Guggenheim Museum - instagram lists #feedolist

guggenheim

“It was an assignment from a magazine that sent me to the Guggenheim this beautiful day in the summer of 2017. I love the juxtaposition of the modern building in the classical style of nearby buildings. I love the iconic, tacky hot dog stands and ice cream truck. The whole thing screams, ‘NEW YORK CITY, BABY!’ This city embraces the old with the new and that’s just one of the many things that make it one of the greatest cities in the world.”—Gugg visitor @shannonshootscocktails #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our #FrankLloydWright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at the link in bio. #Guggenheim #Architecture #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

”One of the artist’s most personal exhibits to date”— @Gothamist on “Basquiat's ‘Defacement’: The Untold Story,” on view through November 6. The exhibition examines Jean-Michel Basquiat’s exploration of black identity and his protest against police brutality after the death of artist Michael Stewart. Learn more at guggenheim.org/basquiat. #BasquiatDefacement __ Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim #Basquiat

guggenheim

#ArtistInterventions: For “Ascension Variations” (2009) @MeredithMonk adapted her musical composition “Songs of Ascension” (2009) to the Guggenheim's unique architecture. With the help of Monk's Vocal Ensemble, a string quartet, a chorus of more than eighty singers, and dozens of dancers performing throughout space, Monk led the audience on a journey through the ramps, stairways, and hidden alcoves of the Frank Lloyd Wright building. Her engagement with the rotunda also recalled “Juice: A Theatre Cantata in Three Installments,” the seminal work that she created for the Guggenheim in 1969. Forty years later Monk revisited “Juice” and incorporated elements of it into this new performance. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim #MeredithMonk

guggenheim

#WorkoftheWeek: “Plant and Animal” (1956) was inspired by radio antennae Takis saw in Calais, France, in 1954. The artist was drawn not only to the structures themselves but also to the ways in which immaterial forces that shape the world were being harnessed by new technologies. “Plant and Animal” suggests this connection by giving the form of the radio antenna a distinctly organic bend, reminiscent of plant stalks or insect antennae. The work’s connection to the invisible forms of energy is heightened by its flexibility, which allows the sculpture to respond to vibration and movement. __ “Plant and Animal” (1956), on view in #ArtisticLicense, is being exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum for the first time. Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/artisticlicense. #Guggenheim #Takis #GuggenheimCollection

guggenheim

#GuessTheArtist answer: Robert Rauschenberg, “Yellow Body” (1968). During a trip to Cuba in 1952, Rauschenberg first experimented with transfer drawings, taking printed images, primarily from newspapers and magazines, placing them face down on sheets of paper, and then rubbing the backs of the images with an empty ballpoint pen or other burnishing device to transfer the original to the paper. The technique has been described as imparting a veiled quality, which the artist heightens by applying paint, pencil, and crayon marks over the transferred images. “Yellow Body” exemplifies a technical development in which Rauschenberg applied a chemical solvent, such as lighter fluid, to the preprinted image, facilitating a clearer and more complete transfer. #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim #Rauschenberg

guggenheim

#GuessTheArtist—this artist first experimented with transfer drawings during a trip to Cuba in 1952. Comment your best guess below and we’ll share the answer by the end of the day. Good luck! #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim

guggenheim

“There’s no doubt that besides the museum’s collection works, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building is also a work of art. It is impossible to visit and not fall in love with its curves and not look up at the oculus. During every one of my visits, I take photos and explore all of the masterpiece’s angles.”—Gugg visitor @claraeloisa #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our #FrankLloydWright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at the link in bio. #Guggenheim #NewYorkCity #Architecture

guggenheim

Other kitties will say it’s photoshopped 😻😻 Check out our Instagram Story to meet some of our staff members' Gugg cats! __ “Loiza’s (@shades_of_gris) favorite pastime is climbing and there is literally no surface too high for him to reach.”—@the_gayze, Public Engagement Coordinator #Catoftheday #CatsofInstagram #Guggenheim

guggenheim

In 2009, #AnnHamilton created a site-specific installation responding to “The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, 1860-1989.” Building on the artist's interests in language, architecture, materiality, and the body, “human carriage” gathered sliced cross sections of books that served as the intellectual foundation for the exhibition. Several times a day, a “reader” standing at the top of the museum's ramp attached a bundle of these books to a wheeled carriage adorned with a pair of Tibetan temple cymbals. As the carriage spiraled down the ramps along an aluminum track, the bells rang repeatedly, until the books dropped into a large heap at the bottom of the rotunda. In this way, “human carriage” evoked the processes of circulation, interpretation, appropriation, and misunderstanding that take place when cultural knowledge travels and is transmitted from one cultural context to another. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

