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nasaclimatechange

Formerly Greenland's fastest-flowing glacier, Jakobshavn Glacier slowed dramatically when a nearby ocean current cooled, though it's still adding to global sea level rise. • Visit the link in our bio for the full story. • 📸: The calving front of Jakobshavn Glacier, center. Credit: NASA/OIB/John Sonntag • #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #greenland #glacier #ice #ocean #sealevelrise #earth #earthscience #water #science #omg

nasaclimatechange

The 2015-2016 El Niño event brought weather conditions that triggered regional disease outbreaks throughout the world, according to a new NASA study that is the first to comprehensively assess the public health impacts of the major climate event on a global scale. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2846/2015-2016-el-nino-triggered-disease-outbreaks-across-globe • 📸: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio • #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #elnino #earth #earthscience #disease #mosquito #science #data #datavisualization #publichealth #climate #weather #ocean #plague #hantavirus

nasaclimatechange

For decades, NASA has used data from Earth-observing satellites to better understand our planet’s interconnected systems and how they are changing. • We look at Earth as a system, examining the cycles and processes—the water cycle, the carbon cycle, ocean circulation, the movement of heat—that interact and influence each other in a complex, dynamic dance across seasons and decades. • Our new book, “Earth,” showcases breathtaking satellite imagery of our 4.5-billion-year-old home planet. Swipe to see more and download a free copy of the eBook: https://go.nasa.gov/2tHCYU5. • Image 1: Baltic Sea Image 2: Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar Image 3: Mt Taranaki, New Zealand Image 4: Guadalupe Island, Baja California Image 5: Laguna San Rafael National Park, Chile • #nasa #climate #earth #ebook #bookstagram #science #satelliteimagery #beautiful #homeplanet #water #carbon #ocean #land #balticsea #merguiarchipelago #mttaranaki #guadalupeisland #lagunasanrafael #myanmar #newzealand #bajacalifornia #chile

nasaclimatechange

#Repost @nasaearth: Love is in the Air ♥️ When swirls of clouds formed over the South Pacific Ocean, we couldn’t help but notice their heart-like shape. But fluid dynamics has a solid explanation for this Valentine in the sky. ☁️ . The pattern is known as a von Kármán vortex, and the phenomenon occurs in a wide range of places around the planet. It forms when the flow of a fluid is diverted around a blunt object, imparting rotation in alternating directions along the object’s lee side. In this instance, the vortices were produced as winds were diverted around the Juan Fernández Islands, 670 kilometers (420 miles) off the coast of Chile. .🌬️ Von Kármán vortices can form whenever there is strong air flow around a barrier, but they need clouds or smoke to become obvious to the human eye. On February 2, 2019, the rotating air produced swirls in a layer of marine stratocumulus. The disturbance that trailed behind the islands was visible in these images acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. .🌀 Read more about this celestial Valentine ❣️ go.nasa.gov/2TPlxMG (Link in bio) #nasa #earth #climate #clouds #pacificocean #southpacific #love #heart #valentinesday #chile

nasaclimatechange

Earth's global surface temperatures in 2018 were the fourth warmest since 1880, according to independent analyses by @NASA and @NOAA. The past five years are, collectively, the warmest years in the modern record. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2841/2018-fourth-warmest-year-in-continued-warming-trend-according-to-nasa-noaa/ • 📽: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA’s Earth Observatory #nasa #noaa #globalwarming #climatechange #science #earth #earthscience #climatescience #co2 #greenhousegas #sealevelrise #icemelt #flooding #heatwave #trend #visualization #data

nasaclimatechange

Tropical ocean warming from climate change could lead to a 60 percent increase in extreme rain storm frequency by the end of the century. Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2837/warming-seas-may-increase-frequency-of-extreme-storms • 📸: An "anvil" storm cloud in the Midwestern U.S. Credit: UCAR • #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #tropical #ocean #sea #rainstorm #storm #extremeevents #weather #climate #earth #science #earthscience #climatescience

nasaclimatechange

Happy 50th anniversary, #Earthrise! 🌏 Taken in Moon orbit during the Apollo 8 mission on Christmas Eve 1968, this iconic image speaks to our planet's fragility, the vastness of space and our place in the universe. Explore more at the link in our bio ⬆️. . . #nasa #christmaseve #christmas #christmaseve2018 #christmas2018 #earth #climate #earthscience #science #apollo8 #moon #space #history #onthisday #happyholidays #anniversary #universe

