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LATimes

Their new homes had hot water, bathrooms and kitchens full of appliances. But moving into the apartments didn’t come without issues. New residents still had to fight addictions, heal illnesses, overcome trauma and look for jobs. To make it easier, there was on-site counseling and other services. To ease loneliness, some residents invited friends over who were still homeless. A visit could turn into a few days, then a few weeks, and weeks could lead to eviction. At one building meeting, residents aired grievances about others’ behaviors and guests. “It’s no better here,” said one resident, “than it was out there.” Watch our Instagram story for more. 📸: @francineorr

LATimes

When you see #okra in the markets this time of year, buy them to make this relish — double or triple the recipe if you need to — because it keeps a long time in the fridge and you’ll be looking for excuses to eat it on anything. It might not win any beauty contests but it will elicit bursts of pleasure from those you serve it to, or at least those with good taste to embrace the goo, @latimesfood cooking columnist @benbmims writes. Visit the link in our profile for the recipe. 📸: @mariahtauger

LATimes

Big Mama and her neighbors were supposed to be in apartments by June. But by mid-July, the mood on the L.A. street soured even more. Outreach workers said nothing had changed, that the delay was normal, but Big Mama wasn’t so sure. By September, her frustration had turned to anger. “I’m just out here every day and every night. It’s a feeling I can’t explain. I feel like I’m forgotten,” she said. 📸: @francineorr took this photo of Big Mama, left, and Top Shelf trying to keep Old Man Mike cool by placing a towel on his head and pouring water over him as they sit in the shade at Broadway Place and 39th Street. Watch our Instagram story for more.

LATimes

Students and teachers returned to Paradise’s public schools, a significant infusion of life for a town that all but disappeared nine months ago. Reconstruction still lags and debris-removal trucks fill the roads, but the return of students and teachers marked the beginning of what many here hope will be a rebirth. “I believe that the schools are the cornerstone. You are not going to have a town if you don’t have families. And you are not going to have families if you don’t have good schools,” said Michelle John, superintendent of the Paradise Unified School District. “If you asked me, I think it’s everything.” 📸: @genaro4707

LATimes

The market for raw, uncensored images of childbirth has surged in recent years, spilling from niche to mainstream thanks to platforms like Instagram. Now, more and more millennial parents are paying professionals to capture them. In L.A. alone, dozens of professional photographers now make their living in the delivery room — and, increasingly, in the OR — documenting the first moments of motherhood for clients who pay thousands of dollars for wedding-style albums of their labor. 📸: @allisonzaucha

LATimes

In August of 1943, Frank Sinatra performed at the Hollywood Bowl before a sold-out crowd of 10,000. The opening act by the Los Angeles Philharmonic included selections “Bumble Bee” and “Night on Bald Mountain” from the Disney movie “Fantasia.” Then at 10 p.m., #FrankSinatra appeared onstage. His selections included “Dancing in the Dark,” You’ll Never Know” and “The Song Is You.” Los Angeles Times writer Marvin Miles wrote about the event, calling it “a big night, best expressed by one breathless babe. ‘He sends me – and he leaves me there.’” #tbt

LATimes

Most people wouldn’t give a second look to this encampment on Broadway Place, where Big Mama lived with her neighbors in a collection of ragged tents. Big Mama and her neighbors had been chosen for a program that would target entire encampments, moving their residents en masse into supportive housing. “The Street Within” is a four-part series that follows the residents of a homeless encampment in South L.A. as they transitioned from the streets into permanent housing. Watch our Instagram story for part one of the series. 📸: @francineorr

LATimes

Looking for a summer treat? Consider these mangonada bars. The filling is tangy from chamoy, the apricot-based fruit sauce, and fruity from floral ripe mango, and is set atop a pleasantly spicy Tajin-flecked cookie crust. Serve these bars chilled from the fridge at your next backyard picnic or barbecue. The spice will make you sweat, the fruit will cool you off and you’ll quickly go back for more, writes @latimesfood cooking columnist @benbmims . Visit latimes.com/food for more food coverage. 📸: @lesliegrow

