Tate - instagram lists #feedolist

Tate

#WorkoftheWeek: Ithell Colquhoun's Scylla 1938. This title refers to the female monster who, according to ancient Greek mythology, fed on passing sailors. Colquhoun explained that the painting could be understood both as a seascape and as an image of her own body. ‘It was suggested by what I could see of myself in a bath… it is thus a pictorial pun, or double-image’. On free display at Tate Britain in Walk Through British Art: 1930.

Tate

📢 JUST ANNOUNCED 📢 The ★★★★★ Don McCullin exhibition will travel to @tateliverpool next summer, with an additional selection of works depicting life in Liverpool and other northern towns and cities. See more than 250 iconic photographs captured over the last 60 years, all printed by McCullin himself in his own darkroom. Link in bio for more info! 📷 #DonMcCullin, Liverpool 8 Neighbourhood, Liverpool circa 1970

Tate

'The photograph fulfils my deep need to stop things from disappearing... I have tried to create order out of chaos, to find stability in flux and beauty in the most unlikely places.' - Dorothy Bohm ​ ​📷 Today marks #WorldPhotographyDay! What is your favourite subject to photograph? ​ ​​Dorothy Bohm, Petticoat Lane Market, East End, London c.1960–9.

Tate

Do you recognise this London train station? 🚂 Documentary photographer Wolfgang Suschitzky captured this scene in 1941 at King’s Cross Station in London. His portfolio of poetic and illuminated images show an affection for the city in which he found freedom and safety. ​ See Suschitzky's photography alongside his sister's, Edith Tudor-Hart's, in a free display of the siblings' work at Tate Britain. #WorldPhotographyDay

Tate

When's the last time you went on an adventure? 🗺️🔎 Sir William Coldstream, On the Map 1937

Tate

#Artwords: 'Monochrome' comes from the Ancient Greek monochromos, literally meaning 'having one colour'. Monochrome artworks include Li Yuan-chia's 'Monochrome White Painting' or Yves Klein's famous blue 'IKB 79' from 1959. The monochrome often serves one of two purposes. The first of these was to communicate spiritual purity; by choosing one colour, artists could explore the tranquility of total abstraction. The second purpose, for some artists, was to reduce the painting or sculpture to its simplest form so that the focus of the piece would be on its pure physical elements; colour, form, texture or the way in which it was made. Shirazeh Houshiary's Veil 1999 is a square, predominantly black, painting. Its surface is of such a delicate nature that it is dramatically transformed by different light conditions and defies any attempt to photograph or reproduce it. Houshiary made the work in a slow dance around the canvas, which is laid on the floor, and by bending into it as if in prayer. See the painting on free display at Tate Britain.

Tate

FINAL WEEK to experience #FrankBowling's major, career-spanning retrospective. The exhibition showcases Bowling's evolving style over his 60-year career, from his iconic 'map paintings' and his visually arresting ‘poured paintings’ to his sculptural paintings of the 1980s that evoke riverbeds. The exhibition closes 26 August at Tate Britain. Book tickets via our bio link. 🖌️​ @FrankBowlingRA, Cover Girl 1966 Private Collection © Frank Bowling. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2019.

tate

'The true authenticity of photographs for me is that they usually manipulate and lie about what is in front of the camera, but never lie about the intentions behind the camera.' - #WolfgangTillmans Happy birthday @wolfgang_tillmans! 💐 Who remembers seeing the artist's photographs in our 2017 exhibition at Tate Modern?

tate

The major Tate Liverpool exhibition of renowned artist and activist Keith Haring showcases more than 85 artworks including large, vibrant paintings and drawings. Also on display are posters, photographs, and videos that capture the spirited atmosphere of 1980s New York street culture. #KeithHaring, Untitled 1983 © Keith Haring Foundation. On display at @TateLiverpool until 10 November 2019.

tate

‘Ink Splash II’ by El Anatsui may look like an abstract painting at first glance, but the illusion of swift, gestural brushstrokes and splashes were created through a painstaking process of weaving thousands of flattened bottle tops together with copper wire. #ElAnatsui explains, ‘the most important thing is the transformation. The fact that these media, each identifying a brand of drink, are no longer going back to serve the same role but are elements that could generate some reflection, some thinking, or just some wonder…They are removed from their accustomed, functional context into a new one, and they bring along their histories and identities.’ ​ ​See it on free display at Tate Modern, Level 4 of the Natalie Bell building.

