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Economic and political forces in the wake of globalization have wrought unprecedented changes to contemporary cultures. Marked by fragmentation, migration, and mutation, these characteristically postmodern conditions have been reflected in artistic production from the 1970s to the present day. Seeking new ways to probe physical limits and conceptual possibilities in their work, some artists turned with renewed interest to collage and assemblage and embraced multimedia and new media practices. #HomeIsaForeignPlace #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Spend some time outside this weekend at Public Art Fund’s re-staging of Siah Armajani’s seminal public art installation “Bridge Over Tree” (1970). This installation, which coincides with “Siah Armajani: Follow This Line” at The Met Breuer, is the first time that the work has been recreated by the artist since its debut in a Minneapolis public park nearly 50 years ago. Head to Brooklyn Bridge Park through September 29 to experience it for yourself! 📸: @publicartfund #SiahArmajani #PublicArtFund #MetBreuer

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Happy #InternationalMuseumDay from The Met Breuer! Stop by to see one of our current exhibitions including #SiahArmajani and #HomeIsaForeignPlace, enjoy a meal at @florabarnyc, or admire some architectural features of our Marcel Breuer designed building (like our lobby lights, shown here 💡). #MetBreuer #MetModern

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In these works, Siah Armajani identifies each house according to its position relative to a bridge. The bridge creates a specific site—a “neighborhood” or “home”—with its own particular spatial and temporal coordinates. “A bridge is something in-between,” Armajani explains. “What is before the bridge, after the bridge, above the bridge, and below the bridge brings [these positions] together and makes them one neighborhood.” _____ Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian-American, born 1939) | House before the Bridge | 1974–75. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Mark Bradford’s “Crack Between the Floorboards” was inspired in part by Gustave Caillebotte’s 1875 painting “Les raboteurs de parquet (The Floor Planers)” in which three shirtless laborers are seen from above stripping varnish from a bourgeois apartment’s floorboards. As an early depiction of the urban working class and the eroticized male nude, “Les raboteurs de parquet” shocked the art establishment. Bradford translates these themes into an abstract, kaleidoscopic work that alludes to contemporary issues of class, location, and space. _____ Artwork: Mark Bradford (American, born 1961) | Crack Between the Floorboards | 2014. #HomeIsaForeignPlace #MetModern #MetBreuer

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One of the earliest modern abstract artists in the Arab world, Saloua Raouda Choucair was interested in Islamic art, modernist art and architecture, science and mathematics, and Pan-Arabist politics that promoted the idea of unity across Arab nations. “Structure with One Thousand Pieces” is a prototype for an unrealized, large-scale installation and epitomizes Choucair’s vision of what contemporary Islamic or Arab art (she employed both terms) should accomplish. The work features an internal lamp that radiates light through the irregular wooden slats, simultaneously evoking mashrabiyya, or wooden latticework, and an illuminated office tower. See it now in #HomeIsaForeignPlace. _____ Artwork (from right to left): Saloua Raouda Choucair (Lebanese, 1916–2017), Structure with One Thousand Pieces, 1966–68. | Adolph Gottlieb (American, 1903–1974), T, 1950. | Mark Rothko, American (born Russia, now Latvia), 1903–1970, Untitled, ca. 1944–45. #MetModern #MetBreuer

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We’re open! Though normally closed on Mondays, we are open with special hours today, May 6, from 10 am to 5:30 pm. Start your week off with “Home Is a Foreign Place: Recent Acquisitions in Context” and “Siah Armajani: Follow This Line” before heading downstairs to enjoy lunch outside in our sunken garden with Flora Coffee. #HomeIsaForeignPlace #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Siah Armajani recalls a childhood game he played with his classmates as they walked home from school. Wandering through the streets of Tehran, they would trace their path along the city walls, enjoining their peers to "follow this line." Covering significant moments in the artist's life and career, “Follow This Line: An Illustrated Chronology” invites readers to dive into Armajani's reflections on democracy, anarchy, architecture, technology, and philosophy. Check it out by visiting metmuseum.org or clicking the link in our bio. _____ Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian-American, born 1939) | Dictionary for Building: Loading Dock #2 | 1974–1975. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Rather than focus on those works that explicitly address exile and associated themes, “Siah Armajani: Follow This Line” identifies tactics that define this aesthetic across the trajectory of Armajani's practice. For the first time, the artist's sculptures, installations, and drawings are understood as props for public performances. Across the exhibition, props for official or institutionalized speech compete with props for performing magic spells, veiled calls for political activism, and poetry readings. #SiahArmajani #MetBreuer #MetModern

