Jasper Doest - instagram lists #feedolist

jasperdoest

Back to school. Today all schools have started again in Curaçao. Soon my cousin Odette @vetdoest and flamingo Bob will be out on their mission, educating local kids about wildlife and conservation for Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben @fdoccuracao. The kids are interested and excited to know about the natural world and what happens in it. Using their natural curiosity and love of animals is a great way to teach kids about conservation and an important pillar of @fdoccuracao. It doesn’t take much to teach children about the environment or to get kids excited about nature. Taking your kids around your neighborhood and talking about the trees and animals you see could be enough to show them how important the natural world is to our survival. With your help, they’ll become educated stewards of planet Earth.

jasperdoest

Bob and his two flamingo friends (both with an amputated wing, which makes it impossible for them to return to the wild) hanging out around Odette’s salt water pool in her backyard. While Bob joins Odette on her educational visits @fdoccuracao as he’s really accustomed to people, the other two don’t like people that much and rather hang out around Odette her house and keep Bob company when he’s not on duty. Bob is a Caribbean flamingo, from the island of Curaçao. His life took a dramatic turn when he flew into a hotel window, leaving him severely concussed. He was cared for by my cousin, Odette Doest @vetdoest , a local vet who also runs a wildlife rehabilitation centre and conservation charity – the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben (FDOC). Existing disabilities meant Bob couldn’t be released, but instead he became ambassador for FDOC, which educates locals about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

This is Dora as she recovers after surgery. She was rescued by my cousin Odette @vetdoest and her neighbor Dorien (hence the name Dora) in March this year. She had a very complicated fracture on her right wing and metal pins were needed to keep the bones in place. After a slow recovery Dora had surgery last week and had her pins removed. Her wounds will need some time to heal and hopefully she’ll be able to use her wing again after which she would be able to be released.

jasperdoest

Flamingo Bob, #prettyinpink @fdoccuracao

jasperdoest

Caribbean nights @fdoccuracao part II

jasperdoest

Enjoying the land of the lizards... 🦎

jasperdoest

We have been getting a lot of questions regarding Bob’s ‘bumblefoot’. Bumblefoot is a bacterial infection and inflammatory reaction on the feet of birds and some small mammals. If left untreated, the infection could eventually be lethal. When flamingo Bob flew against the Hilton hotel on Curaçao, my cousin Odette , who is a veterinarian specialized in birds @vetdoest, noticed Bob was suffering from bumblefoot caused by living in captivity for some time. While she treated him, the infections had already progressed to a chronic arthritic condition. She realized Bob would never survive in the wild. X-rays showed her diagnosis was right and she decided to take Bob in and give him all the medical care he would need to minimize his discomfort. Flamingo Bob is now the ambassador for @fdoccuracao , Odette’s charity through which she educates the people in Curaçao about the importance of the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

Lazy Sunday in Bonaire, no Bob, he stayed in Curaçao. No camera: #iphoneonly These donkeys started flooding the island after being released from their former farming duties. After being released they multiplied like rabbits, causing problems for both local ecosystems and themselves (getting injured in traffic). Now 700+ donkeys spend their lives at @donkey_sanctuary_bonaire where they are looked after. Although I do appreciate their efforts, it raised a lot of questions especially at a government level. Perhaps I will look into it one day, but for now it’s Sunday :-) Enjoy your weekend!

jasperdoest

Flamingo Bob pool interpretation after either Blue Curacao or looking at Picasso and Dali for a while.

jasperdoest

On a Monday morning Flamingo Bob walks down the empty playground of the Marnixschool after finishing the summer education session for @fdoccuracao. I love working here in #curaçao. Not only is it great to contribute to a conservation initiative, and spend time with my cousin and nephew but visually it is also great fun!

jasperdoest

This is Dora. She was rescued by my cousin Odette @vetdoest and her neighbor Dorien (hence the name Dora) in March this year. She had a very complicated fracture on her right wing and metal pins were needed to keep the bones in place. After a slow recovery Dora had surgery today and had her pins removed. Her wounds will need some time to heal and hopefully she’ll be able to use her wing again after which she would be able to be released. Fingers crossed!

