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#MapplethorpeMondays—for Louise Bourgeois’s retrospective at the @themuseumofmodernart in 1982-83, the museum commissioned Robert Mapplethorpe to create a portrait of the artist for the exhibition’s catalogue. Having never met the photographer and nervous that the shoot would be a catastrophe, Bourgeois brought along one of her own sculptures as a prop, “Fillette” (1968), a 2-foot-long phallus. Mapplethorpe’s portrait shows Bourgeois grinning mischievously as she holds her work under her arm. The inclusion of Bourgeois’s sculpture becomes a humorous reference to the recurring subject matter shared by both artists. See this work in “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now,” on view through July 10 and share your visit using #Mapplethorpe. __ Image: “Louise Bourgeois” (1982) #LouiseBourgeois #Guggenheim

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Through #LaborDay, September 3, including #FleetWeek (May 22-27), we are proud to offer free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families as part of #BlueStarMuseums, a collaboration among the @NEAArts, @BlueStarFamilies, the Department of Defense and more than 2,000 museums across the United States. Learn more about our participation at guggenheim.org/news. #Guggenheim __ Photo: David Heald

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Recent acquisition to the #GuggenheimCollection: Liu Shiyuan ( @shiyuanliu), “Almost Like Rebar No. 1” (2018) __ “Through photography, video, and installation, Liu Shiyuan explores the relationship between truth and meaning in today’s digital world. She examines how meaning and discourse can be manipulated and hybridized, feeding and shaping our understanding of mass culture, language, and identity. To make ‘Almost Like Rebar No. 1,’ Liu started by perusing a copyright-free sharing website where discarded photographs and videos from commercial shoots are uploaded. The resulting work presents these images embedded among those taken by the artist. Figures covered in fabric encapsulate the ‘dressed’ nature of these images in floating browser-like windows, each carefully choreographed inside an artist-made frame. Liu sees the irregularity and free-flowing geometry of the frame as a metaphor for herself always existing between cultural borders. Shiyuan’s work is an exceptional addition to our collection of contemporary photography and shows how artists today push the boundaries of this medium to challenge and refract the information and image-saturated condition of our post-internet age.”—Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art (@huikyungan) __ Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Collector’s Council, with additional funds contributed by Alexander Mason Hankin, 2018 #Guggenheim #LiuShiyuan

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Recent acquisition to the #GuggenheimCollection: LaToya Ruby Frazier, “Shelter 1992–93 and Dark Matter Study, Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum, Joshua Tree, CA” (2016-17) __ “LaToya Ruby Frazier wields photography as a both documentary tool and a weapon against injustice and inequality. Her advocacy for marginalized people and places motivated her 2016 pilgrimage with artist Abigail DeVille ( @victoriouspurple) to the sculptor Noah Purifoy’s Outdoor Desert Art Museum in Joshua Tree, California. Frazier found ‘an ally and a predecessor’ in Purifoy, known for his transformation of salvaged wreckage. In this work,one of a series of photographs that document the artists’ journey, found materials come together in the form of a shelter, light peeking through gaps in its roof and walls. DeVille’s presence in this photograph, partially concealed by a mirrored sculpture of her own creation, accentuates the intensity of the artists’ shared, meditative experience.”—Indira Abiskaroon, Curatorial Assistant, Collections (@i_abiskaroon) __ Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Council, 2018 #Guggenheim #LaToyaRubyFrazier

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Bring your friends and family today, May 18, to the Guggenheim for #ArtMuseumDay and #InternationalMuseumDay! Take advantage of 2-for-1 admission, 10% off at The Wright restaurant (@the_wright_nyc), and a free gift at the #GuggenheimStore when you spend $25 or more! __ Photo: David Heald #Guggenheim

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"The museum truly is a 'temple of the spirit.' Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture makes you feel free and literally lets you walk around. As if you’re stepping out of time and into a hall of eternity, with its cylindrical vortex of cool becoming more brilliant as you move up, where light exudes pure acceptance—a 360 degrees total panoramic understanding. A feeling of absolute perfection. And outside, a garden next to it that is @centralparknyc. Love it."—Gugg visitor @bartdykstra #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