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During the 1950s and 1960s Jasper Johns frequently appropriated well-known images such as targets, maps, and flags—in his words, “things the mind already knows.” In “White Flag,” shown here at left, Johns drains this iconic subject of its characteristic red, white, and blue coloration, leaving it to loom, ghostlike. The painting’s bleached appearance and composite, layered form make the familiar image strange. By challenging our understanding of what constitutes a national symbol and complicating our relationship to this highly charged American image, it speaks powerfully, if ambiguously, to the issue of national identity. _____ Artwork: Jasper Johns (American, born 1930) | White Flag | 1955 | © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY #HomeIsaForeignPlace #MetModern #MetBreuer #JasperJohns

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“Home is a Foreign Place: Recent Acquisitions in Context” is now on view! Taking its title from Zarina’s 1999 suite of thirty-six woodcuts, this collection display features art that explores the meanings of finding a “home” and “place” in our increasingly interwoven globe, whether by necessity or choice. _____ Artwork: Zarina (American, born Aligarh, India, 1937) | Home is a Foreign Place (detail) | 1999 | © Zarina Hashmi #HomeIsaForeignPlace #MetModern #MetBreuer

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To coincide with the exhibition “Siah Armajani: Follow This Line” at The Met Breuer, @publicartfund is presenting a re-staging of Armajani’s public art installation “Bridge Over Tree” at Brooklyn Bridge Park through September 29. Armajani constructed “Bridge over Tree” for the Walker Art Center in 1970. The structure ascends and descends steeply over a small pine tree, negating any practical function, but also producing a location, or site where one had existed before. The model shown here of this seminal work is on view at The Met Breuer through June 2. Swipe to see the full model ➡️ _____ Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian-American, born 1939) | Bridge over Tree | 1970 #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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It's Roof Garden season! The Met’s 2019 Cantor Roof Garden Commission: Alicja Kwade, ParaPivot opens today! Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. The exhibition is on view through October 27 at The Met Fifth Avenue. _____ Artwork: Alicja Kwade (b.1979, Poland) | Installation view of ParaPivot II (2019) for The Roof Garden Commission: Alicja Kwade, ParaPivot at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2019 | Courtesy of the artist; 303 Gallery, New York; KÖNIG GALERIE, Berlin/London; and kamel mennour, Paris/London. | Photograph by Hyla Skopitz. #CantorRoof # AlicjaKwade #MetModern #MetBreuer #TheMet

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Today is your final chance to see “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” at The Met Breuer! Fontana is widely known for his series of slashed paintings from 1958 known as the Cuts (Tagli). This exhibition presents extraordinary examples of this iconic series, while also exploring Fontana’s beginnings as a sculptor and his pioneering work with environments, contextualizing the radical nature of the Cuts within the artist’s broader practice. _____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Concept, Expectations (Concetto Spaziale, Attese) | 1965 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Don’t miss your final days to see “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold,” on view through April 14. The first major survey of Lucio Fontana in the United States in more than forty years, this exhibition reexamines the career of one of the most innovative artists of the twentieth century. _____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | (Left) Spatial Concept, The End of God (Concetto Spaziale, La Fine di Dio), 1964 | (Right) Spatial Concept, The End of God (Concetto Spaziale, La Fine di Dio), 1963 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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“Home Is a Foreign Place: Recent Acquisitions in Context” is now on view on our second floor. This exhibition highlights recent acquisitions of modern and contemporary art from Latin America, the Middle East, North Africa, and South and Southeast Asia, alongside works by iconic modern American artists from The Met collection. Taking its title from Zarina's 1999 suite of thirty-six woodcuts, this exhibition will feature art that explores the meanings of "home" and "place" in our increasingly interwoven globe, whether by necessity or choice. Check out our story today for a preview! #HomeIsaForeignPlace #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Opening this Tuesday! “Home Is a Foreign Place: Recent Acquisitions in Context” will present a diverse group of paintings, sculptures, installations, and videos made between 1944 and 2016 that explore artistic engagements with language, architecture, space, seriality, politics, and media. Highlighting recent acquisitions from Latin America, South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa, alongside existing icons of American art from The Met’s collection, this thematic installation asks viewers to reconsider what it means to make a home in the world, whether by chance, necessity, or choice. _____ Artwork: Donna Conlon (American, born 1966) | Coexistencia (Coexistence) (detail) | 2003 | Single-channel digital video | © 2003 Donna Conlon #HomeIsaForeignPlace #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Tonight! Join us at The Met Fifth Avenue at 6:30 pm for “MetFridays—Siah Armajani and Public Art.” Explore Armajani's work in the context of the history of public art from the 1980s to today as artist Liam Gillick and art historian David Hodge share their insights on the evolving significance of social space in contemporary artistic practice. This event is free with museum admission. _____ Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian, born 1939) | Details from Dictionary for Building | 1974–75. #SiahArmajani #MetBreuer #MetModern #TheMet