LATimes

Although scientists cannot predict when or where the next major earthquake will occur, the U.S Geological Survey produces hundreds of earthquake scenarios to help us plan for the inevitable. For an L.A. Times special project, we worked with three USGS experts to map significant earthquake scenarios on faults across California. We even took a special look at quake scenarios for landmarks like Disneyland. What would a powerful earthquake feel like where you live? Go to the link in the bio and look up an address to see a map of the shaking near that spot. 🗺: Zach Levitt

LATimes

In actions that would affect more than 6.5 million California students, state lawmakers are poised to make ethnic studies a graduation requirement in high school and at Cal State universities. The high school requirement — the first such in the nation, according to a legislative analysis — appears to have broad backing among Sacramento lawmakers and beyond. At its core, supporters say, ethnic studies classes teach students how to think critically about the world around them, “tell their own stories,” develop “a deep appreciation for cultural diversity and inclusion” and engage “socially and politically” to eradicate bigotry, hate and racism. 📸: @kentnish

LATimes

“It’s the biggest show in the country,” said Pam Schnebelen, 75, one of a record crowd of ardent cactus fans who attended the Inter-city Cactus & Succulent Show & Sale over the weekend. The parking lot was near capacity at the L.A. Arboretum when “Cactus Con” opened at 9 a.m. Saturday. By the end of Sunday, organizers estimated between 2,000 and 2,500 people entered the show. “Succulents are just really hot right now,” said Schnebelen. 📸: @pixtakerirfan

LATimes

Officer Lojann Dennison, a 20-year veteran with the Navajo Nation Police Department, patrols one of seven districts on a Navajo reservation that's home to 180,000 people. The Navajo are among the few with their own police force. That means Navajo patrolling Navajo, with aspects of the job far outside typical rural policing: She struggles with deeply rooted customs that can call for an officer to choose between allegiance to clan ties and upholding the law. Female officers such as Dennison are a key part of the department’s approach to one of the toughest policing jobs in America. They can be more effective than men in handling abuse against women, which is pervasive here, experts say. Although female officers have made strides within the department, Dennison says true equality still eludes them. 📸: Randi Lynn Beach

latimes

Financial toxicity describes the problems a person has relating to their inability to afford medical treatment. In our latest graphic op-ed, the author dives into the issue relating to her husband’s ability to afford cancer care. The views expressed in the piece reflect the opinions of the author and/or artist, not The Times. Visit the link in our bio the see the rest of the story by Fumiko Chino. Art by @inkvessel

latimes

At @museumofdeathofficial in Hollywood, Manson and his notorious “family” have a place of honor in the 3,000-square-foot collection, where they claim more prominent real estate than nearly any other deathly display. In fact, now that it’s the anniversary, one thing is clear: Interest in Manson isn’t heightened, because it’s never really gone away. “I’ve been doing this for 25 years,” said Eric Holler, who sells murderous memorabilia said he supplied the museum’s New Orleans branch with a set of original Ted Bundy courtroom sketches. “Manson has been the top seller for 25 years. It doesn’t matter — anniversaries, the [Quentin] Tarantino movie. … I don’t see an uptick. There’s always extreme interest.” 📸: Gary Coronado

latimes

For Walmart manager Robert Evans, a night out to the El Paso Chihuahuas game was intended to be a few hours of peace after the mass shooting that happened at his store last Saturday. Evans saw the first bullets fly and ran into the store, yelling “active shooter!” He was the last store employee to leave the scene after being interviewed by investigators. But days later, Evans was standing on the field at the first home game for the Chihuahuas since the shooting. The team was honoring him for helping to save people from the shooter. During the game, his mind wandered back to the shooting, but in a moment that made him smile, a rainbow appeared beyond the stadium. “I love baseball,” he said quietly after the game. 📸: Rudy Gutierrez