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Recent acquisition to the #GuggenheimCollection: Lawrence Abu Hamdan ( @lawrenceabuhamdan), “Contra Diction” (2015) __ “Lawrence Abu Hamdan’s practice is based in meticulous research and collaboration. ‘Contra Diction: Speech Against Itself’ began as a live audio essay examining what the artist describes as the ‘politics of listening’ in an era of increased surveillance. In the installation version of the piece, Abu Hamdan uses a monitor and teleprompter to present his text, which he filters through a series of sonic manipulations and supplements with visuals from previous artworks and documentary footage. Drawing from sources such as a press conference given by a falsely-accused Anthrax attacker and the alleged mass conversions of the Druze minority in northern Syria by Wahhabi groups, the lecturer's true subject is speech itself and the myriad ways in which we might, as the artists has suggested, ‘represent ourselves in this all-hearing, all-speaking world.”—Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections (@mamacurator) __ Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Collectors Council with additional funds contributed by Eleanor Killian, 2017 #Guggenheim #LawrenceAbuHamdan

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Recent acquisition to the #GuggenheimCollection: John Akomfrah (@smoking_dogs_films), “The Vertigo Sea” (2015) __ “In John Akomfrah’s panoramic, three-channel projection ‘The Vertigo Sea,’ the artist assembles what he calls ‘oblique tales on the aquatic sublime,’ composing a poignant and at times gut-wrenching essay on humanity’s use and abuse of the ocean. Inspired by a 2007 account of Nigerian refugees who were stranded in the Mediterranean for ten days trying to reach Europe, ‘The Vertigo Sea’ weaves together narratives of forced migration and other forms of seaborne exploitation through a mix of historical footage, staged scenes of actors in period costume, and passages drawn from the BBC Natural History Unit archives. Together with the work’s immersive soundtrack, this installation explores today’s social, political, and environmental crises.”—Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media (@smoke_and_mirrors) __ Credit: Purchased with funds contributed by the International Director’s Council and co-owned with @sfmoma and @mcachicago #Guggenheim #JohnAkomfrah

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Recent acquisition to the #GuggenheimCollection: Gillian Wearing, “Dancing in Peckham” (1994) __ “Gillian Wearing’s photographs, videos, and sculpture probe the tensions between self and society in an increasingly media-saturated world. ‘Dancing in Peckham’ was inspired by a woman that Wearing observed feverishly dancing at a jazz concert. Wearing videotaped herself in a London shopping center, where she danced for a half hour to music held only in her own mind. Her silent choreography touched on emotions ranging from blissful reverie to mania, which passing shoppers regarded with a mix of suspicion and apathy. With this piece, Wearing highlights the fragile norms by which we distinguish psychic interiority from public self-presentation, and pays homage to those who step outside social conventions.”—Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media (@smoke_and_mirrors) __ Gift of Gary & Tracy Mezzatesta, 2017 #Guggenheim #GillianWearing

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Recent acquisition to the #GuggenheimCollection: Liliana Porter (@lilianaporter.art), “Untitled (Self portrait with square II)” (1973/2014) __ “Trained as a printmaker in Buenos Aires, Mexico City, and New York, Liliana Porter’s practice explores the concept of time through printmaking, drawing, photography, installation, sculpture, video, and performance. ‘Untitled (Self portrait with square II)’ is from a series of photographs from the 1970s featuring segments of the artist’s body interacting with lines inscribed in space. The contours of a rectangle spill off of the artist's face onto the wall behind her to form a continuous shape. By juxtaposing present and past, original and copy, living and inanimate, Porter enacts visual puns that amplify what is reality versus perception.”—Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator (@amaraantilla) __ Purchased with funds contributed by the Latin American Circle, 2018 #Guggenheim #LatinAmericanCircle

