Lynsey Addario - instagram lists #feedolist

lynseyaddario

The parade of shoes from the stage during graduation at the University of York. Last week, I received an Honorary degree for my career in photojournalism from the @uniofyork alongside other Honorary recipients: Game of Thrones star, Mark Addy, author and poet, Nnimmo Bassey; video game designer, Charles Cecil; paediatrician, Professor Diana Gibb; historian, Professor Catherine Hall; and biologist and Nobel Prize winner, Richard Henderson. A great honor and huge thank you to the University of York for recognizing the importance of journalism. #photojournalism #ItsWhatIDo #OfLove&War @nikonusa #nikonambassador

lynseyaddario

#Repost @amillionlittlepiecesmovie with @get_repost ・・・ Based on the controversial best-seller. A Million Little Pieces is in cinemas Aug 30th in the UK and Dec 6th in the US. #amillionlittlepiecesmovie #new #poster #aarontaylorjohnson #samtaylorjohnson #billybobthornton #charliehunnam #charlesparnell #dashmihok #daviddastmalchain #eugenebyrd #giovanniribisi #juliettelewis #odessayoung #ryanhurst @aarontaylorjohnson @samtaylorjohnson @ayoungcowgirl @dastmalchian @dizmihok @juliettelewis @rambodonkeykong @thisischarliep @vududaddy @michaelmuller7 @jamesfrey_

lynseyaddario

Kurdish fighter with the YPG, Kasuma shamsedi, 25, is surrounded by women who have surrendered from ISIS’ last stronghold of Baghouz as she patrols through Hol Camp in Northern Syria, March 2019. This is an outtake from an upcoming coming story for @natgeo to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. #nikokambassador @nikonusa #lynseyaddario #itshwhatido

lynseyaddario

Cpl Gabrielle Green, Artillery Sensor Support Marine from Perkasie, PA, shows her tattoo while on the 26th Marine expeditionary Unit stationed at camp Lejeune, NC, USA, December 2017. This is an outtake from an upcoming coming story for @natgeo to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. #nikokambassador @nikonusa #lynseyaddario #itshwhatido

lynseyaddario

Lilach Bashari, 30, from Netanya, with Border Police, patrols near Damascus Gate in Jerusalem, March 2019. This is an outtake from an upcoming coming story for @natgeo to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. #nikonambassador @nikonusa #itswhatido #lynseyaddario

lynseyaddario

Inbar Shimon with the Israeli border police patrols in the 'kasbah' (covered market), in Hebron, March 2019. The Border Police are a cross between police and military, count toward obligatory military conscription in the Israeli Defense Forces, and first incorporated women in 1995. They are patrolling in the volatile city of Hebron, near the Cave of the Patriarchs.This is an outtake from un upcoming story for @natgeo, to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. #nikonambassador @nikonusa #itswhatido #lynseyaddario

lynseyaddario

A female member of the ELN walks through a village to bathe by the river after spending the night with her unit in Colombia, February 2019. This is an outtake from a forthcoming story for @natgeo, to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. #photojournalism #itswhatido #lynseyaddario #nikonambassador @nikonusa

lynseyaddario

Fighters with the Kurdish militia, the YPG, await surrenders of men, women, and children in the human corridor in the edge of Baghouz, in March 2019. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the publishing of this story for @natgeo. @nikonusa #nikonambassador #itswhatido

lynseyaddario

Female fighters with the YPJ, an all female Kurdish militia in northern Syria, take shelter from the rain during a women’s day celebration near Hasaka, March 2019. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the publishing of this story.

lynseyaddario

A female member of the ELN in Colombia at shooting practice along the San Juan River, February 2019. This is an outtake from a forthcoming story for @natgeo, to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story.

lynseyaddario

An outtake from a 2016 project documenting migration into Europe. A mother and son about to board a rescue ship, the #Aquarius, at sea off the coast of Libya in the Mediterranean, operated by @doctorswithoutborders. During its time at sea, the Aquarius has rescued roughly 80,000 migrants and refugees from the Mediterranean. Without the work of @doctorswithoutborders and dozens of other rescue organisations on the Mediterranean thousands more would have lost their lives. Rescue ships like the #Aquarius are no longer allowed to operate in the Mediterranean and dinghies carrying migrants from Libya are most often turned away.

lynseyaddario

This can’t be safe.

