNC-Lavalin’s business interests in Canada.” . In reaching his decision that the Prime Minister “sought to improperly further the interests of SNC-Lavalin,” the Ethics Commissioner concluded that Mr. Trudeau’s actions, and those of his officials in the PMO [Prime Minister’s Office], were “contrary” to principles of prosecutorial independence. . Mr. Dion criticized the government for failing to waive the principle of cabinet confidence for this investigation, which limited the amount of information that witnesses could provide to him during interviews and in the production of documents. “I am convinced that if our office is to remain truly independent and fulfill its purpose, I must have unfettered access to all information that could be relevant to the exercise of my mandate,” the Ethics Commissioner wrote. . SNC-Lavalin is facing charges of fraud and bribery related to alleged payments of millions of dollars made to public officials in Libya between 2001 and 2011 to secure government contracts. . If convicted, the company could face a 10-year ban on receiving federal government contracts. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Daniel Leblanc and Kathryn Blaze Baum Photo by Andrej Ivanov/Reuters

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When Fraser Challoner and his partner, Skip Muise, first became co-owners of Wedgeport Boats in 2008, they were laying off workers for months at a time almost every year, an especially hard call in a small fishing village such as Wedgeport, Nova Scotia, located on the southwestern tip of the province, about 300 km from Halifax. . But, as business began to pick up, they expanded to a new property and added buildings. Now Mr. Challoner, the general manager, is booking contracts into 2021. . So it’s a good day at Wedgeport Boats, and not only because there’s a cool wind to cut the afternoon heat. Not counting the fleet on land for serving or retrofitting, there are six boats in various stages of construction – a hull with its ribs still showing in one bay; workers fibre-glassing a nearly finished hull in another. . “We’re so busy,” Challoner says, “we can give work away.” . But every boom has its complications, especially when your work is tied to an industry famous for glory-day highs and devastating lows. . For one thing, as the boat-building association’s executive director Jan Fullerton points out, yards are having trouble finding skilled workers to handle all the business on offer right now. That’s meant some poaching between yards, but also a new focus on apprenticeship programs to attract young Nova Scotians into the trade, or bring in skilled workers from other countries. . At Wedgeport, one of the welders who worked on the Katie Anne is Simon An, a 21-year-old from South Korea who graduated recently from Nova Scotia Community College and is hoping to receive his permanent residency in Canada. . Challoner says that while the yard doesn’t struggle to keep workers, “we have an aging crew,” and not enough certified boat builders coming up behind them. But yards also have to be careful about the size of their work force, he says, given that the current run of contracts isn’t likely to last. . When you live off the ocean, you learn fast that what the tides brings in, it also takes out. But for now, and on this day especially, business is bright. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Erin Anderssen 📷 Andrew Tolson/The Globe and Mail @andrew_tolson

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In Photos: Flights cancelled as Hong Kong protesters take over airport for second day — Image 1: A tourist gives her luggage to security guards on the second day of an airport disruption by pro-democracy protesters. Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images . Image 2: Stranded travellers at closed check-in counters. Kin Cheung/The Associated Press . Image 3: Travellers react as they manage to walk through the protesters to the departure gates. Vincent Thian/The Associated Press . Image 4: Protesters occupy the arrival hall at Hong Kong airport on August 12. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images . Image 5: Thousands of protesters fill the airport in a show of anger over the police response to protests the night before. Lam Yik Fei/The New York Times . Image 6: Travellers make their way past protesters displaying a banner. Lam Yik Fei/The New York Times . Image 7: Combination of photos show protesters wearing eyepatches in solidarity with a comrade reportedly hit with a type of non-lethal ammunition known as a beanbag round. Kin Cheung/The Associated Press . Image 8: A stranded passenger pushes her luggage among protesters walking near Hong Kong’s airport. Vivek Prakash/AFP/Getty Images . Image 9: Flight information board at Hong Kong airport shows cancelled outbound flights. Vincent Thian/The Associated Press . Video: Raw footage of protesters at the airport terminal. The Associated Press — Follow the link in our bio for more coverage . . #hongkong #hongkongairport

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Writing-on-Stone’s next chapter: Inside one of Alberta’s most gorgeous rodeos - Shadows creep across the arena as the rodeo begins at Writing-on-Stone. A young woman on horseback carries a flag as O Canada is played. Cowboys stand and sing, hats in hand, beneath a powder-blue sky. . For 54 years, the event has been contested amid the canyons, grasslands, hoodoos and sandstone cliffs of the Badlands in southern Alberta. Cowboys compete beneath a crescent moon and camp beneath the Milky Way in Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park. In July, the park was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site for the collection of thousands of Indigenous rock carvings and paintings within it. . The ring sits at the bottom of a valley carved by ice 10,000 years ago. The Sweet Grass Hills of Montana, 2,128 metres high and 12 kilometres away, serve as a backdrop. . Bareback and bucking horses run free at night and are driven into the arena, hooves pounding and dirt flying, by horsemen each day. . “This is as much a part of Western culture as carbon in the rocks,” says Jesse Doenz, the rodeo chairman. . He and others were worried that the UNESCO designation could lead to the rodeo being ousted from the park. The Writing-on-Stone Rodeo committee’s lease expires at the end of the year. Instead, it is being extended for five years. . “From our perspective, we see the rodeo as a unique feature of the park,” says Travis Sjovold, the manager at Writing-on-Stone. “We value the people it brings to us." - Follow the link in our bio to read more from Marty Klinkenberg Photos by Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail @toddkorol . #writingonstonerodeo

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RCMP officers in Gillam, Man., carry one of two metal boxes that contain remains believed to be of the B.C. murder suspects, Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod. The boxes were loaded late Wednesday into police planes heading to Winnipeg, where the coroner will examine the remains. Investigators found the bodies Wednesday morning in a densely forested area near Gillam, about one kilometre from where they had located several items linked to the two last Friday, Manitoba RCMP Assistant Commissioner Jane MacLatchy said. Police were able to concentrate their search after tour guide Clint Sawchuk spotted a blue sleeping bag in the Nelson River, tangled up in some willows, on Friday. Mr. Sawchuk’s find, it turned out, led police to spot a wrecked rowboat later that day and eventually to the bodies. A professional tracker had been brought in to help the RCMP search and was with officers when the bodies were found in brush near the shoreline of the Nelson River, said a source familiar with the investigation who was granted confidentiality because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the matter. Autopsies are being scheduled in Winnipeg to confirm identities and determine causes of death. However, Assistant Commissioner MacLatchy said she is “confident” the bodies are that of Mr. Schmegelsky, 18, and Mr. McLeod, 19. The two were charged with second-degree murder in the death of University of British Columbia lecturer Leonard Dyck, 64, and named suspects in the deaths of American Chynna Deese, 24, and her Australian boyfriend, Lucas Fowler, 23. Police expected the men to be charged in the deaths of the latter two but were awaiting forensic evidence. All three victims were found dead in Northern B.C. in mid-July. 📷 by Melissa Tait (@meltait) Reporting by Renata D’Aliesio, Ian Bailey and Andrea Woo

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'This can happen to you.' David Milgaard on justice, faith and freedom - David Milgaard is 67. His name is a part of our history and culture, and his story is one of Canada’s most egregious wrongful convictions. It is never out of the news for long, even now. On the day I arrive at his townhouse outside Calgary, it is almost 50 years to the day since he was arrested and charged for a murder he didn’t commit. . “Is it really 50 years?” he says, when I mention the anniversary to him, and he pauses to do the math. Then his voice grows soft. . It is difficult for him to talk about even now. But he knows he cannot stay silent. . Saskatoon police issued a warrant for Mr. Milgaard on May 26, 1969. He turned himself in four days later in Prince George. He was 16. . The police department investigating the murder of nursing assistant Gail Miller was already battling allegations of brutality and “irresponsible conduct.” Amid that scrutiny, the arrest of Mr. Milgaard was a win, a step forward in a case that had profoundly upset the Prairie city for months: A young woman sexually assaulted and killed on her way to work, her body discarded in a snowbank. . Mr. Milgaard was found guilty, and sentenced to life in prison. But he steadfastly declared his innocence, and his mother, Joyce, believed him. For the next 23 years, she fought tirelessly to free him, and then worked seven years more for him to be exonerated and compensated. . The thing Mr. Milgaard wants you to know is that it could have been you. That it could be you. He wants you to know his story isn’t just about what he’s endured – 23 years in prison for his wrongful conviction, then 27 more dealing with the consequences – but that it could just as easily be your story. . He wants you to know that there are innocent people kept in prison right now, while the true perpetrators are out there, free. Most importantly, he wants you to care enough about the wrongfully convicted that measures will be taken to protect them, in ways that he himself was not protected. — Follow the link in our bio to read more from Jana G. Pruden Photos by Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail @toddkorol

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‘Fairytale’ win for first British jockey to race in a hijab — A teenager made history as the first British jockey to compete in a major event wearing a hijab on Thursday, winning a “fairytale” victory at the famed Goodwood racecourse. . Khadijah Mellah beamed and shared a high-five with another rider after crossing the finish line on her horse Haverland ahead of 11 other female jockeys. . The 18-year-old from a deprived south London neighbourhood had never sat on a racehorse until April and Goodwood described her victory in the Magnolia Cup, a charity race for non-professional jockeys, as a “fairytale win.” . Mellah, who competed against riders including former Olympic cyclist Victoria Pendleton and presenter Vogue Williams, said before the race it was “crazy” that she was the first female Muslim jockey in British competitive horse racing. . “There’s quite a stereotype around Muslim girls and them ‘not being able to follow their sporting passions and dreams’,” she said in a statement. . “I am thrilled that I am part of a shift in social understanding of what women can achieve and what they can be good at.” . Mellah, who will start university in the fall, said she had “a couple of sleepless nights” as she prepared for the race. . “I want to be a role model to anyone who wants to do something that they wouldn’t initially believe was in their comfort zone and allow people to follow their aspirations,” she said. — Follow the link in our bio for the full story Photo by Mark Kerton/The Associated Press