guggenheim

#WorkoftheWeek: Trained as an art historian and self-taught in photography, Ilse Bing began her photographic career making portraits and architectural images. Bing established herself as an exceptional talent with the handheld Leica camera, and she was a pioneer in experimenting with solarization and night photography. Her works, influenced by the modernist theories of the Bauhaus and the principles of Surrealism, feature slanted perspectives, dramatic shadows, and a textural sensibility. __ “Self Portrait” (1945) and “Between France and USA” (1936), on view in #ArtisticLicense, are being exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum for the first time. Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/artisticlicense. © Estate of Ilse Bing #Guggenheim #IlseBing #GuggenheimCollection

guggenheim

#Guggenheim60—“I remember capturing this photograph in 1997, during my first trip to New York City. At that time, I was studying architecture and the Guggenheim was one of my favorites. One of my habits with emblematic buildings, was to take a ‘special’ photo as seen in the image. Fortunately, I will return to the city in October of this year, and of course I will visit the museum.”—Gugg visitor @nakious __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our #FrankLloydWright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at the link in bio. #Guggenheim #NewYorkCity #Architecture

guggenheim

For the 2008 exhibition “theanyspacewhatever,” #PierreHuyghe, whose work often plays with the constructs of time and reality, staged “OPENING”—a happening that occurred on three evenings over the course of the exhibition. In this piece Huyghe darkened the Guggenheim's rotunda and disrupted its spatial flow, distributing headlamps to visitors and inviting them to roam the spiral ramp in blackout conditions. Theatrical and disorienting “OPENING” transformed visitors' experience of the museum, filling its cavernous interior with roving beams of light and encouraging moments of wonder and discovery. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photo: David Heald #Guggenheim

guggenheim

Online ticketing for our performing-arts series @worksandprocess, starts today! The new season “looks backward and forwards” ( @nytimes) with commissions by @MachineDazzle and @CarolineAdelaideShaw; a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the @MetOpera’s #Akhnaten; #WPRotunda performances by @DanceTheatreofHarlem, @RoomfulofTeeth, and @CalebTeicher and Ben Folds ( @MurkanPianist); a sneak peek at Seared with @mcctheater; and so much more! Visit worksandprocess.org for the full season lineup and to purchase tickets. __ Image: Dance Theatre of Harlem New York Company Premiere, January 1971. Photo: Suzanne Vlamis #Guggenheim #PerformingArts

guggenheim

#WorkoftheWeek: “Untitled” by Maria Helena Vieira da Silva resembles an architectural construction; its fragmented, brightly colored shapes and black lines emerge from the background in a tense, grid-like formation. Having studied painting with Fernand Léger, Vieira da Silva adopted the restricted palette and faceted forms of the Cubists. Rather than planning out her richly textured compositions, she often began by laying down lines, and allowed the work to evolve as she progressed—a practice akin to that of the Surrealists. __ “Untitled” (1953), on view in #ArtisticLicense, is being exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum in New York for the first time. Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/artisticlicense. #Guggenheim #MariaHelenaVieiradaSilva #GuggenheimCollection

guggenheim

To our followers in Spain—@museoguggenheim’s exhibition “A Backward Glance. Giorgio Morandi and the Old Masters,” explores the relationship between Morandi’s signature still lifes and historical masterworks that the artist appreciated and studied. Learn more at giorgiomorandi.guggenheim-bilbao.eus. #MorandiGuggenheimBilbao

Guggenheim

To our followers in Spain—@museoguggenheim’s “Learning Through Art 2019” features works by students participating in #LearningThroughArt—the artist-in-residence program in Bilbao’s elementary schools. Designed to support the primary school curriculum using art as a tool, this program encourages questions, ignites curiosity, promotes new inspiring ideas, and stimulates the excitement of discovery. Learn more at guggenheim-bilbao.eus. #GuggenheimBilbao.