Tate

'I don't want it all to be pretty – it's a combination of loss and gain. Things are born, live and hang in limbo. That's what life's about.' - Cornelia Parker Parker’s work frequently transforms the nature of an object or material through the use of extreme force. She has crushed, stretched and exploded numerous objects, like a shed in this artwork. Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991, Tate collection.

Tate

'I prefer my work to be shown outside. I think sculpture grows in the light and with the movement of the sun... with space and the sky above, sculptures can expand and breathe' - #BarbaraHepworth Dame Barbara Hepworth, Four-Square (Walk Through) 1966, on display in the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden in St Ives. 🍃

Tate

France-Lise McGurn's free #ArtNow exhibition 'Sleepless' at Tate Britain explores the intimate experience of living in a city. Her fluid works spill from the canvas onto the gallery walls, floors and ceilings. ​ ​ See more of the display in today's story, or in real life at Tate Britain until 8 September 2019.

Tate

Did you know that only around 10% of the population is left-handed, including American artist Alice Neel? In this portrait, the angles of Ashton's body makes her look almost sculptural, and the cropping of the figure adds to an overall sense of anxiety. ​The resulting painting offers the viewer an uncomfortable but strongly depicted image of femininity. #LeftHandersDay ​ Alice Neel, Ethel Ashton 1930, on display at @TateLiverpool.

Tate

#WorkoftheWeek: What can you see unfolding in André Fougeron's grand painting? This artwork is a key piece of social criticism. Fougeron depicts multiple conflicting narratives of corruption, rooted in colonialism, class and capitalism. See André Fougeron's Atlantic Civilisation 1953 on free display at Tate Modern.

Tate

Where's your favourite spot in London? Edward Bawden's prints show some of London's markets in 1967: 1. Billingsgate Market, 2. Borough Market, 3. Covent Garden Flower Market, 4. Covent Garden Fruit Market, 5. Leadenhall Market 6. Smithfield Market. 💐🥖

Tate

John Crome founded the Norwich School of Painters, a group of 19th century artists spanning three generations, who primarily concentrated on landscape. His early pictures were strongly influenced by Dutch 17th century painters but his later work, like this painting, shows his interest for naturalism and atmospheric effects. Crome and John Constable were some of the earliest artists to paint portraits of trees, representing specific species rather than generalised tree forms. Constable’s favourite tree was said to be the ash. 🌳 John Crome, The Poringland Oak c.1818–20 on free display at Tate Britain in the Spotlights: 1819 display.

Tate

#ArtWords: With origins in 1970s New York, 'Graffiti art' refers to images or text painted usually onto buildings, typically using spray paint. Keith Haring begun his graffiti work by drawing in New York’s subway stations; filling empty poster spaces with chalk drawings which people would walk past every day. His aim was to make art accessible to everyone. #KeithHaring, Crack is Wack mural, NYC June 27, 1986. @keithharingfoundation. See more of Haring's work in the @TateLiverpool exhibition - link in bio.

Tate

#WorkoftheWeek is John Singer Sargent's Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose. ​ ​Sargent was able to paint for only a few minutes each evening when the light was exactly right. He would place his easel and paints out beforehand, and Polly and Dolly would pose in anticipation of the few moments when he could paint the mauvish light of dusk. The lanterns appear to glow a wonderful orange from the canvas. See the painting on free display at Tate Britain and watch the lanterns glow when you view the painting through your Instagram app. #TateAR

Tate

Which artwork could you spend all day in front of? 💭 Fahrelnissa Zeid, Untitled c.1950s, on free display in Tate Modern's Start Display.