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Slick science: How researchers are preparing for Canada’s next major oil spill – The sight of thick black oil spreading across a picturesque northern lake sounds like an ecologist’s nightmare. But last month, as Madeline Stanley, a PhD student and project officer at the Experimental Lakes Area, watched one multicoloured slick after another spreading across pristine water, she was thrilled. . The research site in Northwestern Ontario, includes 58 small lakes that serve as a natural laboratory for investigating environmental contamination, one of the few places on Earth where aquatic ecosystems can be deliberately polluted for scientific study. . Concerns about the growing volume of oil moving across Canada by rail and pipeline and a dearth of information on how to deal with oil-related accidents are big reasons why Stanley’s work is part of a broader effort by Canadian scientists to examine the effects of oil spills on freshwater environments. . Here, “oil” is shorthand for a complex blend of hydrocarbons that is particularly relevant to Canada. Diluted bitumen, sometimes called “dilbit,” consists of the tar-like raw material that is extracted from the Alberta oil sands mixed with a lighter petroleum derivative called diluent, which allows the bitumen to flow. . For this summer’s experiment, dilbit was poured into several floating enclosures fixed to the edge of a small test lake. Every enclosure is built to confine the dilbit within a rectangular expanse of water 30 metres long and bordered by a 10-metre stretch of shoreline. . While the amount is modest – just one litre per enclosure – it is enough to allow scientists to estimate the effects of a much larger spill on different kinds of freshwater environments. And it did not take long for a dark, gooey residue to coat the rock, soil and plants at the edge of the enclosure. . Experts say the need for such studies is acute. Much of what scientists know about oil spills is based on tanker or oil-rig disasters in seawater, where oil is more buoyant and often more dispersed than on small inland waterways. . Follow the link in our bio for more by Ivan Semeniuk – for subscribers 📷 Alyssa Lloyd/The Globe and Mail

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‘Spaceship’ fossil hints at rich diversity of ancient seas – The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto has unveiled a previously unknown family of extinct animals – nicknamed “spaceships” because of their science fiction appearance – that lived off the coast of what would eventually become North America about 506 million years ago. . This was during the Cambrian Period, when the continents were barren but the oceans were teeming with all manner of bizarre creatures that collectively represent the first great flowering of animal life on Earth. . Trapped by mudslides and preserved for the ages, many of those species are now coming to light in the Canadian Rockies, where ROM researchers are exploring new fossil sites. . The latest to be unveiled is Cambroraster falactus, a football-shaped arthropod that motored along the seafloor, presumably using its comb-like claws to scoop up worms and other tiny critters wriggling in the mud. . “You can imagine it almost like a fishing trawler, raking the bottom,” said Dr. Jean-Bernard Caron, the museum’s curator of invertebrate paleontology. . They found dozens of examples of the creature’s distinctive carapace, which likely helped protect it from predators. Two notches on either side of the carapace provided openings through which it could peer upward and backward, watching for danger, while it moved blindly forward. . Fossil remains of Cambroraster reveal a circular mouth on its bottom side. This puts it in the same broad animal group as Anomalocaris, a larger, swimming carnivore that was the Cambrian’s top predator. The entire line died out at the end of Cambrian. . The find is an exciting one because Cambroraster is so large – roughly palm-sized – whereas many Cambrian fauna never grew longer than a few centimetres. . An even larger spaceship-like species has also turned up at Tokumm Creek. The dinner-plate-sized big brother to Cambroraster is still being analyzed. Together, the new finds are a strong indication that scientists have not yet sampled the full diversity of life that was present during the Cambrian Period. . Follow the link in our bio page for the full story by Ivan Semeniuk Images by the ROM @romtoronto

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RCMP rushed to the small Manitoba community of York Landing on Sunday, following a reported sighting of the two men wanted in the killings of three people in British Columbia. . Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, have been the target of a week-long manhunt from B.C. to northern Manitoba. On Sunday, members of the Bear Clan Patrol say they spotted two men fitting the descriptions of Schmegelsky and McLeod near the garbage dump and water treatment plant of the York Factory First Nation. The community is about 200 kilometres southwest of Gillam, where the RCMP have focused their search. . The manhunt for the pair has drawn 40 police officers to Gillam, a remote blue-collar community of 1,200 people about 700 km north of Winnipeg. Until Sunday afternoon’s possible sighting, the police have had few credible leads to go on. Earlier in the day, Inspector Lewis told reporters the search for the pair could stretch on for days or weeks in the remote wilderness of northern Manitoba. The day earlier he noted that the manhunt is “evolving and dynamic.” . The search has involved police trucks, quads, sniffer dogs, infrared-equipped drones, helicopters, boats, and since Saturday, a Canadian Air Force CC-130H Hercules plane staffed with trained search and rescue spotters. There has been no sighting of the pair since Monday, when the SUV that police believe they were driving was found on fire in a ditch near Fox Lake Cree Nation. Another military aircraft was added to the RCMP’s arsenal late Saturday, a CP-140 Aurora that has specialty surveillance capabilities, including infrared camera and imaging-radar systems, a military spokeswoman said. . Police officers have gone door-to-door in Gillam and Fox Lake with the hope of gathering leads and had spoken with about three-quarters of residents by Sunday morning. . Although the RCMP on Friday said they believe it’s possible someone may have inadvertently helped the suspects leave the Gillam area, Inspector Lewis said northern Manitoba remains “ground zero” for their manhunt. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Renata D’Aliesio, Ian Bailey, Andrea Woo, Xiao Xu Photos by Melissa Tait/The Globe and Mail @meltait

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What do we really know about male desire? Not much, according to Canadian sex researchers - Although sex researchers historically gave male subjects centre stage, they paid surprisingly little attention to how men actually desire. Today, contemporary sexologists say our cultural understanding of men’s sex drive remains simplistic and leans on old clichés – that male libido is always sky-high, self-centred and ready to go, with practically anyone. Men who aren’t this way are still treated as exceptions, not the rule. . Canadian researchers and clinicians are starting to push back on these ideas by asking deeper questions about the inner world of male desire. They’re looking at how heterosexual men lust (and don’t) within their relationships, what motivates them to have sex with their partners, what frustrates them in their intimate lives and how they process rejection from the women they love. What they’re finding counters much of what’s been previously assumed about men. . “We’ve got this stereotype about men’s desire being constant and unwavering. More recently, we’ve got #MeToo highlighting stories of men’s sexual desire being dangerous, toxic and about power. But what else is going on?” said Winnipeg relationships therapist Sarah Hunter Murray. . Murray interviewed nearly 300 men and spoke to hundreds more over a decade in her therapy practice – executives, truck drivers, athletes, teachers and dads among them. Their insights are included in Murray’s recent book, Not Always in The Mood: The New Science of Men, Sex, and Relationships, which offers a male desire that’s less voracious, indiscriminate and skin deep, and more emotionally complex – fragile, even. . Follow the link in our bio to read the full story Illustration by Cristian Fowlie @crrristian

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Al-Assad’s Nuremberg moment: Page by page, an NGO and its Canadian founder build a case for Syrian war crimes — If you haven’t heard of William Wiley or the Commission for International Justice and Accountability, the non-profit organization that he established in 2012, that’s because he likes it that way. CIJA has no website, and there’s no sign on the door of the office that Mr. Wiley and his team work out of. The Globe agreed not to name the European country that CIJA’s head office staff are located in, out of concern that the group’s work could make it a target. . But the project is well-known to Western governments, including Canada’s, which collectively provide $8-million in annual funding for the group’s 150 investigators. Though the first grant came from the British government, Ottawa has since taken the lead, providing CIJA with $3-million a year since 2015. Mr. Wiley and his team represent a new force in international justice – one that struck a deal with anti-Assad rebels to keep the evidence from going up in smoke and being lost forever. . The reason for all the cloak and dagger can be found among the piles of thick binders that Mr. Wiley keeps on the black metal bookcase behind his desk. Crimes Against Humanity Committed in Detention Facilities of the Syrian Regime, is the title page of one – hundreds of pages thick – that lays out the alleged crimes committed by officials. . CIJA’s files also contain what Mr. Wiley says is proof that Mr. al-Assad himself had knowledge of, and approved the actions of, his subordinates. “It’s pretty clear that Assad was not a figurehead. He was in charge, and the senior guys deferred to him.” That, Mr. Wiley said, makes the Syrian leader criminally responsible for the alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out by his forces. . “It’s the best evidence against a regime since Nuremberg,” the 55-year-old said, referring to the landmark postwar trials that convicted members of the Nazi regime and became the template for international justice. — Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Mark McKinnon Photos by Marko Djurica/Reuters, Mark MacKinnon/The Globe And Mail, Nazeer Al-Khatib/AFP/Getty Images

