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In this predominantly white region of central Minnesota, the influx of Somalis, most of whom are Muslim, has spurred the sort of demographic and cultural shifts that President Trump and right-wing conservatives have stoked fears about for years. The resettlement has divided many politically active residents of St. Cloud, with some saying they welcome the migrants. But the change has also emboldened white anti-immigration activists who are trying to press an increasingly explicit anti-Muslim agenda. Ekram Elmoge, a 21-year-old who resettled in St. Cloud from Somalia about 5 years ago, described the city as “diversity without inclusion.” She said she had been harassed by white residents, who have yelled, “Go back to your country” and “You’re here for free money.” Click the link in our bio to read more. @ackermangruber shot this photo.

NYtimes

“I love nothing more than flowers,” says the perfumer Ezra Woods. “There’s something magical about being able to eat something so beautiful.” When Woods, of the brand #RegimedesFleurs, cooks at home for himself and his boyfriend, he likes to make a big salad with edible flowers that he sources at the farmer’s market. He’s not too fussy about what kind of flowers go in the mix. What’s essential is using whole-leaf lettuce and at least some floral component, for improving both taste and mood: “I find when I make edible-flower food that it has this crazy energy to it,” he says. “I know that’s woo-woo, but we’re in California, so it’s fine.” Click the link in our bio for @ezrawoodsofficial’s fragrant flower salad recipe. Photo by @JuliaStotz.

NYtimes

Judge Judy is still judging you. Judith Sheindlin has dominated daytime ratings by making justice in a complicated world look easy. “I get up in the morning, and I look in the mirror, and I say, ‘When did my young person start to inhabit this old person’s body?’” she said. In the last 2 decades, “Judge Judy” has won 3 Emmys and become the highest-rated daytime TV show in syndication. The program has accomplished all this without changing much of anything, mostly because there has been no need. The show is regularly named in people’s obituaries: ‘‘He also enjoyed woodworking, crossword puzzles and watching ‘Judge Judy.’” So … who IS Judge Judy? Lucky for us, @jazzloon profiled the iconic arbitrator in this week’s @nytmag. Read more at the link in our bio. @ramonarosales shot this photo.

NYtimes

It's 2019, and every pie on Instagram has some kind of intricate, lattice-y, floral cut-out look that most people will never attempt. This is not one of those pies. In fact, you don't even need a pie dish to make it, just a rimmed baking sheet. Get the recipe for @samanthaseneviratne’s blueberry-rhubarb slab pie at the link in our bio. (Photo: @dmalosh, food styling: @simoncooks)

NYTimes

This is what abortion access looks like in Mississippi. Laurie Betram Roberts, pictured above, runs the Mississippi Reproductive Freedom Fund. The nonprofit helps those seeking abortions, even as state abortion laws clamp down on its operations. The fund doesn’t just help poor clients obtain access to the procedure; it also provides support in the form of birth control, books, money for groceries and child care. It’s a place run by people who understand what it’s like to need such essentials. Read more about @mrff_funds_abortions and its volunteers at the link in our bio. Photographed for @nytmag by @fancybethany.

NYTimes

At a new drag show in Brooklyn, queens and L.G.B.T.Q. Arabs can party freely. When Ana Masreya, who grew up in Cairo, made her drag debut in New York City last summer, she felt like an outsider among the other queens. So she created her own cabaret in Brooklyn that celebrated diversity and fused a love of drag with a passion for Egyptian culture. “I want to create drag for our people,” Ana said. Ivy Kush, a queen born and raised in Morocco, had never done anything like this back home. “Oh no, honey,” she said. “I can’t be myself in Morocco.” Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our bio to read the full story. @dedecim shot these photos.

NYTimes

President Trump said he called off a strike against Iran on Thursday night with 10 minutes to spare, saying the potential of 150 casualties stopped him because it was “not proportionate.” In a tweet on Friday morning, @realdonaldtrump wrote, “We were cocked & loaded to retaliate last night on 3 different sights.” The planned military strikes were in retaliation for Iran shooting down an American surveillance drone this week. American officials say the drone was over international waters when it was shot down, while Iran asserts the aircraft was in its airspace. The @FAA has banned all American flights over Iranian-controlled airspace. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio to catch up on what you need to know about the crisis. Photo by @erinschaff.

