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If the 1995 Disney animation is your guide, Pocahontas was a free-spirited Native American who befriended wild animals and sang to the wind. So why is she dressed like European royalty in her painting at the National Portrait Gallery? • Pocahontas, the Indian princess who allegedly saved the life of English colonist John Smith, survives as an example of an early American heroine. While Smith may have embellished the story of his rescue, the importance of Pocahontas to relations between colonists and Native Americans is undisputed. Following her conversion to Christianity and marriage to Englishman John Rolfe, Pocahontas journeyed to England with her family to demonstrate the ability of new settlers and native tribes to coexist in the Virginia colony. • 🎧 Listen to the latest Portraits podcast episode where curator and author Paul Chaat Smith separates out what we know and what we think we know about this iconic figure. Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Radio Public, and on our website.

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Composer and pianist Billy Strayhorn never achieved the celebrity that some other jazz musicians enjoyed in their lifetimes. Nevertheless, his composing and arranging collaboration with Duke Ellington over three decades yielded many of the most memorable compositions in the history of jazz. As Ellington once put it, "Billy Strayhorn was my right arm, my left arm, all the eyes in the back of my head." #SmithsonianMusic • 📷: Billy "Sweet Pea" Strayhorn by William Paul Gottlieb, c. 1945 (printed 1979). National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

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“...What interested me was the African-American experience throughout whichever time I spoke of. It was always about African-American culture and people — good, bad, indifferent, whatever — but that was, for me, the universe.” -Toni Morrison, 1931-2019. . 📷: Toni Morrison by Robert McCurdy, 2006. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; on loan from Ian and Annette Cumming. © Robert McCurdy.

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On August 6, 1926, in strong, choppy waters, Gertrude Ederle became the first woman to swim across the English Channel. During a time when female athletes were not taken seriously, Ederle proved critics wrong and successfully swam across the channel, clocking a time of fourteen hours and thirty-one minutes for thirty-five miles, fourteen miles more than needed. • Despite swimming extra miles, Ederle beat the record time by two hours. When she paused occasionally to accept nourishment, concerned observers asked her if she wanted to come out. She responded, “What for?” #BecauseOfHerStory 🏊‍♀️ • 📷: Gertrude Ederle by Underwood & Underwood, 1925. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

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We are saddened to hear about the passing of American novelist, Toni Morrison. Morrison wrote about the experiences of African Americans since her first novel, "The Bluest Eye," in 1970. With the publication of each new work, her critical acclaim grew, winning the prestigious National Book Critics Circle Award in 1977 and the Pulitzer Prize for Beloved in 1987. In 1993, Morrison won the Nobel Prize for Literature, becoming the first black woman to become a Nobel laureate. . Her portrait is currently on display in our "20th Century Americans" exhibition on the third floor and will be on view through the end of 2019. . 📷: Toni Morrison by Robert McCurdy, 2006. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; on loan from Ian and Annette Cumming. © Robert McCurdy.

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Happy birthday to first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong! 🎂 🚀 • On May 25, 1961, speaking before a joint session of Congress President John F. Kennedy declared, “This nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before the decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth.” Eight years later, the crew of Apollo XI—astronauts Michael Collins, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, and Neil Armstrong—fulfilled Kennedy’s challenge. • On July 20, 1969, while Collins orbited the moon in the Command Module, mission commander Armstrong and Lunar Module pilot Aldrin descended to the lunar surface. A short time later, Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon, followed shortly by Aldrin.

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Louis Armstrong helped transform jazz into an international phenomenon. Raised in New Orleans, Armstrong moved to Chicago in 1922 to join King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band. Several years later he formed his own band, billed himself as the "World’s Greatest Trumpet Player," and helped to develop the jazz style popularly known as swing. • His technical prowess, rhythmic ingenuity, memorable improvisations, and lively "scat" singing made Armstrong a standout. Happy birthday to this jazz pioneer! • 📷: Louis Armstrong by Harry Warnecke and Gus Schoenbaechler, 1947. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. Warnecke.