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Thunder Bay was once a hub for newcomers from across Europe, but isolation and a weak economy have made 21st-century multiculturalism a distant dream. – The city’s only cricket field, located in a public park in the middle of a quiet subdivision near the teaching hospital, is slightly unorthodox. . The pitch is lumpy and made of artificial turf. The wickets are held together with duct tape. Boundaries include a basketball hoop and a suburban street with parked cars, which everyone tries to avoid denting. . None of that deters the couple of dozen players from Thunder Bay’s two postsecondary schools in River Terrace Park. The schools recently began fielding teams, and they are entirely populated by international students and recent graduates from India. . “We play good in Thunder Bay,” says a player nicknamed Captain Cool “This is our home.” . For a growing number of young Indian men, Thunder Bay really is home – as awkward and imperfect a home as the cricket field, but home nonetheless. . These young men and women are bucking the trend in Thunder Bay. The isolation, small size and economic stasis of this city of about 120,000 have generally repelled immigrants over the past 20 years. . The #cricket players point to a brighter future. For a place that hasn’t seen meaningful population growth for two generations and is trying to make the difficult transition from an industrial economy to a white-collar one, this influx of young, skilled migrants should be a blessing. . But Captain Cool and his friends also embody a dilemma: Many newcomers to the city aren’t putting down roots. . It’s a problem faced by huge swaths of rural Canada and many small cities, but Mayor Bill Mauro recognizes the existential stakes for Thunder Bay in particular, a city that was built on #immigration and is now struggling to rebuild itself the same way. . “On the one hand, [the international students] are just a fantastic success story for us,” he says, “But it’s the same as it’s always been … whether there’s enough economic opportunity here to keep young graduates.” . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Eric Andrew-Gee Photos by Melissa Tait / The Globe and Mail @meltait

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Canadian index rises for second consecutive month – Canada’s home prices rose for the second consecutive month in June, according to new data from the Teranet-National Bank House Price Index. The national composite index increased 0.8 per cent in June compared with May. Nine of the 11 metropolitan markets surveyed in June experienced month-over-month price gains. . There were monthly increases of 2.2 per cent in Ottawa-Gatineau; 2.1 per cent in Victoria, 1.6 per cent in Hamilton; 1.5 per cent in Halifax; 1.3 per cent in Toronto; 0.8 per cent in Montreal; 0.3 per cent in Quebec City; 0.1 per cent in Winnipeg; and a slight gain in Edmonton. . The two markets posting decreases were: 0.3 per cent in Vancouver; and 0.1 per cent in Calgary. . The composite index saw a year-over-year improvement of 0.5 per cent to 224.96 (also meaning prices went up by 124.96 per cent since June, 2005). The national index, which looks at pricing trends based on a large sample of the sales of properties registered at land title offices, set a record high 226.23 in September, 2018. In June, the average sales price of various housing types in the national survey was $554,343 for the 11 markets. . “The fact that monthly gains are reported for May and June does not mean that the market recently turned the corner. These two months typically register the strongest growth rates in a year,” National Bank economist Marc Pinsonneault said in a research note. . Written by Brent Jang Follow the link in our bio to explore more housing data. Chart by The Globe and Mail, Source: TERANET-National Bank

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From the summer of 1963 up to today, we think ice cream would be popular in any decade. But this was REALLY popular ice cream! #globetbt . @lymond1922 : Beginning in the late 1950s, The Globe and Mail published a weekly Saturday magazine which included feature-length articles and some truly wonderful photography. Most often the photography was taken by a Toronto-based freelance photographer named Erik Schack (later known as Erik Christensen) . Here is a selection of photos Erik took one night in July 1963 at George Dawson’s Stoney Creek Dairy, a small drive-in ice cream parlour near Stoney Creek, Ontario. I like these photos because they capture a timeless pleasure – individuals young and old, savouring delicious ice cream on a hot summer night. . From the photo captions: Long line-ups at the Stoney Creek Drive-in ice cream parlour, July 14, 1963. George Dawson’s Stoney Creek Dairy is scarcely designed as a customer-catcher. It stands on a minor road that forks unobtrusively away from No. 8 Highway to amble into Stoney Creek, Ontario. There are no flashy neon signs across its sober brick facade. The crush of people is sometimes unbelievable. On sunny summer Sundays, close to 15,000 clamoring connoisseurs of Dawson’s delectable frozen delicacy choke the road, the dairy’s groaning parking lot and the driveways of resigned residents nearby. 40 white-uniformed helpers inside the the dairy scoop, plunk, squirt and sprinkle in a dizzy-paced race to reduce the endless queue of customers. . Photos by Erik Schack [Erik Christensen] / For The Globe and Mail . #tbt #history #archives #photographyarchive #stoneycreekhistory #icecream #icecreamhistory #drivein #1960s

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Gaps in wildfire science leave Canadian researchers fighting blind against growing risks – Thousands of homes and vast swaths of forest were consumed by the Horse River Fire that ripped through Fort McMurray in 2016. But if the scale of the destruction was shocking, the fire’s extreme intensity and the speed with which it overwhelmed the Northern Alberta city illustrated a stark risk that experts had worried about for years. . Some of the tens of millions of dollars Alberta spent on wildfire prevention that year helped fund efforts to thin trees around the city, plant less-combustible hardwoods and clear brush from homes, according to a post-incident report. . Such precautions are in use across Canada, yet they are based primarily on technical guidelines developed in the United States; few have been validated by scientists to gauge how effective they are in northern, boreal forests. . “What that means is that people really don’t know, because it hasn’t been done,” said Brian Stocks, a wildfire-science specialist and one of several investigators hired to assess the Fort McMurray blaze for the Alberta government. . That knowledge gap is just one of a growing number of blind spots that scientists say jeopardize millions of people and billions of dollars of infrastructure as more intense and frequent wildfires chew through larger tracts of Canada’s forests each year. . Canada has never spent more to combat wildfires, yet efforts to understand and adapt to the fast-evolving hazards have faltered, hampered by the attrition of key researchers and acute funding constraints. . As a result, the country lacks a comprehensive framework for assessing risks. There is no national system that maps where cities, towns and infrastructure are in relation to vegetation, what the fuel loads are and what sort of fire behaviour they might generate. . As climate change makes blazes bigger and costlier, scientists say the dearth of knowledge is a danger we can’t ignore any longer. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Jeff Lewis Photo by Jonathon Hayward/The Canadian Press

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Tuesday, Freshii appointed Daniel Haroun as their new CFO. Two weeks ago, Joe Castaldo profiled the company’s CEO Matthew Corrin in Report on Business Magazine. . Freshii, the healthy fast food chain, has spread like some kind of nutritious weed, sprouting up between restaurants better known for burgers and fries than kale and quinoa. The Toronto-based company now has nearly 450 stores in 16 countries, including far-flung locations such as Saudi Arabia, Colombia and Ecuador. . Mattthew Corrin, who opened the first Freshii in 2005 at age 23, had the foresight to recognize the appeal of quick, fresh food and the hustle to aggressively expand the concept. He now has visions of transforming the company from a mere restaurant chain to a “health and wellness” brand, pushing his products through any venue possible. . Freshii rocketed to an initial public offering in January 2017 with bold plans to more than triple its store count in a few short years. The company hit a valuation of close to $400 million and boasted quarter after quarter of strong same-store sales growth, a rarity in a sluggish industry. . But Freshii’s stock price has collapsed more than 80% since then and trades around $2 today. Competition has intensified in the past decade, sure, but even that doesn’t explain the depths of Freshii’s troubles. Could Corrin himself be the problem? — Follow the link in our bio for the full story (for subscribers) Photos by Justin Poulsen / @justinpoulsenphoto, @sparksphotographers; source photo Darryl Dyck / The Canadian Press

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Opinion: The life-changing magic of making do – Making do is a deeply pragmatic philosophy. It means asking of our things the only question we should ever ask of them: “Can you fulfill your intended use for me?” . The answer – if we can be honest, and resist a moment of discomfort, inconvenience or boredom – is, extraordinarily often, yes. Making do is about taming the reflex to discard, replace or upgrade; it’s about using things well, and using them until they are used up. Taken literally, it simply means making something perform – making it do what it ought to do. . As Juliet Schor writes in Plenitude: The New Economics of True Wealth, “We don’t need to be less materialistic, as the standard formulation would have it, but more so.” By becoming more materialistic, in this deeper sense, we can radically reorient our relationship with things. In this way, we can not only mitigate the high cost of thoughtless consumption, saving us money and the planet harm, but also, we might just wind up a whole lot happier. . Getting the most out of things often requires investment, and the economics of repair can be challenging: It may be cheaper to buy a new sweater, made in Bangladesh, than to pay a Canadian tailor to fix an old one. Ideally, we’d mend it ourselves – a basic repertoire of DIY repair skills is wonderful way to make do – but either way, there’s deep value in reviving the thing. Never mind that a mended garment is perfectly functional; it’s often improved, imbued with a hint effortless imperfection. . Follow the link in our bio page for the full piece By Benjamin Leszcz Illustration by Melinda Josie @melindajosie

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In Newfoundland and Labrador’s opioid crisis, a flying doctor lifts rural residents’ hopes of recovery — It is an hour or so before midnight when Dr. Todd Young’s truck peels onto the unlit strip of asphalt paved into a remote section of woods. . His pilot and plane are already waiting. This night’s flight was planned for tomorrow, but warnings of early morning fog have set off an urgent race to get Dr. Young up into the sky – and back down more than 500 kilometres south in Marystown – to ensure he can see the dozens of addictions patients registered to see him. . Dr. Young, a physician based in Springdale, the rural town of 3,000 where he was born and where his father is still the local barber, flies his own plane into eight-and-counting small Newfoundland and Labrador towns each month to provide treatment for opioid addiction. In most of those places, he is the only doctor willing to prescribe opioid-replacement medication – methadone or Suboxone – and he often has to convince pharmacists to dispense the medication. . In all but one of the towns he flies to, he is the only doctor who offers rapid access to treatment, meaning a patient asking for help is usually seen within five days (elsewhere in the province, patients wait an average of one month, although in rural areas, if there is a doctor who offers opioid addiction treatment, waits are often much longer). . Newfoundland has struggled in recent years to counter a growing opioid epidemic that, as in other provinces, has ensnared people from all walks of life. The province was recently slammed for having the country’s highest opioid prescription rate per capita – and the country’s only increasing rate of opioid prescriptions – in a report published last year by the Canadian Institute for Health Information. . “Every nook and cranny is affected by addiction,” Dr. Young said. “People are suffering in the smallest of towns.” — Follow the link in our bio to read the full story by Jessica Leeder . Photos by Darren Calabrese @dbcalabrese