nasaclimatechange

East Antarctica has the potential to reshape coastlines around the world through sea level rise, but scientists have long considered it more stable than its neighbor, West Antarctica. • Now, new detailed maps show that a group of glaciers spanning one-eighth of East Antarctica’s coast have begun to lose ice over the past decade, hinting at widespread changes in the ocean. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2832/more-glaciers-in-east-antarctica-are-waking-up • 📸: NASA/Michael Studinger (first image); NASA's Earth Observatory/Joshua Stevens (second image) #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #sealevelrise #antarctica #ice #glacier #icemelt #ocean #science #earthscience #agu18 #climatescience #earth #change

nasaclimatechange

The wintertime growth of Arctic sea ice might have partially slowed its decline over decades, new NASA research shows. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2831/wintertime-arctic-sea-ice-growth-slows-long-term-decline-nasa • 📸: NASA/Alek Petty #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #arctic #ice #seaice #arcticocean #ocean #sea #water #winter #wintertime #seawater #science #earth #earthscience #environment

nasaclimatechange

#ICYMI An international team of researchers, including a NASA glaciologist, has discovered a large meteorite impact crater hiding beneath more than a half-mile of ice in northwest Greenland. • The crater — the first of any size found under the Greenland ice sheet — is one of the 25 largest impact craters on Earth, measuring roughly 1,000 feet deep and more than 19 miles in diameter, an area slightly larger than that inside Washington’s Capital Beltway. • Earlier studies have shown large impacts can profoundly affect Earth’s climate, with major consequences for life on Earth at the time. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2828/international-team-nasa-make-unexpected-discovery-under-greenland-ice/ • 📸: NASA #nasa #climate #greenland #ice #impactcrater #crater #earth #icesheet #greenlandicesheet #glacier #meteorite #iceage #washingtondc #paris #science #earthscience

nasaclimatechange

NASA’s Operation IceBridge 🛩 spotted a massive iceberg three times the size of Manhattan that broke from Pine Island Glacier in Antarctica. . The IceBridge flight took the team over the glacier as part of the long-running campaign to collect year-over-year measurements of sea ice, glaciers and critical regions of Earth's ice sheets. ❄️ . Ice shelves, floating glacial ice areas that surround much of Antarctica, calve icebergs as part of the natural process of ice flowing out to sea. But scientists are also watching closely to see if the frequency of calving events is changing over time. . Pine Island and nearby Thwaites Glacier alone are contributing about 1 millimeter 📏 per decade to global sea 🌊 level rise, as their flow of ice to the sea has accelerated in recent years, according to NASA research. . Full story: https://go.nasa.gov/2QACSHp . 📷: NASA/Kate Ramsayer . #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #arctic #seaice #ice #science #water #ocean #antarctica #glacier #earth #icemelt #earthscience

nasaclimatechange

After some unforeseen issues, a NASA ice-observing airborne campaign stayed up all night taking sea ice measurements over Antarctica's Weddell Sea while a space laser named ICESat-2 flew over. • Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2T6KBPh • 📸: NASA/Linette Boisvert #nasa #climate #ice #seaice #antarctica #weddellsea #science #operationicebridge #icesat2 #earthscience #earth

nasaclimatechange

Operation IceBridge, NASA’s longest-running aerial survey of polar ice in a warming world, flew over the northern Antarctic Peninsula on Oct. 16, 2018. • During the survey, designed to assess changes in the ice height of several glaciers draining into the Larsen A, B and C embayments, IceBridge senior support scientist Jeremy Harbeck spotted a very sharp-angled, tabular iceberg floating among sea ice just off the Larsen C ice shelf. • A photo of the iceberg (second image) was widely shared after it was posted on social media. • “I thought it was pretty interesting; I often see icebergs with relatively straight edges, but I've not really seen one before with two corners at such right angles like this one had,” Harbeck said. • The rectangular iceberg appeared to be freshly calved from Larsen C, which in July 2017 released a chunk of ice about the size of the American state of Delaware (called "A68"). • In a different photo (first photo), Harbeck captured both the edge of the now-famous iceberg and a slightly less rectangular iceberg. • That image also captures the Delaware-size iceberg in the distance. • “I was actually more interested in capturing the A68 iceberg that we were about to fly over, but I thought this rectangular iceberg was visually interesting and fairly photogenic, so on a lark, I just took a couple photos,” Harbeck said. • Image credit: NASA/Jeremy Harbeck #nasa #climate #ice #glacier #iceberg #operationicebridge #antarctica #delaware #science

