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“To me it is a relief to imagine that I don’t need certainty of many things. On the contrary: I think that what I personally need is to be able to participate in the construction of these certainties. We, as a society, build a consensus together. Science could also be considered an illusion, an illusion of facts. You can interpret reality, not accept it as something immutable, but as an organically built construct based on a mix of all the knowledge we have,” Argentine artist Leandro Erlich told @silviarottenberg.⁣ ⁣ Elevators going nowhere, a rainy sidewalk reflecting a hidden cityscape in its gutter, a beauty salon missing its mirrors, an empty classroom filled with ghost-like reflections of the public — these are among the works visitors can enjoy in Ehrlich’s playful, interactive survey, which remains on view @museomalba in Buenos Aires through the end of October. 🐬 #leandroerlich #argentina

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Gordon Parks’s photographs of Flávio da Silva originated in the Kennedy’s administration’s effort to develop closer sociopolitical and financial relationships in Central and South America. #LifeMagazine hired Parks to travel to Brazil as their representative, documenting poverty in Rio de Janeiro as part of a special issue on Latin America.⁣ ⁣ Parks focused his photo essay on the asthmatic 12-year old son of the large da Silva family. Although Parks took numerous photographs of other family members, it is his lovingly framed gelatin silver prints of the boy, Flávio that stand out.⁣ ⁣ After receiving both acclaim and criticism for his photographs, Parks never abandoned his subject, returning to Brazil many times to photograph again and again. An exhibition @gettymuseum explores Parks’s decades long relationship with one of his most important subjects. #WorldPhotographyDay⁣ ⁣#gordonparks

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Renowned painter, textile artist, and activist #FaithRinggold spoke with Hyperallergic editor @jasmineweber for an upcoming interview addressing Ringgold’s artistic influences, upcoming projects, and the Anyone Can Fly Foundation. (📷 @jasmineweber)

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Artist Dan Mills, whose latest exhibition is now on view @contemporary_maine, delves into devastating numbers and world reports, then converts them into chaotically beautiful cartographies. The central paradox of his map pieces is that, even as they record the woes of the world, they are stunning and seductive. The visuals engage; the numbers appall. ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ One of the largest — 92 by 144 inches — and most recent pieces in the show, “Current Wars & Conflicts… (with, by continent, Belligerent and Supporter groups marked with letters, and Asylum Seekers, Internally Displaced, Refugees, Stateless, and Killed marked with a letter for every million),” from 2019, exemplifies Mills’s approach. One of the largest — 92 by 144 inches — and most recent pieces in the show, “Current Wars & Conflicts… (with, by continent, Belligerent and Supporter groups marked with letters, and Asylum Seekers, Internally Displaced, Refugees, Stateless, and Killed marked with a letter for every million),” from 2019, exemplifies Mills’s approach.⁣ ⁣ Using data gleaned from various reports, he presents a world map chock-a-block with stenciled B’s, K’s, S’s, and other letters swarming across the continents, piling up at the bottom of the map and filling up the oceans in between. Each letter represents a million people, a fact that makes this presentation all the more overwhelming. #DanMills #Maps

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Makeshift memorials and shrines dot the parking lot outside the Walmart in El Paso, Texas where 22 people were murdered by an armed gunman last week. Crosses, candles, balloons, photographs, and flowers have become common symbols of the mourning that follows mass shootings; however, residents of the Texan border town are also using music to remember the fallen victims.⁣ ⁣ While in the Texas city to cover the catastrophe’s aftereffects, photojournalist J. Omar Ornelas found a musical tribute being paid at the memorial site for the shooting victims. “Mexicans never fail in death,” he wrote on Twitter, accompanying a video he captured of the song. “A corrido is born at the site of the #ElPasoShooting.”

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In honor of #InternationalCatDay: The story of cat art collector, Patrick Eddington. The Utah-based artist and high school art teacher who passed away in 2016, cultivated a unique project for much of his life. Simply titled the “Cat Project,” it emerged through Eddington’s extensive correspondence with countless writers and visual artists, from Kiki Smith to Marcel Dzama to Ray Bradbury. ⁣ ⁣ Eddington asked each of them to create or share an existing cat-related work and send it to him. Quinn’s Auction Galleries, the house which eventually shepherded the sale of the 246 lots noted that the letters Eddington wrote to artists and writers were “charming and persuasive.” One could say the same about many of the artworks he received in return. 🐈 Gayleen Aiken, “Bad Kitties Wreck the Room” (courtesy Quinn’s Auction Galleries, from the collection of Patrick Eddington).