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It is September 1962. Two Globe staff photographers pose nonchalantly in a parking lot as a fellow photographer snaps their photo. They hold the tools of their trade and the requisite burning cigarette. #globetbt 📷🗄🗞 . Paula Wilson @lymond1922, Globe photo editor and researcher: “I like this photo because it allows me to match a name to a face. Over the years I have looked at literally thousands, if not tens of thousands of photos and negatives taken by Harry McLorinan and Harold Robinson. Both men were long-time staffers, hired by the newspaper in the early 1940s and both were to spend upwards of thirty years taking photos of everything under the sun. These two men were consummate professionals who created a body of work encompassing both the ordinary and the extraordinary. I salute them. . Caption: 1962. Globe and Mail staff photographers, Harry McLorinan and Harold Robinson, September 11, 1962. . Do you recognize the cameras? We see a Rolleiflex and a Mamiyaflex from possibly the 1950s? This photograph may have been taken for an internal newsletter called “The Inside Story” which was published in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Swipe to see examples of the newsletter. . Paula has viewed and scanned thousands of negatives and prints over the years. Recently she chose a few hundred select photos for a new mural of Globe history and news events that was installed in the event space at The Globe and Mail Centre in #Toronto. We’ll be posting some of the photos which have never been published, as well as some from the news archives. . Photo by John Boyd / The Globe and Mail . #tbt #archives #newspaper #photography #Rolleiflex #Mamiyaflex #history #photographyhistory #archivesofinstagram #history #photohistory #canadahistory #mediumformat #blackandwhite #120film

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Chase Outlaw has the perfect cowboy name and the rugged features of a motion-picture bronco buster. The only evidence of the bull-riding accident he suffered last year is a slight bit of muscle weakness below the left eye. . It is the exact spot where his head slammed against the base of one of War Cloud’s horns. His face exploded inside itself. Thirty bones shattered. . He is 5 feet 6 inches and weighs 150 pounds. For a living, he rides whirling, bucking beasts that weigh nearly a ton. He is in Calgary competing at the famous Stampede. Heading into the event, he is the third-ranked bull rider in the world. . He had recently returned from having both shoulders rebuilt when the violent blow to the face occurred. It took 12 hours of surgery, and another seven hours at a later date, to fix. . “Quitting never crossed my mind,” says Outlaw, 27. He is from Arkansas and has a syrupy Southern accent. “It is what I love to do. If you had an accident going to get groceries, you wouldn’t decide not to get groceries again.” . He had facial-reconstruction surgery, and it kept him off bulls for only 75 days. He has made only one concession since he returned: he wears a helmet now when he rides. . “You always know the risk and the danger is there,” Outlaw says from his home in Hamburg, Ark. “Being able to come back and face that giant is what separates the men from the boys. . “You have to be very strong mentally and block out negative thoughts. You use whatever fear there is inside you and turn it into fuel.” . The accident happened on July 23 during a Professional Bull Riders rodeo in Wyoming. In a matter of seconds, War Cloud lurched backward and threw Outlaw forward. They smacked heads and he fell off. . Outlaw had 15 fractures on each side of his face. The broken bones included bilateral bony orbital rims, bilateral floor orbit blowouts, naso-orbital-ethmoid fractures, open nasoseptal fractures, a bilateral maxillary fracture, broken nasomaxillary buttresses and both cheek bones. His eye sockets were broken, as was his nose. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Marty Klinkenberg Photos by Todd Korol / @toddkorol . . @outlaw365

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Robert Wickens refused to believe it. When the Canadian IndyCar driver awoke from a coma in a hospital room last summer, his family gave him the news: he was paralyzed. . “I was just like, ’No – you’re wrong. You’re wrong!’” he says. “And then people would cry and leave the room, because I guess I was being stubborn.” . Less than two weeks earlier, his car flew off the track and slammed into the catch fence at Pennsylvania’s Pocono Raceway, a few hours north of Philadelphia, destroying the vehicle and bringing his burgeoning career to a halt. . Until that moment, Wickens was on top of his sport, having taken IndyCar by storm in his debut year. Now his spine was broken, his neck was broken, both hands and legs were broken, along with an arm, an elbow and four ribs. . In a matter of seconds, Wickens went from rookie sensation to a man trying to piece his life back together. . But against incredible odds and warnings from doctors that his injuries might be insurmountable, Wickens is now trying to engineer one of the most remarkable comeback stories Canadian sport has seen – even if he knows it defies all logic. . He wants to race again, but first he must teach himself to walk. With his fiancée, Karli, by his side, the 30-year-old from Guelph, Ont. is determined to defy the odds, embarking on an intensive rehabilitation program as he slowly regains some of the feeling in his legs. . Opening up about the crash and the toll it’s taken on their lives, Karli admits how scared she was the day her cell phone rang in the aftermath of the accident. She was at home watching the race on television and saw the wreck being replayed over and over. Amid the chaos, a woman at the track had found her number and relayed a message from Wickens before he was flown to hospital in a helicopter: “Tell Karli I love her,” Wickens said. . That was when Karli knew it was bad. He never talked that way. Those sounded like last words. — Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Grant Robertson Photos by David Goldman / @thedavidgoldmanphoto Video from IMS Productions

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Khartoum’s vulnerable tea sellers face deadlier risks in Sudan’s time of turmoil — The tea women, who number in the thousands on Khartoum’s busy commercial streets, have always been one of the most vulnerable groups in the city. They are often harassed and punished by police, even though they earn only two or three dollars a day for brewing glasses of sweet, fragrant tea at their tiny stalls on the dusty margins of the streets. . But when they decided to support the street protests against Sudan’s military rulers this year, they were exposed to greater dangers than ever before – and some may have paid with their lives. . For six weeks, the tea sellers had volunteered to run the biggest kitchen at Khartoum’s main protest camp. . When the police and paramilitary forces launched a brutal attack on the protest camp in the predawn hours on June 3, the women faced the same gunfire that killed more than 100 of the protesters. . For decades, under Sudan’s authoritarian regimes, the tea sellers have endured harsh treatment from security forces. Many of the vendors are migrants, and most are so impoverished that they do not even own their tea glasses or food equipment. (They usually pay a rental fee to the owners.) . “They never left us in peace,” said Awadeya Mahmoud Koko, leader of a co-operative that represents about 27,000 tea vendors and other food workers in the Khartoum area. “They confiscate our belongings and take them to the police station, they make us pay a fine and then a week later they do it again. It’s because we’re not socially acceptable. They don’t want to see us on the streets.” . Ms. Koko had left the protest camp at about 3:30 a.m. that night, just shortly before the assault began. “I was lucky I made it out,” she said. When she returned to the site later, she discovered that the security forces had burned the protest camp to the ground. Her volunteer kitchen was gone. . The fate of the six missing tea sellers is still unknown. “Their families are still hoping that they’re alive,” Ms. Koko said. “They don’t want to believe they’re dead.” — Click the link in our bio for more by Geoffrey York Photos: Andreea Campeanu/The Globe And Mail/ @andreeacampeanu

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Vladimir Guerrero Jr., 20, of the Toronto @BlueJays smashed out 29 home runs in the opening round of the #MLB All-Star Home Run Derby — breaking the old record of 28 set by Josh Hamilton in 2008. ⚾️ . But in the end, in a matchup of rookies, Pete Alonso of the New York Mets outhomered Guerrero 23-22 in the final round at Progressive Field in Cleveland on Monday. . #Guerrero hit 91 homers total to pass Giancarlo Stanton’s Derby record 61 set in 2016. . He outlasted Joc Pederson of the Los Angeles Dodgers, 40-39, in a semifinal for the ages that went three tiebreakers. Guerrero hit 29 in the second round after his record in the opening round. . Pederson ripped 27 homers in regulation and hit two more in the bonus round to tie. Guerrero then hit eight more going first in a 1-minute swing-off but Pederson matched him at 37 on his last swing. . Each player then had three swings and both homered once. They repeated the tiebreaker and Guerrero smacked two homers while Pederson connected on his first swing but then hit a liner and a grounder to end the epic battle. . “I believe in God and I believe in myself but that’s one hell of a player over there,” Guerrero said through an interpreter to ESPN in reference to Pederson. “That was a great show we put on.” . Guerrero, the son of 2018 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Vladimir Guerrero, was the youngest participant ever. . His hands blistered, Guerrero more than equaled his season’s salary of $468,468. He got $500,000 for finishing second, plus a $100,000 bonus for hitting the longest homer. . Text by AP and Reuters. Photos by Tony Dejak/AP, John Minchillo/AP, Jason Miller/Getty, Charles LeClaire/USA TODAY, Gregory Shamus/Getty . #HRDerby #AllStarGame #PLAKATA #VladdyJr #BlueJays #letsgobluejays