guggenheim

Summer is heating up at tonight's #ArtAfterDark with @JADALAREIGN! Check out our Story ⬆️ for an inside scoop of the party. __ Photo: Ben Hider #Guggenheim

guggenheim

“The Guggenheim has held a place in my imagination from the first time I saw it on film. I don’t remember the film, but I’ve wanted to visit for decades. I was in New York City for only 48 hours and was able to visit and view the Hilma af Klint exhibition. I was moved—the museum seems to have been designed for her art.”—Gugg visitor @meg_fender #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

“After doing extensive research behind the history and planning of the Guggenheim for a term paper for my Art History class at the State College at New Paltz ( @SunyNewPaltz), I took a bus to Manhattan to visit the museum and I was much better prepared to appreciate what I saw. I was interested not only in the unique architecture, but how the art work was exhibited. The glass dome made for an interesting photograph as well as the design of the water fountain. The museum guides were also helpful in providing Frank Lloyd Wright's thinking and planning. It's also interesting, now, to see how people dressed in 1961, compared to today.”—Gugg visitor David Miles #Guggenheim60 __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our #FrankLloydWright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at the link in bio. #Guggenheim

guggenheim

The second part of “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now” is now on view, addressing Robert Mapplethorpe’s complex legacy in the field of contemporary art. In addition to a focused selection of Mapplethorpe’s photographs, the exhibition features the work of six Guggenheim collection artists who explore identity through photographic portraiture: Rotimi Fani-Kayode, @LyleAshtonHarris, @GlennLigon, Zanele Muholi ( @muholizanele), Catherine Opie ( @csopie), and Paul Mpagi Sepuya ( @pagmi). Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/mapplethorpe. #ImplicitTensions #Mapplethorpe __ Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim # RotimiFaniKayode #LyleAshtonHarris #GlennLigon #ZaneleMuholi #CatherineOpie #PaulMpagiSepuya

guggenheim

As part of the 2008 exhibition "theanyspacewhatever," #AngelaBulloch inserted a night sky into the ceiling of the rotunda. "Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12" (2008) digitally simulated a constellation of stars as seen from beyond the earth's atmosphere, melting away the physical confines of the museum. Utilizing software that produces computerized images of visible star fields, the installation offered galaxy views not otherwise visible to the human eye, creating a fiction of time and space that shifted the perceived notion of reality. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

guggenheim

#WorkoftheWeek: Robert Morris’s “Untitled (Black Felt)” is comprised of hanging strips of heavy felt that respond to gravity. The sculpture was formed through the simple actions of cutting and dropping, and is an example of anti-form. This term is associated with a group of sculptors who embraced chance and worked from the principle that form should be derived from the characteristic qualities of a chosen material. __ “Untitled (Black Felt)” (ca. 1969), on view in #ArtisticLicense, is being exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum in New York for the first time. Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/artisticlicense. Photo: Ben Hider © 2019 The Estate of Robert Morris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York #RobertMorris #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection

guggenheim

#GuessTheArtist answer: Doris Salcedo, “A Flor De Piel” (2011-12) __ To create this work, Salcedo stitched together hundreds of rose petals, each chemically treated to preserve its dark color and pliant texture. Salcedo created this work in homage to a Colombian nurse who was kidnapped and tortured to death after providing care to injured parties on both sides of Colombia’s protracted civil war. She has described the work as a floral offering to those who have been affected by violence. #GuggenheimCollection #DorisSalcedo #Guggenheim

guggenheim

#GuessTheArtist—this artist is highly regarded for their evocative political sculpture, installation, and performance with themes and subjects related to historical incidences of mass violence, trauma, racism, and colonialism. Comment your best guess below and we'll share the answer by the end of the day. Good luck! #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim

guggenheim

#FrankLloydWrightFridays—caption this 🍦 __ 📷 Gugg visitor @mikadololo #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity #NationalIceCreamMonth

guggenheim

Happy #WorldEmojiDay! 👁️ 🌈 🐍 ✨reminds us of Vasily Kandinsky’s “Around the Circle (Autour du cercle)” (1940). Which emojis do you see within this work? Comment below. __ #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim #Kandinsky

guggenheim

In 2008, #DouglasGordon presented a site-specific, text-based installation, “prettymucheverywordwritten,spoken,heard,overheardfrom1989…” (2008) throughout the rotunda, walls, floor, and lobby as part of the exhibition “theanyspacewhatever.” Gordon’s text installations utilize and animate their surrounding architecture and are “completed” through the audience’s interaction with them. This work, which included phrases such as “Nothing will ever be the same,” “I’m closer than you think,” and “There is something you should know,” evoked ambiguity and revealed the artist’s obsession with opposites—fact and fiction, good and evil, and so on—and the ways in which such dichotomies often collapse into one another. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