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Author and Nobel Laureate #ToniMorrison has died at age 88. In honor of the transfiguring writer, whose novels built pathways to new national conversations around race in America, we leave you with this quote from a 2005 interview: ⁣⁣ ⁣ “This is the time for every artist in every genre to do what he or she does loudly and consistently. It doesn't matter to me what your position is. You've got to keep asserting the complexity and the originality of life, and the multiplicity of it, and the facets of it. This is about being a complex human being in the world, not about finding a villain. This is no time for anything else than the best that you've got.” ⁣

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Few publications did more to cement photojournalism in the American imagination than LIFE. As a general-interest publication, the magazine was broad in scope by design, but an exciting exhibition @nyhistory takes a new perspective on the iconic relic of print media. “LIFE: Six Women Photographers” offers a small but memorable selection of black-and-white prints and contact sheets from Margaret Bourke-White, Hansel Mieth, Marie Hansen, Martha Holmes, Nina Leen, and Lisa Larsen — women who worked for the magazine during its prime.⁣ ⁣ Image: Marie Hansen, photograph from “The WAACs,” LIFE, September 7, 1942 (© LIFE Picture Collection, Meredith Corporation). Click the link in bio to read @abbey_e_bender’s full review. #photography #womenphotographers #lifemagazine

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In “In Coffee, Rhum, Sugar & Gold: A Postcolonial Paradox,” now on view @moadsf, artist Phillip Thomas’s own evocation of grandiose Old Mastery (pictured) juxtaposes a seemingly white-aspiring post-colonial Black bourgeoisie against a literal wallpapered backdrop of Black suffering, with silhouetted detailings of white militarism and hanging Black bodies alongside depictions of white leisure.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ The paradox named in the show’s title speaks to the commonality and cultural ubiquity of these materials — the drivers of colonial slave economies in the Caribbean — and how their assimilation into contemporary society has enabled a forgetting of their primacy as cash crops of European coloniality. A further paradox lies in the fact that many of the Caribbean nation-states that have emerged from these former plantation economies presently exist as raw exporters of fruits, extracted mining products, natural gases, and fertilizers, and are also consumer markets for the finished manufactured and agricultural products sold back to them through trade agreements and manipulated global markets. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Tap the link in bio to read @babywasu’s review ⬆️

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Over the last 70 years, Ebony and Jet magazines served as incomparable records of Black politics, fashion, beauty, music, sports, and culture, becoming essential fixtures in African American households. Last week, the expansive archive of these major chroniclers of African American life was sold for $30 million. ⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ The various foundations which banded together to make the purchase will donate the archive of over four million prints and negatives, which has been largely inaccessible to researchers in past years, to the NMAAHC and Getty Research Institute, to preserve the collection and increase public access to it.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ (1) 1954 Funmakers Ball participants Eddie McClennon, Bobbie Laney, 1st place winner for “Best Costume’ and Toni Evans pose for a photo. [G. Marshall Wilson/EBONY Collection] ⁣ (2) Clark Terry walks with his son Rudolph under the Apollo Theater marquee after Terry’s first stage show with Duke Ellington’s band in 1955. [G. Marshall Wilson/Johnson Publishing Company]⁣ (3) Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks during early days of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1956. [Moneta Sleet, Jr/Johnson Publishing Company]⁣ (4) Ray Charles plays dominoes by feel with Herman Roberts. [David Jackson/EBONY Collection]

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Against a backdrop of rising rents, uncontrolled development, and lack of affordable housing, David Hammonds’ tents are a clear visual reminder of the Los Angeles housing crisis. The odd juxtaposition of jovial diners overlooking a tented ghost town implicates the viewer’s own complicity in Los Angeles’s housing failures, suggesting that the burden and responsibility for this crisis is not equally shared by all. ◻️ Hammons’s discord with the commercial art world is a strong undercurrent in his new @hauserwirth show. It’s evident in the nylon tents that lead up to the gallery. Hammons’s wry observations are literally written on the walls, speaking in code to anyone willing to listen. ◻️ 〰️ David Hammons and Martin Creed’s neon sign “Everything is going to be alright” at Hauser & Wirth, Los Angeles, photo by Colony Little #davidhammonds #losangeles

