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Roya Rahmani, the first woman to be Afghanistan’s ambassador to the United States, remembers all too well what her country was like under the Taliban’s rule in the 1990s. Women were beaten for leaving their homes and barred from attending school or holding jobs. “People were drained of hope,” she said. Today, women make up 28% of the Afghan National Assembly — more than in the U.S. Congress. But as the U.S. and the Taliban move toward a preliminary peace agreement, which could be released in days, there are growing concerns that the gains Afghan women have made over nearly 2 decades will be lost under future Afghan governments. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @lexey took this photo.

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What does a presidential campaign sound like? For one, candidates love to play songs about love. Swipe➡️to see what else we found when we analyzed rally playlists from 10 of the candidates running for president in the 2020 U.S. elections. In some cases, their messaging synchronized with the music: @kirstengillibrand, for example, has been clear about her focus on women’s rights in her campaign. 73% of her playlist is made up of songs by women artists. Visit the link in our bio to see our full analysis and hear the songs. Let us know which one’s your favorite to listen to in the comments below.

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400 years ago, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No part of America has been untouched by the years of slavery that followed. “Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different — it might not be a democracy at all,” writes Nikole Hannah-Jones. To explore the legacy of slavery, The New York Times and @nytmag have started the #1619Project, a collection of essays, criticism, art and an audio series from more than 30 contributors about the lasting impact of American slavery. Each of the stories in the #1619Project takes up a modern phenomenon and reveals its history. From the lack of universal health care to mass incarceration, from the brutality of capitalism to the epidemic of sugar, The 1619 Project explores how America’s years of slavery still shape the country today. Click on the link in our bio or check out our Instagram story to see more. @dannielle_bowman shot this photo.

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In a Syria shattered by 8 years of civil war, what does a government victory look like? At least half a million people are dead. More than 11 million have been severed from their homes. Grandparents are raising their orphaned grandchildren in abandoned buildings. And so many men are gone that it’s up to the women — many of them working for the first time — to try to rebuild. Our journalists, given rare access to the country, found ruin, grief and generosity. Tap the link in our bio to read their full report. @meridithkohut took these photos.

NYTimes

In @nytopinion⁣⁣, the Editorial Board writes: “As he announced that he was firing the police officer who had put Eric Garner in the chokehold that led to his death, New York City’s police commissioner, James O’Neill, sent the country’s largest police force a message: You may not think I’m on your side, but I am.” ⁣⁣⁣ ⁣ “It was a powerful message from one of the most prominent law enforcement officials in the country: Police officers who violate the public trust must be held accountable, for the good of the public and the police force.”⁣⁣⁣ ⁣ “But Mr. O’Neill said that Mr. Garner’s death ‘must have a consequence.’ It must. And, after too many years, it finally has.” Visit the link in our bio to read more. @damonwinter took this photo of Eric Garner's gravestone, which refers to Mr. Garner as “Beloved son, brother, husband, father & grandfather.” ⁣⁣

NYTimes

One minute, it was a wedding — nearly a thousand guests packed under one roof. The next minute, a suicide bomber walked in, leaving at least 63 people dead and nearly 200 wounded. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the blast. Violent loss in Afghanistan is often a daily reality, but weddings — a celebration of union — had largely remained the exception, occasions when people could dance without guilt, laugh without hesitation. For the bride and groom, who survived, and hundreds of their relatives, that respite was snatched. On Sunday, the couple's new bedroom sat unused and mourners gathered for funerals. The attack came at a time when American negotiators are finalizing a deal with Taliban insurgents to extricate U.S. forces from the country after 18 years. Although the Taliban wage the majority of insurgent violence, the Islamic State — no ally of the Taliban’s — has also established a small but stubborn foothold in Afghanistan and has claimed responsibility for many deadly explosions. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @jimhuylebroek took these photos.