NYTimes

Primadonna the duck is an emotional support animal, pictured here with her owner, Vayne Myers, who has experienced anxiety since he was a child. The number of emotional support animals in the U.S. has been growing rapidly. Many Americans say these animals have done wonders for their mental health and claim they have a right to live with the animals, as well as to take them onto planes and into restaurants and stores. But critics say many are really just pets that do not merit special status, and more than two dozen state legislatures have enacted new laws to crack down on fraud. Click the link in our bio to read more. @eve_edelheit shot this photo.

NYTimes

Yes, those people are sunbathing in the against the backdrop of the World Trade Center. In the 1970s, while developers and the city arm-wrestled over what to build in Lower Manhattan, resourceful locals turned the empty landfill into a beach. @fredrconrad, a @nytimes staff photographer, took this photograph while roving around town in 1977. At the time, it must have seemed merely whimsical — a postcard from the eternal war between business and pleasure. But today there’s an elegiac and unsettling aspect to the image, of course, since we know the fate of the towers, which these sunbathers couldn’t have imagined. For more, click the link to the story in our bio, and follow @nytarchives for more #tbt photos.

NYTIMES

Eight months before the all-important Iowa caucuses, Democratic presidential candidates spoke at the capital city’s #Pride celebration to show their support for the #lgbtq community. One after another, candidates like Mayor @pete.buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., who is vying to become the nation’s first openly gay president, took the mic and addressed crowds decked out in rainbow garb. We spoke with some of the celebrants about the issues that matter most to them. Visit the link in our bio to learn more. @jakenaughton shot these portraits. #🏳️‍🌈

NYTIMES

Before cellphones, a Turkish “bird language” allowed farmers and herders to communicate across long distances in the Pontic Mountains. This whistled form of communication, known as kuş dili, can travel several miles farther than a person’s voice. Today, about 10,000 people in the Pontic Mountains in Turkey’s northern Giresun province speak the language, but technology is contributing to its disappearance. Visit the link in our bio to learn more. @malinfezehai shot these videos.

NYTIMES

The idea of reparations for African-Americans is gaining traction among Democrats on Capitol Hill, where Speaker Nancy Pelosi supported establishing a commission that would develop proposals and draft a “national apology” to repair the lingering effects of slavery. Nearly 60 House Democrats support legislation to create the commission, which has been stalled in the House for 30 years. The bill was the subject of a congressional hearing on Wednesday — the first one on reparations in more than a decade, and the first on this specific bill. The current debate over reparations has been fueled by the rise of the #BlackLivesMatter movement, as well as by the writings of Ta-Nehisi Coates. In his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee, @tanehisipcoates took aim at Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader: “He was alive for the redlining of Chicago and the looting of black homeowners of some $4 billion. Victims of their plunder are very much alive today. I am sure they would love a word with the majority leader.” Read more at the link in our bio and follow @racerelated for an exploration of how race is lived today. @gdemczuk took this photo.

NYTIMES

This week, Facebook unveiled plans for a new cryptocurrency called Libra, which it hopes will become the foundation for a new financial system. Libra was designed to be independent of Facebook and to improve on flaws that have held back other cryptocurrencies, though that is unlikely to prevent concerns from regulators, competitors and users. If the project should come together, it would be the most far-reaching attempt to date by a mainstream company to jump into the cryptocurrency market. But the social media giant will have to overcome the perception that it does not effectively protect the private information of its users — a fundamental task for a bank or anyone handling financial transactions. Read more at the link in our bio. @delcancompany created this illustration.

NYTIMES

You might assume that someone would have thought of this perfect Venn diagram of social media, beauty pageant, puppy adoration, grinning female empowerment and Gilded Age excess by now. But in fact, this was the first ever Miss Dog Mom USA pageant. On a Sunday afternoon in May, 12 women and their 4-legged companions strutted their way through an opening dance number, a costume competition and an evening wear segment. It was a serious event and the women were there to win. Any high comedy that ensued — like the moment when a 3-pound, bug-eyed Chihuahua named Voldemort decided to stop walking, forcing his owner to drag him across the stage like a dust bunny on a string — was purely incidental. Read more at the link in our bio. @amylombard took these photos.