jasperdoest

Sometimes things come together in the craziest ways. Over the past 12 years I’ve traveled to Japan many times and I really got to love the country. I can’t wait to continue my work there but in the meantime I’m enjoying other parts of the world, like here with Flamingo Bob on the island of Curaçao. I couldn’t have guessed I would ever get to photograph my pink muse in front of a giant Japanese koi carp painting. That happened while visiting friends of my cousin Odette @vetdoest this weekend. In Japanese culture, the koi carp is a highly respected and very symbolic fish that is closely tied to the country's national identity. The koi carp is thought to be a symbol of luck, prosperity, and good fortune within Japan. Good luck to you Bob 🍀

jasperdoest

Children are born curious. Look at these faces while checking out Flamingo Bob’s “teeth” as we visited the Marnixschool this morning. The kids are interested and excited to know about the natural world and what happens in it. Using their natural curiosity and love of animals is a great way to teach kids about conservation and an important pillar of @fdoccuracao. It doesn’t take much to teach children about the environment or to get kids excited about nature. Taking your kids around your neighborhood and talking about the trees and animals you see could be enough to show them how important the natural world is to our survival. With your help, they’ll become educated stewards of planet Earth.

jasperdoest

Enjoying a lazy Sunday... Besides being the face of @fdoccuracao, Bob also plays an important role in the rehabilitation process of other injured flamingoes. This is Dora, she was brought in some months ago and Bob has kept her company throughout her recovery process. Because of the stress and her injury, Odette @vetdoest decided Dora shouldn’t stay at the veterinary practice. So...Bob and Dora now hang out in Odette’s bedroom. Meanwhile Bob has taught her how to eat from a bowl and his presence calms her down. Hopefully Dora’s wing will fully recover and she can get back to the wild soon.

jasperdoest

Any plans for the weekend? Flamingo Bob is going for a swim in the ocean and maybe in the pool. Sounds like a great plan to me. Enjoy the weekend! Bob is a Caribbean flamingo, from the island of Curaçao. His life took a dramatic turn when he flew into a hotel window, leaving him severely concussed. He was cared for by my cousin, Odette Doest, a local vet who also runs a wildlife rehabilitation centre and conservation charity – the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben ( @fdoccuracao). Existing disabilities meant Bob couldn’t be released, but instead he became ambassador for FDOC, which educates locals about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

A beautiful day for a swim. Flamingo Bob enjoys a swim in the Caribbean Sea. Arthritis in his feet is causing him difficulties to walk but he feels very comfortable in the water, which is why @vetdoest takes him out for a swim on a regular basis. Bob is a Caribbean flamingo, from the island of Curaçao. His life took a dramatic turn when he flew into a hotel window, leaving him severely concussed. He was cared for by my cousin, Odette Doest, a local vet who also runs a wildlife rehabilitation centre and conservation charity – the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben ( @fdoccuracao). Existing disabilities meant Bob couldn’t be released, but instead he became ambassador for FDOC, which educates locals about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

Curaçao was colonized by the Dutch around 1634. During those times the Dutch West India Company (WIC) were in the business of slave trade and Curaçao was an important part of their logistics. Slaves were inspected on the island to be sold to other countries, but several were left behind for different reasons and sold to the owners of the plantations. There used to be around 100 plantation houses around Curaçao. After the abolition of slavery, slaves stayed and still worked at the plantations, for lack of better options. With the arrival of the Shell Refinery, they traded their plantation days for industrial work. Many of the houses eventually went into ruins, but some still do exist. We were privileged to visit two privately owned plantation houses with @vetdoest and while we learned about the history of Curaçao and my family’s roots, Flamingo Bob enjoyed on of the beautiful private beaches. Thanks to @landhuissannicolas and @hofimango for the warm welcome.

jasperdoest

I hope you enjoyed the weekend. When Flamingo Bob is not working with DVM Odette Doest on a wildlife education program for @fdoccuracao, he really enjoys his time around the house where Odette has built a salt water pool for the birds. Bob is a Caribbean flamingo, from the island of Curaçao. His life took a dramatic turn when he flew into a hotel window, leaving him severely concussed. He was cared for by my cousin, Odette Doest @vetdoest , a local vet who also runs a wildlife rehabilitation centre and conservation charity – the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben (FDOC). Existing disabilities meant Bob couldn’t be released, but instead he became ambassador for FDOC, which educates locals about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