NYTimes

Phoenix is getting hotter, and the city's schedules of work and play are shifting later into cooler hours. Neighborhoods come to life at dawn and dusk, when residents hike, jog and paddleboard. Many take to the city’s 200 miles of rocky trails after dark to avoid heatstroke. And across the city, certain construction work starts in the middle of the night — not only for the safety of workers, but also because even some building materials can be affected by intense heat. (Concrete, for example, can get too hot or dry too quickly and later crack.) Even night is not the respite from heat it once was: It can still be 100 degrees long after sunset. But for some residents seeking to escape blistering temperatures, the evening is the new start of the day. That will be true for more cities as the world gets hotter. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @george_etheredge took these photos.

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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @kasia_strek shot these photos for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think she was when she captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)

NYTimes

On his first album in eight years, Raphael Saadiq explores his personal history like never before. “It’s probably the most honest record I’ve ever made,” the Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter said. “Jimmy Lee” is named for his brother, who overdosed in the 1990s after contracting H.I.V. The album uses his brother’s story to tell a broader one about lives under pressure, while bringing his family’s tragedies into his music. It wasn’t his plan to make a concept album, but over the course of a few nights in this studio in early 2019, he began to hear the ghosts speak. Visit the link in our bio to read why it took @raphael_saadiq more than two decades into his career to bring these stories into his music. @peterprato took this photo.

NYTimes

This falcon is part of an elite assassination squad with a very particular mark: the seagulls of a Jersey Shore boardwalk. The gulls have grown more aggressive and taken to dive-bombing beachgoers for their snacks, and some have even learned to bite people so they drop their food. After more than a few incidents, Ocean City, New Jersey, finally decided it had had enough: Officials unleashed a posse of trained raptors — four hawks, two falcons and one owl — to try to tame the gulls. Now they have to keep an eye out for these sharp-clawed bouncers of the skies. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @michellegustafson took this photo of children listening to a falconer explain how the birds patrol the boardwalk.

NYTimes

Sometimes all you need for a great meal is a pile of peak summer vegetables, just off the grill, topped with a garlicky, lemony tahini dressing. For this recipe, take care to keep the fire medium-hot, so you can cook the vegetables without letting them become scorched. A bit of char is nice, of course, but don’t try for perfect grill marks. Visit the link in our bio to get @david_tanis' recipe for @nytcooking and remember to hit save. @andrewscrivani took this photo, with food styling by Iah Pinkney.

NYTimes

Sho Madjozi is a new kind of global pop star. One of South Africa’s biggest breakthrough musicians, she pays homage to her heritage while updating it, cutting across continents and genres. In past years, she has played at European festivals — including in Barcelona, Berlin and Krakow — and shared a bill with Beyonce and Ed Sheeran at the Global Citizen Festival. On Aug. 17, she will perform in Warm Up, a concert series @momaps1 in Queens that spotlights rising international artists. @shomadjozi spent most of her youth outside of South Africa, growing up amid cultural influences from around the world, but it is the Tsonga heritage of her birthplace that she is best known for celebrating. Being Tsonga — a distinct ethnic group with its own language and culture — “wasn’t cool” growing up, she said, and she wanted to change that. Now, she regularly wears traditional Tsonga garb onstage and off, presenting a fun, positive and empowering image of what a young African woman might be like, Madjozi said, if she “didn’t come from a place that had been subjected to colonialism and apartheid.” Visit the link in our bio to read more. @edu_bayer shot this photo.

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When the Indian government shut down Kashmir’s internet and phone services earlier this month, it brought the region to a halt. Everyday transactions, family communications, online entertainment and the flow of money and information have been paralyzed — and shopkeepers say that vital supplies like insulin and baby food, usually ordered online, are running out. India announced on Friday that restrictions would be eased over the next few days, with schools and government offices to reopen on Monday and phone service to be gradually restored. The blackout has been part of India’s decision earlier this month to wipe out the autonomy of Jammu and Kashmir, an area home to 12.5 million people that is claimed by both India and Pakistan and has long been a source of tension. India’s Hindu nationalists have long wanted to curtail the special freedoms that the predominantly Muslim territory has enjoyed. But many were still stunned by this month’s move, seeing it as an attempt by Narendra Modi, India’s forceful prime minister, to consolidate power. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @lokeatul took this photo.

