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#ICYMI a fully functional Launch Abort System with a test version of Orion attached, launched on NASA’s Ascent Abort 2 test. During AA-2, the booster sent the LAS and Orion to an altitude of 31,000 feet, traveling at Mach 1.15 (more than 1,000 mph).

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Now ➡️ and then. On this day in 1962, Kennedy Space Center was formed. As we build on the legacy of those who came before us, we push onward as we prepare for a return to the Moon and journey to Mars.

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On June 27, @nasa’s Mobile Launcher made its way to Launch Complex 39B ahead of a summer of testing. The next time it rolls out, it will have the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft on board for the first Artemis mission.

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NASA technology demonstrations, which one day could help the agency get astronauts to Mars, and science missions, which will look at the space environment around Earth and how it affects us, have launched into space on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket this morning at 2:30 a.m. ET from Launch Complex 39A. The NASA missions lifted off at as part of the Department of Defense’s Space Test Program-2 (STP-2) launch.

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#TBT With an international payload and crew aboard, the Space Shuttle Columbia lifted off from Launch Pad 39B on this day in 1996 🚀

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The abort motor for NASA’s Artemis 1 mission is offloaded from a heavy transport truck inside the Launch Abort System Facility. The abort motor will be integrated with Orion subcomponents and prepared for Artemis 1. The abort motor is one of three motors located on the tower of the Launch Abort System (LAS).

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Drew Smith, a robotics engineer, makes adjustments to the Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) during testing in the regolith bin. Smith and other members of the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab run tests, which simulates the Moon’s reduced gravity using the gravity assist offload system to see how RASSOR excavates regolith 🌑

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This Dragon capsule 🐉 that recently returned from a resupply mission to the International Space Station, launched from Kennedy on May 4.

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Orion’s service module for NASA’s Artemis 1 mission was moved from a test stand to a test cell. With microphones, strain gauges and accelerometers attached, the service module will undergo acoustic testing to check for flaws, the latest step in preparing for the agency’s first uncrewed flight test of Orion on the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. Artemis 1 will be the first mission launching Orion on the SLS rocket from Kennedy’s Launch Pad 39B. The mission will take Orion thousands of miles past the Moon on an approximately three-week test flight.

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This test version of the Orion spacecraft attached to the Launch Abort System for the Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) flight test will be hoisted up and moved inside the vertical integration facility for stacking atop the booster. During AA-2, targeted for July 2, the LAS with Orion will launch on the booster more than six miles in altitude, where Orion’s launch abort system will pull the capsule and its crew away to safety if an emergency occurs during ascent on the Space Launch System rocket. AA-2 is a critical safety test that helps pave the way for Artemis missions near the Moon, and will enable astronauts to set foot on the lunar surface by 2024.

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The vehicle for Orion’s Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) flight test exits the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 22, 2019. The flight test article made the 21.5 mile trek to Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in preparation for its launch this summer.

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Prior to rolling out to the pad, workers inside the Launch Abort System Facility (LASF) were completing the integration of a test version of the Orion crew module with the Launch Abort System (LAS). The test vehicle and the LAS will be used for the Orion Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) Flight Test. AA-2 is a full-stress test of the LAS, planned for July 2.

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Rescue team members are using a Boeing CST-100 Starliner training capsule to rehearse a search and rescue training exercise in the unlikely event of an emergency resulting in a splashdown. NASA and the Department of Defense (DoD) Human Space Flight Support Office Rescue Division conducted the open-ocean exercise, after nearly two weeks of training, off the coast of Cape Canaveral. This exercise provides team members with the necessary training ahead of Boeing’s Crew Flight Test with astronauts targeted for later this year.