Flamingo Bob enjoys a lovely summer evening at a private beach in Curaçao. Now that all schools are closed for the summer, his educational duty is reduced to a minimum and he spends most of his time hanging out with his flamingo friends @fdoccuracao. As Odette still feels he belongs out in the open, she regularly takes him to the beach for a swim, which also serves as aqua therapy for his arthritic feet. Bob is a Caribbean flamingo, from the island of Curaçao. His life took a dramatic turn when he flew into a hotel window, leaving him severely concussed. He was cared for by my cousin, Odette Doest @vetdoest , a local vet who also runs a wildlife rehabilitation centre and conservation charity – the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben (FDOC) @fdoccuracao. Existing disabilities meant Bob couldn’t be released, but instead he became ambassador for FDOC, which educates locals about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

Caribbean nights @fdoccuracao

jasperdoest

I can’t believe this was already 10 years ago. Remember this morning @pancrasdijk & @madruud? Dreaming of wild encounters again...have a nice weekend! Photo @jasperdoest #onassignment @natgeo NL in @nationaalparkzuidkennemerland in 2009

jasperdoest

Odette Doest, doctor in veterinary medicine, catches a green turtle from the saltwater pool in her backyard, on the island of Curaçao, to prepare for the animal's release. Odette runs a wildlife rehabilitation center ( @fdoccuracao), and this particular animal had been brought to rehab three times by @seaturtleconservationcuracao, after swallowing fishhooks that needed to be removed from its mouth. Green turtles are endangered and are an essential link in the marine ecosystem. We must work together to protect endangered and threatened species, right here and right now. In order to protect animals like these , we need to conserve 30% of the planet by 2030. #CampaignforNature

jasperdoest

The story of flamingo Bob wouldn’t be there without these wonderful pink colored birds. However, to me the story emphasizes empathy as the starting point for initiating positive change. This is why I’m really happy that the story is shortlisted for the @alfredfriedaward. Congratulations to all other shortlisted photographers including Dutchies @ilvynjio and @carlakogelman 👏👍 The Alfred Fried Photography Award recognizes and promotes photographers from all over the world whose pictures capture human efforts towards a peaceful world and the quest for beauty and goodness in our lives. Thanks to the judges for recognizing the work of @vetdoest and @fdoccuracao. Bob is a Caribbean flamingo, from the island of Curaçao. His life took a dramatic turn when he flew into a hotel window, leaving him severely concussed. He was cared for by Odette Doest @vetdoest , a local vet who also runs a wildlife rehabilitation centre and conservation charity – the Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben (FDOC). Existing disabilities meant Bob couldn’t be released, but instead he became ambassador @fdoccuracao, which educates locals about the importance of protecting the island’s wildlife.

jasperdoest

While visiting Flamingo Bob last time when I was in Curaçao, @vetdoest and I had x-rays taken of Bob to check out his arthritis. For educational purposes we also took one extra of its neck. Although their neck is really long, with 19 vertebrae flamingos actually have fewer neck vertebrae than many other long-necked birds. But having fewer vertebrae doesn’t necessarily mean that the neck is shorter; the bones themselves are longer. This shows as a series of angles (like a dot-to-dot puzzle) when the bird bends its neck, rather than as a continuous smooth curve. This allows flamingos to bend their neck backwards or downwards to allow them to clean their feathers and search for food. Its neck is vital to the process of filtering food from water; a flamingo often needs to turn their head upside down in the process.