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Don’t miss your final weeks to see “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” at The Met Breuer. @wsj says, "In our current climate of huge retrospectives . . . ‘On the Threshold’ is a necessary—and for those who look closely, rewarding—addendum." On view through April 14. _____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Concept, Expectation (Concetto Spaziale, Attesa) | 1959 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Start your weekend at The Met Breuer! We are open until 9 pm every Friday and Saturday. Enjoy current exhibitions including “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” before heading downstairs for dinner at @florabarnyc. _____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Olympic Champion (Waiting Athlete) (Campione Olimpionico [Atleta in Attesa] ) | 1932 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Amid the Italian economic boom, the space race, and the growing Cold War nuclear threat, Lucio Fontana created his most iconic artworks: the Cuts. With the rupturing of the picture plane, the radical gesture of the Cuts was an act of sabotage to the discipline of painting. Fontana presented the viewer with a form—the void—that was literally made of space. _____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Concept, Expectation (Concetto Spaziale, Attesa) | 1967 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Working in a figurative style, Lucio Fontana favored a realist stance inspired by the ancient sculptures of Etruscan sarcophagi—exemplified in his female portraits, some of which are also painted with color or gold. But he was an eclectic artist, both absorbing traditions and assimilating avant-garde movements such as Futurism, which allowed him to maintain creative independence during the Italian Fascist regime. Working with clay, Fontana succeeded in unifying genres, themes, and historical references, while pushing the boundaries of sculptural practice. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Siah Armajani’s “Dictionary for Building” is composed of approximately 150 small-scale architectural maquettes made with cheap and ephemeral materials. In this key work, Armajani combines units of domestic architecture—doors, windows, gables, walls, chairs, and so on—to create improbable hybrid structures. These units abut one another in surprising and often nonsensical ways. In this manner, the artist renders the annexed elements useless in a conventional sense, while opening them up to new possibilities for meaning. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Lucio Fontana started his Holes series in 1949. Titled Spatial Concept, his first perforated paintings were conceived as screens for the transmission of electric light. Stretched canvas became Fontana’s support of choice and the activation of the picture plane would define much of his work from the early 1950s onward, part of his radical contribution to easel painting. The void, the infinite, and the fourth dimension were among the artist’s names for this opening of the pictorial surface to what lies beyond. _____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Concept (Concetto Spaziale) | 1950 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #LucioFontana #MetLucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Embroidery along the top of Siah Aramajani’s “Wall” identifies the collage as a parcham, a wall hanging used to decorate assembly halls during religious festivals in Iran. Checkered tiles and the peaked arch of a coffeehouse represent the social gathering sites of southern Tehran. The phrase “follow this line” appears twice, alongside a piece of twine that moves across the work and tangles at the top left corner. _____ Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian, born 1939) | Wall | 1958. #SiahArmajani #MetBreuer

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Though widely known as a painter, Lucio Fontana trained as a sculptor and was well into his career when he used a canvas for the first time, at age fifty-one. His artistic beginnings were marked by fertile experimentation in both Argentina and Italy, a transatlantic experience that defined his vision. Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Battle (Battaglia) | 1947 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Lucio Fontana’s radically innovative Spatial Environments helped to set the course for future developments in installation art. Immerse yourself in examples of Fontana’s environments alongside approximately 100 objects, including selections from his iconic Cuts series ‪through April 14‬ in the exhibition “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold." ____ Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Environment in Red Light (Ambiente Spaziale a Luce Rossa) | 1967/2019 | Reconstruction authorized by Fondazione Lucio Fontana − project Pirelli HangarBicocca 2017 | © 2018 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #MetBreuer