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At the turn of the twentieth century, Thomas Hart Benton was among many young painters who embraced abstraction. He soon rejected that brand of modernism, however, and emerged as a leader of the regionalist school of realism, whose primary concern was the portrayal of local life and history in America. • Benton made this portrait of himself and his wife at Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts, around 1924. Best known for his panoramic murals, he brought to his works a boldness of composition. • This self-portrait are among the many in our "Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today" exhibition. Only two weeks left to see it! • 📷: Self-Portrait with Rita by Thomas Hart Benton, c. 1924. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Mooney.

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Jack Johnson was a world champion heavyweight boxer, nightclub owner, and automobile enthusiast who lived his life in defiance of Jim Crow segregation. White boxers avoided him since they feared losing to a man of an "inferior race," and he chased a few around the world to shame them into fighting him. • His boxing style combined power, balance, and looseness: he stood in the center of the ring and taunted opponents as they tried to avoid his long reach. A charismatic man with extraordinary confidence, he raced around in convertibles and often played classical cello at his Club Deluxe in Chicago. • 📷 : Jack Johnson by Paul Thompson, c. 1910. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

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Born in Gambia, Africa, Phillis Wheatley was the first African American to publish a book and the first American woman to earn a living from her writing. This was no small feat, considering that she came to America as a slave. • In 1761, the Wheatley family in Boston purchased her. A small child then, she was called Phillis after the name of the ship that transported her from Africa. Unlike most slaves, Wheatley had an opportunity for an education and soon learned to read and began to write poetry. • Her work caught audiences' attention in Boston and London and prompted an English publisher to print her collection, "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral" in 1773. #BecauseOfHerStory • 📷: Phillis Wheatley by Unidentified Artist, 1773. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

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Sandra Cisneros is one the most prominent Latina voices in American literature. Drawing upon her experience as the daughter of a working-class Mexican American family in Chicago she published her first work, "The House on Mango Street," which earned her the coveted American Book Award. • Cisneros was the first Latina to become a MacArthur Fellow in 1995 and in 2002, the New York Times and other national newspapers selected her novel "Caramelo" as a notable book of the year. #BecauseOfHerStory • 📷: Sandra Cisneros by Al Rendón, 1998 (printed 2014). National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; acquisition made possible through the Smithsonian Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. © 2015 Al Rendón.

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Julie Packard is a leading ocean conservationist, so when the Portrait Gallery approached her to sit for a portrait she had one request: She wanted to work with an artist who could paint fish and water. 🐠 • Inspired by Packard’s commitment to ocean conservation, the portrait was conceived during Gangloff’s visits to the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. The design is reflective of the aquarium’s aquatic life and the artist’s affinity for large-scale canvases and bright color palettes. • Visiting the museum? You can find the portrait on the first floor and while you're here listen to our podcast, "Portraits," as director @kimsajet talks to Packard and Gangloff on the day of the portrait's unveiling for a behind-the-scenes account of what it's like when the Portrait Gallery is your matchmaker. 💕 • 🎧 Find the "Portraits" podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Radio Public or on our website. • 📷: Julie Packard by Hope Gangloff, 2019. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; funded by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Board of Trustees. © Hope Gangloff.

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On July 20, 1969 at 4:17 p.m. EDT, Apollo 11 became the first manned mission to land on the moon. NASA’s first attempt to land men on the moon was a unifying moment for America. More than half a billion people watched on television as Neil Armstrong climbed down the ladder and proclaimed, "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind." • Time covered every facet of the nine-day mission. For this special issue, Time selected one of its favorite artists, Louis Glanzman, who had made twenty-nine covers for the magazine. His painting depicting Armstrong on the moon carrying the American flag and a camera has been one of Time’s most popular covers ever. #Apollo11at50 #Apollo50 • 📷: Neil Alden Armstrong by Louis S. Glanzman, 1969. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Time magazine. © Louis S. Glanzman.