jasperdoest

I was in Germany earlier this week to speak at the World Press Photo exhibition in Balingen and I noticed that many people think it is Flamingo Bob in this photograph. This is not Bob! This Caribbean Flamingo was transported from @bonairewildbirdrehab in Bonaire to my cousin’s veterinary practice in Curaçao as it needed immediate medical care for its severe foot lesions. @vetdoest treated the bird and made special socks to fit the birds feet to avoid too much stress on the healing wounds. After the recovery at @fdoccuracao, the bird was transported back to Bonaire where it occasionally visits the rehabilitation center there. And guess what, he’s pink now! The image that was awarded in World Press is part of the print collection we’re currently selling to raise funds for flamingo conservation and wildlife education in the Caribbean. In case you’d like to order a print and support this cause, please follow the link in bio. Video: @studioschrikdraad

jasperdoest

Over the past months I have received an incredible amount of people contacting me about ‘Meet Bob’ and I received many questions about where to acquire prints and how to help the great work that @fdoccuracao is doing in the Caribbean. I am excited to announce that from today we will be selling a selection of photograph that will support this cause. So if you’re interested in ordering one of these images, please visit the temporary website (link in Bio) or send an email to prints@jasperdoest.com so that we can help animals in need and education future generations about the natural world. On behalf of Flamingo Bob and his friends, many thanks ahead!

jasperdoest

*PRINTS AVAILABLE SOON* I’m very happy to announce that soon I will start selling fine-art prints of my series ‘Meet Bob’, through which you’re able to support the school education program of Fundashon Dier & Onderwijs Cariben. Stay tuned! Enjoy your weekend :-)

jasperdoest

I can’t believe as of today, 5 years have past since I wandered on these wastelands to document these white storks -often regarded as symbol of new life and fertility- foraging on the excretions of our human society. They survived near-extinction only decades ago and here they are now. It was sobering to think of the symbol of new life carving a home in human waste. It is clear that the European stork population has thrived as a result of this continuous food source. These birds have become largely depended on food leftovers in our municipal waste, even changing their migratory paths. With the new European Union legislations on waste management, a lot of these open landfills would disappear. A great development. But on its own only a short-term solution. We need to start making efforts on a different level within the chain. Recycling at the end of the chain is not solving the problem as long as we're still overproducing. And what about the storks? They became addicted to junkfood. Where will they go? What will happen is still unclear. We've created a mess...it's time to start thing about long-term solutions and clean up while we still can. Five years have passed now, it’s time for some serious changes people! #planetorplastic #bethechange #beonewithnature

jasperdoest

Gannet pairs are monogamous and may remain together over several seasons, if not for all of their lives and knowing this makes it easy to anthropomorphize this situation. However, I love doing these intimate portraiture where I try to capture what I feel, rather than what I know or see. John Meyeriwitz once said; “You fill up the frame with feelings, energy, discovery and risk, and leave room enough for someone else to get in there.”

jasperdoest

Gannets conduct a distinctive courtship display. The two birds bow, point their heads skywards and preen each other to strengthen their bond. They usually form lifelong pairs and begin breeding at four or five years of age.

jasperdoest

I often receive questions about the time I spend in the field, sweating on the arrival of the right moment. Most people assume that I must have an incredible amount of patience, but I don’t think patience is the right word. Time spent in anticipation is often productive...and has nothing to do with killing time as it is part of learning to understand the appreciation of what is in front of you. That can be a time consuming process, which takes more than just taking my camera and shoot the scenes as they come. That approach would often results in pictures are messy, with too many distracting details, too many elements. It was with these gannets that I realized that the colony itself and the chaotic atmosphere were not hurdles to overcome, but were instead the key elements of the life within the colony that I wanted to capture. I introduced an artificial light source to highlight the dynamics of one part of the colony, and my images came alive. I had my recipe; I only needed time for its flavors to permeate and evolve.

jasperdoest

I reached a turning point some years ago, when a friend of mine, the photographer Bart Breet, asked if I would like to join him to take pictures of gannets, the large sea-birds that inhabit massive colonies along the Atlantic coast. An amazing experience! But when I came home, I discovered that my photographs showed none of that atmosphere. They were technically well-executed, but looked to me like meaningless, two-dimensional portraits. In my pursuit of the perfect image, I had failed to think about the idea I wanted to communicate as distinct from the moment I was capturing. So I had to return to try and capture what it is like to be surrounded by these magificent birds, nesting side by side on these rocky cliffs. Once again, I submerged myself amidst the nesting gannets. At first they seemed surprised by their intruder and acted a little wary. But, as I avoided eye contact, moved with caution, and spoke softly to them, they came to accept me. The intruder became a guest. Soon they didn’t pay attention to me at all, too busy arguing with their neighbors.