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Suzanne Lacy’s art is always recognizable as hers. From her earliest social practice pieces in the 1970s, her work has confronted issues of gender, violence, race, aging, and capitalism, among other pressing sociopolitical concerns, through a striking visual language that is at once alarming, witty, moving, eye-opening, and, often, beautiful. ◾️ ◾️ In the retrospective exhibition Suzanne Lacy: We Are Here, currently on view @sfmoma, Lacy’s themes are spelled out before you even get to the exhibition. The stairs from the ground floor to the exhibition spaces bear messages in black letters on yellow: “Who’s winning the war on women? Is VIOLENCE gender neutral? Whose LABOR is invisible?” . Read Bridget Quinn’s review at the link in bio. #suzannelacy: We Are Here is on view @sfmoma through August 4.

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BREAKING: After months of protest, an emerging biennial boycott, and an accusation of war crimes, Warren Kanders has resigned from his position as vice chairman of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s board of trustees. ◾️ “The targeted campaign of attacks against me and my company that has been waged these past several months has threatened to undermine the important work of the Whitney,” said Kanders in his resignation letter to the board, according to the New York Times. . . #whitneybiennial #warrenkanders #whitneymuseum

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Late in Lulu Wang’s latest feature, The Farewell, Billi ( @awkwafina) steps up to deliver a speech at a wedding. She apologizes, “My Chinese isn’t great,” as she’s done out of insecurity a number of times. “It’s great! Go on!” yells someone in the wedding party, and so she does. But the feeling of distance from one’s own family remains. That distance is familiar to anyone who’s moved away from their native country. In Billi’s case, it’s navigating Mandarin as a bilingual person while having lived in a country that prioritizes English. 🔲 Hyperallergic spoke with filmmaker @thumbelulu about navigating the gaps inherent to emigrating, adapting her personal narrative for both film and radio (through an episode of @thisamerlife) where she lays out her family narrative, and how life itself can be just as performative as the characters we watch on the big screen. 〰️ Link in bio for full interview. #thefarewellmovie #luluwang #awkwafina

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Giveaway Alert! 🥳 Hyperallergic is giving away 10 pairs of tickets to #JayMyself @filmforumnyc. The upcoming documentary details the whimsical life of photographer Jay Maisel, who was said to have pulled off the greatest NYC real estate coup of all time. Visit the link in bio ⬆️ for your chance to enter and to view an exclusive clip of the film. @oscopelabs ◾️ In 1966, photographer Jay Maisel purchased the historic Germania Bank Building at the corner of Bowery and Spring in Manhattan for around $100,000. time“). For nearly 50 years, he and his family lived in the six-story, 36,000-square-foot building, until he sold it in late 2014 for $55 million. The new documentary Jay Myself examines Maisel’s career and work, using his move out of his longtime home as a focal point. #JayMyself #giveaway

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#ForensicArchitecture has announced its decision to withdraw from the 2019 #WhitneyBiennial. The London-based research group has also requested to replace its 10-minute video about the global spread of tear gas and bullets produced by companies linked to Whitney Museum vice chairman Warren Kanders, with new evidence they’ve found that directly links the weapons manufacturer to violence on the Israeli-Palestinian border in Gaza. The organization has previously claimed a connection between the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) and Sierra Bullets — a weapons manufacturer partially owned by Kanders — through contracts with the army’s preferred supplier of ammunition, the Israeli Military Industry. Now, one of Forensic Architecture’s researchers in Gaza believes she has found direct evidence linking the museum board member to border violence that the United Nations classified in a recent report as a potential war crime. 🔗 Link on profile page 🔗

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💫 San Francisco! We are pleased to announce our official media sponsorship for this year’s edition of @sfartbookfair, which begins today @minnesotastreetproject. The San Francisco Art Book Fair is an annual multi-day festival of artists' publications. The event is FREE and OPEN to the public and features artists’ books, art catalogs, monographs, periodicals, zines, printed ephemera, and artists' multiples. These works are presented by over 100 independent publishers, antiquarian dealers, artists, collectors, and enthusiasts. 📚 📚 For more information, visit the link in bio. Images courtesy @sfartbookfair.