Tate

'We are deeply saddened to hear of the death of Takis. His uniquely poetic and endlessly inventive spirit will be missed by all those who knew him, as well as by the many more who encountered his art. It was a great privilege for all of us at Tate Modern to have worked with him on his exhibition. Using magnetism, light and sound as his raw materials, Takis’s audacious sculptures were a radical break from convention. I’m sure he will continue to be an inspiration to artists for generations to come.' - Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions & Programmes, Tate Modern Takis, sculptor of magnetism, light and sound. Born October 29, 1925, in Athens, died August 9, 2019.

Tate

Felicitas Vogler was an outstanding photographer and lover of nature, Beethoven and cats. She met British artist Ben Nicholson in St Ives in 1957 and married him less than two months later. He encouraged her interest in photography and shared her fondness for felines, especially their cat Tommy. She captured this image of Ben and Tommy in 1965. 🐾 #InternationalCatDay

Tate

#ArtWords: The term collage derives from the French term papiers collés (or découpage), used to describe techniques of pasting paper cut-outs onto surfaces. The technique was first used by artists in the early 20th century. 'Collage allows the opening up of conscious, which is very direct… it's also a way of looking at what you are consuming all the time' - John Stezaker. In Stezaker's masks he combines postcards with portraits of film stars, opening a window into another space. The images together activate our innate tendency to interpret faces in patterns and imagery. The scene in the postcard could be seen to reflect the interior state of the figure. Alternatively, by replacing eyes with blankness or holes, the works might be showing us death beneath the features of living beings. John Stezaker, Mask XIII and Mask XIV 2006, on free display in Tate Modern's 'Materials and Objects: Collage.'

Tate

David Goldblatt began taking photographs in 1948 – the same year that saw the start of apartheid in South Africa. ​As a young photographer, Goldblatt set out to capture ‘the underbelly of the society that underlay South Africa’. He explained: ‘to understand it visually, I also had to get a grasp on the history of the country.' His images reflect this desire to understand the full context behind what is depicted. See a free display of David Goldblatt's photography, open now at Tate Modern. David Goldblatt, Child Minder. Joubert Park, Johannesburg 1975, printed 2013; Blanketed Man at the Trading Store. Hobeni, Bomvanaland, Transkei 1975, printed 2013; Couple on a Sunday Afternoon. Zoo Lake, Johannesburg 1975, printed 2013.

Tate

Robert Indiana, LOVE Red Violet 1966-98 ​ ​❤️

Tate

What does your Sunday look like? 🦆 ​ ​Hans Casparius (1900–1986), Regents Park, London 1930, printed 1970–9, available to view by appointment in Tate Britain's Prints and Drawings Room.

tate

Hungarian artist Dóra Maurer (born 1937) is set to take over Tate Modern with a year-long exhibition of her photographs, films and paintings ⁠— spanning more than five decades of her playful conceptual work. This is the first UK exhibition to showcase Maurer as an influential artist, teacher, networker and curator — and it's free to see. Opens Monday at Tate Modern. See bio link for more. ​ ​Dóra Maurer, Seven Twists V 1979, printed 2011, Tate collection. Purchased with funds provided by the Russia and Eastern Europe Acquisitions Committee 2015.

tate

Last chance to see The EY Exhibition: #VanGogh and Britain! 🌻 We're staying open late in the exhibition's final week so you don't miss seeing some of the artist's most iconic works. @TateCollective go for £5 and Members enter any time, any day. To see late opening hours or buy tickets, click today's bio link. ​ Vincent van Gogh's Starry Night over the Rhone 1888 (Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France). ✨✨✨