NYTimes

Plastic is filling up the world. Studies have detected plastic fibers in the stomachs of sperm whales, in tap water — even in table salt. But as concern grows about plastic debris in the oceans and in our bodies, the production of new plastic is booming, with more than a dozen plastic-producing plants being built or planned around the world by petrochemical companies. One new plant is the Shell Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex, under construction outside of Pittsburgh. Once completed, the plant will convert natural gas into plastics, producing more than a million tons of plastic in the form of tiny pellets, which will be turned into items like phone cases, auto parts and food packaging. Many in the Pittsburgh area see it as an economic engine, but others worry about long-term harm. On Tuesday, President Trump toured the chemical plant, touching on energy policy and speaking to workers about the jobs the plant would create and the benefits that would be offered. He also claimed credit for the project, however the plans for the chemical complex were announced in 2012 while President Barack Obama was in office. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @ross_man_tle took this photo.

NYTimes

Futhu dreamed of educating the children in his village. But soon he learned that it was dangerous for the Rohingya to dream. A Muslim minority group, the Rohingya have been the target of an ongoing brutal ethnic cleansing campaign by the Myanmar military that has forced hundreds of thousands to flee to Bangladesh in the wake of systematic killings, rape and torched villages. That strife shaped Futhu’s life in his village: Ever since he was small, he knew that Rohingya on the border of Myanmar were considered illegal immigrants by both Myanmar and Bangladesh. The Burmese government said they were Bangladeshi. Bangladesh maintained they were Burmese. So a question hung over them: How could they not be offspring of this land? Did they fall from the sky? Seeking to answer those questions of identity for the children of his community, Futhu set out to teach them their history and culture. That act almost cost him his life. Visit the link in our bio to read more from @nytmag. @adamjdean took this photo.

NYTimes

There are nearly 4,000 strip clubs in the U.S. Last year, they brought in $7 billion in revenue. But in many places, the price of a lap dance has remained essentially unchanged since 1990, despite inflation. “If you ask the customer to pay more than $20, they’ll look at you like you have two heads,” said Zara Moon, a stripper and artist in Los Angeles. In response to issues like this, dancers and their allies across the nation are fighting to reform labor practices; put an end to sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace; and reduce the stigma around what they believe is as legitimate a profession as any. Click the link in our bio to read more. @fremson and @septemberdawnbo shot these photographs.

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The Wayuu, an indigenous group of shepherds in South America, survived colonization, war and separation due to the creation of national borders. They lived off the land for hundreds of years before Venezuela or Colombia were founded. But Venezuela’s economic collapse today proved too much for those living there: Many have left. And for Wayuu traveling on foot to their Colombian counterparts, the search for a new home hasn’t gone according to plan. The influx of arrivals to Colombian settlements like Parenstu was taxing for their new hosts, who were torn between a desire to help and an instinct to protect their resources. Celinda Vangrieken, pictured in the second photo, is the leader of Parenstu and her family has lived in Colombia for a century. She said she watched with sympathy as refugees arrived, haggard and desperate. But while they might be her people, she said they’re not her blood. “They said, ‘We’re Wayuu, we’re from here like you,’” she said. “But this is not their land.” The struggle reflects the broader crisis upending Latin America, where a mass exodus of Venezuelans is testing neighboring countries. This month, Colombia announced it will give citizenship to more than 24,000 undocumented children of Venezuelan refugees born in the country. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @estascalles took these photos.

NYTimes

If you’ve ever felt rage while commuting, know that you’re not alone — these photos from the 1940s onward show how people have been commuting over the decades. Some people walked. Some biked. Others took the subway or a boat. In 1996, a heavy snowfall turned one man’s commute from New Jersey to Long Island City into a 6-hour test of endurance. “This is absurd,” the man told a Times reporter. “I’ll probably get to work just in time to come back.” But it’s not all bleak. These photos also record the triumph of the human spirit, depicting the ways people have reinvented the commute over the years. Tim Koors, @fredrconrad, Doug Wilson and Dith Pran took these photos. #TBT

NYTimes

Trips to the beach are one of the enduring delights of summer. The blankets and umbrellas, the briny air, the rhythmic waves. From the shores of Rhode Island to California, to the Lake of the Ozarks, to Hawaii and the Florida Panhandle, this summer we took a look at some of the best beaches in America — and for those of you who prefer pools, we’ve got you covered, too. Visit the link in our bio to read up on which #beaches and #pools you should keep on your radar for this last stretch of summer. @annabellerosephoto, @rdiazphoto, @marcogarciaphotography, @annapetrow, and @allegraanderson took these photos.