jasperdoest

Have you ever looked a Northern Gannet straight in the eyes, looked at a macaque’s fingerprints, or the tail of an arctic tern? As a photographer, I have come to see my job as reclaiming these kinds of unusual perspectives on nature, to provide viewers with a moment of aesthetic surprise. Although readers are inundated with images of the natural world in newspapers, magazines, ad campaigns, and social media, I have the impression that many of us have lost touch with the environment. I’d like to encourage people to pay closer attention as unexpected beauty can be found just around the corner. Earlier this month @nautilusmag republished ‘The Decisive Moment’ a short essay I wrote back in 2013 about my quest for the unexpected while visiting a Gannet colony in the South of Ireland.

jasperdoest

Alongside the coast of Isla Santa Cruz in Galápagos, the five year old Leandro and his twin brother Emilo play in the surf while their father David keeps a watchful eye. David lives in Quito, on the mainland of Ecuador, together with his wife Mariel and their two sons and remembers he visited this place with his parents when he was nine years old. David and Mariel came to Galápagos to teach their children about the natural beauty of this archipelago, the importance of plastic free oceans and to pass on their respect for the natural world to the next generation. Photo by @jasperdoest while #onassignment in #galapagos for #wwf @wnfnederland

jasperdoest

A beaver approaches my boat as I silently wait near its lodge at the end of a sunny day in National Park #Biesbosch. The beaver population reached extinction in the Netherlands in 1826, but due to a very successful reintroduction program there is now a growing population of 300-400 animals within the national park. @nldeltabiesboschharingvliet is a unique freshwater tidal region that arose from the eternal struggle between man and water. Over the years it developed itself to one of the richest new wildernesses in Western Europe, where one can find great numbers of beavers, kingfishers and even top predators like osprey and white-tailed eagle. It was great to return to this beautiful area with the family this weekend and it brought back great memories from my assignment for Dutch @natgeo in this National Park a few years back.

JasperDoest

Things that happen when listening to ‘Liquid Spirit’ by @gregoryportermusic on a sunny evening... Photo by @jasperdoest #onassingment for Dutch @natgeo in 2015 in National Park De Biesbosch.

JasperDoest

Moon sets the waters near Wada fishing camp in the Barotse flood plain,one of Africa’s great wetlands, on the Zambezi River in the Western Province of Zambia. The Zambezi River delivers a wide range of fresh water fish for those living in the Barotse flood plain. Fish, which provides an important source of both income and protein, are therefore an essential part of the household diets. Shortages in fish occur during the period of flooding and during the annual fish ban that lasts from December to March. During the annual flooding most people living in the area move to higher altitudes but because of the drought this year people have stayed in the area all year round, turning temporary small fish camps into permanent homes. Photo @jasperdoest #onassignment with @studioschrikdraad for @wwf, working with @africanparksnetwork, Zambian Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE) on a story about the relationship between waterflows and the lives that depend on it in Western province of Zambia.

jasperdoest

The African lion has lost more than 75% of its historic range and numbers of wild lions continue to decline. Kafue National Park is the largest protected area in Zambia and the second largest national park in Africa which lies at the heart of a massive 25,600 square mile wilderness and is a key stronghold for the species. Although Kafue also holds a significant population of lions, the population could be much larger if the principal threats were controlled. In fact, Kafue represents one of the sites with the greatest potential for recovery in lion numbers in Africa. Lions are greatly limited in Kafue by poaching of their prey for meat. Additionally, lions are sometimes caught as by-catch in the wire snares used by poachers to catch antelopes and buffaloes. Through a combination of conservation science, conservation actions, and a comprehensive education and capacity-building effort, the Zambian Carnivore Programme (ZCP) @zcp_org is dedicated to conserving large carnivores and the ecosystems they reside in. In collaboration with the Zambia Department of National Parks and Wildlife and an array of partners (including @wnfnederland), ZCP now works across Zambia in most of the country’s key ecosystems for large carnivores and their prey.

jasperdoest

A selection of images from the past 6 months...and then people ask me what I want to have for my birthday 🙄 How could I ever wish for more?! Thank you all for the birthday wishes and sharing and caring along the way. I hope you’ll live your life like every day is your birthday. And please take care of each other and the wonderful planet that we share together; today and for many days to come!