tate

Last chance to catch the first full retrospective dedicated to #FrankBowling, an artist who's relentlessly explored the properties of paint for over 60 years. From staining, throwing, layering and pouring, Bowling is interested in paint as 'organic matter, pliable and beautiful.' He describes his works, known for their textured terrains and luminous surfaces, as 'more land than landscape.' And now 85 years old, he continues to establish, and systematically break, an ever-changing set of self-imposed rules about painting. 'The possibilities are endless', he says. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️🖌️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This Friday's #LateatTateBritain explores the passage of Frank's life and his extraordinary work. Join us for rarely seen film footage in his NYC studio to digital face painting, Jazz and Blues performances and collaborative quilt making — all for free at Tate Britain. A nice opportunity to catch the exhibition too. Link in bio for more details. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ @FrankBowlingRA, Toward Crab Island 1983, Sheldon Inwentash and Lynn Factor, Toronto © Frank Bowling. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2019.

tate

@StudioOlafurEliasson presents: The Cubic Structural Evolution Project! From now until 18 August in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, visitors are invited to build a vision of a future city in white Lego bricks. #OlafurEliasson first staged this work in 2004. The bricks are recycled each time the work is shown and new cities are made. So far in London we’ve seen some incredible constructions from dedicated builders of all ages (see today’s story!) Join the build FREE and see what you can make...

tate

📸 Photographer Robert Mapplethorpe took this photo of bodybuilder and budding actor Arnold @schwarzenegger in 1976, aged 29. Today he turns 72. Mapplethorpe makes reference (possibly ironically) to the 19th century Western tradition of representing the nude, whereby the idealised body is positioned beside drapery, similar to that of the curtain in this photograph. Robert Mapplethorpe, Arnold Schwarzenegger 1976, Tate, National Galleries of Scotland and @artistrooms collection.

tate

Claudette Johnson has been making larger than life drawings of Black women since the early 1980s. She is motivated by an attempt to convey individuals without distortion or caricature, both as subject and form. Her figures are monolithic, seemingly to resist their containment within the edges of the paper. She usually works from life onto large sheets of paper taped to her studio wall. She begins with a dry pastel drawing, which she often paints over in sections using blocks of watercolour and gouache paint, before adding a final layer of drawing with pastel. The results are richly coloured and sensuous images that convey a sense of urgency in their expressive broken lines and pulsing forms. Standing Figure with African Masks was painted from life in the artist’s studio in East London, using a small mirror placed on a chair. Although she doesn't consider the work a self-portrait, it's the first recognisable image that Johnson has made using herself. ​ 'I am a Blackwoman and my work is concerned with making images of Blackwomen... I’m interested in our humanity, our feelings and our politics; some things which have been neglected… I have a sense of urgency about our ‘apparent’ absence in a space we’ve inhabited for several centuries.' ​ Claudette Johnson's Standing Figure with African Masks 2018 ​is currently on display @mao_gallery in Oxford, UK.

tate

#WorkoftheWeek: Can you make out The #EiffelTower in Robert Delaunay's abstract painting? He took his inspiration from a postcard showing the tower overlooking the rooftops of Paris. The colourful, overlapping forms speak of the bright lights and fast-paced interactions that take place in the city. Robert Delaunay, Windows Open Simultaneously (First Part, Third Motif) 1912, on free display at Tate Modern.

tate

Walead Beshty’s 'Travel Pictures' is a series of photographs depicting the ruins of the former Iraqi embassy in East Berlin. Walead Beshty learned about the building shortly before the outbreak of the Gulf War, when he read a newspaper report about a fire that was caused by squatters. In 2006 Beshty flew from Los Angeles to Berlin to photograph the embassy, and then back again to develop the photographs. During these journeys his film was sent through several airport X-ray machines. The long title of the work names all the codes for the airports through which the film travelled, and the names of the machines through which it passed. As a result of these journeys, you can see bands and flares of colour on the prints. The images are as damaged as the building they depict. Like the neglect of the embassy, the cause can be traced back to political history: X-ray machines were first installed during the 1970s to prevent hijackings, and airport security was tightened even further after the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York in September 2001. See the 'Travel Pictures' on free display at Tate Modern until 1 December 2019 (link in bio for more info.)