NYTimes

No boy has been born in this Polish village for almost a decade. The anomaly first drew the attention of the Polish media when the small agricultural community with a declining population, Miejsce Odrzanskie, sent an all-girls team to a regional competition for young volunteer firefighters. Residents aren’t sure what accounts for the lack of boys, but many think it might just be a coincidence. The mayor of the surrounding area has offered a reward for the next couple to have a boy. In the meantime, in a village with no schools, coffee houses, restaurants or even a grocery store, the volunteer fire department has become the center of social life — and the youth team has been winning competitions in Poland since it was founded 6 years ago. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @kasia_strek took this photo.

NYTimes

Meet the women redefining Jamaican dancehall. Known for its raunchy lyrics and explicitly provocative style, dancehall music blossomed in 1970s Jamaica and has long been dominated by men. Now it is in the midst of a global revival, with many more women making dancehall music — and by taking on topics like queer love and colorism, they are changing the language of the genre. Check out our Instagram story and visit the link in our bio to read more. @rorosiemarie took these photos of @spiceofficial, @mslegendary, @jadakingdom and @shenseea.

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Amelia Earhart’s disappearance in 1937 has led to wild and unfounded theories: that she was an American spy captured by the Japanese, or that she lived out her days after assuming a false identity as a New Jersey housewife. But a new and unexpected clue about the details of her plane crash recently emerged: a tiny speck (less than one millimeter long) in a photograph that intelligence analysts say resembles the landing gear of Earhart’s Electra. After studying the photo, Robert Ballard, who found the Titanic and other famous shipwrecks, began searching for the lost plane this month with Allison Fundis, a rising explorer he hopes will eventually take his place. The two explorers are confident they will find the lost plane. Visit the link in our bio to find out more and see the new photographic evidence.

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A common peeve among tailors: too much dry cleaning, poorly done. Unless there is a stain or a lot of sweat, let the wool heal itself. Inside the colorful hives of activity that are Brooklyn’s tailor shops, politics are a battleground, but so are pleats. The photographer @stephensperanza, who owns a total of one suit — off-the-rack — started venturing into tailor shops in Brooklyn to explore what seemed like a dated practice. But inside their doors he found vibrant cultural scenes, with virtuosic artisans and conversations out of barber shops. For Yosel Tiefenbrun, a bespoke tailor and non-practicing Chabad rabbi of East Williamsburg, it is difficult to watch a customer drape a custom suit over a metal chair. One tailor said he had made suits for Jay-Z; another said his business boomed during the crack era, but when the neighborhood gentrified, clients stopped commissioning suits and instead only came for quick alterations. “I like to mix colors and fabrics to make one-of-a-kind garments,” said Antonio Brown, pictured in the third photo. “Once I make a design, I don’t do it again.” Click the link in our bio to see more of Stephen’s photos and make sure to follow @nytimesfashion for more sartorial inspiration.

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Plastic waste is a scourge of modern life. On the Ivory Coast, a group of women is turning it into an asset that will help other women earn a decent living while cleaning up the environment – and improving education. The women make their living in Abidjan picking up plastic waste on the city streets and selling it for recycling. They’re lead players in a project that turns trash into plastic bricks to build schools across the West African country. The new plastic-brick classrooms are badly needed — some classrooms now pack in as many as 90 students. And while mud brick erodes in the sun and rain, the new plastic classrooms could last practically forever. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @yagazieemezi took this photo.