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Previously known more as the short-lived, ill-fated, muse-mistress-photographer of Pablo Picasso during his “Guernica” (1937) period than as an artist in her own right, Dora Maar (née Henriette Théodora Markovitch) is finally receiving her first solo show, which includes more than 400 of her bold works and other items, at the @centrepompidou in Paris. ◾️ ◾️ Click the link in bio to read @josephnechvatal’s review. 🎨 Dora Maar, “Portrait of Ubu” (1936), gelatin-silver print 24 x 18 cm © Adagp, Paris Photo

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The art world’s drug advocacy movement, spearheaded by artist Nan Goldin and the group PAIN Sackler, has just registered a new success. In a surprise move yesterday, the Louvre Museum in Paris has decided to remove the Sackler name from its wing of oriental antiquities and erased all mention of the embattled family, owners of OxyContin producer Purdue Pharma, from its website. Click the link in bio ⬆️ for full story by @hakimbishara. . 〰️ 📸 PAIN Sackler’s protest outside the Louvre Museum in Paris in July (courtesy PAIN Sackler)

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Artist Mari Katayama was born in Saitama, Japan in 1987, with congenital tibial hemimelia, which caused her to have shortened legs, club feet, and a cleft left hand. She chose a double leg amputation at the age of 9, facing the choice of using a wheelchair with the legs she had or walking with prosthetics. Much is made of Katayama’s differently-abled body, and while an understanding of her physical history is necessary to fully appreciate her images, her work expands beyond a mere exploration of disability. 〰️ Visit link in bio for full story on @katayamari’s transcendent self portraiture. 1. Mari Katayama, “shadow puppet #014” (2016); 2. Mari Katayama, “bystander #001” (2016) [© Mari Katayama, courtesy Rin Art association]

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“White male art critics who have gone through the educational pipeline can still achieve success in their field without studying critical race theory. For this reason, they are often unable to read work by artists of color unless this work is loudly didactic,” M. Charlene Stevens writes of critic Kurt McVey’s reactionary response to the recent New York Times Opinion article, “The Dominance of the White Male Critic”. ◻️ ◻️ “I need an ally who can listen to critics of color without feeling threatened, without lashing out at people he claims to support.“ . Visit the link in bio for full article 📸 John Edmonds, “Tête de Femme” (2018) archival pigment photograph; (courtesy the studio of John Edmonds)

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Robert Rauschenberg was one of a number artists invited by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to attend the launch of Apollo 11, the spaceflight that landed two Americans on the moon on July 20, 1969, and he responded with an unparalleled burst of energy. Even now, a half-century after this historic event, his response feels fresh, brimming with brilliant visual and material connections and associations. ◻️ ◻️ An exhibition titled “Robert Rauschenberg: Stoned Moon” (1969-70), @craigfstarrgallery, presents a group of works that were meant for Stoned Moon Book, the artist’s book that, sadly, was never published. 🌗 Click the link in bio for full review. Image: Robert Rauschenberg, “Cover Page, Stoned Moon Book” (1970). © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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One of the latest accusations against #JeffreyEpstein comes from Maria Farmer, who filed an affidavit in April claiming that Epstein leveraged her dreams of becoming an artist against her when she was a 25-year-old student at the New York Academy of Art. The billionaire allegedly assaulted her and her younger sister, who was only 15 years old at the time... ◾️ ◾️ In an interview with Democracy Now, the journalist Vicky Ward said that she first learned of Farmer’s allegations while reporting on Epstein for Vanity Fair in 2003. Unfortunately, the magazine’s editor, Graydon Carter, cut that section from her piece after taking a meeting with the billionaire. . . Click the link in bio for full story ⬆️

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Artists: what’s in your stars this July? Perhaps it’s time to start anew or draw the sun with a coke can in its hand. Check out Jack Sjogren’s summer predictions. And remember, it’s still Cancer season, so lay off those exclamation points (!). . ☪️ . 💫🌒🥀☯️🌞🔮🧿 #astrology #horoscopes