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When you visit “Siah Armajani: Follow This Line,” be sure to take a seat and spend time with the reading material in Armajani’s “Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3.” 📚 Armajani’s design includes references to the histories of violence toward racial and political minorities in the United States and early Soviet designs for popular education and entertainment. These diverse sources combine to produce structures that are reminiscent of the modernist belief in the ability of architecture to embody and disseminate new, more just, models of society. Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian, born 1939) | Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3 | 1988. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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In celebration of the opening of our Lucio Fontana exhibitions, The Met Breuer and @elmuseo have partnered to offer visitors a two-for-one admission deal, valid now ‪through April 14, 2019‬! • This is how it works: With the purchase of suggested admission to The Met Breuer you can gain free access to El Museo. To redeem, any time during promotional period, show proof of purchase (receipt or sticker) from The Met Breuer at El Museo. • “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” is on view at The Met Breuer (on floors 3 and 5) and The Met Fifth Avenue (Gallery 913). The installation “Lucio Fontana: Spatial Environment” (1968) is on view at El Museo. Both exhibitions are open ‪through April 14, 2019‬. • Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Concept, Expectation (Concetto Spaziale, Attesa) | 1968 | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome #LucioFontana #MetLucioFontana #MetModern #metbreuer

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Beginning in the late 1960s, the motifs of the house and the bridge became central to Siah Armajani’s practice. In this period, the artist was familiarizing himself with nineteenth-century American farmhouses, bridges, and barns—structures built by artisans, carpenters, and joiners, rather than architects—which he described as “common-sense buildings.” Armajani’s treatment of these structures, and the common sense he ascribes to them, makes them appear both familiar and unfamiliar, that is—unheimlich (unhomely, or uncanny). Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian, born 1939) | House #7 | 1978/2018. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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It's your final weekend to see “Julio Le Parc 1959” at The Met Breuer! This first solo exhibition in a New York museum of Argentinian artist Julio Le Parc celebrates the artist's extraordinary gift to The Met of twenty-four works, and also marks the occasion of the artist's ninetieth birthday. On view ‪through tomorrow, February 24.‬ Artwork: Julio Le Parc (Argentine, born 1928) | Development of Circles and Squares (Développement de Cercles et Carrés) | 1959. #MetJulioLeParc #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Siah Armajani’s practice can be explored in relation to what might be called an aesthetic of exile, one that makes space—real and conceptual—for the dislocated figure who is central to so much of the work. The works on view in “Siah Armajani: Follow this Line” combine a wide range of references: political propaganda, religious sermons, handwritten letters, magic spells, recited poems, songs broadcast on the radio, and architectural elements. As hybrid objects, they invite new readings and offer multiple perspectives. At the same time, they resist interpretation by blocking access, obscuring legibility, and frustrating conventions of use. These two apparently contradictory gestures are central to the experience of exile. Artwork: Siah Armajani (Iranian, born 1939) | Seven Rooms of Hospitality: Room for Deportees | 2017. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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“Siah Armajani: Follow This Line” is now on view! This exhibition traces the development of Armajani’s art from his early days as a political activist in Tehran in the 1950s to his most recent installation, a series of sculptures that directly confronts the refugee crisis unfolding around the world today. It also features many never-before-seen and recently rediscovered works from the 1960s and 1970s, as well as most of the approximately 150 works that exist today from the artist’s landmark series “Dictionary for Building,” an installation originally composed of thousands of small-scale, architectural maquettes. #SiahArmajani #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Happy birthday to Lucio Fontana, born on this day in 1899! A witness to the historical, cultural, and technological developments that defined the postwar period, Fontana’s work reflects the influence of a wide range of styles from art history and an irreverence towards hierarchies and conventions. See “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” through April 14. Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Seated Young Lady (Signorina Seduta) | 1934 | © 2018 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #MetModern #LucioFontana #MetBreuer

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“Those very famous Cuts were actually not made by a painter, but by a sculptor.” —Iria Candela, curator of “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold,” speaking about Fontana’s iconic “Cuts (Tagli)” series. This morning, curator Ira Candela lead a special #EmptyMet tour of #MetLucioFontana. Explore how Fontana’s beginnings as a sculptor contextualize the radical nature of the “Cuts” within the artist’s broader practice through April 14 at The Met Breuer. #MetModern #LucioFontana #MetBreuer

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From 1958 until his death in 1968, Lucio Fontana worked on his Cuts series while receiving international acclaim. Over time, the slashes became straighter and more calculated. “They think it’s easy to make a cut or a hole,” said the artist. “But it’s not true. You have no idea how much stuff I throw away. The idea has to be realized with precision.” #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer Artworks: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Spatial Concept, Expectation (Concetto Spaziale, Attesa), 1964 (left) | Spatial Concept, Expectation (Concetto Spaziale, Attesa), 1965 (right) | © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome.