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In 2001, #FrankGehry designed a retrospective exhibition of his own unique career, highlighting 40 projects through drawings, models, photographs, videos, and furniture. The exhibition design for "Frank Gehry: Architect" included two site-specific interventions, allowing visitors to experience the architect's work on a built scale and demonstrating the firm's use of unconventional materials. The titanium-clad canopy on the outdoor sculpture terrace and the immense aluminum mesh structure hung from the rotunda's oculus ribs referenced Gehry's early chain-link fence vocabulary while embodying the formal aesthetic that has become emblematic of his practice. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: Ellen Labenski #Guggenheim

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This week we’re sharing recent acquisitions to the #GuggenheimCollection, made possible through the support of generous patrons. Follow along to discover a new artwork each day! __ “Romare Bearden has been celebrated for his abstract paintings and socially engaged collage, as well as for co-founding Spiral, a group devoted to considering the social and political role of African American artists in the Civil Rights Movement. In 1964, Bearden created ‘Projections,’ a new series for a proposed Spiral exhibition entitled ‘Black and White.’ Using a Photostat machine (an early projection photocopier), he enlarged collages that he made from found photographs, paint, and cut paper. In ‘Evening 9:10, 461 Lenox Avenue,’ Bearden references the popular art-historical subject of card players as well as the traditions of Cubism in order to present a fragmented yet realistic document of daily life in the black community of Harlem.”—Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media (@smoke_and_mirrors) __ #RomareBearden, “Evening 9:10, 461 Lenox Avenue” (1964) Purchased through prior gift of Julian J. Aberbach and Joachim J. Aberbach, Dr. and Mrs. Samuel S. Mandel, and Mr. and Mrs. Nathan L. Halpern with additional funds contributed by the Photography Council, 2017 #Guggenheim

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For "The Worlds of Nam June Paik" in 2000, visitors were invited to experience an uncanny fusion of the natural and the technological as the museum's iconic rotunda was transformed by Paik's relentless explorations of the moving image. At the center of this dazzling multisensory environment was "Jacob's Ladder" (2000), a series of zigzagging laser projections that passed through a seven-story waterfall cascading down from the oculus. On the museum's fifth ramp visitors encountered "TV Garden" (1974), where video monitors of various sizes playing "Global Groove" (1973) were hidden amidst an undergrowth of live plants. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

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To celebrate @poetsorg’s #NationalPoetryMonth, we collaborated with poets inspired by “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” #MapplethorpeMondays Enjoy the final poem by Armoni Boone (@im.armoni) A Mirror of Multitudes A shutter can seal timelines like *click* we can measure time with light conversation. We were always just kids, right? We understood blood sacrifice early on *click* Sure, different masters, but we both believe in honest work. To see a new destiny on the other end of a lens is to hold hands with God across an unwritten stanza. *click* *click* *cli- ___ Artwork: Robert Mapplethorpe, "Phillip Prioleau" (1982) #Guggenheim #Mapplethorpe

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To celebrate @poetsorg’s #NationalPoetryMonth, we collaborated with poets inspired by “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” #MapplethorpeMondays Poet Korde Arrington Tuttle (@heykorde) where i once had teeth am i howling or cackling crying out for love __ Artwork: Robert Mapplethorpe, “Skull” (1988) #Mappethorpe #Guggenheim

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"I am an artist who makes walks. A walk defines the form of the land in space and time beyond the scale of sculpture or the fixed image. Some of my walks are formal (straight, circular, rhythmic) almost ritualized.”—Richard Long Richard Long translates his deeply personal experiences in the wilderness into sculptures and mud drawings for exhibitions and private collections. “Red Slate Circle” (1980) consists of 474 stones from a New York State quarry. When installed in the Guggenheim’s rotunda, the monumental ring echoes the building’s unique spiral while conjuring images of vast canyons, still lakes, and stone pathways leading into the distance, and suggests real distances the artist himself has covered on his walks. __ Richard Long, “Red Slate Circle” (1980). 28 feet (853.4 cm) diameter. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London #RichardLong #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection #EarthMonth