NYTIMES

About 20 years ago, the Taliban blasted away at Bamiyan’s famous statues, reducing what were thought to be 2 of the biggest standing Buddhas on the planet to thousands of fragments. Since then, the degradation has continued, as Afghanistan and the international community have spent years debating what to do to protect or restore the site. One recent idea came from a Chinese couple who created a 3D version of what one of the destroyed Bamiyan Buddhas would have looked like. "The first time I saw this, I cried," said an artist. "To think we had the real thing, and now it is gone." Unesco has declared the complex a “World Heritage Site in Danger,” one of 54 such locations worldwide. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @jimhuylebroek shot this photo.

NYTIMES

The assignment: Build a boat from scratch with your schoolmates that will not sink in the East River. The challenge: Your phone is collected at the beginning of class. In October, a group of middle school students began their quest, meeting for 2 hours a week. “Middle school is a battlefield,” said Laura Botel, the program coordinator of Brooklyn Boatworks, a nonprofit after-school program that runs the boatbuilding workshop. It gives students ownership over a project, she explained. “To complete it, they see there are times they really do need each other.” The students named their craft “Pizza Sail.” And last week, they set sail. Read more at the link in our profile. @gabbyjones.jpeg shot this photo. #⛵#🍕

NYTIMES

Mangonada superfans, are you tuned in? This recipe has plenty of Tajín and chamoy between those layers of blended frozen mango. Plus a tamarind candy straw. And an option to add tequila or rum, if that's the vibe. Link to the recipe by @gdanielagalarza is in our bio. (Photo: @dmalosh, food styling: @simoncooks)

NYTIMES

Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. @andyhaslamphoto shot these photos while on assignment for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think he was when he captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)

NYTimes

“It’s 2019: Nudes are the currency of love,” Zendaya's character explains in the first episode of the new TV series “Euphoria,” which debuts on HBO Sunday. Zendaya’s character, Rue, plays a high school junior committed to numbing herself with vodka and whatever drugs she can get her hands on after a failed stint in rehab. It’s a far cry from Zendaya’s 8-year run as a Disney Channel star. “It’s a scary jump,” Zendaya said of her role in “Euphoria.” “But I think it was time for me to do this.” She’s confident the “Euphoria” audience is unlikely to overlap with Disney’s target demographic. “I don’t think any of my 8-year-old fans know” that this show exists, she said, smiling. “If they do, I don’t think their parents will let them watch it.” Read more of our interview with @zendaya at the link in our profile. @chantalaanderson shot this photo.

NYTimes

There's nothing complicated about this potato salad. It's really just boiled potatoes, a simple Dijon vinaigrette and fresh herbs. That's it. Get @williamnorwich's recipe for Potato Salad With Dijon Vinaigrette at the link in our bio and follow @nytcooking for more recipes, both simple and complex. Photo by @krausfoto6.

NYTimes

She's the queen of eating shellfish on the internet. Bethany Gaskin ( @bloveslife2) claims that eating giant crab legs on YouTube has made her a millionaire. That's because she's a celebrity in the world of #mukbang, an internet phenomenon that involves eating outsize portions on camera. 🦀 Get all you can eat at the link in our bio. Photograph by @maddiemcgarvey for @nytimesfashion.

NYTimes

Meet Frank, Tun, Colt and Bailey. They’re among the 55 dogs on active duty or in training at Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola who patrol the prison’s borders, sniff for narcotics, search for escapees and provide support to infirm and elderly inmates. (Frank tracks escaped prisoners; Tun and Colt are in training; Bailey was a washout as an explosives dog but will soon be certified as a narcotics dog.) Dogs have always been an integral part of prison life at Angola, which is America’s largest maximum-security prison. Two years ago, the prison started a volunteer program that trains service dogs to help veterans. Swipe right to see more good dogs, and visit the link in our profile to read more from @nytopinion about how the program is changing prison life at Angola. @fredrconrad shot these photos.

NYTimes

The best women's soccer team in the world is fighting for the World Cup title in France ... and also for equal pay at home. The U.S. women's national team is the best in the world and has been for decades. Since the FIFA Women’s World Cup was inaugurated in 1991, the United States has won 3 of the 7 titles, including the most recent one in 2015. And on March 8 of this year, they sued the United States Soccer Federation, claiming “purposeful gender discrimination.” “The bottom line is simple,” the star defender Becky Sauerbrunn said in a statement. “It is wrong for us to be paid and valued less for our work because of our gender.” Catch the game today and read more from @nytmag about their ongoing fight for equal pay at the link in our bio. @dina_litovsky photographed Mallory Pugh ( @malpugh, at right) during a match against Belgium on April 7.