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Ernie Barnes grew up in a segregated district of Durham called “the Bottoms,” near Hayti, a historically African-American community. As a child, art became a spiritual solace from the bullying he experienced in school, while the discipline and rigor from football fortified him physically. For Barnes, the sport eventually became a ticket out of the Jim Crow South.. ◾️ “The Sugar Shack” (1971) depicts a riotous scene from a Durham dance hall the artist snuck into when he was 13 years old. Beyond its pop culture permanence, “The Sugar Shack” establishes Barnes’s North Carolina roots as a key influence in his work. ◾️ “Ernie Barnes: A Retrospective” is on view through September 8 @caaminla. 🎨 Ernie Barnes, “The Sugar Shack” (1976), (Collection of Jeannie and Jim Epstein © Ernie Barnes Family Trust)

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During a visit on Wednesday, July 3 to the Catholic Charities Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas, three drawings were given to Dr. Sara Goza of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) that offer insight into the world that children detained in US government detention centers at the US/Mexico border are forced to endure. ◾️ ◾️ The black line drawings were relayed to Dr. Goza by a mental health clinician/social worker specializing in Latino child trauma, according to AAP. In an email to Hyperallergic, AAP explained that one of the drawings is by a 10-year-old boy from Guatemala, another by an 11-year-old from Guatemala, and the third one was by a different 10-year-old child whose country of origin remains unclear. ▫️ ▫️ Image description: One of the images from a child immigrant at one of the many Catholic Charities Humanitarian Respite Centers at the US/Mexico border. (courtesy @ameracadpeds)

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“We Make America is about diversity; it is about all of America,” Maria de Los Angeles, a graduate of Yale’s MFA program who has been a key organizer of the group told writer Sarah Rose Sharp in 2017. “We are makers, and we can have a voice, and what we do in life can have an impact socially. It’s not just artists. It’s anybody who makes things — which is everybody — and by making things, we can transform reality.” 🔷 ♦️ Signs and props by We Make America (photo by Debra Pearlman) #FourthofJuly #independenceday

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Midsommar is one of the most intentionally funny horror movies in many years. That sense of humor doesn’t erase the growing unease throughout, though. 🌻 A film about a group of American grad students on vacation in rural Sweden, it ties survival directly to being a gracious visitor in another culture. Characters are condemned to horrid fates when they harshly judge a tradition they don’t understand, or when they disrespect a sacred site, or when they break the local rules of conduct. In the end, Midsommar can be seen as a dark parody of stories about Americans “finding themselves” in other countries. Eat (human flesh), Pray (to the harvest god), Love (anyone but that asshole). 🌻 . . Click the link in bio for full review by @danschindel. #midsommar #AriAster #a24

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Last week, Ivanka Trump showed up to the G20 Summit with her dad in a display worthy of an autocratic government. After what appeared to be an awkward moment in Osaka, when the Trump daughter appeared to push herself into a conversation with world leaders, the #UnwantedIvanka hashtag was born. And with its birth, it launched a thousand plus hilarious memes. #UnwantedIvanka #memes

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Happy Pride, NYC! 🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈 . . . Image: Kay Tobin Lahusen, “Men kissing under a tree” (1977) #worldpride #pride #nycpride

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Diego Rivera called retablos the “one true and present pictorial expression of the Mexican people.” He and Frida Kahlo collected them, and she borrowed the votive features and compositions in such works as “Henry Ford Hospital,” an autobiographical painting that shows her giving birth to a stillborn. 🙏 An exhibition @princetonu_artmuseum includes retablos, mostly from the mid-20th century, which tell stories of people crossing the border. “These retablos are the more ethnographic side of our studies,” said University of Guadalajara professor and contributing collector Jorge Durand. “We wanted to tell the story from the migrant’s point of view and this was a good way.” ▫️ ▫️ Image courtesy @princetonu_artmuseum. #retablos #fridakahlo #diegorivera

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Fans hoping to catch a glimpse of Yoko Ono at the June 19 opening of her project “Add Color (Refugee Boat)” at the @lmcc_nyc River to River Festival were bound to be disappointed to find that the artist was not present. 🔮 On the flip side, the work itself evokes precisely the vibes that shot the legendary experimental artist to fame in the 1960s. For better or for worse, Add Color (Refugee Boat) is just the sort of project Ono might have completed during her hippie heyday: a rosy statement about peace and love delivered through digestible symbolism without any real critical spike. ▫️ ▫️ Photos of installation and details by @hakimbishara. Read Bishara’s full article on Ono’s Refugee Boat project at the link in our bio. ☝️#yokoono #nycsummer