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On May 25, 1961—three weeks after the United States sent it's first astronaut into suborbital flight, President John F. Kennedy issued a challenge. Speaking before a joint session of Congress, he declared, "This nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before the decade is out, of landing a man in the moon and returning him safely to earth." Eight years later, the crew of Apollo 11—astronauts Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong, and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin—fulfilled Kennedy's challenge. • Stop by the museum this weekend to see the portrait of the crew, on the third floor. 🚀 #Apollo11at50 #Apollo50 • 📷: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins by Ronald Carl Anderson, 1969. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Mr. and Mrs. William D. Blakemore, Midland, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. Omar Harvey, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. R.K. Keitz, Dallas, Texas; Col. and Mrs. Thomas A.P. Krock, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Lloyd, Jr., Houston, Texas; Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Maxfield, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Nagorny, Jr., Houston, Texas; Dr. and Mrs. H.B. Renfrow, Dallas, Texas; Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Taylor, Dallas, Texas; Dr. and Mrs. J. Robert Terry, Miami, Florida; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Young, Dallas, Texas; and an anonymous donor.

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‪Artist Kehinde Wiley is known for his vibrant, large-scale paintings of African Americans posing as famous figures in Western history. The portrait does not include an underlying art historical reference but some of the flowers in the background carry special meaning to its subject, President Barack Obama. Obama made history in 2009 by becoming the first African American president. . In our latest podcast episode, @kimsajet speaks with "graphic journalist" ‬ @wendymac on her sketches and snippets of conversation that convey little slices of life, including a drawing she created of security guard, Rhonda, standing next to the portrait of President Barack Obama who describes the stories of it's visitors. . Listen to "Portraits" on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, Radio Public, and on our website! . 📷: President Barack Obama by Kehinde Wiley, 2018. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. © 2018 Kehinde Wiley

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Happy 4th of July! 🇺🇸 Celebrating in town for the holiday weekend? Stop by the Portrait Gallery. We'll be open regular hours from 11:30 a.m.—7 p.m. 📷 : George Washington by William Clarke, 1800. Gift of Eleanor Morein Foster in memory of Charles Harry Foster; National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

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After marrying in Washington, D.C. in 1958, Richard and Mildred Loving returned to Virginia, where they were jailed for violating the state’s Racial Integrity Act. The Lovings pleaded guilty but received suspended sentences, contingent upon their leaving the state and not returning together for twenty-five years. They moved but longed to be reunited with their families in Virginia. In 1963, with the help of lawyers from the American Civil Liberties Union, the couple sought to have their convictions and sentences set aside. When the trial judge in Virginia upheld the judgment against them and pronounced the Lovings guilty of “a most serious crime,” the United States Supreme Court agreed to hear their case. On June 12, 1967, the Court issued a unanimous opinion that state laws prohibiting interracial marriage were unconstitutional. Learn more about this image on "Portraits," a podcast series hosted by director @kimsajet as she speaks with author Sheryll Cashin who sees Mildred Loving as a complex person who confronted her own questions of race and identity and puts the court case in historical and geographical context: npg.si.edu/podcasts . 📷: Richard and Mildred Loving by Grey Villet, 1965. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution © Grey Villet

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This photograph shows four members of the Mattachine Society in 1966, including Craig Rodwell, pictured facing the camera with his eyes downcast, demanding to be served at Julius's Bar in Greenwich Village. At the time, many bars refused to sell liquor to the gay community because New York regulations forbade the practice. This "sip-in" by Rodwell and other activists was intended to call attention to this and other forms of discrimination against the gay community. Moving to New York at the age of eighteen, Rodwell emerged as one of the most prominent gay rights activists of the period. He was a major figure in the "Stonewall" riots of 1969 and later founded what became the first Gay Pride parade. #SmithsonianPride #Stonewall50 . 📷: Craig Rodwell (with John Timmins, Randy Wicker, and Dick Leitch) by Frederick William McDarrah, 1966 © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah #WorldPride

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The talent and success of the trailblazing singer Marian Anderson not only tested limits and broke boundaries but turned her into a civil rights icon. Explore the life and legacy of this groundbreaking performer in "One Life: Marian Anderson" opening Friday, June 28. #myNPG . 📷: Marian Anderson at the Lincoln Memorial by Robert S. Sculock, 1939. Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

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Dance with us at this year’s America Now, when three of your favorite Smithsonian museums unite for a ✨FREE✨ one-day festival celebrating the best of art and history in DC. More information at americannow.si.edu. . While you're here, be sure to visit our store for a "Go-Go Belongs Here" t-shirt designed by artist @nekishadurrett! 🔥