jasperdoest

Just finished selecting images from my recent assignment for @wwf in Zambia where we looked at the importance of free flowing rivers and the lives depending on them. The Nyambwezu waterfalls contribute to the Kabompo river, which feeds into the Zambezi river, Southern Africa’s “River of Life”. The fourth largest river system in Africa, it drains seven countries and supports millions of people, who make use of its rich fisheries, forests, water, and rich floodplain soils. These vast wetlands hold huge amounts of water for months or even years, meaning flood peaks are delayed by nearly two months which makes it possible for people and the economy to survive dry spells. Large-scale developments are emerging which could have negative impacts on ecosystem integrity and wildlife, and above all the livelihoods of millions of people who rely heavily on the ecosystem goods and services provided by the river and its wetlands. Photo by @jasperdoest #onassignment @wnfnederland in #Zambia

jasperdoest

A vast seasonally flooded ecosystem in the Western Province, Liuwa Plain’s stunning wildlife was nearly decimated following years of heavy poaching and civil war in neighbouring Angola. Today, under the management of @africanparksnetwork, this area has undergone and is still undergoing rapid recovery. Liuwa is dominated by spotted hyena. The lion population was reduced to a single lioness in the early 2000s, but even with recently reintroduced lions, hyenas remain the top predator. The resulting unusual carnivore dynamic has provided a special opportunity to gain insight into the relative impacts of lion and hyena on cheetah and wild dog respectively. While the full complement of wildlife species is being restored, a research and monitoring program bu @zcp_org , in concert with restoration efforts, allows for research-based conservation of this unique ecosystem. Photo by @jasperdoest #onassignment for @wwf, working with @africanparksnetwork, Zambian Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) and the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE).

jasperdoest

Free flowing water is at the center of the livelihoods in the Barotseland, where the annual flooding of the upper Zambezi provides opportunities for local wildlife as well as fishing and agriculture for local communities. In the event of poor flooding, local communities rely on the harvesting and selling of the reeds (makata) for sustenance, which is then used for making fences, doors for huts, mats and baskets. The region is currently facing the worst drought in 30 years. The poor rain results in too much of the reeds currently being harvested, making the riverbanks more vulnerable to soil erosion and river sedimentation. In addition, the reeds are a critical habitat for the bird species on the floodplains. The increased harvesting of the reeds results in the degradation of this habitat. Photo @jasperdoest #onassignment with @studioschrikdraad for @wwf, working with @africanparksnetwork, Zambian Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE) on a story about the relationship between waterflows and the lives that depend on it in Western province of Zambia.

jasperdoest

Liuwa Plain National Park in Zambia has one of the oldest conservation histories in Africa, dating back to the 19th century where the King of Barotseland, Lubosi Lewanika, appointed his people to be the custodians of the park and its wildlife, where they maintain that sentiment today. With over 10,000 people living within the park, Liuwa is a living example of how people and wildlife can co-exist and benefit in a shared landscape. Water is at the center of the livelihoods in the Barotseland, where the annual flooding of the upper Zambezi provides opportunities for local wildlife as well as fishing and agriculture for local communities. However, the region is currently facing the worst drought in 30 years, which could possibly lead to increased pressure on wildlife as local communities search for alternative food sources because of reduced food availability. I’m currently #onassignment with @studioschrikdraad for @wwf, working with @africanparksnetwork, Zambian Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), the Barotse Royal Establishment (BRE) on a story about the relationship between waterflows and the lives that depend on it in Western province of Zambia.

JasperDoest

A huge wilderness area like the Kafue is often perceived as ‘untouched’ by man, the reality is very different. Anthropogenic fires (i.e. started by man) have been shaping the landscape here for a couple of thousand years since the iron age. And this is a difficult concept to grasp at first. When you come around a bend in the road and are confronted by a fire the natural human first reaction is not to think “ah, fire – that has been part of the shaping of the Kafue landscape for a couple of thousand years!”. The first natural reaction is that it is out of place, dangerous and destructive. If it is in October then it possibly is. If it is May then the general reality is quite different. So why did man burn the African savanna and why still? There are many reasons, some ancient and some new. The main reasons being hunting, creating fresh growth for grazers (domestic and wild) and to clear areas around habitation to reduce wildlife threats and allow cropping. These reasons still exist of course but can be added to by factors such as protective burns around habitations, to increase visibility (tourism) and the prevent late season fires to be destructive. People deliberately burn parts of the savanna and woodland so that if late fires come through they do not cause havoc – an early burned area will stop a late season fire due to the absence of fuel load. These early fires burn relatively quickly and cool in contrast to fires later in the season when vegetation is at it’s driest. text by Gilmour Dickson @kaingulodge