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Join us in congratulating this year’s #LearningThroughArt students on their first museum exhibition! "A Year with Children 2019" is now open, featuring works created by students participating in Learning Through Art (LTA)—our artist-in-residence program in New York City public elementary schools. LTA partners teaching artists with educators in each of the city’s five boroughs to design projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum. The program encourages curiosity, critical thinking, and ongoing collaborative investigation. Learn more at guggenheim.org/ywc2019. __ Participating schools: PS 86 (Kingsbridge Heights), PS 8 (Brooklyn Heights), PS 9 (Prospect Heights), PS 28 (Washington Heights), PS 38 (East Harlem), Mosaic Preparatory Academy (East Harlem), PS 145 (Harlem), PS 219 (Flushing), PS 130 (Bayside), PS 144 (Forest Hills), PS 317 (Rockaway Park), and PS 48 (Grasmere) __ "A Year with Children 2019" is also made possible by @jacadi_officiel Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

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"Climbing up the spiral of the Guggenheim just before closing, I watched each floor shut its lights off as I wandered through the genius of #HilmaafKlint. Moments like this are life affirming."—Gugg visitor and actor @brielarson #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

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#GuggChangeover has commenced. Installation for “Artistic License: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection” starts today in our rotunda—ramps are closed and admission is reduced through May 22. Plan a visit to see #Mapplethorpe, #SimoneLeigh, #Brancusi, and masterworks from our collection by Picasso, Kandinsky, and more. Plus, come back to see #ArtisticLicense after it opens on May 24 and subtract the cost of your ticket from your full-priced admission. During our changeover process, visitors can see how exhibitions are taken down and created in the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed rotunda. Everything must be built to accommodate the rise of the ramps and angles of the walls; there is no “backstage.” #GuggChangeover __ © 2017 Joana Avillez/Illustration Division (@joanaavillez) #Guggenheim

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#FrankGehry's striking exhibition design for "The Art of the Motorcycle" in 1998 took its cue from the materiality and craftsmanship of the titular vehicle by cladding the face of the museum's ramps with chromed stainless steel. More than 130 motorcycles were exhibited chronologically, from an 1868 French steam-powered velocipede to the 1998 MV Agusta F4. Gehry's intervention accentuated the curves of the rotunda, offering distorted reflections that revealed fleeting glimpses of the motorcycles themselves and emphasized the feeling of speed that the exhibition sought to engender. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photo: David Heald #Guggenheim

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To celebrate @poetsorg’s #NationalPoetryMonth, we're collaborating with poets inspired by “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” #MapplethorpeMondays Poet Andrew Garvin ( @garvinsayshello): "Thomas" The other night I met you in a rectangle and that was all. My choice later to ask you out came from this circle place. Where only I can see your muscle clean and folded like a made bed. Hands taut on the edge of infinity. Your veins, bolded in sweat, throbbing for my tongue. Love without right angles. If we together could know the luxury of square windows. Lodgepole pines. The volume of a deep cenote. Tilt your head so I can shape your eyes. Please tell me what it is so I can give it. For the parabolas on your chest to swell. __ Artwork: Robert Mapplethorpe, "Thomas" (1987) #Guggenheim #Mapplethorpe

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To our followers in Spain—don’t miss @museoguggenheim’s exhibition, “Architecture Effects,” on view through April 28. What makes architecture more than just building? This exhibition explores the dialogue between art, architecture, and storytelling in our era. Learn more at guggenheim-bilbao.eus. #ArchitectureEffectsMGB __ Photos: Sergio Verde #Guggenheim #MuseoGuggenheim

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Did you #GuessTheArtist correctly? Here’s the full view of Joan Miró’s “Figure, Dog, Birds” (1946), from our collection. __ Born today in 1893, Miró is well known for his Surrealist paintings and sculptures. In the late 1920s he embarked on a period of experimentation with mediums and techniques from papiers collés (pasted papers) to collages and lithography, in order to push the limits of painting and reinvigorate it. Learn more about the artist at guggenheim.org/collection. #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection #Miró

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#GuessTheArtist—this artist’s first major museum retrospective was held at @themuseumofmodernart in 1941. Comment your best guess below and we'll share the answer by the end of the day. Good luck! #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection

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"[Simone] Leigh’s unfaltering dedication to place black femininity at the center of her narrative has allowed a younger generation to not only bear witness to these lives but acknowledge and accept them as part of the fiber of contemporary art."—@cultured_mag __ “The Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh, Loophole of Retreat” is now on view. Learn more at guggenheim.org/simoneleigh. __ #SimoneLeigh #HUGOBOSSPRIZE #Guggenheim Photos: Kyle Knodell

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“Empezando en lo terrenal y terminando en lo abstracto o celestial, como la magnífica exposición de Hilma af Klint. It is always a pleasure to visit you, teacher.”—Gugg visitor @fer_gil #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ “Beginning in the earthly and ending in the abstract or celestial, like the magnificent #HilmaAfKlint exhibition. It's always a pleasure to visit you, teacher.” #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity #Architecture

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On view Friday, April 19—discover new work by the Hugo Boss Prize 2018 winner Simone Leigh ( @simoneyvetteleigh), whose career has insistently foregrounded the black female experience. Both deeply personal and piercingly political, Leigh’s sculptures resonate with a timeless beauty. Explore narratives of communal nurture, resilience, and resistance in "The Hugo Boss Prize: Simone Leigh, Loophole of Retreat." Check out our Instagram Story for a preview 🔝 __ Special thanks to HUGO BOSS ( @boss) for making this exhibition and the Hugo Boss Prize possible. #SimoneLeigh #HUGOBOSSPRIZE #Guggenheim Photo: David Heald

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Throughout #EarthMonth, we’re highlighting Guggenheim Collection artists who engage the natural world in their artistic practice. #MegWebster was greatly influenced by the Land art movement in the 1970s. “Stick Spiral” (1986) is an ephemeral installation of tree branches and other foliage laid out in a colossal spiral. An ecologically minded artist, Webster stipulated three rules for the work’s creation: the trimmings must come from local vegetation, they must be recent enough to retain the fragrance and flora of the original plants, and they must be cut down for a reason other than the work’s exhibition. By using live plants that grow and decay, she represents the timelessness and abundance of nature. #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection Photo: Ellen Labenski

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In 1998 visitors to "China: 5,000 Years" encountered four colored pillars that sliced through the rotunda's ramps. Aligned with the four cardinal directions, each featured calligraphy alluding to the mythical creatures of the Chinese zodiac that correspond with each direction and color. These colossal columns, part of the exhibition's design by architect Arata Isozaki (winner of the 2019 Pritzker Architecture Prize) in collaboration with Adegboyega Adefope, were a dramatic unifying gesture in an exhibition that brought together works of art spanning the Neolithic period to the late 1990s, many of which had never been seen outside China. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photo: Ellen Labenski #Guggenheim

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Over the course of a career that spans sculpture, video, and social practice, Simone Leigh ( @simoneyvetteleigh) has continuously and insistently centered the black female experience. Using materials such as ceramic, raffia, and bronze, Leigh creates forms that merge the female figure with domestic vessels or architectural elements, evoking the labors of care and protection that have historically fallen to women. Discover new work by Leigh in “The Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh, Loophole of Retreat,” opening Friday, April 19. Learn more at guggenheim.org/simoneleigh. #HUGOBOSSPRIZE __ Simone Leigh, "Jug" (2019). Photo: David Heald #SimoneLeigh #Guggenheim

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Our thoughts are with the people of Paris and those battling the blaze at the Notre-Dame Cathedral. The City of Light has proven its resiliency time and again, and we wish strength and solace for all those affected by this terrible loss. __ Marc Chagall, "Paris through the Window" (Paris par la fenêtre), (1913) #NotreDame #NotreDameParis #Guggenheim

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To celebrate @poetsorg’s #NationalPoetryMonth, we're collaborating with poets inspired by “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” #MapplethorpeMondays Poet @lawarman: for a moment we were seen in the dark a finger in a finger and a finger and another finger __ Artwork: Robert Mapplethorpe, "Calla Lily" (1986) #Guggenheim #Mapplethorpe