LynseyAddario

Ten years ago today, we got married in southwest France surrounded by 200 of our closest friends and family who flew in to celebrate with us from around the world. I had just survived a car accident and was basically bedridden for most of the three months leading up to one of the biggest days of our lives. I could barely help with wedding planning, my dress all but fell off when I tried it on a few days before the ceremony (thank you, @tarasubkoff for finding the only available tailor in the villages surrounding Lectoure) and you pulled chunks of glass from the accident out of my back on our honeymoon. You called me the wrong name at the altar out of nerves—my sister’s name—and I laughed, because it didn't matter.  I knew how much we loved each other. Ten years, two children, two countries and six houses later, I still love you more than ever. Happy Anniversary, @pauldebendern Happy #independenceday photographs by the great @landonnordeman

LynseyAddario

An undocumented immigrant waits to be arrested after being caught hiding in the bushes along the border with Mexico, in Texas, October 4, 2018. Originally shot on assignment for the @nytimes. #immigration #itswhatido #photojournalism #nikonambassador @nikonusa

LynseyAddario

Border Patrol agents apprehend undocumented immigrants crossing the border into the US by McAllen, Texas, October 3, 2018. Originally shot on assignment for the @nytimes. #immigration #itswhatido #lynseyaddario #nikonambassador @nikonusa

LynseyAddario

Border Patrol agents apprehend undocumented immigrants crossing the border into the US by McAllen, Texas, October 3, 2018. Originally shot on assignment for the @nytimes. #immigration #itswhatido #lynseyaddario #nikonambassador @nikonusa

LynseyAddario

United States Border Patrol agents chase after and detain undocumented migrants on horseback along the border with Mexico near Penitas, Texas, June 7, 2018. Originally shot on assignment for the @nytimes. #nikonambassador @nikonusa #immigration #lynseyaddario #itswhatido

LynseyAddario

Border Patrol agent Robert Rodriguez looks through his night vision goggles while trying to apprehend undocumented immigrants crossing the border into the US by McAllen, Texas, October 4, 2018. This is an outtake from a @nytimes assignment at the border near McAllen, Texas and Mexico. @nikonusa #nikonambassador #photojournalist #itswhatido #lynseyaddario

LynseyAddario

A male recruit with Echo company runs through the mud during the "Battle of Hue City" event of 'the Crucible', at Parris Island, in South Carolina, February 21, 2019. 'The Crucible' is the 54 hour culminating event of everything the marine recruits have learned throughout recruit training during their 13 week period at Parris Island. It is designed to simulate and evoke the stress of combat; it is a test of military skills, physical and mental endurance, and the ability to work as a team. At the end of the 54 hour period, the recruits are given their title of marines. This is an outtake from a recent assignment from Parris Island, published in the @nytimes.

LynseyAddario

A young South Sudanese boy walks for miles to bring a bucket of food to his mother, who is busy collecting firewood in the bush outside Bentiu, in South Sudan. On #WorldRefugeeDay we should think about all those who have been displaced from their homes due to war and insecurity. On assignment for @natgeo @nikonusa #nikonambassador @refugees @unmissmedia

lynseyaddario

Brothers. It has been such an incredible two months with little Alfie and Lukas. I haven’t had two months at home since I gave birth to Lukas almost 8 years ago. What a treat to spend time with my family, and to watch Lukas welcome Alfred into our home. Off to work again this weekend. I’ll miss my boys. @pauldebendern

lynseyaddario

Pretty much the best mamma gift ever. Thank you, @kimberlyjmuller @michaelmuller7 for the genius personalized flak jacket stuffed with baby goodies!

lynseyaddario

This is just disgusting on so many levels. Shame on you, Alabama, and shame on us, America, for sinking to such a low point for women, for reproductive rights, and for human rights. This law would force women (and children) who have been raped and victimized by incest to carry the child of their perpetrator. These are the laws that increase the risk of maternal mortality for high-risk pregnant mothers. (And the United States already has one of the highest rates of maternal death in the developed world.)

lynseyaddario

Mother’s day hairstyling in Nonnie’s kitchen. I’m away from my boys, but with my mom and my Nonnie.

lynseyaddario

Tomorrow night in #Hartford #Connecticut! Honored to be in such great company!!! Not too late to get tickets!! #Repost @ctforum with @get_repost ・・・ We are so excited to have these extraordinary photojournalists on our stage in less than 24 hours! There are still some tickets left to Photo Wonders with @petesouza, @lynseyaddario & @brianskerry, moderated by @wnprnews’ Lucy Nalpathanchil. Saturday, May 11 at 7:30pm. There are still a few tickets left! Box office opens at 6:30pm @thebushnell. #photowondersforum #hartford #photojournalists #connecticut

lynseyaddario

Morning workout with Alfie in a basket. #LosAngeles #lifewithanewborn

lynseyaddario

Afghanistan panoramics from 2000, when the country was under Taliban rule. If you’re in Los Angeles this weekend, stop by @photoville at the @annenbergspace to see “Of Love and War” and other incredible work by @jbmoorephoto @ccole_photo #contacthigh @natgeo and others! @penguinpress #LosAngeles #photojournalism