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#OTD in 1969 Apollo 10 Commander Thomas P. Stafford, Command Module Pilot John W. Young, and Lunar Module Pilot Eugene A. Cernan, were strapped into their Command Module (CM) perched atop a Saturn V rocket and lifted off precisely on time at 12:49 PM EDT

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The NASA insignia was designed in 1959 and is filled with symbolism: 🔵 The sphere represents a planet ✨ The stars represent space ✈️ The v-shaped vector represents aeronautics 🚀 The circular orbit represents space travel

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#FBF Pictured here is the Apollo 6 launch vehicle as it leaves Kennedy’s Vehicle Assembly Building on the transporter heading to launch pad 39-A. The uncrewed Apollo 6 mission was the final qualification flight of the Saturn V launch vehicle and the Apollo spacecraft.

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The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the Dragon cargo module climbs upward after liftoff from Space Launch Complex 40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early morning May 4, 2019. Liftoff was at 2:48 a.m. EDT. This is SpaceX’s 17th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-17) mission for NASA to the International Space Station.

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Dragon’s solar arrays have deployed and the spacecraft is safely in orbit following a launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at 2:48 a.m. EDT from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, carrying more than 5,500 pounds of research, hardware and supplies to the International Space Station.

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Space Shuttle Enterprise moments after release from the back of the SCA during the first ALT flight. 🚀 #OTD in 1979: Launch Pad 39A received its first visitor since the launch of the Skylab space station six years earlier. The Space Shuttle Enterprise, the first of a new kind of spacecraft, made the slow 3.5-mile trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to the launch pad, atop the same Mobile Transporter that had carried Saturn V’s during the Apollo Program.

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#OTD in 1990, STS-31 Discovery lifts off to deploy @nasahubble. On board: Loren Shriver, Charlie Bolden, Kathy Sullivan, Bruce McCandless and Steve Hawley

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NASA and the Department of Defense Human Space Flight Support Office Rescue Division are conducting search and rescue training exercises at the Army Warf on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and in the Atlantic Ocean 🌊

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#OTD in 1972 Apollo 16 launched aboard a Saturn V rocket 🚀 In this photo a large crowd of spectators look on as the 363-feet tall Apollo 16 space vehicle moves out of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Launch Complex 39 toward Pad A.

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#OTD in 1981, space shuttle Columbia and STS-1 lifted off with astronauts John W. Young, STS-1 commander, and Robert L. Crippen, pilot, marking the first flight of the Space Shuttle Program. 🚀

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#TBT This week in 1972, Apollo 16 launched 🚀. It carried with it a Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by @nasa_marshall to transport astronauts and materials on the Moon. Today, @nasa is developing the Space Launch System, the most powerful rocket ever built, capable of sending astronauts to the Moon, Mars and deeper into space than ever before.

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Welcome to our Cryogenics Test Laboratory! 👩‍🔬 In the first image, James Fesmire transfers a charged Cryogenic Flux Capacitor device to a bath of water. This demonstration is a visual aid that conveys that a large quantity of fluid is stored in the device at low temperature. In the second image, Fesmire pours liquid nitrogen from a dewar into an insulated glass flask. #NASA

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European Service module, Orion and solar arrays? Oh my! 🚀 All three pieces of hardware are being prepared for the launch of Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) in our Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout building. During EM-1, the spacecraft will travel thousands of miles past the moon on a three-week journey before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean🌑 #NASA

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A test version of the Orion crew module, at left, and the Launch Abort System (LAS) are inside the Launch Abort System Facility (LASF) where they will be integrated. The fully functional LAS will be used for the Orion Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) Flight Test, a full-stress test of the LAS that will launch from Space Launch Complex 46, carrying a 22,000-pound Orion test vehicle to an altitude of 31,000 feet and traveling at more than 1,000 miles an hour.

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NASA Administrator @jimbridenstine spoke to #NASA workers across the nation and members of the news media, during a #Moon2Mars event on March 11, 2019. Behind him is the Orion crew module for Exploration Mission-2. Bridenstine presented a closer look at America’s work to return astronauts to the Moon in a sustainable way and continue exploration to Mars.