NYTimes

The New York Times has obtained a preliminary design of the Harriet Tubman $20 bill, pictured above. The image of the bill, which was to be the first to bear the face of an African-American, was previously unreleased. The Trump administration announced last month that it would delay the release of the design by 6 years, citing technical reasons. The change would push completion of the imagery past President Trump’s time in office, even if he wins a second term, stirring speculation that Mr. Trump had intervened to keep his favorite president, Andrew Jackson, a fellow populist, on the front of the bill. Click the link in our bio to learn more about the bill and the plans for its release. #💵

NYTimes

Hootie & the Blowfish is a great American rock band. Yes, really. The band that produced “Cracked Rear View,” one of the albums that defined the 1990s and spawned the Top 10 hits “Hold My Hand,” “Let Her Cry” and “Only Wanna Be With You,” has generally been reviled, shrugged off or forgotten. But it’s time for a reassessment, according to our pop music critic, Jon Caramanica. “At its peak, Hootie & the Blowfish was a genuinely excellent band,” @joncaramanica writes. “This is perhaps one of the last unpopular opinions.” Visit the link in our profile to read more in defense of the band, and share your thoughts in the comments below. @lovebryan shot this photo.

NYTimes

The jazz funeral is perhaps New Orleans’s most emblematic ritual, dating to the late 1800s and the birth of jazz itself. It remains a powerfully transcendent rite, and a preferred way for black New Orleans to honor its revered dead. Slow dirges give way to joyous, uptempo numbers and cathartic dancing as the body is “cut loose,” and the soul ascends to heaven. When Leah Chase, the celebrated Creole chef and civil rights icon, died on June 1 at age 96, there was no question that her city would say farewell with a jazz funeral. On Monday afternoon, pallbearers emerged from St. Peter Claver Catholic Church with Mrs. Chase’s coffin. Hundreds were there to greet her. Soon they fell in line behind her hearse as it carried her on her last trip through the streets of the storied Treme neighborhood. Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our profile for the full story. @ek_the_pj shot these photos.

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Who can adopt a Native American child? A bitter custody battle over this question is playing out in a Texas court. A white couple who adopted a Navajo boy, Zachary, is also trying to adopt his half sister (pictured in the second photo), but U.S. federal law gives Native American families priority to adopt Native American children, and the little girl’s great-aunt would also like to adopt her. Should tribal ties be the deciding factor in determining who gets custody? Tribes say yes. A federal judge says no. A lawyer for the family who adopted Zachary says the law “was about stopping unjustified breakups of Indian families, but this child has never lived in an Indian family.” “Our Navajo children are sacred to us,” says a social worker from the Navajo Nation. “We have our traditions, our ceremonies and our language handed down to our children. We don’t want to lose that.” The case is now before a federal appeals court. Whoever loses is almost certain to ask the Supreme Court to hear it. Swipe right to see more, and visit the link in our profile to read the full story. @ilanapl and @allisonvsmith shot these photos.

NYTimes

Where’s Norman Rockwell when you need him? On June 28, 1956, a 5-year-old named Steven was one of the many children at Grand Central Terminal heading off to summer camp, in his case Camp Deerfield in Wilmington, Vermont. Sleepaway camps emerged in the late 1880s to counter the pernicious trends of mollycoddling and “indoor-ness.” Separating from their kids has not gotten easier for parents in the decades since. Helene Drobenare, executive director of Camp Young Judaea Sprout Lake, has seen enough teary-eyed parents that she has a speech prepared: “I say, ‘When you say goodbye to John, Jim, Sally, whoever you say goodbye to, you’re going to keep those sunglasses down, you’re going to hold back those tears as much as you can, and you’re going to smile with those teeth out. The most important thing you’re going to do is give your kids the message that you believe in them … When you turn around and you’re rolling out of the gate, you can cry all the way down the road — and there’s a liquor store where you can stop and get your first bottle of wine.” Photographs by Meyer Liebowitz, Barton Silverman and Steve Zavatski. Follow @nytarchives for more #tbt photos and click the link in our bio for more photos of summer camp fun.