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To our followers in Italy—“The Nature of Arp” is now on view at @guggenheim_venice. Organized by the @NasherSculptureCenter, this exhibition investigates the achievements of Jean (Hans) Arp, one of the most important and multifaceted artists of the modern era. Explore Arp’s influential body of work in a rich variety of materials and formats, including sculptures in plaster, wood, bronze, and stone, painted wood reliefs, collages, drawings, textiles, and illustrated books. __ Photos: Matteo De Fina #Guggenheim

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Last night, our Young Collectors Council hosted artists, curators, and guests at the annual #YCCParty. Artist @brendanfernandes curated performances that combined classical ballet technique and the Japanese bondage art of shibari for an unforgettable evening! To view more photos visit flickr.com/guggenheim_museum Performers: @abigailsimonofficial @biggywalsh @chemita04 @elina.miettinen @jonatan_lujan_ @mauriciovera @nicomarkbrown @tyzydel @violetta Shibari Masters: @kinkbaku.m @vincenttiley Music by @karstensollors __ To learn more about the YCC visit guggenheim.org/ycc Photos: @dudemanshouse and Will Ragozzino #Guggenheim #GuggenheimYCC

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"Concrete foliage"—Gugg visitor @pedroeliudmx #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity #Architecture

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Dance and desire take center stage at tonight’s #YCCParty! With performances that combine classical ballet technique and the Japanese bondage art of shibari, artist @brendanfernandes brings “ballet kink” to life in our iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-deigned rotunda. Check out our #InstaStory for a sneak peek. –– #Guggenheim #GuggenheimYCC

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“My exploration through my art of the relationship between myself and nature has been a clear result of my having been torn from my homeland during my adolescence.”—Ana Mendieta Mendieta’s work revolves around the body, nature, and the spiritual connections between them. In her “Silueta” (Silhouette) series (1973-80), created on location in Iowa and Mexico, Mendieta carved and shaped her own figure into the earth to leave haunting traces of her body fashioned from flowers, tree branches, mud, gunpowder, and fire. The resulting photographs document private sculptural performances enacted in the landscape to invoke and represent the spirit of renewal inspired by nature and the power of the feminine. __ Artworks: Ana Mendieta, “Untitled (Silueta Series),” August 1976; “Silueta Muerta,” August 1976 #AnaMendieta #EarthMonth #GuggenheimCollection

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For #ClaesOldenburg's 1995 retrospective, Oldenburg and his wife Coosje van Bruggen, a frequent collaborator, created "Soft Shuttlecock." A daring interaction with the space, the artists' giant shuttlecock appeared to be wedged between two ramps; some of its feathers hung flaccidly against the parapet walls below, while others were suspended from the rotunda's oculus with cables. This work humorously deflated the imposing structure of the building by diminishing its relative scale while also underscoring the museum's institutional role as a site not only for culture and education but also for recreation and entertainment. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

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To celebrate @poetsorg’s #NationalPoetryMonth, we're collaborating with poets inspired by “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” #MapplethorpeMondays Rob Halpern, Poet: Mapplethorpe’s model looks like my dead friend Gene Aka Portia Manson creator of Hippy Dick a DIY zine For granola-fags and also FILM @ 11 a low-tech VHS fairy-porn production outfit that gratified A pre-internet niche market whose patrons came From the readers of zines like Hippy Dick all chic Drag queen sex acts for the revolution w/ titles Like Thank Gay I’m God and Mercury Rising an homage To Anger they both screened in SF one nite back in 1990 At the Dream Center on Fillmore featuring a live Improvised soundtrack performed by The Temple Whores after which Portia and I slept together his Touch was painfully tender but I was inexperienced And lacked the requisite body hair to inspire his Lust having already left my own hippy days Behind I had shaved my head & beard in a ritual Of molting tho I had yet to coincide with my punk Desire I just cldn’t open myself to Portia’s erotic rituals & the mysteries of queer ecstasy before he withdrew While dying of HIV-related meningitis in 1993. __ Artwork: Robert Mapplethorpe, “Jaime” (1974) #Guggenheim #Mapplethorpe