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The story of the opioid crisis, told on skin — The opioids crisis is killing an average of 12 people per day in Canada, leaving friends and family struggling for ways to cope with a deep and sudden loss. One way is to record it on their skin. . Tattoos that show the name, signature, fingerprint or heartbeat of the person who died are becoming increasingly popular as the crisis grinds on. Some are ornate and rich with symbolism, others are strikingly simple. A few even incorporate a trace of the person’s remains by mixing their ashes with the ink. . “It’s like a talisman that a person can hold onto,” says Leslie McBain, who co-founded Moms Stop the Harm, which represents the families of victims. She has a raven on her right arm in memory of her son, Jordan Miller, who died of a drug overdose in 2014 when he was only 25. A trickster – smart, funny, sometimes loud and naughty – he had many of the raven’s qualities, she says. . For Helen Jennens of Kelowna, B.C., who has lost two sons to opioids and has memorial tattoos on both feet, the tattoos are also a way to shatter the stigma those suffering from drug addiction often carry. “If I am not afraid to brand myself in a way – to acknowledge I don’t have any shame – it’s showing that my boys had a chronic, relapsing disease, not a moral failing, and I’m not afraid to talk about it.” . Marcus Gee spoke to people across the country about their tattoos and those that they honour. Follow the link in our bio to read their stories. — Photography by Amber Bracken, Darren Calabrese, Jackie Dives and Chris Donovan @photobracken @dbcalabrese @jackiedivesphoto @cdonovanphoto

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Early social media 60 years ago on the streets of Toronto. In June 1959 workers install The Globe and Mail’s “News Ticker” at Yonge and Dundas, made up of 1,120 light bulbs. 💡 The Globe headline read: “The News While It’s Hot…In Letters 3 Feet High” 🗄 This is the first weekly post from our archives chosen by Paula Wilson @lymond1922, a photo editor and researcher at The Globe. #globetbt 📸 “I love this series of pictures since they capture the spirit of a time and place. Here we see a busy street corner in late 1950s #Toronto being transformed into a news hub for passers-by. It makes me realize that every generation has used the technology at hand to spread the “news”. We like to think that the Internet and social media have transformed the way we learn about our world, but 60 years ago, news outlets such as The Globe and Mail were already sending out the first “tweets”. . Caption: “Bystanders will be able to read bulletins flashed instantaneously from the editorial department of The Globe and Mail. These electric bulletins mark the inauguration of the newspaper’s newest public service and will bring news headlines to citizens in a novel way through the complex mechanism which is almost as legible in bright daylight as at night.” . From June 11, 1959 story: “Technicians worked for weeks assembling the complex mechanism on top of the Brown Derby Tavern. The display was manufactured in sections which were hoisted into place. Some 35 miles of wiring was installed, 5,600 connections made.” . Other photos show editors selecting headlines. “Nerve Centre of the operation is a News Flashes office established in the newspaper’s Editorial Department. Bulletins are copied on a perforated tape which feeds continuously into an electronic transmitter. As the transmitter operates its messages simultaneously flash across the 55-foot length of the display.” . A photo of the ticker in action. Headlines had to be about 10 words or fewer. And page 25 from The Globe the day the ticker was launched. . Photos by Jack Dobson/The Globe and Mail . 💡 if you have info on the Brown Derby Tavern, comment! . #tbt #archive #torontohistory #history #archivesofinstagram #newspaper #yongeanddundas

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When U.S. President Donald Trump takes the stage at the Lincoln Memorial to mark his country’s Independence Day Thursday, he will be surrounded by the might of the world’s most powerful military. Tanks and armoured vehicles will flank him. The Blue Angels, a Navy squadron of demonstration fighter jets, will perform aerial acrobatics overhead. An F-35 will buzz the crowd. . Normally an apolitical event, this year’s Fourth of July celebration on the National Mall has been taken over by the President. He has rebranded it A Salute to America, added a speech by himself and ordered up the hardware. . Mr. Trump patterned the show on Bastille Day in Paris, whose martial tone impressed him during a visit two years ago. Critics charge that the President is turning a publicly funded celebration into a campaign event as he revs up his 2020 election machinery. . “We’re going to have a great Fourth of July in Washington, D.C. It’ll be like no other,” Mr. Trump told reporters in the Oval Office this week. “It’ll be special.” . The National Parks Service, which keeps a partial record of presidential activities on Independence Days past, shows only two occasions during which the sitting president held a military event in Washington that day: James Madison in 1812, shortly before launching an invasion of Great Britain’s Canadian colonies; and James Polk in 1848, months after winning the Mexican-American War. . “We have not typically had, as we didn’t feel we needed to have, a big military parade as the Soviets did in Red Square,” said Barbara Ann Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center on Public Affairs. “That is not typically how we celebrate our patriotism.” — Follow the link in our bio for more by Adrian Morrow in Washington D.C. Video by Reuters, photo by Jacquelyn Martin / The Associated Press

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In the social upheaval of the late 1960s, as Canada was envisioning its future as a modern nation, the Globe and Mail's first art director brought complex issues to life in vivid colour. . These poster-like magazine covers burst out of the otherwise grey pages of the Saturday Globe and Mail like psychedelic bombs. Embodying the spirit of the late 1960s, they tackled complex issues and visually captured one of the most transformative periods in the cultural and political life of Canada. And then they vanished. . The history of graphic design in Canada is missing a chapter on their creator Margaret Stewart (1928-2019), art director of The Globe Magazine from 1964 to 1971. Despite being well-known in Toronto where she was active from the 1950s to the 1980s, her work is virtually unknown today. Fortunately, since bound copies were discovered in a forgotten library cupboard at The Globe just prior to the paper’s move in 2016, we have an opportunity to rediscover a remarkable period in her career. These covers had already caught my eye repeatedly as a visual kid growing up in Toronto, so when I first met Marg (as the mom of one of my best friends in middle school), I was surprised to learn that she was responsible for them. . As an art director, she was expert at choosing the right illustrator or photographer for a job, but some of her strongest work as a designer and conceptual thinker emerged when she was working with no budget, inferior visuals or just a headline. One of her signature strategies was to pump up the contrast on murky wire photos, transforming them into graphic silhouettes that fused seamlessly with the headlines. She wasn’t the only art director who used this trick, but, as her Rudolf Nureyev cover reveals, her approach was unmistakably original. . When The Globe Magazine was replaced by the syndicated Weekend Magazine in 1971, Marg lost the platform where she was able to do the most original and arguably the strongest work of her career. Not one to be thrown off course, she moved up into a newly created senior position working for the paper at large as the first art director of The Globe and Mail. — Follow the link in our bio for Bryan Gee’s story

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Hubert Jim says he can smell visitors long before he ever sees them. . This sounds, of course, like total hokum. But a few hours after saying it, Hubie, as Mr. Jim is better known, suddenly went pounding down the winding one-kilometre trail leading to a sturdy, log bridge he built years ago. There, on the far side of the churning, white waters of the Cayoosh Creek stood a pair of bemused retirees from Britain, blinking in the hot, spring sun. Hubie, a Lil’wat Nation hereditary chief, had apparently nosed them out. . The protest camp named Sutikalh was erected in 2000 by a group of First Nations people aiming to stop the last, pristine watershed on Lil’wat lands from being turned into a ski hill. The resort would rival Whistler, the co-host of the 2010 Winter Olympics and playground to the global super rich that also happens to be located on the traditional territories of the Lil’wat Nation. . “So much of the world has already been destroyed,” he says. “I’m looking after the mountain not just for the Lil’wat, but so the whole world can enjoy it.” . Two decades on, he is operating what might be Canada’s longest-running protest camp. For this, he has sacrificed his youth, a job, the possibility of love. . A new ski resort on Lil’wat lands could mean jobs for the 2,500 members of the chronically underfunded first nation, B.C.’s third largest, by population. The roads in Mount Currie, as the community is known locally, were not paved until 1966. Until 1987, it had no high school. . But Hubie, who was born in Whistler before it became a resort, doesn’t believe another ski hill will lift his people from poverty: “They told us Whistler would be good for the Lil’wat. But in the end, all we got were dishwashing jobs, snow-shovelling jobs. Our people were left cleaning up after the rich.” . “I made myself a prisoner here,” he says. “I don’t know my own family any more. It’s a job I wouldn’t wish on anybody.” . “Then again, I’m never really alone – the animals are my best friends,” he says as dawn breaks over the mountain, his faithful, 13-year-old mutt still snoring loudly. — Follow the link in our bio for Nancy MacDonald’s full story Photos by @melissarenwick, Hubert Jim

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Six years ago, Anna Todd was an aimless 24-year-old military wife living in Texas when she began tapping out After on her smartphone in a Target checkout line. It started as a piece of fan fiction based on the boy band One Direction, and it made her a publishing superstar. In April, After made its Hollywood debut – the first film adapted for the big screen from a story published on Wattpad, an online platform that connects writers with readers. * Since its launch in 2006, Toronto-based Wattpad has become a social networking star, with more than 70 million users, predominantly young women. And it has redefined the solitary acts of reading and writing as collective experiences. Wattpad’s four million authors upload roughly 500,000 posts a day (the site has a catalogue of 565 million stories), allowing readers to not only consume their content, mostly for free, but to interact with writers and fellow readers via votes, direct messages and comments. * Users spend 22 billion minutes a month on the platform, mostly on their phones, writing a combined 200 million comments and messages. The average session lasts 37 minutes—10 minutes more than Snapchat or Instagram. * Wattpad has ambitions far beyond ad-driven social media. Its readers are throwing off billions of points of data a day—a vast, real-time trove of insights that reveal what kinds of stories speak to them and how. By using artificial intelligence algorithms to mine that data, Wattpad believes it can determine which of its stories could hit it big as books, movies or shows. * So, can Wattpad co-founder Allen Lau fulfill his dream of creating the next Disney? -- Follow the link in our bio or read in Report on Business Magazine -- Photo credit: Sandy Nicholson/Fuze Reps @sandynicholsonphoto @fuzereps