NYTimes

Russell Harvard wants to know why there’s a TV show about meerkats but not one about deaf people. “Are the writers afraid of writing deaf characters? Are we too complex?” he asked. In the Broadway production of “King Lear,” which closed June 9, Russell, 38, played the Duke of Cornwall, a role in which he translated Shakespeare’s language into American sign language. In the 2007 movie “There Will Be Blood,” Russell played another deaf character and used a vintage form of sign language: signing “small,” as he put it. “Now we sign bigger," he said. “There’s a lot more facial expression. Back in earlier decades, facial expression was very limited. We were a lot more stoic when we signed, because we didn’t want to be too intrusive with hearing people in their environment.” Read more at the link in our profile. @nate_nate shot this photo.

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"Have you seen our door to the Sahara?” South of Marrakesh, the Draa Valley — an 8,900-square-mile oasis that runs along the Algerian border — still exerts an indefinable pull, retaining traces of its now almost-vanished Berber kingdom. For @tmagazine's Spring Travel issue, @aatishalitaseer went in search of ancient #Morocco. Click the link in our profile for the full story. Photo by @richard_mosse.

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Spike Lee has a lot of projects underway, including the second season of his Netflix TV series, “She’s Gotta Have It.” So it’s no wonder he spends most of his Sundays working, either in his NYU office or the @40acresandamulefilmworks headquarters in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Some other things we learned when we asked him about his Sunday routine: He uses his BlackBerry as his alarm: “Yes, I have a BlackBerry. I don’t like typing on the iPhone.” He’s trying to cut out bread. He buys all the papers on Sunday. “That was my chore growing up. I had to get the Sunday paper. Back then you had to do what your parents told you to do.” Read more via the link in our profile. @elias.williams shot this photo.

NYTimes

“It’s almost as if the president is trying to cast a spell to confuse people so they cannot know the true nature of reality, and what we do is pick apart the way in which the [expletive] was sold to you. I think that’s why it’s going well. Our job is to identify the [expletive], and there’s never been more.” Read more from @stephenathome's conversation with David Marchese in @nytmag through the link in our bio. @mamadivisuals shot this portrait.

NYTimes

These are like those 3-ingredient peanut butter cookies everyone loves, but with a little cocoa powder and bittersweet chocolate thrown in. Follow @nytcooking for more delicious treats, or hit the link in our profile for @samanthaseneviratne’s recipe. Photo by @conpoulos, food styling by @simoncooks.

NYTimes

Friday is the first day of @fifawomensworldcup, and we're sharing stories about female soccer players of all ages, from all over the globe. For the first time, Spanish club leagues like Barcelona have entered their under-12 and under-14 girls’ teams in local boys’ leagues. Barcelona has been so impressed by the results that starting next season, it will do the same with its under-10 girls’ team. If anything, the results suggest the girls met the challenge too easily. Explore what real life is like for professional female soccer players competing in #FIFAWWC in our Instagram story. @edu_bayer shot these photos.

NYTimes

The Tony Awards are Sunday. We sent photographers to 5 Broadway theaters on a recent Saturday night to capture what it’s like backstage in the run-up to the ceremony. Things are tense and tingly enough before the curtain rises at any time of the year. What’s it like during prize season? “It’s much like sports,” says nominee Damon Daunno, who plays Curly in the revival of “Oklahoma!” “We’re a team and we’re about to play this game together.” Swipe through to see more behind-the-curtain photos or click the link in our bio. These photos were shot by @heathersten, @dedecim, @photodre, @Dina_Litovsky and @theotherchrislee.

NYTimes

Buildings can be designed to withstand earthquakes. So why doesn’t the U.S. build more of them? Thousands of buildings in Japan are built using a seismic technology that can greatly reduce damage and prevent collapse during an earthquake. That technology has been sparsely used in the U.S. Seismic safety advocates describe this as a missed opportunity to save billions of dollars in reconstruction costs after the inevitable Big One strikes. Swipe to see the scale models we created out of balsa wood, Baltic birch, basswood and chipboard to demonstrate the effect this engineering technique, called base isolation, has when an earthquake hits. Read more at the link in our profile. Photos by Tony Cenicola and cinematography by Yousur-Al-Hlou and @jkessel .

