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What might she be thinking? 🌿 #mood Henri Matisse, “Woman Seated in an Armchair,” 1940, on view in the East Building

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Anna Atkins was one of the first women to take up photography. Trained as a botanist, Atkins used the cyanotype method—a camera-less technique—to capture a range of native British plants. This 1840s print, “Ferns. Specimens of Cyanotype,” will be on view in our upcoming exhibition, “The Eye of the Sun: Nineteenth-Century Photographs from the National Gallery of Art,” which celebrates the 180th anniversary of photography’s introduction to the world. It opens September 8. 📸 #worldphotographyday #theeyeofthesun #cyanotype #annaatkins

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Evenings at the Edge is back this fall with a new name: NGA Nights! Join us on September 12 as we explore the Gallery after hours. We’re heading “Back to School” with pop-up talks, classic jams, and a live version of the hit podcast @missedinhistory. Tap the link in our bio to register, or learn more at NGA.gov/nights. 📸: @austinkgraff #nganights #myngadc #nightatthemuseum #missedinhistory

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Pikachu stopped by the Gallery and visited #JapaneseAnimals on his way to the @pokemon World Championships this weekend! See the exhibition during extended hours until 8pm every night through its final day on Sunday, August 18. #myngadc #pokemon #pikachu

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Tuesday sparkle ✨ Leo Villareal’s “Multiverse” captured by @lifethrualens2016. #myngadc #thosengalights

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Jan Jansz van de Velde III specialized in intimate compositions of simple, everyday objects. “Still Life with Stoneware Jug and Pipe” (1650) is an example of a “tabackje,” or “tobacco still life.” In the work, a wine jug emblazoned with the crest of Amsterdam is surrounded by a long clay Gouda pipe, a paper wrapper filled with tobacco, and an earthenware brazier whose broken sides reveal embers of glowing peat within. Van de Velde was one of the great still-life painters of the Dutch Golden Age, with only 40 or so paintings executed during his short career. This new acquisition is the first work by the artist to enter the Gallery's collection. See it on the Main Floor of the West Building in Gallery 50B. #dutchpainting #stilllife #dutchgoldenage

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Only one week remains to see #JapaneseAnimals! The exhibition is open late every evening through Sunday, August 18—we hope to see you soon! 🦊🦊 Sacred Foxes, Kamakura - Nanbokuch periods, 14th century, wood with pigments, Kiyama Jinja

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In the mid-1860s, Gustave Courbet immersed himself in the sea along the Channel Coast. He swam and painted daily, mesmerized with the beaches of Normandy and their mercurial conditions of weather and light. The artist completed a series of marine paintings, including “Calm Sea” and “The Black Rocks at Trouville.” These two paintings consist of the same strikingly simple compositions—sand, sea, sky—but are distinct in atmosphere and tone. 🌊 #gustavecourbet #seaandsky

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“Harmless Kitty” wishes you a happy International Cat Day. 🐱 See Nara Yoshitomo’s 1994 work (courtesy National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo) in our exhibition “The Life of Animals in Japanese Art,” on view through August 18. 🐱 #japaneseanimals #internationalcatday #narayoshitomo

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Tonight we remember Toni Morrison. The American author was photographed in 1996 by Brian Lanker as part of his series “I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America.” 📚 #tonimorrison

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The feeling of a summer day, captured by Vincent van Gogh. 🌾🍃 #partsofpaintings Detail of “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” 1890

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Every evening through August 18, “The Life of Animals in Japanese Art” will stay open late until 8pm. While you’re here, explore the exhibition with an audio tour or join a nightly pop-up talk at 6 and 7pm. See you tonight! #JapaneseAnimals

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Congratulations to our Museum Assistants - it’s their last day at the Gallery! Tatyiana, Lapreia, and Isis spent their summers working on a variety of projects across the institution. They gave public talks, assisted visitors with information and audio guides, helped run family programs, and learned from staff across the Gallery. Thanks to the Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Program for making their summer jobs possible! #mbsyep #myngadc #washingtondc

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Artwatchers with Oliver Lee Jackson’s “Triptych (3.20.15, 5.21.15, 6.8.15)” in our special exhibition of the artist’s work. See it through September 15 on the Mezzanine of the East Building. 📸: @aquinsta #oliverleejackson #myngadc #artwatchers