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"Fontana would have been proud of the work his student-turned-master has done, and we need to see more of it." — @nytimes on “Julio Le Parc 1959” During the 1940s, Julio Le Parc studied under Lucio Fontana. Don’t miss your chance to see works by both artists on view simultaneously at The Met Breuer. Artwork: Julio Le Parc (Argentine, born 1928) | Post-Image Color Horizontal (detail) | 1959 | © Julio Le Parc #MetLucioFontana #MetJulioLeParc #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Lucio Fontana began his artistic career as a sculptor in Rosario, Argentina, in the mid-1920s while working for his father’s business. Fontana y Scarabelli produced tomb sculptures for the local cemeteries. The aspiring artist then moved to Milan to receive classical sculptural training in carving at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts. Showing early signs of anti-academic irreverence, Fontana preferred modeling to carving and during the 1930s developed his career in Italy by situating sculptures and reliefs made of plaster, terracotta, or ceramics at the center of his practice. Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Italian, 1899–1968) | Portrait of Teresita | 1940 | Fondazione Lucio Fontana, Milan © 2019 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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After you visit “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” at The Met Breuer, head to The Met Fifth Avenue to see Fontana’s “Neon Structure for the Ninth Milan Triennial,” on view in Gallery 913. Conceived in 1951 for the monumental stairway of the Palazzo dell’Arte, this installation is created with over one hundred yards of a looping fluorescent neon tube. It marks the first time Fontana used neon lights, a modern technology common in street advertisements but rarely chosen by artists at the time. This installation is part of the exhibition “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold.” Three other environments reconstructed on the occasion of the exhibition are presented at The Met Breuer (on Floor 3 and Floor 5) and at ‪ @elmuseo #MetLucioFontana #MetModern #LucioFontana #MetBreuer Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968) | Neon Structure for the Ninth Milan Triennial (Struttura al Neon per la IX Triennale di Milano) | 1951/2019 | © 2018 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. Reconstruction authorized by Fondazione Lucio Fontana.

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“But go. See for yourself. Register the full range of Fontana’s output.” — @washingtonpost on “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold" See Lucio Fontana’s sculptures, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and environments ‪through April 14.‬ #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer Center: Lucio Fontana (Italian, 1899–1968). Spatial Concept, New York 10 (Concetto Spaziale, New York 10), 1962. © 2018 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome.

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Now on view! “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” reassesses the legacy of this key postwar figure through a selection of exquisite sculptures, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and environments made between 1931 and 1968. It unpacks Fontana’s approach to painting by reevaluating his work in sculpture and decorative arts. See the exhibition through April 14. Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968). Spatial Environment in Red Light (Ambiente Spaziale a Luce Rossa), 1967/2019. Painted wood, glass tubes, neon, and mixed media. Reconstruction authorized by Fondazione Lucio Fontana − project Pirelli HangarBicocca 2017 #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Opening this Wednesday, “Lucio Fontana: On the Threshold” is first major survey of Lucio Fontana in the United States in more than forty years. This exhibition will reexamine the career of one of the most innovative artists of the twentieth century. The Argentine-Italian artist is widely known for his Cuts series, slashed paintings that became symbols of the postwar era. The exhibition will present extraordinary examples of this iconic body of work. It will also explore Fontana's beginnings as a sculptor, including his exquisite work in ceramic, as well as his pioneering environments, contextualizing the radical gesture of his Cuts as part of the artist's broader search to integrate the space of art and the space of the viewer. Artwork: Lucio Fontana (Argentine-Italian, 1899–1968). Spatial Concept, Expectations, 1959. Olnick Spanu Collection, New York © 2018 Fondazione Lucio Fontana/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. #MetLucioFontana #LucioFontana #MetModern #MetBreuer