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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @darrenshiggins shot these photos for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think he was when he captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)

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Candace Bushnell, the writer best known as the creative force behind “Sex and the City,” lives in a one-bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper East Side. “It’s a single woman’s apartment, which feels great,” she said. “I’m in the same building where Dorothy Parker lived.” We asked her to detail her Sunday routine, which includes a 30-minute bounce session on her mini trampoline. “As I’ve gotten older I’ve become more solitary. This routine isn’t the routine I had 20 years ago. I wouldn’t have exercised. I would have had a boozy brunch with friends,” @candacebushnell said. Visit the link in our bio to get into the nitty-gritty of how she spends her Sunday. @michelleagins took this photo of Candace in her apartment.

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Don't go in that water. Normally, New Jersey’s largest lake would be buzzing with swimmers and water skiers this time of year. But workers have been laid off, sailing lessons canceled and summers ruined as clouds of blue-green algae — which make the water unsafe for swimmers — are blooming in quantities never before recorded. Climate change is a likely factor, scientists say, in an increase in blooms of cyanobacteria — single-cell organisms that, when they grow densely, can produce toxic substances. Click the link in our bio to read more. @rickloomis shot this photo.

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“It’s like the Olympic ceremony of wine — except it happens daily for almost a month,” writes Sebastian Modak, our #52Places traveler. The Swiss aren’t generally known for dancing all night to ABBA. But every 20 years or so, the small town of Vevey lets loose with an over-the-top party during its winegrower’s festival, Fête des Vignerons. The celebration of local winemaking traditions prides itself on happening only once in a generation, and the entire town is transformed throughout the festival, with parades marching along the shore of Lake Geneva. Every day of the festival, a different canton of Switzerland is represented — a crowd of wizard-looking men in cork top hats from Geneva one day, steampunk marching bands from Fribourg, pictured, the next. Click the link in our bio to read more from @sebmodak, who took this photo, and make sure to follow @nytimestravel.

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The only words more beautiful than "tomato season" are "Hi, I made you this roasted tomato tart with ricotta and pesto." For this savory snack, you'll want smaller, sturdier tomatoes, salted to accompany the tanginess of the crispy, crème fraîche-brushed pastry. This tart is best eaten at its flaky prime straight out of the oven, but it’s also great cold, devoured directly from the fridge. Get @alexaweibel's recipe from @nytcooking at the link in our bio, and don't forget to hit save to bookmark this for later. @christophertestani took this photo and it was styled by @bwashbu.

NYTimes

The deep blues and white-out whites of Santorini exercise a particular hold on the romantic imagination. The Greek island has become the ultimate destination for pre-wedding photographs and developed into a multibillion-dollar business — particularly for Chinese and Taiwanese couples. For 26-year-old Tzuchi Lin and his fiancée, Yingting Huang, having their pre-wedding shots made on Santorini meant the world. “It’s very exciting. Actually, we didn’t sleep last night,” he said. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @lauraboushnak took this photo of the couple in the midst of their photo shoot.

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Jeffrey Epstein, the financier indicted on sex trafficking charges last month, committed suicide at a Manhattan jail, officials said on Saturday. This is a developing story. Tap the link in our bio for more details.

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Which of these people should run a media empire? “Succession” returns for its second season on Sunday. In its first season, the HBO series was perfectly attuned to this era of the 0.0001 percent, offering a no-holds-barred look inside the fictional Roy family that bristled with the drama of generational conflict. Savored by fans for its ability to cut the rich and influential down to size, the show will try to continue to strike its balance of discord, farce and tragedy without repeating itself and avoid the dreaded sophomore slump that plagued “Big Little Lies,” “Westworld” and “True Detective.” “Sometimes when you write a second season, the first draft can feel like self-parody,” said Jesse Armstrong, its creator, in a recent interview that also included the actors who play Logan Roy (Brian Cox) and his children Kendall (Jeremy Strong), Roman (Kieran Culkin), Shiv (Sarah Snook) and Connor (Alan Ruck). To find out who the cast thinks should take over the Waystar Royco media empire, click the link in our bio. @vincenttullo shot these portraits.