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When you find that one work of art and it all seems to make sense... This 📸 of her two-and-a-half year old daughter (with Degas’s “Four Dancers,” c. 1899) taken by Mallory Perry. #myngadc #lifeimitatesart #tinydancer

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This week, Kaywin Feldman’s name was set in stone in the West Building as the fifth Director of the National Gallery of Art. Feldman’s name was carved by Christine Dunn, with final tinting completed by Nick Benson. Benson’s family business, The John Stevens Shop, has been in operation since 1705 and has inscribed many of the Gallery’s panels. ⚒ #myngadc #stonecarving 📸 by Tricia Zigmund, Gallery photographer

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We’re celebrating our summer interns today! As part of the Gallery’s internship and fellowship program, these interns (from 11 states, the Netherlands 🇳🇱, Italy 🇮🇹, and Iran 🇮🇷) work closely with staff, participate in the ongoing work of a department, and attend a biweekly seminar that introduces the variety of departments, programs, and functions of the museum. Internships range from curatorial to publications to facilities management. This summer many of our interns have taken over the Gallery’s Instagram Stories. More in our highlights above ⤴️. Want to learn more about interning at the Gallery? Visit nga.gov/interns #myngadc #ngainterns #nationalinternday

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Just announced: “The Life of Animals in Japanese Art” will stay open until 8pm from August 3-18. For a full schedule of exhibition talks and programs during these extended hours, tap the link in our bio. We hope to see you soon! #japaneseanimals #myngadc

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Have a case of the Mondays? Cheer up with Picasso’s “Peonies” from 1901. 💐 #picasso #summerflowers

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“Artist” is not a word we usually associate with astronaut Neil Armstrong. Yet a photograph taken by him 50 years ago today, “Buzz Aldrin, Moon Walk Reflection” is now in the National Gallery of Art's collection. He and fellow Apollo 11 crew member Buzz Aldrin photographed each other and their marks on the Moon using a camera specially modified for their bulky, gloved hands. 👨‍🚀📸 Find your Sea of Tranquility and check out “By the Light of the Silvery Moon” as we celebrate the anniversary of Apollo 11’s successful Moon landing! 🌖 #apollo50 #apollo11 #ngalunarphotographs

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Stay cool, DC. 💦🏊‍♂️ #heatwave Wilson Shieh and Crown Point Press, printed by Catherine Brooks, “Swimmer,” 2005, color softground etching with aquatint on gampi paper chine collé mounted onto woven paper

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Imagine stepping into Paul Weber’s “Scene in the Catskills” (1858, Corcoran Collection). What might you hear? Smell? Touch? ⛰ #catskills #landscapepainting #paulweber

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🗞+🐚+📚+🥖+🎩 = Charles Bird King, “Poor Artist’s Cupboard,” c. 1815 #worldemojiday #emojisinthewild #trompeloeil

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Rembrandt van Rijn was born on this day in 1606. He painted “A Polish Nobleman” in 1637. Through dramatic accents of light and dark on the sitter’s face, bold brushwork, and dense application of paint, Rembrandt created a powerful, almost sculptural presence. By emphasizing the man’s furrowed brow and by shading his eyes, Rembrandt has portrayed him as a thoughtful individual. 🎨 #rembrandt

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That NGA wall, captured by @jenburnett ✨ #myngadc #thatngawall #architectureandpeople

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This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Photography played a significant role both in preparing for the mission and in shaping the cultural consciousness of the event. “By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs” includes a selection of photographs from the unmanned Ranger, Surveyor, and Lunar Orbiter missions that led up to Apollo 11, as well as iconic NASA and press photographs of the astronauts that were disseminated widely in the wake of the mission's success. See the exhibition beginning Sunday, July 14 through January 5, 2020 on the Ground Floor of the West Building. #ngalunarphotographs #apollo50

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Wandering around the West Building ⛲️ This photo captured by @fotosbymickez #myngadc #nationalgalleryofart

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“Paint generously and unhesitatingly, for it is best not to lose the first impression.” —Camille Pissarro, born on this day in 1830. The artist painted this work, “Landscape, Ile-de-France,” in 1873. 🎨 #camillepissarro #onthisday