Tate

#ArtWords: 'Afrofuturism' refers to artwork which combines sci-fi, history and fantasy to explore black identities. While the term has its roots in African-American science fiction literature, it has come to be used more generally to encompass music and visual art as well as literature that reflects upon African diasporic experiences. Ellen Gallagher, Bird in Hand 2006, on free display at Tate Modern.

Tate

'A lot of my paintings are anonymous backdrops for the drama of words.' - Ed Ruscha (roo-shay). ​ Here are three works from Ed Ruscha's 2001 Country Cityscapes series ⁠— a series of photogravure prints that illustrate a relationship between words and images, and specifically landscapes. The ambiguity between menace and humour in the titles highlight the slippery meaning of words without their context. The term 'cityscape' echoes 'soundscape,' the sounds that make up an environment, and points to the colloquial use of language in the city, combined with picturesque postcard scenes (the artist has wryly referred to himself as a landscape painter). Explore Ruscha's ongoing fascination with words, image and place in Tate Modern's newly opened @artistrooms display of the artist's paintings, prints and photographic books (free entry!) Edward Ruscha, You’re A Dead Man 2001, Noose Around Your Neck 2001 and You Will Eat Hot Lead 2001, from the artist's Country Cityscapes series.

Tate

Who's your travel companion? ☀️ This painting features the artist’s niece in northern Italy, Rose-Marie Ormond. They often travelled together and Rose-Marie was one of his favourite subjects. John Singer Sargent, The Black Brook c.1908, on free display at Tate Britain in Walk Through British Art: 1890 Room.

Tate

💧 In Olafur Eliasson's Big Bang Fountain the viewer sees water pumped upwards in bursts and illuminated by a slow flashing light. The light catches the water in the air, freezing the bursts in frenzied and globular forms. Rather than experiencing the entire journey of the water, viewers can only glimpse the final moment of each burst, a mesmerising series of abstract forms. Experience the captivating work of #OlafurEliasson in tonight's environment-focused Uniqlo #TateLates which takes inspiration from the artist's newly opened exhibition. Tonight's Uniqlo #TateLates includes pop-up talks about everyday eco-activism, artist discussions around sustainability and a climate change speed date drop-in. We've gone paperless with this month's programme but you can find the online version by clicking the link in our bio 🌍 Other ways we've gone green🍃 include: reusable, washable cups for visitors instead of single use plastic, plastic-free food and drink packaging to feed tonight's artists, staff and DJs, biodegradable crisp packets, reusable Tate water bottles for artists plus our new water fountain outside Tate Modern for visitors to re-fill instead of purchasing plastic. We'll be reviewing and updating our green practices every month. This is just the beginning! Big Bang Fountain 2014, on display in @StudioOlafurEliasson's major exhibition at Tate Modern (tickets are £10 from 6-10pm tonight.) 💧

Tate

🏳️‍🌈 Join @tateliverpool's free Pride party tonight & kick off the #LiverpoolPride weekend right! 💃 Voguing masterclasses 📚 Poetry performances 🎶 80s music 🎨 Free entry to ★★★★★ Keith Haring exhibition The pink triangle, now considered a symbol of pride, was reclaimed by gay rights activists in the 1970s. This symbol was first used by the Nazis to identify and shame gay and bisexual men and transgender women (while some lesbian and bisexual women and transgender men were given a black triangle). Keith Haring used his art to fight for LGBTQ+ equality right up until his death in 1990. Keith Haring, Silence = Death 1989 © Keith Haring Foundation, on display @tateliverpool until 10 November 2019.