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If you were living in the 19th century, would you have been able to have a portrait of yourself? If you were an enslaved person, Native American, or an immigrant, there's a good chance you could not. Listen to the first episode of Portraits, our new podcast with director Kim Sajet, as historian Jill Lepore addresses this lopsidedness of history and shares her own efforts to research stories of overlooked individuals throughout history. . 🎧 Listen now on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, and Radio Public. Image Credit: First Lady Michelle Obama by Amy Sherald, 2018, Oil on linen, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

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The career of Ira Aldridge illustrates the costs that racism inflicted on African Americans and on America itself. Aldridge was one of the great actors of his age—but he was black. Unable to work in America, he moved to England in the 1820s and lived abroad until his death. Aldridge's most famous role was Othello, in which he is shown here, a part that he invested with the poignancy of his own experience. A Russian critic wrote in 1858 that "he was Othello himself, as created by Shakespeare." Aldridge played most of Shakespeare's main characters, especially the tragic heroes. Aldridge's career foreshadows the fate of many African American artists, such as dancer Josephine Baker or jazz musician Dexter Gordon, who chose to go to Europe to find wide acclaim. . 📷: Ira Aldridge as Othello by Henry Perronet Briggs, c. 1830

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In mid-nineteenth-century America, the growing presence of women in public life coincided with the rise of portrait photography. The democratization of portraiture began in 1839, with the introduction of the daguerreotype—the first practical photographic method. . Created between 1846 and 1856, the daguerreotype and ambrotypes in "Women of Progress: Early Camera Portraits" feature the likenesses of more than a dozen memorable American women. See "Women of Progress: Early Camera Portraits" on view now. #BecauseOfHerStory . 📷: Lucy Stone by unidentified artist, c. 1855

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In April 1997, comedian Ellen DeGeneres came out to the world when she told Time magazine, "Yep I'm Gay." DeGeneres was ambivalent about coming out, feeling that there should be a zone of privacy allowable to public figures and celebrities but that it "has been the most freeing experience because people can't hurt me anymore." DeGeneres is one of America's most successful show business figures having won multiple awards for her work and continues to perform as she began—as a stand-up comedian. #SmithsonianPride #PrideMonth . 📷: Ellen DeGeneres by Firooz Zahedi, 1997 © Firooz Zahedi. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Time magazine

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On Friday, June 14, the museums' Kogod Courtyard is closed to prepare for an event. The Courtyard Café is open from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. with limited seating. We apologize for any inconvenience.

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“In my dining room, we changed the course of America over a bowl of gumbo and some fried chicken." . Leah Chase is reverentially referred to as the “Queen of Creole Cuisine.” In 1945, she married jazz musician Edgar “Dooky” Chase Jr. and joined the family restaurant business in New Orleans. By the 1960s, Dooky Chase’s Restaurant was famous for Leah’s recipes and also as a gathering spot for prominent civil rights activists, including Martin Luther King Jr., who would join local leaders for strategy sessions over meals upstairs. Native New Orleans artist Gustave Blache III made a series of small portraits documenting Chase in the kitchen. . In honor of her life and achievements, her portrait will be on view in the museum's In Memoriam space on the first floor. . 📷: “Cutting Squash (Leah Chase)” by Gustave Blache III, 2010, oil on panel, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the artist in honor of Mr. Richard C. Colton, Jr. Copyright Gustave Blache III

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Say hello to our new director of history, research and scholarship/senior historian, Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw! Shaw is the first woman to hold this senior position at the National Portrait Gallery 🎉 . Shaw, who received her doctorate in art history from @stanford, has focused more than two decades on race, gender, sexuality and class in the art of the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. She’ll be working with our History, Curatorial and Audience Engagement departments to strengthen the museum’s scholarly programs and be a thought leader on connections between portraiture, biography and identity in America. . Welcome to the National Portrait Gallery, Gwendolyn!