nasaclimatechange

"My name is Joanne Speakman, and I’m from the Northwest Territories (NT) in Canada. I’m indigenous to the Sahtu Region and grew up in Délįne, a beautiful town of about 500 on Great Bear Lake. Now I live in Yellowknife, NT, and study environmental sciences at the University of Alberta. • "I was a summer student this year with the Sahtu Secretariat Incorporated (SSI), an awesome organization in the NT that acts as a bridge between land corporations in the Sahtu. My supervisor helped organize a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a fellow student and me to fly with NASA. It was a dream come true. • "One of NASA’s projects is called the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), which is studying climate change in the northern parts of the world. People from the circumpolar regions have seen firsthand how drastically the environment has changed in such a short period of time, especially those of us who still spend time out on the land. • "Weather has become more unpredictable and ice has been melting sooner, making it more difficult to fish in the spring. Climate change has also contributed to the decline in caribou, crucial to Dene people in the north, both spiritually and for sustenance. • "Studies like ABoVE can help explain why and how these changes are happening. Along with traditional knowledge gained from northern communities, information collected by ABoVE can go a long way in helping to protect the environment for our people and future generations." • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/blog/2821/students-traverse-land-air-and-water-in-canada-with-a-nasa-mission-to-study-climate-change/ • Image: Joanne Speakman helps scientists map wetlands near the city of Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Credit: Paul Siqueira #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #arctic #boreal #wetlands #canada #northwestterritories #science #environment

nasaclimatechange

The Arctic Ocean's blanket of sea ice has changed since 1958 from predominantly older, thicker ice to mostly younger, thinner ice, according to new research published by NASA scientist Ron Kwok of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. • With so little thick, old ice left, the rate of decrease in ice thickness has slowed. • New ice grows faster but is more vulnerable to weather and wind, so ice thickness is now more variable, rather than dominated by the effect of global warming. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2817/with-thick-ice-gone-arctic-sea-ice-changes-more-slowly • Image: Small remnants of thicker, multiyear ice float with thinner, seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea on Sept. 30, 2016. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Alek Petty #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #arctic #seaice #ice #science #water #ocean #beaufortsea #earth #icemelt #earthscience

nasaclimatechange

#Repost @nasajpl_edu ・・・ "We're studying how atmospheric rivers – which are long jets of water vapor – move through the Earth system and identifying key physical properties that characterize their frequency and magnitude ... • "Just to give you a sense of how much water they can hold, a single atmospheric river can transport 25 Mississippi Rivers of water as water vapor. So the implications are that they can cause severe flooding, or in their absence, they can cause drought periods. So they're very important for water management, especially for regions like California that depend on precipitation for water ... • "We found that with climate change, these atmospheric rivers will occur 10 percent less, but they will be 25 percent wider and stronger." • Flooding caused by atmospheric rivers can wreak havoc on communities, so a @NASAJPL team is taking a deeper look. • #MeetJPLintern Vicky Espinoza, an Earth science student from the University of California, Merced, who's studying how these events might evolve with a changing climate and what it might mean for communities around the world. [Link in bio and here: https://go.nasa.gov/2O79dZq] #Internship #intern #STEM #science #education #career #NASA #student #college #space #Earth #nasa #climatechange

nasaclimatechange

Over a mere four days this summer, snow from the previous winter melted into a pond of slush on Canada’s Lowell Glacier. Mauri Pelto, a glaciologist at Nichols College, called the area of water-saturated snow a “snow swamp.” • “I haven’t seen a snow swamp of this size develop this quickly ever,” said Pelto, who has spent 38 years monitoring glaciers in the region. • The false-color images above show the progression of the rapid snow melt in the Kluane National Park in the Yukon Territory. The top image was taken on July 22, 2018, by the Multispectral Instrument on the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2; the bottom image was acquired on July 26, 2018, by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite. • On July 26, the slush covered an area of more than 40 square kilometers (25 square miles). • Pelto has seen similar puddles of slush on other glaciers, but the rapid development of such a large melt area on Lowell Glacier is unusual. “The only way to generate such an extensive snow swamp is to have the snow saturated with water all the way to the surface,” he said. • Visit the link in our bio to learn what might have made the event so unusual. #nasa #climate #canada #yukon #glacier #ice #water #melt #science #snow @nasa_eo