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Years of armed conflict, internal upheaval and Israeli restrictions on trade and labour have made Gaza a hard place to earn a living. The Trump administration hopes to change that with a US$50-billion relief package in the Middle East – but in Gaza, Palestinians told The Globe it’s not the recipe for peace they want. – The warehouse of the Sharaf metal products factory could serve as a museum to the collapse of the Gaza Strip. In its heyday, the family-owned Sharaf factory employed 70 people. Now it only has one employee. . With Israel limiting the import and export of dozens of categories of goods – and making it extremely difficult for people to enter or leave Gaza – the unemployment rate here has soared past 50 per cent. And a 2017 UN report predicted Gaza would become “unlivable” by 2020. . Among the lures the White House is dangling in front of the Palestinians is US$5-billion to construct a transportation corridor that would connect Gaza to other Palestinian communities in the West Bank. The White House plan also hints at easing Gaza’s isolation by building a trading hub next to it in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. . The Globe and Mail spoke to more than two dozen residents of the Gaza Strip – frustrated high-school students, desperate food-aid recipients, fishermen blocked from accessing the sea by the Israeli navy and a top Hamas official – and all agreed there was a desperate need for economic development in the strip. But none saw peace emerging if the promised aid was connected to Palestinians having to compromise on their dream of a having an independent state. . “This is our land, our homeland, and Trump is trying to buy it,” said Soma Shaheen, a 36-year-old mother of five who has been forced to slash prices in half at the henna stall she runs in the Gaza Strip’s lone shopping mall. Still, she said, the promise of money, on its own, couldn’t bring peace to the region. Asked if promises of economic development could convince Palestinians to accept Israel’s control of Jerusalem, Shaheen had a simple response: “We do not agree.” . Follow the link in our bio for the full feature story by Mark MacKinnon Photos by Heidi Levine/The Globe and Mail

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Thirty horses have died racing or in training at Santa Anita since late December, collapsed from a heart attack or euthanized after broken legs or shoulder or pelvic injuries. . That’s not even a particularly high number for the track. Fifty-four horses died racing or training there in 2017; 59 in 2012. But a stunning 23 deaths in the first few months of 2019 – among them Princess Lili B, who broke her legs during training – brought a blast of media attention and calls for the track to shut down. . There is a lot at stake – thousands of local jobs, the future of the sport at one of America’s most hallowed tracks, and perhaps more than that. The racing industry has been struggling from declining attendance, attacks by animal rights activists and an increase in scrutiny of the toll it takes on the horses. Last year, 493 horses died while racing at North American racetracks, according to data from the Jockey Club. . Race fatalities are a long-standing part of the centuries-old sport – but many say horse racing is now in crisis, with Santa Anita at the epicentre. . No one knows this better than Belinda Stronach, president and chair of The Stronach Group (TSG), which owns Santa Anita and six other iconic racetracks, including Gulfstream near Miami and Pimlico in Baltimore, home of the Preakness. The Stronach family has made large investments in the sport, starting in the early 1960s and now find themselves at the centre of its fight for survival. . In an interview with The Globe and Mail, Ms. Stronach laid out a series of safety initiatives that TSG is championing, in conjunction with trainers, jockeys, breeders, rival track owners and state and federal governments. “Historic change is taking place in racing,” she said. She also defended her decision to keep the track open through the weekend, the end of the spring season. “If we closed the track last week, I believe it would have been the beginning of the end of horse racing in California,” she said. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Tavia Grant and Andrew Willis Photos by Barbara Davidson/The Globe and Mail @photospice

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First Person: Why Canada’s ‘gay dollar’ is important to me — When I first heard the news that Canada would debut a gay dollar coin this year, my first reaction was, “Hmm... is it really necessary?” . My humble, don’t-cause-a-ruckus, present-day gay self first saw the new coin as governmental silliness, such as when the U.S. Post Office held a vote for the Elvis stamp: puffier, older Elvis versus hip-shaking, younger Elvis. (I voted for the pelvic thrust.) . The coin marks a 50-year anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada in 1969 and, considering how relatively short that span is, the changes have been absolutely astounding. . Born in 1964, I’ve lived through the entire process. The coin is the least that can be done to commemorate darker times and the gains that the LBGTQ community has realized. . There was a time at the peak of the AIDS crisis when my friends and I made our own gay money. Once a month, I’d meet with a small group of volunteers who buddied up with persons with AIDS in Los Angeles, sharing struggles and the emotional toll. During breaks, we’d take bills out of our wallets and stamp them with a pink triangle and the words “Gay Dollar.” There were times I was too embarrassed to pay with my stamped money, so I’d write a cheque. . Over time, I felt more empowered and grew to be as “in your face” as my meek self could ever be. I got my ear pierced, slapped a pink triangle sticker on the bumper of my Honda Accord and occasionally donned a gay T-shirt. . I’m sort of here. I’m queer. Get used to it (please, if that’s all right with you). — Follow the link in our bio to read the first person essay by Gregory Walters Illustration by Drew Shannon @bonyfingers

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Canada’s tiniest grads: How kindergartens are starting to embrace convocation ceremonies — Graduation ceremonies typically signal the end of high school or even the elementary-grade years. However, some schools across the country have been hosting celebrations for their tiniest grads for years, and now, the Toronto Catholic District School Board has moved to formalize it. . In March, the board of trustees approved a policy that directs school staff who are organizing kindergarten graduation celebrations. . The policy, which is unusual among school boards, includes sending an invitation to parents at least 30 days before the celebration; inviting the superintendent, trustee and parish priest; and having principals respond to an annual survey to determine if year-end kindergarten celebrations were held at their schools. It sets out procedures for “an event that recognizes the accomplishments and celebrates the child’s transition into the primary division,” but does not require every school to hold a kindergarten ceremony. . While the policy may not appear onerous, some question the fuss of having guidelines for a locally organized event for children so young. “As a parent, I think it’s silly,” said Maddie Di Muccio, president of the Toronto-based advocacy group Society for Quality Education. “But as a professional, I can also understand where it’s coming from … because as silly as this sounds, school boards are accountable to the public and they should write things down.” . Michael Del Grande is the trustee at the board who brought forward the policy. He said he wanted his board to go even further and require all schools to host kindergarten graduation ceremonies. “To me, it’s a natural. I don’t know why it’s not done across every school at our board,” he said. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Caroline Alphonso. Photos by Galit Rodan / The Globe and Mail / @galit_r

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Opinion: Who can save the Chateau Laurier from an eyesore addition? — The planning committee of the Ottawa city council recently gave the green light to a widely controversial addition – one that has been compared to a behemoth toaster, or a nuclear power plant – to the Chateau Laurier hotel, a familiar architectural silhouette to most Canadians. . Canadians could be forgiven if they believed the Chateau was linked by osmosis to the Parliamentary precinct and that it was public space. The problem is that it is not. . The Chateau is privately held by Larco Investments Ltd., which in turn is owned by the Lalji family of Vancouver. Larco Hospitality bought the Chateau in 2013, noting on its website that it was opened in 1912 by Canada’s seventh Prime Minister, Sir Wilfrid Laurier. Larco also owns the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. . When the company made an application to demolish the tired parking garage at the rear of the hotel in 2016, it also requested an extension of 147 rooms. This was granted providing NCC guidelines were followed. The extension was to be distinguishable from, but compatible with, the existing hotel. It was also to be subordinate to the hotel. . But now if Ottawa’s city council gets its way, and if the federal government remains silent, only one criterion will be met. The addition is certainly distinguishable. . Compatibility has been lost completely. The addition does not blend, but rather offends. It jars the eye, not to mention the heart. It overpowers the existing building by its very presence. . Peter Coffman, an architectural historian from Carleton University, notes that while the existing architecture is an “invitation to dream,” the addition is “frankly grotesque.” He likens the Chateau to fire and the addition to water: “The two are locked in a struggle to cancel each other out.” — Follow the link in our bio for more by Penny Collenette, former director of appointments in the Prime Minister’s Office under Jean Chrétien, and adjunct professor in the University of Ottawa’s faculty of law. Image by architectAlliance

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Could an ice-cold swim be an antidote to depression and anxiety? — Susan Simmons leads six athletes across the sand toward the Pacific, their swimsuits and goggles in stark contrast to the puffy coats and boots worn by curious onlookers on this overcast afternoon. They gasp as they enter the frigid water, at least 10 degrees colder than the average pool. . But the swimmers are here for more than a workout. These frigid swim sessions are a kind of therapy session, they say, that eases their symptoms of depression and anxiety. . “If I need a quick fix for my body or mind, I just jump in the cold water,” says Simmons, who took up the practice 11 years ago. “When you’re depressed, you don’t want to do anything. Then you jump into the cold water and you want to run all over the place and enjoy the world again.” . A case report published in The British Medical Journal may support Simmons’s experience. The report presented cold water therapy as an effective treatment for a 24-year-old new mother living with major depressive disorder, who wanted to safely come off her antidepressants. Her symptoms were alleviated after four months of regular swimming in 15 C water, prescribed by Dr. Chris van Tulleken, a medical doctor and scientist out of University College London. . Cold water is not a cure for any mental-health condition, the authors of the case study are quick to point out. Other factors may have played a role in the woman’s recovery, including exercise, social connection from swimming with a group, the sense of achievement from having accomplished something challenging, being immersed in nature and the hormonal shifts from the cold shock response. . But co-author Dr. Heather Massey says there are several intriguing theories about why repetitive cold water swims may alleviate some mental-health symptoms. For one, she says some depressions might be connected to inflammation in the brain; inflammation of the brain’s neural pathways can hinder the release of feel-good chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine and could lead to depressive behaviour. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Karin Olafson Photos by Alana Paterson/The Globe and Mail/ @alanapaterson