guggenheim

#WorkoftheWeek: “I saw Times Square with its light and letters and I realized it was as beautiful and difficult to do as Japanese calligraphy.”—Chryssa Greek-born artist Chryssa moved to New York in 1954, finding inspiration in the spectacle of the advertising neon signs of Times Square. She began incorporating neon into her work in the early 1960s, and was one of the first artists to transform it from an advertising medium into fine art. For Chryssa, the illuminated signs were a perfect example of the intertwining of the vulgar and the visually poetic in U.S. popular culture. She engaged this quality in her neon works, which are illegible but often recall deconstructed letters. __ “Fragmented Signature” (1970), on view in #ArtisticLicense, is being exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum for the first time. Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/artisticlicense. Photo: Scott Rudd #Chryssa #Guggenheim

guggenheim

Did you #GuessTheArtist correctly? Here’s the full view of Paul Cezanne’s “Still Life: Plate of Peaches (Assiette de pêches)” (1880). Paul Cezanne participated in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874. __ Cezanne’s work was motivated by a desire to give sculptural weight and volume to the instantaneity of vision achieved by Impressionists, who painted by nature. Learn more about the artist at guggenheim.org/collection. #Guggenheim #GuggenheimCollection #Cezanne

guggenheim

“I'm happy to live close to the Guggenheim Museum, it always inspires me.”—Gugg visitor @retroflin #FrankLloydWrightFridays Share your photos of the #Guggenheim using the hashtag #FrankLloydWrightFridays for a chance to be featured ✨ __ #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity #Architecture

guggenheim

#GuessTheArtist—the jury for the renowned Salon art exhibition in Paris rejected this artist's submissions many times during his career. Comment your best guess below and we'll share the answer by the end of the day. Good luck! #GuggenheimCollection #Guggenheim

guggenheim

60 years of architecture, 60 years of art, and 60 years of inspiring visitors—what's your favorite memory of the museum? Celebrate the 60th anniversary of our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building by sharing your #Guggenheim60 stories from the last six decades via the link in bio. 🎉 __ Photograph by William H. Short, Guggenheim workers during the construction of the museum #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

"I always notice the museum's beautiful Monstera before going up the spiral. I adore plants, so this view grounded me before immersing for hours in the ‘Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future’ exhibition."—Gugg visitor @green_in_grayscale #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

“I will never forget the day in 1978 when I took this photograph. I was so thoroughly distracted by a personal problem that I couldn’t concentrate on any potential subjects. I had been photographing in Manhattan on and off for two years for a book of images of architecture, and for the first time everything I looked at seemed bleak; my daylong search was fruitless. Disheartened, I was resigned to calling it a day when I came upon the Guggenheim. My bleak mood immediately vanished and I took this photograph, the Guggenheim was the only building that I photographed on that day 41 years ago. I believe that the veil was lifted not only because of this majestic building’s commanding presence and intensity, but also because of the tranquility and peacefulness it emanates.”—Photographer Philip Trager __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our #FrankLloydWright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at the link in bio. __ Photo: ©1980 Philip Trager #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

Happy #4thofJuly! We are open today 10 am-5:30 pm. Escape the heat and explore #ArtisticLicense, photography by Robert Mapplethorpe, new sculptures by Simone Leigh, and masterworks from our collection by #Kandinsky, #Picasso, #Brancusi, and more. Plan your visit at guggenheim.org/visit. __ Photo: William H. Short, historic photo of the American flag on top of the museum during final construction #Guggenheim #IndependenceDay

guggenheim

In 2008, #JennyHolzer created “For the Guggenheim,ʺ in celebration of a recently completed restoration of Frank Lloyd Wright’s landmark building. In this piece, the artist’s own writings and selections from poems by Wisława Szymborska were projected onto the museum’s newly renovated facade one night weekly throughout the autumn. The fragmented texts scrolled steadily upward over each of the Wright building’s rings, vanishing into the darkness above. “For the Guggenheim” turned the museum’s exterior into an environment for looking, discussing, and gathering. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photo: Kristopher McKay #Guggenheim