nasaclimatechange

“Incredibly majestic.” • After years of intensive research on Greenland’s glaciers, Josh Willis, the principal investigator of NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland campaign, is standing next to one for the first time in his life. Apusiaajik isn’t one of Greenland’s giants — in fact, its name means “little glacier.” But its marbled blue-and-white wall of ice is tall, long and, as Willis says, majestic. • It’s also melting. From time to time there’s a loud cracking noise, and seconds later, a few refrigerator-sized chunks of ice drop into the ocean. You can’t help wondering when a larger chunk will fall, and how much icy water will hit you when it does. It’s natural for glaciers to lose ice this way, though disconcerting when you’re in the neighborhood. But Apusiaajik is like most of Greenland’s glaciers, it’s out of balance — melting faster than it can be replenished by winter snowfall. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/blog/2795/a-majestic-glacier-on-a-nasa-campaigns-return-to-greenland #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #greenland #ice #glacier #ocean #omg #science

nasaclimatechange

From NASA's Operation IceBridge campaign in Alaska: A high altitude view of Icy Bay, in the Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness. Just a century ago, this body of water was covered in ice. • More views of our beautiful Earth: https://climate.nasa.gov/beautiful-earth/ #nasa #climate #ice #alaska #water #beautiful #science #operationicebridge #earth #icybay

nasaclimatechange

OMG! NASA researchers are setting out this week on our Oceans Melting Greenland mission. • For the third year in a row, they will drop about 250 probes all around the island, with some drops close to the fronts of glaciers that meet the ocean. The probes sink 3,000 feet (1,000 meters) into the seawater, recording temperature and salinity (saltiness) as they go. • During OMG's first two years, researchers collected the most comprehensive data available on how the ocean is melting Greenland’s ice, but Principal Investigator Josh Willis is hungry for more. • "We're beginning to see some surprising changes in the ocean, just since the start of OMG in 2016, that are affecting the ice," said Willis, an oceanographer at @nasajpl. "We want to see if those changes are still there after two years, and if they're spreading farther along the Greenland coast." • Learn more at omg.jpl.nasa.gov. #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #omg #oceansmeltinggreenland #ocean #ice #science #greenland #glacier

nasaclimatechange

Carbon in Alaska's North Slope tundra ecosystems spends about 13 percent less time locked in frozen soil than it did 40 years ago. In other words, the carbon cycle is speeding up. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2776/arctic-carbon-cycle-is-speeding-up • Image credit: Isla Myers-Smith/University of Edinburgh #nasa #climate #alaska #soil #carbon #science #tree #forest #tundra #arctic

nasaclimatechange

Satellite images of phytoplankton blooms on the surface of the ocean often dazzle with their diverse colors, shades and shapes. But phytoplankton are more than just nature’s watercolors: They play a key role in Earth’s climate by removing heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through photosynthesis. • Yet a detailed account of what becomes of that carbon — how much of it goes where within the Earth and for how long — has beset scientists for decades. So while NASA’s Earth-observing satellites can detect the proliferation and location of these organisms, the precise implications of their life and death cycles on the climate are still unknown. • To answer those questions, this week a large multidisciplinary team of scientists is sailing 200 miles west from Seattle into the northeastern Pacific Ocean with advanced underwater robotics and other instruments on a month-long campaign to investigate the secret lives of these plantlike organisms and the animals that eat them. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2779/expedition-probes-oceans-smallest-organisms-for-climate-answers/ #nasa #climate #phytoplankton #ocean #carbon #science #twilightzone #seattle #pacificocean

nasaclimatechange

#Repost @nasa_eo: There Goes the Ice This natural-color image of ice breaking up on Hudson Bay on July 22, 2018 was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The image shows a large patch of ice swirling in the southern part of the bay near the Belcher Islands, the curved set of islands in the lower right of the image. According to the Canadian Ice Service, ice melt was a few weeks later than normal in northeastern Hudson Bay and along the Labrador Coast, but a few weeks ahead of normal in western and southwestern Hudson Bay. Though the timing of the ice breakup is changing, the bay is usually ice-free by August. The rhythms of sea ice play a central role in the lives of the animals of Hudson Bay, particularly polar bears. When the bay is topped with ice, polar bears head out to hunt for seals and other prey. When the ice melts in the summer, the bears swim to shore, where they fast until sea ice returns. University of Alberta scientist Andrew Derocher is part of a group that monitors Hudson Bay polar bear populations using information gathered from tagged bears and GPS satellites. In a tweet dated July 20, 2018, he noted that some of the tagged bears were still on the ice floes, while others had made the move to shore. https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/92483/there-goes-the-ice #nasa #climate #earth #ice #hudsonbay #belcherislands #canada #polarbear #science