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A massive parade took over Toronto Monday to celebrate the Raptors NBA championship. . Enormous crowds of fans packed a route through Toronto’s downtown to see the champions first-hand. . Hours later than scheduled, the team arrived at Nathan Phillips Square where they thanked fans for the outpouring of support. . Follow the link in our bio to read more about the day. — Visuals by Frank Gunn / The Canadian Press, Fred Lum / The Globe and Mail Andrew Lahodynskyj / The Canadian Press, Melissa Tait / The Globe and Mail, Dan Hamilton / USA TODAY Sports, Nathan Danette/ The Canadian Press, Fred Lum / The Globe and Mail, Tijana Martin / The Canadian Press . . #wethenorth @raptors

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When Barbara Wilson was a high-school student in Port Alberni, B.C., she and other students were urged to see a guidance counsellor to talk about university. . Ms. Wilson, who was 15 at the time, says the counsellor told her she was wasting her time. . “She looked down her nose and said, ’Oh no, you won’t be going to university − you’ll be a maid, or a chamber maid, or a store clerk,” Wilson, now 76, recalled as she sat in a sunny courtyard at Simon Fraser University’s Burnaby campus . Wilson, a member of the Haida First Nation, has proved that counsellor wrong, by going back to school as a mature student to obtain an MA in curriculum and instructional foundation from SFU’s Faculty of Education. . In the process, she defended her thesis at home, in Haida Gwaii, where about 60 people showed up in April to hear Ms. Wilson describe her work, which focuses on climate change and Indigenous law. Since much of her research involved interviewing Haida elders about the impacts of climate change, she felt it was essential to share the results. . “I used the information that people in my village gave me − they shared their thoughts freely, they trusted me,” Ms. Wilson said. . “Because they gave to me, I have to give to them − and what better way to give than to talk about what I’ve learned and to honour them,” she added. . In completing her degree, Wilson reached a personal goal. She was also part of a milestone at SFU, where a record 164 Indigenous graduates convocated in June. . Her desire to defend her thesis at home, was in keeping with her research goals and the broader issue of reconciliation, said David Zandvliet, one of Wilson’s three academic advisers and director of SFU’s Institute of Environmental Learning. . “I think it was a really good decision for SFU to allow that − and I hope they allow it many times in the future,” Zandvliet said. “Because it really speaks to ‘who’s the research for?’ ” . For her convocation, Wilson wore a red robe inherited from her mother and decorated with a family crest. Friends and family members came to cheer her on. . Follow the link in our bio for the full story by Wendy Stueck Photos by Taehoon Kim/The Globe and Mail @tkimphoto

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Tens of thousands line the parade route for the Toronto Raptors to cheer on the NBA Champions. . Follow the link in our bio for more. - Visuals by Timothy Moore / The Globe and Mail, Frank Gunn / The Canadian Press, Moe Doiron / Reuters, Nathan Denette / The Canadian Press, Chris Young / The Canadian Press, Andrew Lahodynskyj / The Canadian Press . . @raptors @nba #wethenorth

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Opinion: Old enough to be your father: What it was like becoming a dad in my 50s — It was Justin and Alexandre Trudeau who warned me I was too old to become a parent. . In the late 2000s, I saw the Trudeau brothers interviewed on television about their father, Pierre Trudeau. They extolled the advantages of having been born to a father in his mid-50s, who was already established in life. . They spoke of how much they had benefited from his wisdom and broad life experience. At the end of the interview, a discordant note crept in. “Now we’re in our 30s and we’re doing interesting things,” Alexandre said, “and he’s not here to see them.” . Children had never been part of my dreams. The product of immigration and divorce, brought up with a strong mother, three sisters and the ambiguity of two father figures, I regarded North American manhood as an alien life form. Even the sensitive, intellectual men I respected had a core of gritty, rooted maleness that I could not locate in my own being. If that kind of masculinity was what it took to be a father, I didn’t have it. . Then, to the astonishment of nearly all who knew me, I celebrated my 50th birthday by getting married. My wife was 13½ years younger than me. Although we did not plan to have children, eventually they happened. At 52, I became the father of a son and, a month before my 56th birthday, of a daughter. Without having foreseen such a turn of events, I had adopted the Pierre Trudeau fatherhood plan. . I’m far from being alone. In 2017, a study published in the journal Human Reproduction revealed that almost one in a hundred American children is now born to a father over 50. The figures for other Western countries are similar. The overall age of parents has been rising for decades, with most men who make this choice now becoming fathers for the first time after 30. Yet the stigma against fathers over 40 persists. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Stephen Henighan, author of Blue River and Red Earth. Photo courtesy Stephen Henighan. . . #fathersday

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Selling the sizzle: Are high-tech veggie burgers the start of a huge new industry, or a fake-beef bubble? — Forget those homemade lentil pucks your vegetarian cousin used to bring to family barbecues. From fast-food restaurants to investing strategy sessions, a new wave of high-tech veggie burgers has suddenly become the entrée of choice for both foodies and money managers. The fake-meat revolution is most evident on Wall Street, where shares of Beyond Meat Inc., purveyor of pea-protein patties, have shot up sixfold since going public in early May. The company’s rise to a multibillion-dollar valuation has burst past all expectations for veggie burgers and similar products. If enthusiasts are right, the still tiny California-based company, with only US$87.9-million in sales last year, could be just the first of several startups to cash in on the growing appetite for artificial beef and similar fare. “Beyond Meat has completely changed the narrative around plant-based proteins,” says Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax who specializes in food policy. “Bay Street and Wall Street used to regard the agri-food sector as this boring, stuffy business. Then Beyond Meat’s shares exploded in price and suddenly attitudes have turned inside out.” The biggest reason for that attitude shift is the dawning recognition that a vast new industry could be up for grabs. Unlike earlier veggie burgers, the new brands of fake meats aren’t aimed primarily at vegetarians or health faddists. They are faux flesh intended to appeal to a much wider audience of mainstream consumers – people who enjoy eating beef, pork and chicken, but are trying to cut down on their consumption of animal protein, for health or environmental reasons. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Ian McGugan (for subscribers) Photo by Fred Lum / The Globe and Mail / @2manycameras . . #bbq

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Opinion: The Raptors steal the Warriors’ identity – and Kawhi Leonard takes his place as a Canadian sports hero — Given their sadsack track record, this is going to be the unlikeliest sentence I’ve ever written: The Toronto Raptors are NBA champions. They are the first non-American team to claim the title. They’re the first Canadian team of any sort to win a major championship since 1993. . Thursday’s Game 6 was an instant classic, an up-and-down bucket festival featuring lead changes, momentum changes and cast changes. Kyle Lowry may have put in the best shift of his career. Fred VanVleet was a government bond – guaranteed. Toronto pulled away very late in the fourth quarter. Steph Curry had his chance and missed it. The Raptors won 114-110. . That’s not what matters. The Warriors were chopped down last week in Oakland. It took them this long to hit the ground. Their era is done. . What does matter is that now – as long as they can keep the band together – is that the Leonard era has just begun. Toronto didn’t rob the Warriors of the title. They stole Golden State’s identity. . It would be wrong to say Leonard now takes his place in the roll call of Toronto sports greats, because no one in living memory can match what he’s managed over the last two months. . It wasn’t the numbers, though those were staggering. It was the implacability, the stubborn refusal to admit what every other team in this country has known for an entire generation – that if you give up, Canadians will forgive you. . Leonard wouldn’t let them. Through force of will, he dragged everyone through the first three rounds of the playoffs. In terms of Canadian heroes, Leonard isn’t Dave Keon-good. He’s Dudley Do-Right good. He’s so good he is essentially imaginary. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Cathal Kellly Photos by Kyle Teradal/Getty Images, Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press, Ezra Shaw/Getty Images, Nick Iwanyshyn/The Globe and Mail, Melissa Tait/The Globe and Mail, Andrew Ryan/Reuters . . @raptors #wethenorth

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Raptors defeat Warriors in Game 6 to secure first NBA title in franchise history — For the first time in their 24-year history, the Toronto Raptors are NBA champions. . Kyle Lowry threw his arms around Kawhi Leonard and the Raptors bench emptied in one of the NBA’s most storied arenas. . The Raps beat the Golden State Warriors 114-110 in a wild Game 6 on Thursday after a game that had 18 different lead changes. They denied the Warriors their third straight championship, and spoiled the party in the Dubs’ last-ever game inside their beloved Oracle Arena. . Kyle Lowry – the longest tenured Raptor – had 26 points, and so did Pascal Siakam. Leonard and Fred VanVleet had 22 apiece, while Serge Ibaka added 15. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Rachel Brady. Photos by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images, Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press, Cole Burston / Getty . . @raptors #wethenorth