latimes

When news broke this week that the billionaire who owns the parent company of luxury gym Equinox and fitness company SoulCycle would be hosting a fundraiser for President Trump, the fitness community did not take to it kindly. Calls for boycotts and gym membership cancellations spread online, and by Wednesday afternoon two West Hollywood residents had organized a protest at the gym for the day of the fundraiser in New York. 📸: @yamphoto

latimes

Ten years ago, @BarbaraDemick traveled through central China to learn more about the origins of the more than 80,000 girls who had been adopted in the United States. It turns out the one-child policy had given rise to a family planning apparatus that was as powerful as the police. They weren’t allowed to take away babies, but sometimes they did. Here’s how she helped reunite two Chinese twins — one of whom was snatched from her family as a toddler and adopted by an American couple. Read the story at the link in our bio. 📸: Liu Hongbin

latimes

@moca recently acquired @xuzhenmadein’s “In Just a Blink of an Eye” for its permanent collection. The work is a performance art piece displaying four human figures, all in baggy streetwear, who remain stock-still in impossible, gravity-defying positions. But what happens to a performance when it goes off view? Can performance art be owned? @deborahvankin explores the topic.

latimes

Once seen as a bastion of Republican supporters in Southern California, Orange County has now officially flipped blue. The county that nurtured Ronald Reagan’s conservatism and is the resting place of Richard Nixon is now home to 547,458 registered Democrats, compared with 547,369 Republicans. Democratic leaders attributed the shift to changing demographics, aggressive recruitment efforts and President Trump. 📷: @alschaben

latimes

This week was one for the record books in Palm Springs as temperatures peaked at 121 degrees Monday — a hot start to August after the hottest July ever recorded globally. Most of Southern California will see a significant cooling trend as the week continues. In the Los Angeles area, the weather has stayed relatively cool. No heat records have been broken since the state’s record-hot July came to an end. As August continues, experts advise residents to keep an eye on temperatures and limit their outdoor activities, hydrate and monitor children, elderly people and animals accordingly. 📸: Gina Ferazzi

latimes

Adam Litwin’s lab coat didn’t look like the others. He observed surgery but never treated a patient himself. He parked in the doctors’ lot with a pilfered pass. For months, he posed as a UCLA surgery resident, until the truth came out and he was sent to jail for two months. Litwin was not, in fact, a student. Just an aspiring doctor blinded by the love of medicine. Now, 20 years later, you might find him in a doctors’ office ⁠— legitimately. Adam Litwin has graduated from medical school and is an MD in the United States, hoping to find a residency program that will admit him. Visit the link in our bio to learn about his turnaround and the challenges he still faces. 📸: @pinaristekphoto

latimes

😜🤐 One home in Manhattan Beach is sporting a bright paint job decorated with two giant emojis. Neighbors say it’s retribution in a property dispute that has turned into a battle with the city. A neighbor reported the home’s owner, Kathryn Kidd, to the city for using the property for short-term rentals, such as Airbnb, which is illegal in Manhattan Beach. Now the property is painted bright pink with yellow emojis. Frustrated homeowners and renters in the El Porto neighborhood plan to raise their concerns again at a City Council meeting, marking the latest chapter of a saga that began in May. “I’m trying not to offend anybody,” Kidd said of the #emoijhouse. “I did it for the purpose of being happy, being positive, and I think it’s cute and quirky and kind of funny, and certainly was a time for the emoji.” 📸: @kentnish

latimes

🎇 Spectators gathered at the water’s edge and joined thousands lining the beach to watch fireworks explode over the pier during the 115th annual fireworks show themed "Sweet Land of Liberty!” in Huntington Beach, Calif., on July 4, 2019. 📸: @alschaben

latimes

The Independence Day magnitude 6.4 earthquake had an epicenter in the remote Searles Valley but was felt as far away as Las Vegas and Phoenix. It was the largest earthquake in Southern California in 20 years and aftershocks, one a powerful magnitude 5.4, were already hitting the area by Friday morning. In Ridgecrest, some spent their 4th of July cleaning up after the quake. 📸: @robgauthier