lynseyaddario

The 2006 Lebanon Israel War was one of the only wars where I covered both sides: the first image is of the Israeli army shooting into Lebanon, and the second image is of the destruction in South Beirut during the ceasefire. If you are in/ around Los Angeles Thursday, May 2, please come listen to the stories behind the photographs from my new book, “Of Love and War” and from the amazing @worldpressphoto winner, @jbmoorephoto at the @annenbergspace at 7pm. Link to RSVP is in bio. @penguinpress @nikonusa #Nikonambassador

lynseyaddario

Happy 106th birthday Nonnie!!! You are our light, our spirit, our little living angel. #LoveNonnie

lynseyaddario

#LosAngeles!!! AN EVENING WITH LYNSEY ADDARIO & JOHN MOORE THURSDAY MAY 2 @ 7pm Annenberg Space for Photography presents Photoville LA Produced by United Photo Industries Join us as two celebrated Photojournalists sit down for a conversation about their impactful work traversing the globe from the current humanitarian crises in Syria to U.S. Mexico immigrant crossings during the Trump administration.

lynseyaddario

When my almost 106 year-old Nonnie and my mom meet Alfie for the first time over FaceTime...#LoveNonnie

lynseyaddario

We are thrilled to welcome little Alfred Phillip De Bendern into this world. Born April 18, weighing 6 lbs, and measuring 19 inches long. We are beyond grateful to our amazing gestational surrogate for making this possible; she and her family have shown incredible generosity, love, and support throughout this extraordinary journey. Lukas is of course over the moon to finally be a big brother. @pauldebendern

lynseyaddario

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Pictured above, migrants arriving in the port city of Augusta, Italy. September 2014. Between January and September 2014, roughly 120,000 refugees landed in Italy, more than double the total for the entire year of 2013. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress.

lynseyaddario

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Pictured above, Children play on fallen trees during a drought in Turkana, Kenya. August 2011. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress.

lynseyaddario

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Pictured above, Iraqis suspected of being part of the insurgency are rounded up and detained by soldiers with the Fourth Infantry Division in Balad, Iraq, June 2003. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress.

lynseyaddario

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress

lynseyaddario

Such a great honor to speak about the importance of frontline journalism at @womenintheworld yesterday, with the great Nima Elbaghir from @cnn and Alexandra Ulmer from @reuters and the one and only @johnavlon. #WITW

lynseyaddario

My love, Lukas. Another sunset. Sorry. #fromwartosunsets

lynseyaddario

That amazing moment when I see my book, “It’s What I Do” in the hotel library in Mexico. #ItsWhatIDo @penguinpress #enelinstantepreciso

lynseyaddario

Women and children who have just surrendered to Syrian Defense Forces in the human corridor outside of Baghouz wait to be transported to al-Hol camp in Hasaka province. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. March 2019, shot on assignment for @natgeo.

lynseyaddario

A wounded man surrenders in the human corridor on the outskirts of Baghouz in the final days of the battle to oust the Islamic State from its last remaining stronghold of Baghuz, in Syria, March 9, 2019. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. On assignment for @natgeo

lynseyaddario

Women and children, who by and large expressed unwavering support for the Islamic State, wait to be registered at al-Hol refugee camp after surrendering during the Islamic State's final days in Baghouz, Deir Ezzour province. Several thousand women and children arrived at the registration area of the camp in March 2019. On assignment for @natgeo in early March. Read the story at the link in bio.

lynseyaddario

Women and children who have just surrendered to Syrian Defense Forces in the human corridor outside of Baghouz wait to be transported to al-Hol camp in Hasaka province. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. March 10, 2019, shot on assignment for @natgeo.

lynseyaddario

One-year-old Fatima looks at her mother as she pulls out a piece of bread. Severely malnourished, Fatima sits alongside her two siblings and mother, Mariam, right, from Kawkaz, Russia, shortly after arriving at the al-Hol refugee camp in March. Fatima, like several other children at Hol, escaped from Baghouz severely malnourished, and was accompanied by families who by and large expressed unwavering support for the Islamic State. Since December, nearly 60,000 have arrived at the camp, pushing the camp to its breaking point, aid workers have said. About 100, mostly children, have died either en route to the camp or shortly after arriving, due to acute malnutrition, pneumonia, hypothermia, and diarrhea, according to the International Rescue Committee. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. A humanitarian crisis emerges as ISIS falls in Syria. March 2019. Shot on assignment for @natgeo a few weeks ago in #baghouz, #syria. Full article, via link in bio. #isis