NYTimes

Many of the immigrants shopping in Palermo’s Ballarò market in Sicily on a recent afternoon bypassed the Sicilian staples and went for heaps of hyacinth pea pods that Bangladeshis call sheem. The pods used to be imported, but Bangladeshis found a way to grow and sell them in the city, angering the local Mafiosi who see cultivation of the pods as a threat to their traditions and control. And it’s not just the mafia. A fear of migrants, their customs — and sometimes, their produce — has taken root in Italy, fueling the rise of populism and the ascent of Matteo Salvini, the tough interior minister and far-right leader of the anti-migrant League party. What Italians actually think about migrants is complicated, especially in Palermo, a city with a history dating back to at least the Phoenicians that adapted to conquerors and waves of immigration. And Ballarò market, in the center of town, is where many of those complications are playing out. Read more at the link in our profile. @giannicipriano took this photo.

NYTimes

In Hong Kong, a growing community of maids has taken up trail running, traversing the city’s lush and vast parks, competing in ultramarathons thousands of feet in elevation. In addition to long work days, one-day weekends and an exhaustive list of responsibilities, these domestic workers — among Hong Kong’s 380,000 foreign maids — find the time and energy to squeeze in runs before the crack of dawn or late at night. While these workers play an outsize role in Hong Kong’s economy — last year alone, they added $12.6 billion to the city’s GDP. — they often face discriminatory treatment. But trail running has emerged as something of an unlikely equalizer: For at least a few hours, the sweat and camaraderie blur the lines between employers and maids, and among locals, migrants and expatriates. “On weekdays, people say, ‘Oh, you’re a domestic helper,’” one marathoner said. “On weekends, on the trails, they say, ‘Oh, you’re a good runner.’” @xyzacruzbacani took these photos. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Meet the Reggae Girlz, the first national soccer team from the Caribbean to qualify for the #WomensWorldCup, which begins tomorrow. While women’s international soccer has made significant progress in some countries, support for it, especially the financial kind, varies widely within individual federations and among corporate sponsors. For the @reggaegirlz, that’s meant no funding from the Jamaican soccer federation since 2015. “We’ve always been an afterthought, and we’re still fighting for equality,” said goalkeeper Nicole McClure, 29. “We want a seat at the table.” On the way to France, the host country for this year’s @fifaworldcup, the players detoured to South Florida to try to raise money to cover the costs of training camps, travel, warm-up matches and future tournaments. @scottymacphoto photographed the team in Florida, along with one of their big benefactors, @cedellamarley, Bob Marley's daughter. Visit the link in our profile to read more. #⚽

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Capt. John Noel was a photographer and filmmaker who accompanied the Royal Geographical Society’s 1922 expedition up Mount Everest — the first documented attempt to summit the highest peak on earth. Using a telephoto lens, he captured George Finch and Capt. John Geoffrey Bruce’s progress in a short film, “Climbing Mt. Everest,” the first motion picture made at that high an altitude. “If you’ve ever faced the Himalayas, you know they can swallow you whole,” Somini Sengupta, a reporter on the @nytimes Climate desk, writes. At least 11 people died last month during one of the busiest climbing seasons on record, and Nepalese officials have said they may change the rules about who is allowed up in future seasons to combat congestion and other safety hazards. Pictures like this one “are a glimpse into our collective capacity for adventure and courage,” Somini observes. “But looking at them now, they are also a glimpse into our capacity for self-destruction, our ability to squander what we love.” Read her full story from @nytarchives in the link in our profile.

NYTimes

On Monday, Queen Elizabeth II welcomed President Trump for his first state visit to Britain. The agenda for the 3-day visit included an 82-gun salute at Buckingham Palace, a lavish banquet with members of the royal family, a joint news conference with Prime Minister Theresa May and a D-Day commemoration ceremony. Read more at the link in our profile. Swipe to see more of these photos shot by @nytmills.

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Eat, pray, love, lose, write a book, repeat. Elizabeth Gilbert, whose 2006 blockbuster memoir “Eat Pray Love” turned the magazine writer and author into a goddess of chick lit and a self-help guru, has made a career out of sharing the details of her personal life with everyone. Now she has a new novel out this week, “City of Girls.” It’s a lively period novel set primarily during World War II, and its main characters — a tribe of women who drink to excess, make bone-headed decisions and have sex with strangers and each other — don’t suffer too terribly for their bad decisions. “Ruination has not been my experience as a promiscuous girl,” Ms. Gilbert said, “and it’s not been the experience of a lot of people I know. You can actually survive your terrible judgment.” Read more at the link in our profile and follow @nytbooks for more book coverage. @heathersten took this photo.