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In 1958, Julio Le Parc moved to Paris, where his encounter with Op artists, such as Victor Vasarely, had an important influence on his art. The series of gouaches Le Parc started that year illuminates his interest in developing geometric abstraction by incorporating movement through variations, sequences, and progressions. Julio Le Parc (Argentine, born 1928), Translational Rotation (Rotación Translativa), 1959. © Julio Le Parc #MetJulioLeParc #MetBreuer #MetModern 1959

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After a day at the Museum, join us for happy hour at Flora Bar! 🥂 Starting tonight from 5:30–7:30 pm, @florabarnyc is featuring $1 oysters, $5 beers, $8 wines, and $10 cocktails. Enjoy these great specials Tuesday–Thursday while taking in Marcel Breuer’s iconic architecture. 📸: @florabarnyc #MetBreuer #MetModern

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Closing today! “Everything Is Connected: Art and Conspiracy” features seventy works by thirty artists in media ranging from painting and sculpture to photography, video, and installation art, from 1969 to 2016. The exhibition presents an alternate history of postwar and contemporary art that is also an archaeology of our troubled times. Tony Oursler (American, born 1957) | Son of Oil | 1982/1999. #MetArtandConspiracy #MetModern #MetBreuer

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In 1983, accusations of child sexual and Satanic ritual abuse were made against employees of the McMartin preschool in Manhattan Beach, California. After years of investigation, research eventually revealed that psychiatrists and social workers had misled children into false memories of molestation through suggestion or coercion. Viewing this imagined trauma through the lens of architecture, Mike Kelley built models of the sites of his own educational training, from his childhood home to the campus of CalArts. He recreated them from memory, leaving voids where he could not recall the structure, as if to suggest that various repressed episodes—real or fictitious—had resulted in these lapses. Don’t miss your final weekend to see “Everything Is Connected: Art and Conspiracy” at The Met Breuer, on view through Sunday. Mike Kelley (American, 1954–2012) | Educational Complex | 1995. © Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts. #MetArtandConspiracy #MetModern #MetBreuer

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Happy New Year!!! 🎆 The Met Breuer is closed on Tuesday, January 1 and will reopen on January 2. We are wishing everyone a safe and healthy 2019! #MetBreuer #MetModern

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It’s your final chance to see “Everything is Connected: Art and Conspiracy” at The Met Breuer. @nytimes calls the exhibition, “a beautiful piece of museum choreography.” See it now through January 6. | Jim Shaw (American, born 1952), The Miracle of Compound Interest (from the series Left Behind) (detail), 2006. #MetArtandConspiracy #MetModern #MetBreuer

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We are waving goodbye to 2018 with a look back at each exhibition on view this past year. Let us know which you saw! Head over to @metmuseum’s page for a look at a selection of this year’s exhibitions on view at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. #TheMet #MetBreuer #MetModern 1. “Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed” Installation view | © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 2. “Like Life: Sculpture, Color, & The Body (1300–Now)” Installation view | © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 3. “Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection” Egon Schiele (Austrian, 1890–1918) | Couple Embracing | 1911. 4. “Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture, 1963–2017” Installation view | © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 5. “Everything is Connected: Art and Conspiracy” Lutz Bacher (American, born 1943), The Lee Harvey Oswald Interview, 1976 © Lutz Bacher 6. “Delirious: Art at the Limits of Reason 1950-1980” Installation view | © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 7. “Leon Golub: Raw Nerve” Leon Golub (American, 1922–2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966. © The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 8. “Provocations: Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer” Anselm Kiefer (German, born 1945). Winter Landscape (detail), 1970. © Anselm Kiefer 9. “Julio Le Parc 1959” Julio Le Parc (Argentine, born 1928), Mutation of Forms, 1959. © Julio Le Parc

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Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Sue Williams adopted an almost exclusively neon palette in her paintings, whose virtuoso loops and coils reveal an exuberance haunted by ghosts of national trauma. In “Hill and Dale, Black-Ops,” multiple representations of the World Trade Center towers twist and turn. The reference to “black-ops” in the title seems to imply that terrorism, violence, and covert government or military operations may be hiding in the shadows everywhere. Sue Williams (American, born 1954) | Hill and Dale, Black-Ops | 2013. © Sue Williams, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York #MetArtandConspiracy #MetModern #MetBreuer