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Ever since Nigeria won its struggle for independence from colonial European rule in 1960, demands have been made for the return of the “Benin Bronzes,” a group of more than 1,000 bronze sculptures and plaques of great cultural and artistic value that were produced from the 13th century onwards. ◾️ @lauraraicovich visited the Rhode Island School of Design’s Museum of Art in mid-April and had the opportunity to speak with Chief Curator, Jan Howard, and Curator of Ancient Art, Gina Borromeo, who have been tracing the provenance of the museum’s Benin Bronze Head, and working toward its repatriation. While museums including the British Museum have come to agreements regarding long-term loans of these objects, it seems no cultural institution has yet permanently returned artworks that Nigerians have been demanding for the past five decades. The process by which that happens, however, can be incredibly delicate and complex. ◾️ ◾️ For full conversation, click the link in bio. Image: Unknown artist, Beninese, “Head of a king (Oba)” (probably 1700s) (images courtesy the RISD Museum). #colonialism #decolonization #nigerianart

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"It’s my job to be an emotional barometer," British filmmaker Jeanie Finlay tells @christinanewland_. Known for her intimate and personal storytelling, Finlay's latest venture, "Seahorse," tells the story of video journalist, Freddy McConnell, a pregnant trans man, as he contends with highs and lows—sometimes feeling the support of others, like his mother Esme, and other times feeling alienated and uncomfortable. ◻️ In a world that is often hostile to trans people, "Seahorse" is gently filmed with an eye for the quotidian details of an otherwise unusual situation. The film is both compassionate and bracing in equal turns. . 📸Freddy McConnell and his baby (courtesy Jeanie Finlay's website)

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Since Monday, visitors to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City have been encountering an unusual sight at the museum’s Modern and Contemporary Art galleries, finding Marc Chagall’s “The Lovers” hidden behind a large cloth. The gesture is part of a global campaign organized by the humanitarian aid organization the International Committee (IRC) to highlight the contributions of refugees to their hosting countries... ◾️ ◾️ “The Lovers” depicts Chagall with his wife and muse Bella Rosenberg during their life together in Paris. The Belarus-born couple fled Nazi-occupied France in 1941 and resettled in New York City. Chagall’s granddaughter Bella Meyer, was the Met’s guest of honor at the shrouding ceremony. “I wouldn’t have been here if my grandparents were not accepted into the US,” she told Hyperallergic. “I’m very moved by [the Met’s] gesture towards refugees,” she continued. “Our culture is made out of all these extraordinary creators.” . 📸 courtesy @metmuseum #WorldRefugeeDay ; Read the story by @hakimbishara at link in bio

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Born and raised in Oakland, @sadiebarnette describes the themes and aesthetics of her work as “abstraction in service of everyday magic and survival in America.” Her work, to quote Essence Harden, isn’t just a love letter to her hometown, but “a love letter to black possibility, liberation and restoration,” a motif befitting Bay Area cultural production, as Oakland and San Francisco have steadily been gutted of Black life through violent, displacing processes of gentrification. ◾️◾️◾️◾️◾️◾️◾️◾️◾️◾️ Barnette’s newest project, “The New Eagle Creek Saloon,” is a recreation of the gay bar her father ran in San Francisco from 1990-1993: the first black-owned gay bar in San Francisco. As she told writer @babywasu that the installation was a commemoration of her father’s dedication to the people, musing that his creation of a safe space for Black queers in a racially antagonistic San Francisco scene was an extension of the political labor of his Black Panther community work. 🌈 Photo by Robert Divers Herrick. Click the link in bio for full story #pride #oakland #sadiebarnette

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🚨ATTN Beach-Bound Art-Lovers🚨 Check out our latest in Summer must-have merchandise. From Guerilla Girls tote bags to Judy Chicago beverage coasters to David Shrigley beach towels and inflatable floaties, we’ve got everything you could need for an art-filled day at the beach! To purchase or peruse, visit the link in our bio ⬆️ #summer #wearableart

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Between 1974 and 1983, photographer Hank O’Neal joined the LGBTQ people marching for their rights through Greenwich Village and documented their journey. These photographs, among with handwritten annotations by Allen Ginsberg, are included in Swann Auction Galleries’s “Pride Sale,” a curated auction of material related to the queer community and the gay rights movement on June 20. 🌈 🌈 Amid the backdrop of the sale’s exhibition, Hyperallergic co-founder and editor-in-chief @hragv will moderate a panel with media activist and LGBTQ PR guru, @cathyrenna, and Director of Development for the Leslie-Lohman Museum, @eddieologist. The panel takes place on Monday, June 17 at Swann Auction Galleries from 6-8 pm. More information at link in bio ⬆️ . 📸 1. Hank O’Neal, “The Gay Day Archive (1974-83); 2. Allen Ginsberg, “Harvey Milk died for your sins.” Courtesy @swanngalleries.