guggenheim

*UPDATE* This performance is now sold out. Follow our Facebook event as more tickets may be released closer to the performance. Just announced—Brooklyn-based singer and producer Joshua Karpeh ( @cautiousxclay) will perform at the Guggenheim on Tuesday, July 16! Co-presented by @WFUV, tickets include access to the museum after the performance. Tickets on sale now at guggenheim.org/calendar. __ Photo: John Daniel Powers #GuggTuesdays

guggenheim

#MapplethorpeMondays—in this self-portrait, which would prove to be one of Robert Mapplethorpe’s last, his gaunt face appears to float within a black void as his hand clutches a skull-topped walking cane in the picture’s foreground. Mapplethorpe died soon after, in early 1989, from AIDS-related complications. That he chose to represent himself in such a haunting manner, holding an overtly morbid symbol of death, speaks to an awareness and acceptance of his own mortality. Despite the artist’s weakened condition, his confident expression and firm grasp exude a characteristic sense of control and mastery of all things, even death. Cognizant of his limited time following a 1986 diagnosis, Mapplethorpe worked to safeguard his legacy during his final years, preparing for two retrospective exhibitions and establishing the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to manage his estate, support the medium of photography in arts institutions, and fund HIV/AIDS medical research. __ See “Self Portrait” (1988) in “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now,” on view through July 10 and share your visit using #Mapplethorpe. #Guggenheim

guggenheim

#PrideMonth: “Can a traditional medium like self-portraiture be radically queer? How can existing visual languages be reconstructed as a way to reclaim agency for queer bodies and POC (person of color)? Self-identified 'visual activist' Zanele Muholi ( @muholizanele) has dedicated their artistic career to combating racism, homophobia, transphobia and other forms of bigotry and violence through image making. In their recent ongoing photo series ‘Somnyama Ngonyama (Hail the Dark Lionness)’ (2014–), Muholi produces self-portraits using various household and collected items- from rubber gloves to extension cords- to construct strikingly theatrical images in which they adopt different personas and styles. Echoing the aesthetics of fashion photography and black-and-white portraiture, these photographs place the artist's body front and center; a combative reframing of how the black queer body is approached and aestheticized.”—Assistant Curator, Xiaorui Zhu-Nowell ( @xzhunowell) — Images from left to right: “Siphe, Johannesburg” (2018); “Ngwane I, Oslo” (2018)

guggenheim

Happy #Pride New York City! "Love is the greatest virtue of the heart"—Frank Lloyd Wright #NYCPride 🌈 ❤️ __ Photo: David Heald #WorldPride #Pride2019 #Guggenheim #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

#PrideMonth: “For Ad Minoliti ( @minoliti), color theory is queer theory. In her expansive painting and conceptual practice, color and figuration become a framework in which to think through multitude, subjectivity, and difference. If queer theory proposes the construction of community through differences, not through sameness or identities, Minoliti’s engagements with color and geometric forms propose the same radical undoing. In her work, form always informs politics, and seemingly rudimentary concepts like ‘color,’ ‘figure,’ and ‘shape’ become inseparable from gendered concepts. The playfulness and humor that abounds in her work also operates as a form of art-historical critique, nullifying modernist, masculinist readings of form and universality.”—Assistant Curator, Xiaorui Zhu-Nowell ( @xzhunowell)

guggenheim

“After many visits to #NewYorkCity, I finally had the chance to visit the #Guggenheim Museum. Both the art and the architecture inside of the building were captivating.”—Gugg visitor @dieggoacosta #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

guggenheim

#ArtisticLicense is a @nytimes Critic's Pick! “A rare, dazzling, dizzying cornucopia of objects, viewpoints and agendas”—Roberta Smith ( @robertasmithnyt). Plan your visit this weekend to the museum's first artist-curated exhibition. Learn more at guggenheim.org/artisticlicense. Photo: Ben Hider #Guggenheim

guggenheim

“I was assigned by LOOK magazine in 1960 to photograph model and actress Isabella Albonico and the Hat. Once she placed the hat on her, I immediately said ‘we are going to the Guggenheim.’ Frank Lloyd Wright was a dear friend of mine and one memory I have of him that I will never forget was after a long walk at his house in @wrighttaliesin, Frank picked up a cane and gave it to me. I noted that I don’t have a need for it and he responded ‘son some day you will.’ Just last year I started to use the cane.”— @tonyvaccarophotographer #Guggenheim60 __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our #FrankLloydWright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at the link in bio. #Guggenheim __ Photograph by Tony Vaccaro. Copyright Toby Vaccaro / Tony Vaccaro Archives. #Guggenheim #FrankLloydWright #NewYorkCity