JasperDoest

I am currently in Zambia working #onassignment for WWF and during our first days we had the privilege of working in Kafue National Park with the Zambian Carnivore Programme (@zcp_org) which is supported by @wnfnederland. ZCP is a Zambian-registered non-profit organization dedicated to conserving large carnivores and the ecosystems they reside in through a combination of conservation science, conservation actions, and a comprehensive education and capacity-building effort. In the past 50 years, we’ve lost more than 60% of wildlife populations and at nearly 17 million acres, the greater Kafue Park, is one of the largest protected areas in Africa. It is also one of 66 critical ecosystems across the continent identified by the IUCN as being essential to the future viability of the African lion. In order to protect places like this, we need to conserve 30% of the planet by 2030. #CampaignforNature

jasperdoest

On Sunday afternoon eleven year old Isabella arrives with a malnourished juvenile flamingo at @bonairewildbirdrehab, while helping her father who drives the ambulance donated by @stichtingdierenlot to @fkkanimalrescue. Since March this year, juvenile flamingos on the island of Bonaire have been brought to the rehab in large numbers, mostly underweight and dehydrated. The reason for this apparent sudden increase in malnourished juveniles is currently being investigated and in the meantime Elly Albers and a group of volunteers, including Isabella, try to do whatever they can to rescue these birds. I was impressed by the dedication of the team of volunteers but especially by this eleven year old #conservationhero.

jasperdoest

Six out of the twelve flamingos that were released back to the wild this morning are wrapped up and ready to be transported back to the flamingo sanctuary on the island of Bonaire. @bonairewildbirdrehab has been receiving increasing numbers of juvenile birds over the past weeks and they currently have around 140 of them in rehab. The population on the island is estimated around 5000 birds and having so many juveniles in rehab could be worrying sign. There has been a lot of speculation about the reason for this sudden increase of these underfed juveniles ending up in rehab. As a result an investigation process is currently being initiated. Last week I traveled to Bonaire together with @vetdoest and the amazing @consune to visit Elly who manages the Bonaire Wild Bird Rehab and I will be sharing some of the work in the near future. But first I need to get home and prepare for an upcoming assignment for WWF in Zambia.

jasperdoest

Throughout the breeding season, and particularly at the beginning, when Storks arrive to their nesting sites and occupy the nests, it often results in fights between the already established birds and the newcomers. These interactions can occur with a variable intensity and aggression level, ranging from only gestures and ritual poses to violent, bloody, even day-long and deadly combats. During sharp fights over the nest, Storks can even direct their aggression towards their own mate, perhaps not recognizing it. The fights with intruders are one of the main causes of brood loss, either during incubating or chick raising and increase when the density of storks increases in an area.

JasperDoest

White storks nesting on the roof of the San Miguel church in Alfaro, Spain. After the industrial revolution, white storks were on the brink of extinction throughout the European continent. However, due to many small conservation efforts all over Europe , banning the use of pesticides, changing the ecosystem and offering new nesting locations the storks were able to recover. These large white birds are now present in large numbers throughout their migration route.

jasperdoest

During first 2–3 weeks of their lives, white stork chicks need to be warmed and guarded by parents. During first 3–4weeks after hatching, at least one parent almost always is present in the nest. Later, chicks are left unattended for a longer period, and when they are ready to fledge, it may last for few hours. Time designated for incubating or guarding young strongly depends on many factors, e.g. weather conditions, food availability or density of breeding population. During hot and sunny days, or when it’s raining, Stork parents stand on the nest above the chicks in this Wing-Drooping Posture – with the wings slightly opened and primaries fanned downward, as “an umbrella” to shade the brood and protect their offspring.