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A fit check of the Orion Crew and Service Module Horizontal Transporter (CHT) with NASA's Super Guppy aircraft began March 12, 2019, at NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility in Florida. The fit check is being performed to confirm loading operations, ensure that the CHT fits inside the Super Guppy and test the electrical interface to aircraft power. The Orion crew and service modules will be readied for a trip to NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, for full thermal vacuum testing. In this unique facility, the crew and service modules will be put through extensive testing to ensure they can survive the rigors of launch, space travel, re-entry and splashdown. #NASA #orion #plane

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“I would encourage young people to get as much hands on experience as they can, whether it’s building a car engine or a summer internship,” says Janine Captain, a lead scientific investigator in the Applied Physics Laboratory at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. “I’ve found that the best way to learn is to jump in and do it, ask questions, make mistakes, and keep on going.” Janine says she feels lucky to work for NASA. She was finishing her graduate degree in the field of environmental chemistry when a postdoctoral position at KSC opened up in environmental remediation. “My mentor called me and said, Opportunity knocks!” Janine loves that working for NASA means she gets to meet people across the world. “The In-Situ Resource Utilization work that I’ve been involved with has been a collaboration between so many amazing people, and with each interaction I continue to learn new things.” #nasa

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Haven't had enough of SpaceX’s Demo-1 launch? Pictured is Crew Dragon guided by four parachutes toward the Atlantic Ocean on March 8 after returning from the International Space Station. The uncrewed spacecraft docked to the orbiting laboratory on March 3, following a 2:49 a.m. EST liftoff aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on March 2. #CrewDragon #NASA #SpaceX

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Dr. Ye Zhang, a project scientist in our International Space Station office, has some advice for young people about to start their career. “There are many doors, many options,” she says. “I would tell them to be well prepared, so when the chance comes, they can be ready for it.” Ye’s path to NASA took her around the globe. She grew up and went to medical school in China before moving to Singapore to get her PhD in biochemistry for cancer research – “A very different area [from space],” she says. She then moved to the United States to complete her post-doc at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston where her research areas were cancer gene therapy and immunotherapy. At NASA, Ye's research was focused on investigating the impact of the space environment on a variety of biological organisms. #nasa #womenshistorymonth

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On March 2, SpaceX's #CrewDragon blasted off from Pad 39A on its way to the International Space Station. On March 8 the capsule will undock from the Space Station and splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean. Live coverage of undocking begins at 2 a.m. ET 🚀 #nasa

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The Demo-1 uncrewed flight test to the International Space Station, SpaceX’s inaugural flight with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, is underway following the successful launch Saturday morning of the company’s Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft. The first-of-its-kind mission, planned to be a full demonstration of the spacecraft and its systems, launched on time at 2:49 a.m. EST from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. #NASA #LaunchAmerica

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“There’s a never-ending depth of cool in this world,” marvels Tom Moss, software team lead in the Applied Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Tom says he grew up in a very rural part of Michigan, where their post office was a bag in their general store. “Many of the kids in my high school were the children of farmers, and engineering wasn’t a common career goal,” he says. “Although, many farmers had to practice engineering to keep their equipment running.” Growing up, Tom knew he was interested in physics and new technology. “My dad was a mechanical engineer, and he was always doing cool little construction projects, and I just found it really neat to create a better bug catcher or build a trap door over the attic stairs so he could walk across.” Years later, Tom is now helping with the software for instruments that will one day be used on the moon. In the photo above, Tom demonstrates the Schlieren effect with a lighter on Dec. 12, 2018. Schlieren systems are used to display changes in the air not visible to the naked eye. Here, hot air rises off the flame, and the image is reflected by the mirror below and displayed on the screen above. #nasa