nasaclimatechange

The waters off of the Alaskan coast come alive each spring with colorful swirls of phytoplankton, tiny organisms that make a big impact on our global climate. #nasa #climate #alaska #phytoplankton #science #beautifulearth #water #chukchisea

nasaclimatechange

South America's Patagonian icefields are melting away at some of the highest rates on the planet, contributing to sea level rise. • Visit the link in our bio for satellite images that highlight this dynamic region. @nasa_eo #nasa #climatechange #globalwarming #sealevelrise #ice #patagonia #southamerica

nasaclimatechange

In August, more than 100 scientists will sail west from Seattle, Wash. to study the role oceans play in absorbing carbon from Earth’s atmosphere and how phytoplankton absorb, store and release that carbon. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2751/nasa-nsf-plunge-into-ocean-twilight-zone-to-explore-ecosystem-carbon-flow/ • Image above: The Pacific Ocean teems with phytoplankton along the West Coast of the United States, as captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite. Satellites can track phytoplankton blooms, which occur when these plant-like organisms receive optimal amounts of sunlight and nutrients. Phytoplankton play an important role in removing atmospheric carbon dioxide. Credit: NASA #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #phytoplankton #ocean #pacificocean #science #carbon

nasaclimatechange

Ice losses from Antarctica have tripled since 2012, increasing global sea levels by 0.12 inch (3 millimeters) in that timeframe alone, according to a major new international climate assessment funded by NASA and ESA (European Space Agency). • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2749/ramp-up-in-antarctic-ice-loss-speeds-sea-level-rise • Image above: Changes in the Antarctic ice sheet's contribution to global sea level, 1992 to 2017. Credit: IMBIE/Planetary Visions #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #antarctica #science #ice

nasaclimatechange

The scientific method is the gold standard for exploring our natural world, and scientists use it to better understand climate change. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2743/the-scientific-method-and-climate-change-how-scientists-know/ • Pictured above: Starting in 1958, Charles Keeling used the scientific method to take meticulous measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory in Waimea, Hawaii. This graph, known as the Keeling Curve, shows how atmospheric carbon dioxide has continued rising since then. #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #science #earth #hawaii #maunaloa #goldstandard

nasaclimatechange

Atmospheric rivers are getting bigger and more volatile. New NASA-led study predicts 10 percent fewer of these “rivers in the sky” by the end of the century, but with heavier rain and stronger winds. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2740/climate-change-may-lead-to-bigger-atmospheric-rivers/ #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #atmosphericriver #rain #storm #flood #extremeweather #science

nasaclimatechange

Reports of the rapidly melting West Antarctic ice sheet often refer to how much the melting could add to global sea levels -- as if meltwater raises the ocean evenly, like a sink filling up. The reality is far different. Water from West Antarctica will end up raising sea levels more in Los Angeles and Miami than in Rio de Janeiro, for example, even though Brazil is thousands of miles closer to Antarctica than the United States. • How do we know? Scientists first observed this ocean pattern using data from the GRACE satellite mission, which ended last October after 15 years of operation. When the NASA/German Research Centre for Geosciences GRACE Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission is launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Central California this month, it will take up the job of monitoring melting polar ice, among other things. That will give scientists a renewed opportunity to understand some of the many processes that lead to different rates of sea level rise on different coastlines. Since runoff from melting ice sheets and glaciers currently accounts for about two-thirds of global sea level rise, understanding these melt-related processes is a critical piece of understanding sea level change at a regional scale. • Full story: https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2725/grace-fo-cracking-a-cold-case/ • Image: Meltwater from Antarctica glaciers like Darwin (foreground) and Byrd affects sea levels in the U.S. Credit: NSIDC/Ted Scambos #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #sealevelrise #ice #ocean #science

nasaclimatechange

Linette Boisvert, a NASA sea ice scientist and researcher with Operation IceBridge, captured this image of an iceberg surrounded by sea ice during a flight in the Arctic. IceBridge is NASA’s longest-running airborne mission to monitor polar ice. During flights, researchers collect data on changing polar land and sea ice and maintain continuity of measurements between NASA's ICESat satellite missions. #nasa #globalwarming #climatechange #arctic #greenland #ice #science