Guggenheim

In 2008, Cai Guo-Qiang’s ( @caistudio) “Inopportune: Stage One” (2004) was presented in the museum’s rotunda, simulating the trajectory of an exploding automobile tumbling through space. In its processional arrangement, the piece recalls stop-motion photography or a sequence of freeze-frames from a movie. Although this installation was originally shown in an expansive horizontal layout, when invited by the Guggenheim to consider the rotunda space for his 2008 retrospective, the artist radically reconfigured the work. The cars were suspended from the oculus and staggered vertically, inviting viewers to experience the work fully as they walked up the ramps. __ Since opening in 1959, our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed museum has served as inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. Follow #Guggenheim60 to discover more artist interventions during our 60th anniversary year! Photos: David Heald #Guggenheim

Guggenheim

“I'm looking for the unexpected. I'm looking for things I've never seen before.”—Robert Mapplethorpe. #MapplethorpeMondays __ See “Self Portrait” (1985) in “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now,” on view through July 10 and share your visit using #Mapplethorpe. #Guggenheim

Guggenheim

#PrideMonth: “How is queerness articulated in historical contexts and in societies where your sexuality and what you desire is regulated? What do our beliefs about historical subjects imply about our understandings of intimacy, gender, and sexuality? Wu Tsang’s (@wu_tsang) films often portray alternative models of social relations and uncover hidden histories and narratives. Her film 'Duilian' (2016) uncovers the queer history of one of China's most famous poets, Qiu Jin. Drafted from the life of the Chinese revolutionary poet Qiu Jin (played by @boychild), Duilian strays from official narratives about the historical figure, and instead focuses on the intimate relationship between the poet and her friend and calligrapher, Wu Zhiying (played by the artist). Through acts of decoding and deliberate ‘mistranslation’ to established narratives, her film exposes ‘history’ as irrational and intimate, and rejects a construct of historical subjectivity that is devoid from passions and affects.”—Assistant Curator, Xiaorui Zhu-Nowell ( @xzhunowell)

Guggenheim

Tickets to #ArtAfterDark on Friday, July 26 are on sale! This event will feature a DJ set by @JADALAREIGN, cash bar, and an after-hours viewing of #ArtisticLicense, #Mapplethorpe, and #BasquiatDefacement. Buy tickets at guggenheim.org/AADTickets. Photo: Ben Hider #Guggenheim

Guggenheim

“It’s a real treat when visiting the Guggenheim on a sunny afternoon, when the building receives direct sunlight. As the sun moves, a natural shadow play is performed along the curves of the building, concluding with long silhouettes that constitute a performance bow at sunset.”—Gugg visitor @dudemanshouse #FrankLloydWrightFridays __ #SummerSolstice #Guggenheim #Frank LloydWright #Architecture #NewYorkCity

Guggenheim

“My grandfather Max Cutler shot this film in 1960 a year after the Guggenheim opened. My grandparents traveled the world and my grandfather took his 16mm Bolex to shoot films. He also wrote a daily entry in his diary from 1952-2010, until the day my grandmother died. He edited his films by hand and added classical music as a soundtrack. My grandparents were married for 68 years and adventured to almost every country in the world. In the entry documenting their day at the museum he writes ‘We easily parked at 88th and 5th Solomon Guggenheim’s circular ramp museum-the foyer with permanent collections of a few prints (one of Picasso). Brancusi’s sculpture of a white seal-we picked up a program which described the current Spanish moderns Rivera’s painted window screens, Nonnel, an earlier artist with more of a Seurat, Monet appearance. This we started at the top and circled to the foyer again…’ In the film my grandmother and their two youngest daughters, my aunts Susie and Jeanne, are wandering around the museum. My grandfather died in 2016 at the age of 99 and his films and diaries are a complete work of a life well lived.” —Elizabeth Daniels ( @elizabethdaniels01) #Guggenheim60 __ 2019 is the 60th anniversary of our Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building, and we’d love to hear about your memories of the Guggenheim over the last six decades! Send us your old photographs or videos taken at the museum and we’ll select our favorites to share with you here. Share your #Guggenheim60 memories at guggenheim.org/60 __ From left to right: film shot by Max Cutler; Max Cutler's diaries; portrait of Max Cutler