lynseyaddario

A young Syrian boy, roughly 3 years old, hugs his mother as they wait to be transported after surrendering along with other women and children on the outskirts of Baghouz to al-Hol camp in Hasaka province. The boy was shot in the eye during fighting in Baghouz, and was among many others who escaped wounded from the ongoing battle between US and coalition-backed Syrian Defense Forces and ISIS. In the final days of the battle for Baghouz, mostly wives, children and relatives of ISIS fighters are surrendering. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. March 10, 2019. A humanitarian crisis emerges as ISIS falls in northern Syria. Shot on assignment for @natgeo in #baghouz. Full article on National Geographic, follow the link in bio. #isis

lynseyaddario

A young girl stands among women and children, who by and large expressed unwavering support for the Islamic State, as they wait to be registered at Hol camp after coming out from Baghouz in the Islamic State's final days in Baghouz, Deir Ezzour province, in Northern Syria, March 7, 2019. Several thousand women and children arrived at the registration area of Hol camp over a period of a few days. Since December, nearly 60,000 have arrived at the camp, pushing the camp to its breaking point, aid workers have said. About 100, mostly children, have died either en route to the camp or shortly after arriving, due to acute malnutrition, pneumonia, hypothermia, and diarrhea, according to the International Rescue Committee. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. March 2019. I shot this on assignment for @natgeo several weeks ago. #isis #baghouz. The story is on the #NationalGeographic website, and the link is in my bio.

lynseyaddario

‘A humanitarian crisis emerges as ISIS falls in northern Syria’, my new story for @natgeo. Women and children relatives, who by and large expressed unwavering support for the Islamic State, arrive at Hol camp after coming out from Baghouz in the Islamic State's final days in Baghouz, Deir Ezzour province, at the Hol camp in Northern Syria, March 7, 2019. Several thousand women and children arrived at the registration area of Hol camp over a period of a few days. Since December, nearly 60,000 have arrived at the camp, pushing the camp to its breaking point, aid workers have said. About 100, mostly children, have died either en route to the camp or shortly after arriving, due to acute malnutrition, pneumonia, hypothermia, and diarrhea, according to the International Rescue Committee. In the final days of the battle for Baghouz, mostly wives, children and relatives of ISIS fighters are surrendering. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. March 2019.

lynseyaddario

Female marines line up after dusk at Parris Island after a gruelling day of events during day 1 of “the Crucible” — a 54-hour marathon of physical and emotional endurance that will test what they have learned. “The Crucible is actually seeing everything that has been taught to them come to life,” said Staff Sgt. Jasmine Rodgers, a 26-year-old drill instructor from Philadelphia. “It shows the best and the worst from them, and by the end of it, they are better for it.” All this to become recruits to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. - the only place in the country where women become Marines. I wrote a piece for the @nytimes about Parris Island, S.C. — the only place in the country where women become Marines. ‘I’ Will No Longer Be in Your Vocabulary. "Women make up 8 percent of U.S. Marines. The military base at Parris Island, S.C., is where these women train. For the next 11 weeks, they would speak only in the third person, calling themselves “this recruit” instead of “I” to absolve all individuality.” Today, women make up 8 percent of the United States Marine force.

lynseyaddario

A typical day at Parris Island consists of a 4 a.m. wake-up, physical fitness, academic classes and group meals. Teamwork is central to everything the recruits do. All of this is in preparation for “the Crucible” — a 54-hour marathon of physical and emotional endurance that will test what they have learned. “The Crucible is actually seeing everything that has been taught to them come to life,” said Staff Sgt. Jasmine Rodgers, a 26-year-old drill instructor from Philadelphia. “It shows the best and the worst from them, and by the end of it, they are better for it.” All this to become recruits to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. - the only place in the country where women become Marines. My piece for the @nytimes on the women becoming marines: ‘I’ Will No Longer Be in Your Vocabulary. "Women make up 8 percent of U.S. Marines. The military base at Parris Island, S.C., is where these women train. For the next 11 weeks, they would speak only in the third person, calling themselves “this recruit” instead of “I” to absolve all individuality.” Today, women make up 8 percent of the United States Marine Corps.

lynseyaddario

My piece for the @nytimes on the women becoming marines: ‘I’ Will No Longer Be in Your Vocabulary. "Women make up 8 percent of U.S. Marines. The military base at Parris Island, S.C., is where these women train. For the next 11 weeks, they would speak only in the third person, calling themselves “this recruit” instead of “I” to absolve all individuality.” Today, women make up 8 percent of the United States Marine Corps.