NYTimes

David Morrison is 7 years old and carries the scars of Ferguson’s upheaval. A veteran protester, he has fled gunshots and tear gas, marched, waved signs and played dead on the asphalt in years of activism that unspooled after a white police officer killed an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown. This is the inheritance of the children in Ferguson, Missouri, where a generation has grown up amid uneven progress in the aftermath of a national reckoning. David’s mother, Aminah Ali, got involved in a citizen-journalism project after the killing of Michael Brown and took David along to protests when he was a preschooler. But one night she began to notice the toll on her son. He jolts awake from nightmares on the living-room couch where he often sleeps, and then cracks open her bedroom door to reassure himself she is still there. “I overexposed him,” she said. “I just felt like, my son needs to be out here. He needs to be exposed to what the police are doing to us. But he was too young.” Many of Ferguson’s young residents threw themselves into student activism, while others pulled away from the rising movement they watched their parents join. And although the city has made some visible changes to its government and criminal justice system, some residents say Ferguson is not moving quickly or aggressively enough to undo long-running racial inequities. Check out our Instagram story and visit the link in our bio to read more. @jaredsoares took this photo.

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An unmarried woman older than 25 in Japan was once called a "Christmas cake," a slur referencing pastries that can’t be sold after Dec. 25. Now the slur is fading as more and more women are choosing to remain single, rejecting the traditional path in which wives and mothers are expected to bear the brunt of domestic labor. The wave is so striking that a growing number of businesses now cater specifically to single women. There are single karaoke salons with women-only zones, restaurants designed for solo diners and apartment complexes that target women looking to buy or rent homes on their own. Travel companies book tours for single women, and photo studios offer sessions in which women can don wedding dresses and pose for solo bridal portraits. “We don’t have to rely on men anymore,” said one single woman, who lives in a condominium she bought herself. @andreadicenzo took these photos. Read more about Japanese women’s newfound cultural and economic freedom at the link in our bio.

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This salad is essentially just a bowl of all the juicy, crunchy things to love about summer. Mix up a watermelon and feta combo with medium-diced cucumbers and melon — or cut them smaller to make it more of a salsa. Don't forget the feta. Click the link in our bio for @martharoseshulman's recipe and more from @nytcooking. @dmalosh took this photo.

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Toni Morrison, the Nobel laureate whose work explored black identity in America, died on Monday in New York at 88. She was the first African-American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature for works which, as the Swedish Academy put it, gave “life to an essential aspect of American reality.” In her first novel, “The Bluest Eye,” she told the story “with a prose so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry,” wrote John Leonard in his New York Times review. . Morrison authored 11 novels as well as children’s books and essay collections, among them celebrated works like “Song of Solomon” and the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Beloved,” widely considered her masterwork. As her writing makes clear, the past is just as strongly manifest in the bonds of family, community and race — bonds that let culture, identity and a sense of belonging be transmitted from parents to children to grandchildren. These generational links, her work unfailingly suggests, form the only salutary chains in human experience. Visit the link in our bio and check out our Instagram story to read more. @damonwinter took this portrait.

NYTimes

Kayakers fear them. Commercial captains hate them. But once a year, the Jet Ski Invasion takes over New York’s waterways for a couple of hours of controlled chaos. The invasion is a simple idea with a precise schedule. During the last week of June, participants met at the Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City, near the border of Queens and Brooklyn. They traveled the narrow expanse of the East River and concluded in the Hudson by the George Washington Bridge. “Jet skiing is one of the lowest price points to entry to get into boating generally, and certainly in New York,” said Adam Schwartz, the owner of Sea the City, a tour company based in Jersey City, N.J. But one logistical challenge is the increasingly crowded harbor. This year, the New York City Ferry Service added additional routes. Personal watercraft tourism is continuing to expand but, not everybody is happy about it. @thecadejo took this photo of the gathering. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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At a vigil on Sunday in Dayton, Ohio, strangers grasped each other in long, tearful hugs after yet another mass shooting in America, as friends of those who had died stood alongside those who had escaped. “I don’t know why I’m surprised,” one mourner said. “This happens all the time.” The gunman’s own sister was among the 9 people killed in the barrage of gunfire in Dayton, which happened less than 14 hours after a shooting at a Walmart in El Paso that left 22 dead and dozens wounded. On a bluff overlooking the store, which is near the border with Mexico, mourners stood silently at a memorial Sunday night. “Even though it is a big city,” one resident said, “it’s a small community.” The gunman in El Paso, angered by what he called a “Hispanic invasion of Texas,” targeted Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in the attack, and the city’s residents — though hurt and shaken — were defiant as a ubiquitous message appeared on signs and in speeches at vigils: “Hate will not define us.” Mourners in both cities have implored lawmakers for gun control, and on Monday, President Trump initially called for tougher background checks for prospective gun buyers. Hours before speaking at the White House, the president proposed “marrying” gun measures with new immigration laws — two of the most politically divisive issues facing U.S. lawmakers. But in his address later Monday morning, he stopped well short of endorsing broad gun control measures, instead falling back on time-honored Republican remedies, calling for stronger action to address mental illness, and violence in the media and in video games. @maddiemcgarvey, @ajmast and Jim Wilson took these photos from Dayton and El Paso. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio for the latest updates.