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“Her name is Mary Tillman Smith, and she is someone,” the pioneering American researcher and collector William S. Arnett wrote in the early 2000s. Mary T. Smith (1905-1995), a sharecropper’s daughter who began making paintings in the 1970s, was hearing-impaired from an early age and the third of 13 children. She and her siblings helped their sharecropper father grow, pick, and pack vegetables. Given her hearing disability, she had a hard time in school but still managed to reach the fifth grade; as a child, she often spent time alone, drawing. 🎨 🎨 🎨 Smith later worked as a domestic servant for white families and moved to Hazlehurst, Mississippi, where she discovered a sense of personal freedom, creating a home and transforming the yard around it into an open-air space for making and presenting her art. An exhibition of her deeply personal, expressionistic paintings continues @shrine.nyc through July 28. 📸 Mary T. Smith at her home in Hazlehurst, Mississippi, early 1980s (photo by George Snyder, courtesy of Souls Grown Deep Foundation). Full review at link in bio. #marytsmith

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Shaun Leonard confronts uncomfortable and divisive subjects, including race, incarceration, and gun control through dialogue and public performance. This Monday, the New York Peace Institute will leads participants in a community-building circle practice @veralistcenter. Each circle of participants will examine a facet of freedom of speech. Following the circle practice, Leonard along with the Circle Keepers, will facilitate discussion rooted in mutual respect, problem-solving, awareness and shared leadership.. ◻️ ◻️ The seminar series “Freedom of Speech: A Curriculum for Studies into Darkness” is directed by @carinkuoni along with Hyperallergic curator-in-residence @lauraraicovich. Admission is free but registration is required. To register, visit link in bio. 📸 “I Can’t Breathe - workshop and performance, courtesy David Willems Photography

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Marcus Linden’s new documentary “The Raft” slowly unspools the strange tale of a voyage ventured into the psychological unknown. Unfolding the insane seafaring journey of ten subjects led by Mexican anthropologist Santiago Genovés, the film transforms the myth of the “sex raft” into a tale of self-made demagoguery. In the end, Genovés’ plan to synthesize a sociological cure for human violence became a trap in which participants endured indentured servitude and recreational abuse at the hands of a man with a god complex.. 🚣‍♀️ 🚣‍♀️ “The Raft” is now playing @metrographnyc and other select theaters. Read @cbramesco’s review at the link in bio. #documentary #film

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Researchers at Williams College surveyed the collections of 18 major US museums to quantify the gender, ethnic, and racial composition of the artists represented in their collections. The study found that 85.4% of the works in the collections of all major US museums belong to white artists, and 87.4% are by men.◻️ 🔹 🔹 @monachalabi, a New York-based artist and data journalist, took notice of the study and offered her own interpretation of its results. Chalabi translates complex academic spreadsheets into written pieces, illustrations, audio, and film, often highlighting social issues through eye-catching and often humorous illustrations based on statistical data. 📸 @monachalabi ◻️ 🔹 Click the link in bio for full story ☝🏻☝🏼☝🏽☝🏾☝🏿

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From 1958 to 2009, Estudio Luisita, the photographic studio run by sisters Graciela (“Chela”) and Luisa (“Luisita”) Escarria, produced iconic image of the stars of Buenos Aires show business. The Argentina exhibition “Luz de noche,” which translates to “Night light” in English, highlights Luisita and Chela’s efforts to create a perfect spectacle, locating this perfection not in the artifice of a performance but in its painstaking construction. ◻️ ◻️ ◻️ Foto Estudio Luisita, “Nélida Lobato” (1971) // Click the link in bio to read more ⬆️ #photography

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Tomorrow – the US Postal Service will release a new collection of boldly colored, geometric stamps honoring the late painter and sculptor, Ellsworth Kelly. One of America’s great 20th-century abstractionists, Kelly died in 2015 at age 92. The stamps feature tiny reproductions if Kelly’s rainbow-hues paintings. 🧩🔶🔴 #EllsworthKellyStamps