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In 2009, Dustin Lance Black rose to stardom with his critically acclaimed film, "Milk," which garnered the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. As he accepted the Oscar, Black recalled the time when he first learned about #HarveyMilk, the subject of his biopic. Milk was the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in the United States, and his legacy gave Black hope that one day he too would be able to live his life fully and authentically. . 📷: Dustin Lance Black by Louis Briel (2012). National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Anonymous gift in honor of Equality Virginia and the American Foundation for Equal Rights © 2012 Louis Briel

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#MayaLin redefined the conventional notion of a heroic war monument with her understated and controversial design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Lin has gone on to have a successful career as an architect who specializes in civil memorials and continued to gain international attention for works including large-scale installations such as @stormkingartcenter Wavefield. . 📷: Maya Ying Lin by Michael Katakis (1988) © Michael Katakis #APAHM

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“I want to bring out the best in a community and contribute something of permanent value.” —I.M. Pei We are saddened to hear the passing of beloved architect, I.M. Pei. Pei is recognized as one of the most influential architects in the world for his striking, high-modernist designs. He would go on to create such iconic structures as the critically acclaimed East Wing of the @ngadc and the distinctive glass pyramid that forms the entrance to the @museelouvre. He will be incredibly missed. . 📷: I. M. Pei by Yousuf Karsh (1979), Gelatin silver print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Estrellita Karsh in memory of Yousuf Karsh © Estate of @yousuf_karsh_official

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The scholar, educator, and political activist #AngelaDavis was the nation’s most iconic revolutionary for a generation. Davis taught philosophy at UCLA as the Black Power movement intensified. Her Afro has always been a symbol of black pride and, as shown here, an example of cultural politics through style. Learn more about this portrait and other selections of photographs from the collection that depict moments of communication: intimate confessions, public speeches, exchanged jokes, political confrontations and more in our newest exhibition, "In Mid-Sentence" open now. . 📷: Angela Davis by Stephen Shames © 1969 Stephen Shames

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🚨DON'T MISS🚨: IDENTIFY: Performance Art as Portraiture w/ Jeffrey Gibson WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 at 5 P.M. in the Kogod Courtyard Exploring the relationship between injustice, marginalization and identity, "To Name An Other" is the latest iteration of "IDENTIFY," the performance-art program created by the museum to recognize individuals who are missing from its historical collections. 50 volunteers who self-identify as LGBTQ+, people of color, Indigenous, and/or Native American will draw on the traditions of drumming to bring awareness to current sociopolitical issues. Created by #WhitneyBiennial artist, @jeffrune, this will be the artist's largest performance to date before traveling to the @newmuseum in the summer of 2019. Don't miss this exciting and powerful performance, free and open to the public! #myNPG

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It's #MuseumWeek and we're celebrating #WomeninCulture! Zitkala-Ša is the founder of the National Council of American Indians which soon became a main force in the effort to make the government's policies toward Native Americans more just. Having spent her early childhood on a reservation in South Dakota, she pursued education opportunities outside where she was increasingly troubled by pressures to disassociate herself from her ethnic heritage. In reaction, she turned to compiling an anthology of Native American lore, published in 1901, as Old Indian Legends. By 1915, she was the leader in the drive to advance Native American interests. Learn more about her and other incredible women who contributed to the women's suffrage movement in the U.S. in our exhibition, "Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence" #BecauseOfHerStory

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Happy birthday to “cool cat” #FredAstaire who revolutionized dance in film. 🕺🏼🎉 Astaire’s artistic synthesis of tap and ballet, his extraordinary sure-footed rhythmic balance and his nonchalance all remain cultural emblems of his style. . 📷: Martin Munkacsi © Estate of Martin Munkacsi, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

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Congratulations to the 46 finalists of our 5th triennial Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition! 🎉 . Their work will be presented in “The Outwin 2019: American Portraiture Today,” a major exhibition premiering October 26. . More details to come! #Outwin2019 #myNPG

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Artist #RogerShimomura explores the experiences of Asian Americans & the challenges of being “different” in America. . “Shimomura Crossing the Delaware” (2010) is based off of #EmanuelLeutze’s 1851 painting “Washington Crossing the Delaware,” found in the @metmuseum. . Shimomura presents himself in the guise of America’s Founding Father. He replaces #GeorgeWashington’s troops with #samurai warriors & he remakes the body of water they cross to resemble San Francisco Harbor with Angel Island (the processing center for Asian immigrants) in the background. The work echoes the composition of a #Hokusai wood-block print. #APAHM

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⚾️⚾️⚾️ Got #baseball on the brain? Swing by tomorrow for "Thursdays at Noon: Curator’s Choice" where we will be discussing a recently acquired portrait of A-Rod by #FreddyRodríguez. #myNPG