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These French doors lead from a sitting area to a bedroom decorated with Marcel Breuer’s Wassily chair and a vintage Moroccan shag rug. Welcome to Casa Fortunato in Lisbon, Portugal. It’s a hotel — and a home. Here, the architect António Falcão Costa Lopes and his wife, Filipa Fortunato, live among (and just above) their guests with their 4 kids and dog. Visit the link in our profile to see more photos of the home, and follow @tmagazine for more gorgeous architecture. @manoloyllera shot this room.

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Today is the 30th anniversary of the crackdown on a student-led democracy movement at Tiananmen Square, in which Chinese soldiers killed hundreds, possibly thousands, of demonstrators in Beijing and other cities. In Hong Kong, a former British colony that returned to Chinese control in 1997, organizers estimated that over 180,000 people attended the annual vigil this year at Victoria Park, far more than last year. “I can feel that the space for freedom in Hong Kong is tightening, so I finally made up my mind to come,” said Lee Yuet-ting, 43, who said he was attending the vigil for the first time. In Beijing, where such a vigil is impossible, crowds of confused tourists were turned away from the square on Tuesday and Chinese social media services were censored more vigorously than usual. Visit the link in our profile to read more. @lamyikfei shot this photo.

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James Holzhauer who? Emma Boettcher didn’t know she was about to dethrone James before he was able to beat Ken Jennings’s “Jeopardy!” record. When Emma, a 27-year-old librarian from Chicago, arrived at the studio on a Tuesday in March, she hadn’t heard of him. She didn’t know that he had already won 32 games and amassed $2.46 million. (The games are prerecorded, and his first win would not air till April.) By Final Jeopardy, she knew she had the win, but it didn’t quite feel real yet. “I don’t think I felt like I won until Alex said so.” Read more about Emma’s win in the link in our profile. @whittensabbatini shot this photo.

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“Melissa Clark is a genius,” one @nytcooking reader wrote after making this lamb tagine. “Tagine,” which refers to both the North African cooking pot and the stew cooked inside it, is a marriage of sweet and savory ingredients. Here, @clarkbar uses dried apricots, cinnamon and nutmeg for sweetness, with lamb, saffron, turmeric and tomato paste to make it deeply savory. Visit the link in our profile to get this and other recipes to celebrate Eid al-Fitr and mark the end of Ramadan. Or tap the bookmark ☝️to save it for later. @francescotonelli shot this photo.

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The men known as the Central Park Five were teenagers when they were arrested and imprisoned. In “When They See Us,” a new Netflix series, @Ava DuVernay brings their story to life. “When we were found innocent,” said Yusef Salaam, one of the 5 men, “there was no tsunami of media that followed in the way that tsunami came out within the first few weeks when they thought we were guilty. The criminal justice system says that you’re innocent until proven guilty. But if you’re black or brown, you are guilty and have to prove yourself innocent.” Visit the link in our profile to read the conversations between the men and their onscreen counterparts pictured here. @bradogbonna shot this photo.

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On Friday, 11 city workers and one contractor were killed in one of the deadliest episodes of workplace violence in the U.S. in recent years. The employees had collectively worked for the city government for more than 150 years. “Today, we all grieve,” David L. Hansen, the Virginia Beach city manager, said on Saturday. “I have worked with most of them for many years. We want you to know who they were, so in the days and weeks to come, you will learn what they meant to all of us.” Here, Kelly Fowler, a state delegate, paid respect to the victims with her daughter Sophie. Visit the link in our profile to read more. @nytchangster took this photo.

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Which box do you check: M, F or X? Nonbinary teens in the U.S. are pushing for driver's licenses that reflect their identity, which proponents say would remove a form of discrimination against nonbinary people. With bills to add a nonbinary marker to driver’s licenses moving through at least 6 legislatures this session, the expansive conception of gender is being scrutinized on a new national scale. @_tonyluong took this photo of El Martinez, a 17-year-old who wrote to Massachusetts state representatives requesting a gender-neutral option for ID documents, and the Maine Bureau of Motor Vehicles provided the photo of a driver’s license with a gender-neutral designation. Visit the link in our profile to read more.

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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? #🔍 Comment your guess below. Emilio Parra Doiztua shot these photos while on assignment for a story we’re publishing this week. Where do you think he was when he captured these scenes? (Swipe left and wait to reveal the answer)