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Wall color. It’s a curatorial decision that dictates the sensibility and perspective of an exhibition. Whether they go for rainbow spectrums or shades of white, curators usually know what they like on a gallery wall. ◻️ 🎨 🎨 🎨 For instance, at last year’s Mel Chin exhibition at The Queens Museum (pictured), the architectural design studio @lot_ek chose a bright, hi-vis yellow. “Choosing such a bright yellow was a major commitment,” writes curator @lauraraicovich, “but sometimes a more intense color is used to accentuate or signal a category of objects as archival or as ephemera.” (📸 by Hai Zhang). Click the link to read nine curators on their favorite wall colors. ◻️ #paintcolor #artcurator

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Happy Summer! Time to grab your best late 19th century boating attire and celebrate the long weekend in style. 🌞 🌞 🌞 Pierre-Auguste Renoir, "Luncheon of the Boating Party," (1881) #MDW

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Ai Weiwei recently filed a lawsuit against Volkswagen and its Danish counterpart Skandinavisk for copyright infringement. Ai alleges that the automaker used an installation of his work at the Kunsthal Charlottenborg in Copenhagen as a backdrop for one of its car advertisements without his or the museum's permission. ◻️ ◻️ The artwork in question was created for World Refugee Day in 2017. It consists of 3,500 discarded, bright orange life jackets used by migrants who fled persecution and landed in Lesvos, Greece. "The infringing material was circulated to over 200,000 people, giving the false impression that I had authorized Volkswagen to use my artwork," @aiww wrote on Instagram in March. In a series of courtroom photos, Italian artist Gianluca Constantini captured a particularly poignant moment in which Ai spoke out about the vests being symbols of human hope and suffering: "I think it is my responsibility to publicize the problems I encounter...these vests are the most important evidence of how human beings try to survive." ◼️ ◼️ Click the link in bio to read the full report by @zacharyhsmall; image courtesy the artist @channeldraw

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In 2016, an Obama administration initiative announced a historical and symbolic makeover of the $20 bill in which the face of slaveholder Andrew Jackson would be replaced with that of former enslaved woman and abolitionist Harriet Tubman. Just yesterday, May 22, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin announced that the Harriet Tubman $20 bill would be postponed until after Donald Trump leaves office—to the year 2026 at the earliest. 💵 💵 When questioned about the matter by Rep. Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Mnuchin replied that the decision will likely come from “another secretary down the road.” Click the link in our bio to find out how one artist ( @danowall ) is taking matters into his own hands with an innovative 3D-printed stamp. @tubmanstamp #harriettubman

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At this year’s Venice Biennale, Frida Orupabo, a Nigerian-Norwegian collage artist, presents a series of digital and physical collages assembled with paper pins, exposing different layers as if to almost implore the viewer to reflect on what they themselves are made of... ◻️ 🔹 ◻️ Paper isn’t Orupabo’s only material. Her Instagram ( @nemiepeba) manifests itself as a personal college, combining stills, text, sound and video loops. More than 2000 posts vary among fragments from her private life in Norway, the cultural and political history of Nigeria, and images of book covers or cartoons. ◻️ ◻️ Image: “Untitled” (2018), collage with paper pins mounted on aluminum (📸 by Carl Henrik Tillberg, courtesy the artist & Galerie Nordenhake) #collage #venicebiennale #fridaorupabo

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A longtime YouTube phenomena, urban exploration videos indulge viewers’ morbid curiosity, while offering a vision of American life that’s rarely seen. The practice, which predates the internet, has always been associated with video art and photography, with the community of explorers themselves taunting the mantra: “Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints.” 🔹 🔹 While many popular videos tend to delve into surreal locations of dreams and nightmares, like abandoned asylums and amusement parks, there’s a growing trend in America toward revealing the mundanity of abandoned suburban homes. In “Abandoned All Belongings and i Don’t Know Why” (2017), an urbexer probes a former home teeming with furniture, paperwork, and plastic. The lives of the one time residents are soon revealed as the camera pans over stacks of canned food, a copy of Stuart Little, and posters of Gwen Stefani, Kanye West, and Barack Obama. 🔹 🔹 Click the link in bio to read @redroomrantings’s full essay on the internet break-in sensations #YouTube #urbexer