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Setesdal has long been considered by many Norwegians to be a fascinating but provincial region whose inhabitants clung to outmoded ways. The area’s rich traditions of fiddle music, song, dance, costume and even language are all curiously distinct from the rest of Norway. But the very distinctions that once prompted urbanites to mock the valley’s rural inhabitants have become sources of interest and pride, even as some inhabitants are leaving for school and work opportunities elsewhere. As those from the region are looking for ways to preserve their customs and keep relevant in the digital era, the historically insular valley is now opening itself to visitors and sharing Setesdal’s natural beauty and cultural wealth with outsiders. Click the link in our bio to read more and follow @nytimestravel for more travel inspiration. @villanueva.photo shot these photos.

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Earth is to elephants as the ocean is to whales. It is their medium, their world, their instrument. They communicate through it. They migrate vast distances across it. They cover themselves in it as protection from the sun. They gather the bones of their dead herd members on it for mourning rituals. But despite mounting evidence that elephants find captivity torturous, some American zoos still keep acquiring them from Africa — aided by a tall tale about why they needed to leave home. At what point does our wonder no longer warrant wounding another being? Read more from @nytmag at the link in our bio. Photographed by@robin_schwartz.

NYTimes

In less than 24 hours, 2 mass shootings in the United States have left at least 29 people dead. The killings are the latest in a particularly brutal week for gun violence in the country. On Saturday, a 21-year-old gunman turned a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, into a scene of chaos in an attack that left at least 20 people dead and 26 others wounded. About 13 hours later, a man stormed an entertainment district in Dayton, Ohio, and killed at least 9 people and wounded another 27. Last week, a gunman killed 3 people and wounded 13 others in a shooting at a garlic festival in Gilroy, California. In all, there have been at least 32 mass shootings — defined as 3 or more killings in a single episode — in the U.S. this year. @adrianazehbrauskas, Jorge Salgado, @cttobin, @howdyluke and Carlos Sanchez took these photos, which are from Dayton and El Paso. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio for the latest updates.

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If you're a fan of “Gossip Girl,” you probably recognize this room. At Lotte New York Palace in New York there is a tour that isn’t advertised online or at check-in for hotel guests. The only way to find out about it is through word-of-mouth — or, well, this Instagram post. The hotel was the home of Serena van der Woodsen and Chuck Bass, some of the main characters of “Gossip Girl.” Throughout the show’s 6 seasons, the hotel became a character of its own, with other characters referring to it just as “the palace.” With the show’s reboot on HBO Max announced in July, the tour — which is currently free — may become even more popular. @kmarksphoto took this photo. Visit the link in our profile to read more. XOXO, @nytimestravel.

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Mango sticky rice, but make it... an ice-cold pudding pop. For this take on the beloved Thai dessert, use glutinous sticky rice soaked overnight, then steamed. Don’t be tempted to use any other kind of rice here — the signature chew is a big part of this frozen treat's appeal. Click the link in our bio to get @samanthaseneviratne's @nytcooking recipe, or tag a friend who would love it. #nyticecream @linda.xiao took this photo.