LAtimes

The durian is no ordinary fruit. Its thorny cantaloupe-sized husk looks like a hedgehog crossed with an avocado. Tan Eow Chong, a clever Malaysian farmer, has made a fortune off the fruit. What defines durian fruit, however, is its overpowering sulfuric scent, which has led to bans from public transportation and the occasional evacuation of buildings. But for the fruit’s admirers, the stench is part of the allure. “If it doesn’t stink, it’s not durian,” Tan said. Tan, now 58, has seen his revenue grow tenfold in the six years since he began exporting durians to China. Now, among locals on this lush island west of the Malay peninsula, Tan is the Durian King. 📸: @suzanneleephoto

LAtimes

Meet Carly Rose: Child prodigy, reality TV flameout and your next indie-pop queen. @carlyrosemusic finished “X Factor” in second place in 2012 at the age of 13; now, 20, the USC music student is relaunching her music career with the release of a new song, “Birds & Bees." 📸: @jaylclendenin

LAtimes

Lee Iacocca, an ambitious salesman who dominated the automobile industry like nobody since Henry Ford, died Tuesday at 94. He’s remembered for his powerful speaking ability and starring role in Chrysler commercials where he’d declare, “If you can find a better car, buy it.” He died in his Bel-Air home from complications of Parkinson’s disease. 📷: Gary Friedman

LATimes

The Manor, a 56,500-square-foot chateau in Holmby Hills, has sold for $120 million — the highest price of any L.A. County residence to date. The Manor was originally built for late producer Aaron Spelling and his widow, Candy Spelling, and completed in 1991. Nicknamed “Candyland” for Candy, the chateau is about as big as a football field. Amenities include multiple gift-wrapping rooms, a barber shop, a flower-cutting room, a basement bowling alley with a shoe closet and a French wine and cheese room. The Manor’s sale is a welcomed boon for a luxury residential market that has cooled significantly year over year. 📸: @jimbartschphotographer

LATimes

A queer bar in Mexico City was attacked, first with fists, then with fire. The owners faced a decision: close La Cañita to protect themselves and their patrons, or fight on? They chose to fight, and their weapon was love. The owners started with the Cañita Fest, a block party designed to grow community relations. “We’re here to support them,” said one attendee. “We are all equal.” 📸: @mallikaphoto

LATimes

Los Angeles @angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs died in a Texas hotel room Monday morning. He was 27. “Skaggs could appreciate his place in Angels lore. He followed the team obsessively as a teenager … He battled injuries throughout his career, but his belief in himself never slackened,” wrote Andy McCullough in the Times’ obituary. Players and fans alike mourn the passing of Skaggs. 📸: @ginaferazzi, @alschaben

LATimes

USA Weightlifting held its annual Nike National Youth Championships at the Anaheim Convention Center to crown the strongest youth athletes in the nation, with some being as young as 11. 📷: @wallyskalij

LATimes

In Berkeley, California, a mural depicting presidential candidate Kamala Harris on a wall at Thousand Oaks Elementary School is a reminder of the senator’s childhood in the city. Today, Berkeley operates under a newer desegregation plan that is based on socioeconomic and demographic data instead of a student’s race. But the original desegregation policy remains a source of civic pride. 📷: @joshedelsonphotography

LATimes

The CROWN Act was approved by the state Assembly last week and would outlaw policies that punish black employees and students for their hairstyles. If signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, the bill would legally protect people in workplaces and K-12 public schools by prohibiting the enforcement of grooming policies that disproportionately affect people of color, particularly black people. This includes bans on certain hairstyles, such as Afros, braids, twists, cornrows and dreadlocks. “It's important to me as a black woman,” said Kari Williams, pictured, who owns Mahogany Hair Revolution, a hair salon in Beverly Hills. “Our skin color and our hair have been used as ways to continue to keep us disenfranchised.” 📸: @dania_maxwell