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Throughout #EarthMonth, we’re highlighting Guggenheim Collection artists who engage the natural world in their artistic practice. #RobertSmithson created the “Yucatan Mirror Displacements (1–9)” by installing 12-inch-square mirrors on dispersed sites in Mexico. The resulting series of nine color photographs was published in @Artforum to accompany Smithson’s essay “Incidents of Mirror-Travel in the Yucatan” (1969). The mirrors reflected and refracted the surrounding environs, displacing the solidity of the landscape and shattering its forms. Part Earthwork and part image, the displacements contemplate temporality; while the mirror records the passage of time, its photograph suspends time. #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection

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“I think the Guggenheim’s architecture is the perfect synthesis of the meaning of art. As you walk up the spiral to view the exhibition, the space architecturally gets bigger, and so does your heart and soul after you have taken this path.”—Gugg visitor @LuS_pics #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity #Architecture

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#GaeAulenti, an Italian architect and acclaimed furniture, lighting, and set designer, was responsible for the design of the 1994 exhibition "The Italian Metamorphosis: 1943–1968," a survey of the art and culture of postwar Italy. Upon entering the museum, visitors immediately encountered the most prominent element of Aulenti's design: wire-frame triangular structures projected into the museum's central void. As they walked up the ramps, these shapes appeared to transform, overlapping and collapsing visually. Though she took a minimalist approach on the ramps, her design was more apparent in the adjacent Tower galleries, where she placed architectural models on large zigzag-shaped pedestals and automobiles on an inclined plane, reminiscent of a racetrack. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

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To celebrate @poetsorg’s #NationalPoetryMonth, we're collaborating with poets inspired by “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” Which Robert Mapplethorpe works have inspired you? #MapplethorpeMondays. Poet @im.armoni: A Mirror of Multitudes A shutter can seal timelines like *click* we can measure time with light conversation. We were always just kids, right? We understood blood sacrifice early on *click* Sure, different masters, but we both believe in honest work. To see a new destiny on the other end of a lens is to hold hands with God across an unwritten stanza. *click* *click* *cli- __ Artwork: Robert Mapplethorpe, "Phillip Prioleau" (1982) #Guggenheim #Mapplethorpe

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A pioneer of contemporary abstraction for more than five decades, Samia Halaby (@samiahalaby_artist) uses painting to reflect the principles of motion in nature. In “Yellow Spiral” (1970), the artist translates the sheen of metallic surfaces onto the two-dimensional picture plane, capturing the dynamic and illusive effects of light on solid form. Part of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, this painting goes beyond pure geometry to create the illusion of depth, volume, and motion emerging from the hard-edged geometry of a flattened spiral. From the strongest radiance of yellow to the deepest grey shadows, it is light that connotes dynamism and imbues the work with kinetic force. The effect is pure, abstract luminosity. #5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth __ #Guggenheim #GuggenheimAbuDhabi

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Over the course of her 40-year career, artist Jenny Holzer has harnessed the power of words through her monumental outdoor light projections and text-based public art projects, intended to challenge, agitate, and even disturb audiences. In “Jenny Holzer. Thing Indescribable,” on view at @museoguggenheim, visitors will experience the evolving scope of Holzer’s practice through site site-responsive installations highlighted throughout Frank Gehry’s iconic building. Learn more at guggenheim-bilbao.eus. #5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth __ Photos: Erika Ede #JennyHolzer #MuseoGuggenheim #Guggenheim

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Gugg staff photo: Indira (@i_abiskaroon), Curatorial Assistant, Collections—"Growing up in New York and living here as an art history student, I spent a lot of time on Museum Mile. I couldn’t begin to count how many times I’ve walked that stretch of Fifth Avenue, but there was something about the Guggenheim that stopped me in my tracks every time." #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