NYTimes

Should black people wear sunscreen? Because people of color are often left out of clinical trials and treatments, there is very little research available about dark-skinned people and skin cancer, and the answer is more complicated than it may seem. Click the link in our bio to read more. @nytchangster took this photo.

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A team of hurricane hunters (yes, that’s a real job), a photographer and one of our reporters flew into the heart of Tropical Storm Barry in July. Like doctors taking a CT scan, hurricane hunters gather real-time data that is crucial to understanding hurricanes across the globe. It is especially important to gather data from weather systems like Barry that defy predictions: The weirdest storms can sometimes produce the best science. The 14-member crew — all with earplugs and a plastic sick bag handy — spent a total of eight hours on the flight researching the storm. “Think about putting a GoPro in the dishwasher — and then running it,” said one of the pilots about flying near storm systems. “That’s what you see.” Click the link in our bio to read more. @nytchangster took these photos.

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No, the answer is not 100. This seemingly simple equation has blown up the (usually quiet) world of Mathematical Twitter. But the question has a clear and definite answer if we all play by the same rules governing PEMDAS or what high school teachers call “the order of operations,” meaning the order in which we tackle multiple components — like parentheses, multiplication, addition — of a math problem. Everyone agreed parentheses should be evaluated first, but here’s the rub: When faced with a division and a multiplication, standard convention holds that they have equal priority. So which comes first? To break the tie, we should work from left to right. Visit the link in our bio to read more and leave your answer in the comments.

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We’re guessing this is not the first time you’ve seen a colorful pool float in your Instagram feed this summer. The trend of lounging on an inflatable unicorn, swan or pineapple — then sharing photographic evidence of it — shows no signs of deflating. Unlike luxury cars or designer clothing, floats are relatively accessible to the average person, not just celebrities and #influencers. Float-mania has provoked competition between companies, all of them vying to create the float design to rule them all, at least for the summer. “Animals are done,” said Barry Glick, C.E.O of the Australian brand @sunnylifeaustralia. Read more from @nytimesfashion at the link in our bio. Photos by @vnina. #🦄#🍕#🍩#🦢#poolfloat

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Five hours of debating over two nights. A widening rift between the party's populist and centrist wings. Strong messages from the race's leading progressives. A shaky front-runner. Click the link in our bio to read what we learned about the 2020 Democratic primary from the debates on Tuesday and Wednesday nights. @erinschaff shot these photos.

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At first glance, roller derby seems like a feminist punk fever dream. It is unapologetic and aggressive, a full-contact whirlwind populated by characters with names like Carnage Electra, Miss U.S. Slay and Bleeda Kahlo. But the blood, sweat and mascara that seem so essential to the modern sport have roots stretching back nearly a century. Roller derby was born in Chicago in 1935, drawing crowds from all over for a trifecta of “noise, color, body contact.” From the sport’s earliest days, men and women skated by the same rules, for the same amount of time, on the same track. And it’s making a comeback — with roller derby leagues now on every continent except Antarctica. Photographer John Sotomayor shot this photo at a New York Chiefs’ women’s squad bout in 1972. Check out the link in our bio to learn more about the long and surprising history of #rollerderby and make sure to follow @nytarchives.

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Sometimes humans and animals have a shared interest, but humans have to save the animals first. The people with nets chasing dogs know this, but the dogs running away didn’t get the message. Dogcatchers who work for Mission Rabies wear T-shirts emblazoned with a paw print logo and carry the canine rabies vaccine. Once they give a dog a shot, it should be safe for at least a year. @missionrabies has targeted Goa, India’s smallest state, as a place to demonstrate its program’s viability to stop the spread of canine rabies. Like other states, Goa has an abundance of street dogs and rabies. Worldwide, about 59,000 people a year die from rabies, including about 20,000 in India — 99 percent of them because they were bitten by a rabid dog. Deaths of people from rabies in Goa fell to zero last year from 15 in 2014, when the campaign started. There have been none so far in 2019. Swipe left to see more photos from @lokeatul and visit the link in our bio to read the story.