LATimes

@spidermanmovie "Far From Home" closes the third phase of the @marvel Cinematic Universe. For Tom Holland, at 23, he has been living his own dream playing Spider-Man for a significant chunk of the past four years. @tomholland2013 is the third actor to don the superhero’s spandex in a live-action feature — but quickly made the iconic character his own when he debuted in 2016’s “ Captain American: Civil War.” “There’s a level of pressure because people really want to know what’s next,” Holland said. “Everyone’s fallen in love with those characters for the past 10 years, and all of a sudden people we know and love and feel we have a connection to, we’ve said goodbye to forever.” 📸: @jlcvisuals

LATimes

Cardi B makes clear in her latest single how she’s feeling these days about engaging with the professional news media. The song is called “Press,” and its chorus finds this wildly popular rapper — an object of intense scrutiny since she broke into the pop mainstream two years ago — repeating that word over and over, each time more irritated than the last: “Press, press, press, press, press,” she growls, “Cardi don’t need more press.” Headlining an arena concert as part of the BET Experience, a few days ago, @iamcardib demonstrated why she's pop music's most grounded superstar. 📸: @francineorr

LATimes

Mar Vista is changing things up, writes @rachelizzzie. The neighborhood sandwiched between Culver City and Venice lost its longtime Sam: Johnson's Bookshop this year, but it gained a new beer garden that serves plenty of German and Belgian brews. The neighborhood's Oaxacan joint gets raves on Yelp for its "pizza" and mole. And who could resist a detour into the fourth dimension at Time Travel Mart, which benefits Dave Eggers’ writing program for kids? Walk this stretch of Venice Boulevard to find a good mix of old — the Grand View Market will make you feel like a local — and new. 📸: @patrickfallon

LATimes

The Free Black Women’s Library is a mobile pop-up library and community for black women. A movement that was first sparked in New York, @thefreeblackwomenslibrary hopes to cultivate an appreciation for black female writers but also a safe space for communities of color. The idea: You take a book by a black female writer, you leave a book by a black female writer. Pictured above is Asha Grant, founder of the L.A. chapter of the Free Black Women's Library (@thefreeblackwomenslibrary_la), at a lending library inside @bloomandplumecoffee, a black-owned coffee shop on Temple Street. 📸: Mel Melcon

LATimes

Guadalajara long has been a bastion of Catholicism. For nearly 100 years, it also has been the cradle of La Luz del Mundo, the largest evangelical church in Mexico. Generations of questions have swirled around leader Naason Joaquin Garcia and the two apostles before him — his father and grandfather. The rumors only strengthened after Garcia’s arrest this month in Los Angeles on charges of human trafficking, rape and child pornography. Since his arrest, parishioners have reported being verbally assaulted and people have vandalized churches. “There has long been tension between Catholics and members of La Luz del Mundo,” said one researcher. Visit the link in our bio to read more from @brittny_ariel on La Luz del Mundo. 📸 @gcoronadophoto

LATimes

There are 3.5 million truckers in the United States. California has 138,000, the second-most after Texas. Nearly half of those in California are immigrants, most from Mexico or Central America. Now, Sikh immigrants and their kids are increasingly taking up the job. Visit the link in our bio to read more from @jaweedkaleem on how Sikh drivers are transforming U.S. trucking. 📸: @pixtakerirfan

LAtimes

When Tom Carruth was 5, he sat on his stoop, entranced by the pale purple rose, “Sterling Silver.” Now, at 67, he’s spent a lifetime concocting roses himself and is an 11-time winner of the top prize in rose breeding. One of his newest creations is the “Huntington’s 100th,” a multicolor, fragrant rose celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens. The hype around the rose is growing like weeds. 📸: Mel Melcon