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Canadian schools reach a turning point in use of seclusion rooms for children with disabilities — Aaron was diagnosed with autism and a speech disorder. To accommodate his needs, he had only been attending school for part of the day in a specialized class. But, after a series of behavioural incidents, which culminated with him injuring an educational assistant, school officials had sent him home midway through the academic year. . He would only be allowed to return, school officials told his mother, Michelle Boshard, if he spent his days isolated in a classroom with two adult supervisors. They would not allow him outside for recess, either, and for safety reasons, they would have to insist Aaron wear a wrestling helmet – the soft foam kind – with the chinstrap securely fastened at all times. . The room officials designated for him had a buzzer-locked door, a beanbag chair, a tent, a desk and a window, where he would be able to see other children playing on the basketball court. . “He was emotionally devastated,” Ms. Boshard said. “Demoralized and shamed.” . Ms. Boshard has since pulled Aaron out of Bayside Middle School in Brentwood Bay, B.C. She homeschools her son. Three years later, the isolation has left them still traumatized – their case highlighting a last option educators use to mitigate the disruptive, sometimes dangerous behaviour of children. . Seclusion rooms are separate spaces used in many schools across the country to temporarily isolate children who are disruptive or show potentially dangerous behaviour. . As schools struggle to embrace inclusion, these in-between spaces have increasingly become the subject of debate. Some parents support the idea of a time-out or calming room, saying that, when used properly, it acts as a temporary safe space. Many others say their children with complex needs are disproportionately targeted and often isolated from their classmates in these rooms for extended periods. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Caroline Alphonso. Photos by Melissa Renwick / The Globe and Mail / @melissarenwick

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Clouds of tear gas billowed over the heart of one of Asia’s most important financial centres Wednesday, as cordons of riot police forcibly cleared a mass of protesters from the streets around Hong Kong’s Legislative Council. . The sounds of megaphone warnings and gunfire echoed through the city amid hours of clashes between police and protesters, who had gathered to demand the withdrawal of an extradition bill that would ease the way for Chinese authorities to seize from Hong Kong people it calls criminals. Early in the day, lawmakers postponed a scheduled 11 a.m. debate of the bill, saying it would resume at another time. . But the delay did nothing to calm crowds that continued to grow in size, demanding the bill be completely abandoned. . By 3 p.m., protesters chanting “withdraw” began to close in on entrances to the Legislative Council, some inspired by the 2014 Sunflower Movement in Taiwan, in which student demonstrators occupied the Executive Yuan in Taipei. . Police in Hong Kong initially withdrew inside the high metal fences of the legislative building, before returning to the streets with a show of force against the protesters, who were armed with little more than construction helmets, umbrellas and, for one man, the protection of pink yoga mats taped to his forearms. With volleys of tear gas, pepper paintballs, water cannons and beanbag bullets, police succeeded in pushing demonstrators away from the city’s government complex. . Inside the People’s Liberation Army garrison across the street, Chinese soldiers kept watch with gas masks on their faces. . Authorities called what ensued a “riot,” and Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, in a televised address Wednesday night, warned that violent protest “is not an act that shows love for Hong Kong.” . Demonstrators, however, accused police of using violence that left some bloodied and many furious, accusing authorities of heavy-handed tactics that would only serve to encourage more people to take to the streets. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Nathan Vanderklippe in Hong Kong Visuals by Nathan Vaderklippe/The Globe and Mail, Kin Cheung/AP, Lam Yik/New York Times, Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

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Tim Page was 20 years of age when he arrived in Vietnam on February 6, 1965 with a contract from United Press International. . He had virtually no photographic experience. . The war was ramping up and a month later the Marines would land at Da Nang. Access to the battlefield was easy, courtesy of the U.S. military, whose helicopters functioned like taxis, ferrying Page and his colleagues to war by day and back home by nightfall to favourite Saigon bars. . Fifty years on, descriptions of what life was like for Western journalists in Vietnam seem almost quaint. . Long gone are the days when they could swan in and out of combat, à la Page. Never again would they have such unrestricted access to the frontlines. Gone too is the notion of journalists as neutral observers of conflict. Instead, they are now firmly in the crosshairs of insurgents; the kidnap and murder of journalists Daniel Pearl and Jim Foley, to give but two examples, are a chilling reminder of their vulnerability. . War photographers are visual historians. Their photographs tell a story of nations made and broken, of societies upended and lives forever altered. Their images, attained at great personal cost over the past 50 years, frame the human spirit with all its maddening, heartbreaking and uplifting contradictions. . On June 22, Page and nine of his colleagues, representing two generations of the world’s finest war photographers, will gather in Toronto to discuss their careers and the changes they have been witness to over the years. Never before has such a stellar group come together, not to photograph, but instead to talk. . Joining the photographers will be Dr. Anthony Feinstein whose book, Shooting War, is the basis for The Globe and Mail’s June 21 and 22 event of the same name, and by editor-in-chief David Walmsley. - Follow the link in our bio to learn more about the event and for tickets.

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Amber L’Heureux sits in the driver’s seat of her pink chuckwagon. . She grips pink and white reins, pulling against the power of four thoroughbred horses hooked to her ride. . She’s wearing pink underwear beneath dirty blue jeans. She doesn’t even care much for pink. . But pink is her signature colour and she’s on the racetrack in North Battleford, Sask., to make a statement. She is the world’s first female professional chuckwagon driver. This is her first race in the big leagues. Her first chance to prove that she belongs. . Chuckwagon races re-enact a Wild West myth: breaking camp to escape attackers. Two outriders − folks on horseback hoofing it with the chucks − accompany each wagon. . Ms. L’Heureux’s grandfather and mom raced thoroughbred chariots and her mom and dad also raced pony chariots and wagons. In these events, the horses and wagons are smaller, although still rollicking. She jumped in wagons to play with the reins whenever she could. . “It’s all I’ve known,” she says, now 26. She joined the pony circuit as a teenager, winning racing buckles, respect, but not self-satisfaction. . “Racing ponies was never going to be enough." . A stuffed unicorn decorated with ribbons dangles under the driver’s seat of her chuckwagon. The green ribbon is for Greg Smith, a friend killed racing ponies in Vermilion. The purple one is for Bill McEwen, a chuckwagon driver who died after a wreck at the Calgary Stampede in 1999. . “I was six,” Ms. L’Heureux says. “I still remember seeing that.” , A guardian angel from her grandparents is pinned to another ribbon. . “Death is never really something that scared me,” she says. “If it happens in a wagon box, at least I’m doing something I love.” . Ms. L’Heureux chases a veteran, with another rookie on her tail, as the three wagons charge around North Battleford’s half-mile track. She holds her ground, finishing second. Ms. L’Heureux changes six decades of history in one dusty minute. . On Day 3, her wagon crosses the finish line first. — Follow the link in our bio for Carrie Tait’s full story Photos and video by Leah Hennel/The Globe and Mail

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They called him Tinker, short for Tinkerbell. . Jason McDonald would have preferred that his given name be put on the scoreboard for Friday night darts at the Royal Canadian Legion in New Waterford, N.S. . But his wish was trumped by members who nicknamed him after the Disney fairy, Mr. McDonald said, because he is openly gay. They called him “fruit,” “queer” and worse. They suggested if he were a “real man,” he would manage a higher darts score and told him that a “real woman would fix you.” . The slurs prompted Mr. McDonald to file a discrimination complaint with the Legion last month and he is also preparing a human-rights complaint to the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. Meanwhile, the executive at his branch resigned in support of him, effectively shuttering the club while an investigation into the allegations by the Legion’s provincial command continues. . “We’re sending a message,” former treasurer Bill White said. “I don’t believe in that prejudice business at all. It disgusts me. I can’t hang around a place like this.” . Since Mr. McDonald went public with his complaint, he has been contacted by Legion members from across the country who say they, too, have experienced branch-level discrimination based on their sexual orientation and that little was done to rectify it. . Mr. McDonald, who has not served in the military, joined his Legion branch’s executive last year to help boost fundraising at the flagging club. . The 41-year-old is one of a few Legion members to speak publicly about facing discrimination inside the 93-year-old veterans’ club and his case shines a light on tough challenges in an already difficult era for the Legion. The service group relies on an army of volunteers to operate its national network of 1,400 branches but, with a rapidly aging membership, the club has had to reinvent itself to appeal to a younger, more diverse population. The transition has not always been smooth. . “This is about the old guard and the new guard,” Mr. McDonald said. “It’s about what’s right and what’s wrong. To me, homophobia is wrong.” — Follow the link in our bio for Jessica Leeder’s full story Photo by Steve Wadden/The Globe and Mail

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Raptors lose nail-biter Game 5 to Warriors, sending NBA Finals back to Oakland — The Toronto Raptors came one agonizing point short on Monday of claiming their first NBA championship in club history. Now they must wait a few more excruciating days to take another shot at it. . With their team on the cusp Monday night, Canadians sat ready to celebrate. Instead, the Golden State Warriors delivered them a heartbreaking 106-105 Game 5 loss to inch closer in the series, 3-2. . The Raps must now hop a plane to California and try again at Oracle Arena on Thursday night. . Stephen Curry had 31 points and Klay Thompson had 26 to lead the Warriors on a night that saw their all-star teammate Kevin Durant make a brief and dramatic comeback. . Six different Raptors scored in double digits in the loss, led by 26 from Kawhi Leonard. Kyle Lowry had 18, Marc Gasol 17, Serge Ibaka 15, Pascal Siakam 12 and Fred VanVleet 11. . Outside Scotiabank Arena, tens of thousands of fans in rain ponchos packed Jurassic Park along with Toronto’s surrounding downtown streets to revel in the night together, withstanding unrelenting showers. The Raptors came into the night with a 3-1 series lead, and fans were desperate to watch their team deny the reigning champs a three-peat, and hoist the trophy at home. . Game 6 is Thursday and a possible Game 7 would be Sunday back in Toronto. — Follow the link in our bio for more by Rachel Brady Photos by Chris Young / The Canadian Press, Melissa Tait / The Globe and Mail, Nick Iwanyshyn / The Globe and Mail, Andrew Ryan / Reuters, Frank Gunn / The Canadian Press . . @raptors @nba #raptors #wethenorth