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“I guess I always found physics interesting and mysterious as a kid,” says Dr. Mark Nurge, a physicist in the Applied Physics Laboratory at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. “I went into electronics, and you learn a lot of formulas and things. But you don’t get to see the underpinnings… Why is this the way it is? Where did it come from? Physics allows you to dig deeper and understand what physical principles are giving rise to the mathematical description.” In the photo above, taken Dec. 12, 2018, Mark adjusts cables on an experiment setup in the lab. The experiment seeks to find new methods of propulsion based on electromagnetism that could be used in robots to service the International Space Station. Mark has had a desire to learn throughout his life and has gone back to school multiple times – he calculates he’s actually spent more years in college than he did primary and secondary school. Mark has racked up a bachelor’s and master’s in electrical engineering, a master’s in engineering management, and a masters and PhD in physics. Photo Credit: NASA/Cory Huston

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Happy #valentinesday 💘 On this day in 2016, @stationcdrkelly grew the first zinnias in space. Recently our scientists at the Deep Space Food Production Lab germinated zinnia seeds that returned from the @iss.

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Today at the Space Mirror Memorial, Center Director and astronaut Bob Cabana, spoke at NASA's annual day of remembrance ceremony and wreath-laying. The event honors the astronauts who sacrificed their lives while furthering our nation’s efforts is space exploration and discovery. #nasaremembers

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During SpaceX CRS-16 mission to the International Space Station for NASA, the Dragon spacecraft will deliver ~5,600 pounds of supplies, equipment & numerous science investigations to the crew aboard the station such as GEDI, RRM-3 and more! You can find out what else is on board here: blogs.nasa.gov/spacex

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Good Morning from Kennedy! We are L-1 day until launch of SpaceX CRS-16. Our #NASASocial is underway. Tune in at 9:30am ET to hear What’s on Board the #Dragon spacecraft heading to the International Space Station. Watch live at: nasa.gov/live

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#NASAsocial group is touring the Rotation Processing Surge Facility, where we formally processed Space Shuttle hardware now being utilized to test pathfinder operations for Space Launch System boosters for Exploration Mission 1. #NASASLS #EM1

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Here at Veggie, we are developing deep space food production for destinations such as the Moon and Mars. We will be studying the effects of radiation on plants on the lunar Gateway which is central to advancing and sustaining human space exploration goals. #NASAsocial #NASAICON

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Our #NASAsocial group visits Swamp Works where they learn about how our regolith test bin simulates the mechanical properties of the moon’s surface. RASSOR 2.0 is a robot that is designed to excavate in low gravity regolith. Also, here at Swamp Works, we are testing 3-D printing using regolith to demonstrate concepts needed for deep space exploration to the Moon and then Mars. #NASAICON

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JUST ANNOUNCED! We’re opening our doors for a ‘Moon to Mars’ #NASASocial event on Oct. 24. Apply for a behind-the-scenes look at our work to lead a human return to the Moon and eventually, Mars. Apply at: go.nasa.gov/2R1af6X

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The mobile launcher is now secured inside the Vehicle Assembly Building where NASA's Exploration Ground Systems will validate all systems are aligned and ready for the NASA's Space Launch System and NASA’s Orion Spacecraft integration and assembly in preparation for flight.

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The mobile launcher is almost all the way inside the Vehicle Assembly Building. To the right is the Launch Control Center that will control the launch of NASA's Space Launch System.

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History in the making! First time the modified mobile launcher for NASA's new Space Launch System rocket moves into the Vehicle Assembly Building for testing.

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NASA’s Exploration Ground Systems Cliff Lanham talks about how all the intricate elements on the mobile launcher work together to power the NASA Space Launch System rocket and NASA’s Orion spacecraft at the launch pad for deep space mission beyond low Earth orbit.

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It is a beautiful morning here at Kennedy! Stay tuned for hear additional speakers for today’s mobile launcher event.

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NASA’s Bill Hill and Exploration Ground Systems Program Mike Bolger talk about the mobile launcher and the ground systems that will power NASA’s Exploration Mission-1 on track for 2020. EM-1 is an uncrewed flight of NASA’s Orion Spacecraft that will travel thousands of miles beyond the Moon and back to Earth over the course of approximately 3 weeks.