LAtimes

Mourners, including law enforcement officers from across the state, said their final goodbye to Joseph Gilbert Solano on Monday, two weeks after the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy was shot while standing in line in civilian clothing at a Jack in the Box in Alhambra. He died two days later. “We’re missing one, but we gained one from above,” said Sheriff Alex Villanueva. 📸: @alseib

LAtimes

For Santa Anita’s low-paid workers, horse deaths bring pain and fear about the future. Roughly 1,500 backstretch workers labor behind the scenes as grooms, trainers, exercise riders and stable cleaners. There have been 30 horse deaths at the track since the start of the racing season, Dec. 26, and some authorities are calling to suspend racing at the track. The workers’ biggest fear is that the track will be shut down permanently amid the controversy, threatening their livelihood. 📸: @kentnish

LAtimes

Wondering what life on Mars might look like? You can find out in the Utah desert, where the Mars Desert Research Station has acted as a reliable stand-in for an actual base on Mars since 2001. With NASA’s plan to land humans on Mars by 2033 and the promise of commercial space travel, interest in the station has soared. Engineers, physicians, geologists, and others come to the station to test ideas related to living on Mars. 📸: @bvanderbrug

LAtimes

Motivated by the death of rap star Nipsey Hussle, Los Angeles-area gangs are engaging in the most ambitious effort to end violence since the 1992 riots. Leaders of the peace movement say the outpouring of grief after Hussle’s March 31 death has made it easier to convince others that the cycle of violence needs to stop. 📷: @genaro4707

LAtimes

Built on testosterone, flop sweat and gigantic globs of flame, Irwindale Speedway offers family entertainment at a fair price. “At Irwindale Speedway, the living is easy, the spectacle … well, you decide,” writes columnist Chris Erskine. “Felonious? Fiery? Silly? Astonishing?” Pictured above is a stunt driver successfully spinning a Ford over eight cars in one of the night's early jumps. The flames were set intentionally to enhance the spectacle. 📸: Gina Ferazzi

LAtimes

Once a sleepy family neighborhood, Highland Park has rocketed into a hipster haven — but there's still much that's authentic. Highland Park is no less culturally and artistically interesting than before the hipsters moved in, @makekeeee writes. 📸: @ginaferazzi

LAtimes

It’s always “Take Your Dog To Work Day” at Amazon in Seattle, where more than 7,000 dogs are registered to come to work. That amounts to a dog-person ratio of 1:7 at the mothership. When their owners have meetings, dogs can pop into a doggy day-care spot for a shampoo, blow dry and “nail pawlish.” They can also play on a 17th-floor deck created just for them, with ornamental fire hydrants and artificial grass. “I’m pretty sure Amazon dogs have the best life,” says Lauren Lee, an Amazon Home senior product manager. 📸: @duceyphoto

LAtimes

#TBT: A brawl marred the Father’s Day 1977 @Dodgers-@Cubs baseball game. These three photos by staff photographer Steve Fontanini appeared in the June 20, 1977, Los Angeles Times. 📸: Steve Fontanini

LAtimes

In response to the college admissions scandal, the University of California released sweeping reforms to better police fraudulent admissions. Though UC was not the only school system implicated in the scandal, UC president Janet Napolitano, above, plans to implement changes, such as reviewing links between donors and applicants, having a higher level of scrutiny for special talent admits like athletes and verifying students’ claims on applications more strictly. 📸: @genaro4707

LAtimes

Moviegoers will still hear Don Rickles’ voice in “Toy Story 4” two years after his death. Rickles, who is the voice behind Mr. Potato Head, died in April 2017 at the age of 90 but wanted his name to be kept alive. Thanks to a painstaking archival process, quotes like “You got to be kidding me” and “I knew it” have been resurrected for the film. 📸: @annecusack