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Happy birthday to David Hockney! The British artist turns 82 today. He made this color etching, “Godetia,” in 1973. 💐 #davidhockney #hbd #flowersinart

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In this print, short-tailed pet cats join to form the head of a feline monster. This type of puzzle print is called ‘yose-e,’ or ‘assembled picture,’ in which small images combine to make a larger one. How many cats can you find? 🐈 Utagawa Yoshifuji’s woodblock print “The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō: The Bewitched Cat of Okabe” (c. 1847-1848, woodblock print, via @meadartmuseum) is on view in the exhibition “The Life of Animals in Japanese Art.” See it in the East Building through August 18. #japaneseanimals #catpuzzle

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We know this girl might not be playing soccer, but she could be the next best goalie. Plus, we’re so excited for Team USA! Good luck in the World Cup Final match today, @uswnt, we’re rooting for you! ⚽️🏃‍♀️ #womensworldcup #uswnt #fifawwc Frank Paulin, “Girl Playing Ball, Seville, Spain,” 1960, gelatin silver print, Corcoran Collection

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A critic once called Tintoretto “the most extraordinary brain that the art of painting has ever produced.” His rich colors and fast, loose brushwork stunned contemporary Venetian viewers. “Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice” brings together nearly 50 paintings and over a dozen works on paper for the first time in North America. See the artist's retrospective through this Sunday, July 7. #tintoretto500 Jacopo Tintoretto, “Self-Portrait,” c. 1588, oil on canvas, @museelouvre, Paris, Départment des Peintures

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Happy Independence Day, America! We’re celebrating with Ellison Hoover’s 1930 nighttime depiction of the Statue of Liberty. What does liberty mean to you? 🇺🇸 #4thofJuly #IndependenceDay

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What sounds might you hear walking down this summer street? ☀️🎶 Grace Hartigan, “Summer Street,” 1956, Corcoran Collection

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Cooling off in the East Building with Isamu Noguchi’s “Great Rock of Inner Seeking” (1974, basalt). 📸: @yoonjoyce #myngadc #isamunoguchi

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Monet painted this specific bridge 41 times. What might have intrigued him so much about it? Claude Monet, “Waterloo Bridge, London, at Sunset,” 1904; “Waterloo Bridge, London, at Dusk,” 1904; “Waterloo Bridge, Gray Day,” 1903 #monet #claudemonet

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Philip Guston was born #onthisday in 1913. Guston uniquely bridged the personal and the political, the abstract and the figurative, and the humorous and the tragic in paintings of lively touch and memorable impact. Today, we’re excited to announce #PhilipGustonNow, a major retrospective opening in June 2020 organized with @MFAH, @Tate, and @mfaboston. The touring exhibition will present approximately 125 paintings and 70 drawings from across the artist's career, including early works from the 1930's that have never been on public view and well-known later works. Tap the link in bio to learn more about the exhibition. Philip Guston, “Painter's Table,” 1973, oil on canvas, © The Estate of Philip Guston

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Recent visitor Edgar ( @edgarexplorer) gives Frank Stella’s “Prinz Friedrich von Homburg, Ein Schauspiel, 3X” (1998-2001) a sniff of approval. 🐶 #myngadc #dogsofngadc #dogsofinstagram

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Time for a summer garden party! The artist has contributed a decanter, lemons, and figs to this still life. What's one thing you might add? Benjamin Benno, “Still Life with Decanter, Lemons and Figs,” 1935, pochoir #stilllife #summer #pochoir

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Our Community Weekend celebrating “The Life of Animals in Japanese Art” starts tonight! We’re open until 8:00 pm for taiko drumming, a sake tasting, DIY buttons and manga drawing, and a kimono fashion show. Tomorrow, stop by with the whole family for Japanese folktales, origami, films, and more. See you this weekend! #JapaneseAnimals Yayoi Kusama, “Megu-chan,” Heisei period, 2014, fiberglass-reinforced plastic, paint, courtesy Cori and Tony Bates; “Toko-chan,” Heisei period, 2013, fiberglass-reinforced plastic; paint, private collection