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🐟 Conservation leader & Executive Director of @montereybayaquarium #JuliePackard & artist #HopeGangloff help unveil our newly-commissioned portrait! See this vibrant painting and its aquatic details on view on the museum's 1st floor. #myNPG #BecauseOfHerStory #EarthOptimism

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🌎 Happy #EarthDay! 🔬 #RachelCarson’s writings made a mark on scientific research by increasing awareness of environmental issues. . As a marine biologist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1936, she was one of only two female professionals at the agency. This 1962 portrait made for #LifeMagazine shows Carson behind a microscope at her Silver Spring, Maryland, home. Carson’s book about the harm of man-made pollutants helped pave the way for dramatic changes in the use of pesticides. . 📷: Alfred Eisenstaedt #EarthOptimism #BecauseOfHerStory #myNPG

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Nothing says love like art! Visit the museum this weekend with friends and family and share your visit with #myNPG. . 📷: @wemyselfandi

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Even the smallest portraits can make a difference. Stop by the “Votes for Women” exhibition today at 1:30 p.m. and meet the great-granddaughter of #IdaBWells. . Professor Michelle Duster will speak about her great-grandmother and the portrait on view. #BecauseOfHerStory #myNPG

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Watching #GameOfThrones? #DYK we have this portrait of actor #PeterDinklage by photographer Jesse Frohman in our collection? Learn more about this photo and other #GOT-related works in our collection by watching today’s Instagram Story. #myNPG

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⚾️ “Hammering” #HankAaron made his major league debut #otd in 1954 with the Milwaukee (later, Atlanta) Braves. . 💥 In 1974 he broke #BabeRuth’s record of 714 career home runs. On his path to breaking the record, Aaron was forced to tolerate insults from people who did not want to see a black man at the pinnacle of America’s pastime. This did not stop him. Breaking Babe Ruth’s record was one of the most significant milestones—not only in Aaron’s career—but in the history of baseball. . 1. 📷: Ross R. Rossin, 2010 2. 📷: Osvaldo Salas, 1956

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#PutABirdOnIt for #NationalPetDay: 🐦 Artist #WillBarnet’s self-portrait in his Long Island studio includes a crow—his neighbor's pet & a frequent flyer to Barnet's studio. The crow's pose mimics the artist's silhouette & gaze.

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If you were in business with your brother, what would your business card look like? . 👨👨This print of mustachioed, dapper-looking artist brothers Henry (left) & Charles Meade (right) was issued after they opened a gallery. Intended to promote their business, the double portrait was also reproduced as a wood engraving. . When Henry visited Europe in 1853, he brought some of the "lithographs of ourselves" for distribution. He wrote to his brother that these prints, along with other images of Daguerre & their gallery, were "nice souvenirs to give and do a great deal of good. I have given all away." #NationalSiblingDay #BrosForLife #FamilyBusiness

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🏆 We’re excited to announce the honorees for our 2019 American Portrait Gala, taking place at the museum on Nov. 17. ✨ The 2019 Portrait of a Nation recipients are #FrancesArnold, @JeffBezos, @EarthWindAndFire, #IndraNooyi, #LinManuelMiranda, & #AnnaWintour! 🤩 #myNPG

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📖 #MayaAngelou was one of America’s most important writers & poets. Angelou wrote a series of 7 autobiographical novels that are a record of resistance & achievement by African American women. Angelou was born #otd in 1928. . 📷: #BrigitteLacombe

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🌀Take a dizzying look at #KogodCourtyard. Do you have a different perspective to share? Tag us with #myNPG! . 📷: @hkwangtv16

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How have political party platforms changed since women got the right to vote? Our friends @pudding.cool analyzed political party platforms to find how often women’s issues appear in the text. . 📊 See a data-driven video on view in the “Votes for Women” galleries. . Watch today’s Instagram story to explore all the platforms & watch the video. . #myNPG #BecauseOfHerStory #womensrights

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#PeakBloom isn’t just for cherry blossoms. Explore vivid patterns and colors in these #orchid captures from #KogodCourtyard! . 🌸 1-3: @hottershot 🌸 4: @missjahoney 🌸 5: @tonytompk 🌸 6: @jimgosailing