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Mounira Al Solh’s work addresses political and sociological issues surrounding identity, displacement, immigration, and feminism related to—and as a consequence of—growing up moving between Lebanon and Syria in an attempt to avoid the Syrian and broader Middle East conflicts. Her direct experiences prompted Al Solh to record refugees’ personal stories in order to prevent them from being obliterated from history as well as to memorialize the tradition of storytelling forbidden under certain dictatorial conditions. “My specialty was to make peasants’ haircut, but they obliged me to work till midnight often,” is a series of hand- and machine-stitched unique embroideries on which the artist combines stitched portraits as well as words—excerpts from conversations held with refugees, exchanges that also inspire the artist’s formal assortment of fabrics. The two works seen above are portraits of Syrian refugees living in Lebanon, recounting their lived experiences of the war. The first work features a group of students accompanied by text denouncing the purposefully unequal system set in place by the Syrian government to discourage their application to universities, preventing a new generation of students from getting a degree. In the second work, a solitary man recounts his personal experience of exile that began in 1989 when, at the age of four, he fled the Lebanese Civil War to live with his grandmother in Syria, who is portrayed in the background under a nondescript flag. Assistant Curator @ylinkabarotto notes, “These two works are the first of Al Solh’s to enter the Guggenheim Collection, complementing the museum’s contemporary holdings of works that address political instability, the contemporary precariousness of borders, and the ways in which our current world is changed- and perhaps even defined - by the worldwide refugee crisis." #5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth __ Artwork: “My specialty was to make peasants’ haircut, but they obliged me to work till midnight often” (2015-17) Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Collectors Council, 2017 #MouniraAlSolh #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim

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Working in performance, photography, sculpture and installation, @BaseeraKhan explores issues of race, gender, migration, and cultural heritage. “Acoustic Sound Blankets” (2017) are comprised of thick, black, sound and light absorbing fabric with a small circular hole cut in the center. The round apertures of the three blankets are decorated with intricate gold patterns that are inspired by drawings of ancient motifs meticulously collected and transmitted by Khan’s generation of female family members for the past 100 years. Khan first conceived the works to be used in her performances as devices to keep her identity undisclosed in an act that she calls “aesthetic concealment.” Affected by the climate of cultural anxiety after 9/11, the works also reflect upon issues of Islamophobia and the perception of Muslim women in America. __ Click the link in our bio to listen to Baseera Khan and @Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, founder and editor in chief of @MuslimGirl, discuss feminism and Muslim identities, moderated by Assistant Curator @YlinkaBarotto. #BaseeraKhan #MuslimWomensDay #WomensHistoryMonth #5WomenArtists #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim

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The powerful and alluring photographic assemblages of Sheree Hovsepian ( @shereehovsepian) are the result of multiple layers of photographic paper rolled, folded and wrapped in volumetric shapes. In her work, Hovsepian often combines black and white images of details of female body parts, drawings, as well as abstract photograms created in the dark room. The works are then covered with sheer natural, or black nylon which, stretching across the surface, further reference to the female body. ”These three works are the first by Hovsepian to enter the Guggenheim Collection where they complement, amongst others, works by Elad Lassry, who also incorporates fabric as well as sculptural elements into his photographic works, and Liz Deschenes, whose practice includes camera-less photography as well as other non-traditional techniques.”—Assistant Curator @ylinkabarotto #5WomenArtists #WomensHistoryMonth __ Artworks from left to right: “Broken Column” (2017); “Horizon” (2017); “Aristotle’s Illusion” (2017) Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Collectors Council, 2017 #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim #ShereeHovsepian

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In #RebeccaHorn's mechanized sculptural installations, ordinary objects spring to life and engage in carefully choreographed ballets. For her 1993 Guggenheim retrospective, Horn created ʺParadiso,ʺ in which two swollen, breast-like funnels were suspended high above the museum's rotunda. With metronomic regularity, these objects excreted a milky liquid that dripped onto the rotunda floor far below. Placing the entire building in a state of tension, ʺParadisoʺ held viewers in suspense as they awaited the next drip. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photo: David Heald #Guggenheim