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It's the first day of summer, and we're celebrating with 1943 photograph by Genevieve Naylor. The artist shot this strikingly composed picture, “Models in Swimsuits,” while working for Harper’s Bazaar magazine. Naylor—one of the first women photographers hired by the Associated Press—worked for the magazine for 15 years after returning from a diplomatic wartime assignment in Brazil. ☀️ #firstdayofsummer

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Arshile Gorky, born Vostanik Manoug Adoian, was a survivor of the Armenian Genocide. He fled to the United States with his sister a year after he watched his mother, Shushan, die from starvation in 1919. When he arrived in New York, his father gave him the only remaining photograph of him and his mother. This painting and another version owned by the @whitneymuseum in New York are based on the photograph. Gorky labored over both paintings for many years. What emotions do you imagine Gorky might have felt while making this painting? #worldrefugeeday

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In the summer of 1968, activists took over the National Mall to raise awareness on the widespread effects of poverty; the movement was known as the Poor People’s Campaign. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a central figure in the campaign, bringing together different groups of people in support of a living wage for all. On June 19, over 150,000 gathered on the National Mall in support of the campaign’s goals and to celebrate Juneteenth Solidarity Day, honoring the historical date of emancipation for African Americans across former Confederate states in America. This photo, captured by photographer Benedict J. Fernandez, is from this summer of 1968 in DC. What strikes you about this photo? #juneteenth

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Marie Laurencin was one of the best-known women artists in France in the 1920s and 1930s. She was sought-after for portrait commissions, created popular prints, and designed theatre sets and costumes. Laurencin was bisexual, though she largely kept this private and separate from her public career as an artist. Instead the artist played to her audience’s expectation of “feminine” imagery while also making a subtle commentary on societal expectations for women of her time. In honor of LGBTQ Pride Month, join a gallery talk tomorrow, June 19, and next Tuesday, June 25, at 1:00 pm on Laurencin’s 1928 work “Girl with a Dove.” 🕊 #marielaurencin #lgbtq #pride #pridemonth

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Celebrating Father’s Day with this detail of Paul Cézanne’ “The Artist's Father, Reading ‘L'Événement’” (1866, oil on canvas). Stopping by the Gallery today? See this work in gallery 90 on the Main Floor of the West Building. #fathersday #paulcezanne

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A little weekend color 🔷🔶 This photo of Katharina Fritsch’s “Hahn/Cock” (2013) captured by @phil.martin #myngadc

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Margaret Burroughs was only in her late 20s when she painted this bold, patterned still life in 1943. By that time, she had already co-founded Chicago's South Side Community Art Center, in 1941. The center became a cultural powerhouse and artistic hub for the city's African American community. The word “powerhouse” also applies to Burroughs. She was a career educator, influential poet and author, accomplished artist, activist and organizer, museum founder and director, and served as a Chicago Park District Commissioner. See “Still Life” on the Ground Level of the East Building in a special installation of works from The Evans-Tibbs Collection. #margaretburroughs #stilllife #nationalgalleryofart

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Mischievous, jolly, and sometimes absent-minded: these are the characteristics of ‘tanuki,’ the Japanese raccoon dog. In Japanese folklore, tanuki are known as masters of disguise. This glazed stoneware raccoon dog is dressed as a Buddhist monk, and might be parodying a well-fed member of the clergy. See Nin’ami Dōhachi’s “Raccoon Dog” (Edo period, 19th century, via @tokyonationalmuseum) in our exhibition “The Life of Animals in Japanese Art,” on view through August 18. #japaneseanimals #raccoondog #tanuki

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Contented cows graze 🐄, fishermen drag their nets in the pond 🎣, and puffy clouds dance over a country estate ⛅️. Take a look at John Constable's 1816 work “Wivenhoe Park, Essex.” Painted outside, Constable captured the radiance of a summer day with naturalistic details. The artist covered half the canvas with a bright sky, letting the billowing clouds interact with the landscape. Where does the light catch your eye? ⛅️ #johnconstable #wivenhoepark #landscapepainting

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Take a look at Fidelia Bridges’s “Pink Roses.” The work is an intensely detailed floral study—a favorite subject and approach of the American Pre-Raphaelites. What are some of the ways that this 1875 watercolor also verges on abstraction? 🌹 #fideliabridges #radicalrealists #flowersinart