Tate

What's your favourite city to visit? 🌇 Birmingham-born artist Raymond Mason has recalled how he 'spent a sickly childhood looking through curtains at a brick-lined street'. In 1971, the artist sat in a Manhattan coffee shop and had his 'heart...warmed by the sight of the brick fronts opposite', as he drew the view from the window. He said: 'all travellers enjoy sitting watching a foreign world pass by'. Raymond Mason, St Mark’s Place, East Village, NYC 1972

Tate

Join Tate Members today and experience #OlafurEliasson's captivating installations in the quiet, before gallery doors open to the public. Members Hours are every Saturday and Sunday between 9 and 10am. 🌅 Link in bio to join! ​ ​ @StudioOlafurEliasson, Wannabe 1991, Din blinde passager / fog walk 2010, How do we live together?, 2019 and Your spiral view 2002 © Olafur Eliasson.

Tate

#TateWeather says the UK's in for a scorcher tomorrow! Time for a dip? 💦 ​ ​Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Bathers at Moritzburg 1909–26

Tate

🧱 From fog-filled tunnels to a London in lego, we've got five things to do with young explorers inside @StudioOlafurEliasson's major Tate Modern exhibition this summer 🌈☀️ link in bio!

Tate

Huguette Caland grew up in a society where female sexuality was often repressed and rarely discussed. She challenges this narrative through subtle eroticism, from her colourful Bribes de corps (Body Parts) paintings from the 1970s to her intricate ink drawings (her Flirt series from 1972) that playfully represent lips, noses and mouths that kiss, poke and prod. These works reflect Caland’s ability to create an artistic language to talk about sexuality. Take a sensual trip through the artist's first UK museum solo exhibition at @tatestives until 1 September 2019. 💕

Tate

@muholizanele is rewriting visual history and challenging the way we think about art. Their first major UK exhibition of photographic and activist work lands at Tate Modern in 2020, and we can't wait. Together with WePresent we're beginning to uncover the richness of Muholi's practice — from empowering communities to taking tender and intimate portraits. Read the article by clicking the link in today's bio. Zanele Muholi, Bona, Charlottesville 2015 © Stevenson Gallery

Tate

@frankbowlingra completed this painting, Mirror 1964–6, when he was 30 years old. The painting features the staircase between the V&A and the old Royal College painting school, where Bowling studied alongside David Hockney, Peter Blake and R.B. Kitaj. Bowling remembers the staircase as a student escape route, and he appears in the painting twice, once at the top and once at the bottom of the stairs. Now 85, #FrankBowling still paints every day in his London studio, continuing his visionary approach that fuses abstraction with personal memories. Uncover more about Bowling by clicking the link in today's bio and see 'Mirror' on display in the artist's major retrospective at Tate Britain.

Tate

This large-scale collage by Mark Bradford is made of materials found by the artist on the streets of Los Angeles, USA, where he works and lives. The work is constructed entirely from paper fragments which he believes, ‘act as memories of things pasted and things past. You can peel away the layers of papers and it’s like reading the streets through the signs’. How do you record your memories? 💭 Mark Bradford, Los Moscos 2004, on free display in Tate Modern.

Tate

#Artwords: 'Rayonism' was a Russian avant-garde movement from the early 20th century. Invented by #NataliaGoncharova and her partner Michel Larionov, the abstract form was characterised by interacting linear forms derived from rays, based on the effect of light on landscape or cityscapes. This pastel piece by Natalia Goncharova is called Rayonist Composition c.1912–13 and is on display in the artist's major exhibition at Tate Modern until 8 September 2019.

Tate

'It is very timely to make a work like 'Looking for Langston' visible to a new generation.' - Isaac Julien Award winning filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien's groundbreaking film 'Looking for Langston' combines poetry and image to explore Black, queer desire and take a closer look at the private lives of the artists who were at the forefront of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. Watch the film on free display at Tate Britain until November 2019.

Tate

Nam June Paik was born #onthisday in 1932! The visionary artist embraced new technologies, pioneering the use of TV in art and making robots out of radios. 📻📻📻 He is also credited for coining the phrase ‘electronic superhighway’ to predict the future of communication in the internet age. How has technology changed the way you communicate? Nam June Paik, Bakelite Robot 2002. A major exhibition of the artist's work opens in October at Tate Modern.