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theLilyNews

Pop star @billieeilish made history Monday: She became became the first artist born in this century to land a No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. “Bad Guy,” the fifth single from @billieeilish’s debut album, “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” dethroned @lilnasx’s “Old Town Road,” which had reigned for a record-breaking 19 weeks. (Photo by Jim Bennett/Getty; Illustration by @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

On Monday, New York Police Department Commissioner James P. O’Neill announced the decision to fire Daniel Pantaleo, the officer caught on video with his arm around the neck of 43-year-old Eric Garner just before he died in 2014. On the video, Garner can be heard saying, “I can’t breathe.” Outside police headquarters, Gwen Carr, Garner’s mother, told supporters that her work isn’t done. “We have other officers that we have to go after. You have heard the names. We know the wrongdoing that they have done,” she said, in a reference to the other officers present when her son died, CNN reported. (Photo by Bebeto Matthews/AP)

theLilyNews

The 19th Amendment, ratified Aug. 18, 1920, granted U.S. women the right to vote — but that right wasn’t easily exercised by many women of color for decades to come. It wasn’t until the 1965 Voting Rights Act — and its extensions a decade later — that women of color secured voting rights protections. In a tweet Monday, Sen. @kamalaharris (D-Calif.), a 2020 hopeful, brought attention to the issue. Still today, advocates say, voter disenfranchisement, such as voter ID laws, keep women of color from the polls.

theLilyNews

In June, when @fatbabesclubofcolumbus threw their first body-positive pool party, their Instagram posts started racking up likes. The four co-founders ( @snackincbus, @kkrryyssttaal, @mellamoesjae and @hannahgodown) were inspired by an episode of @shrillhulu, which is based on @thelindywest’s 2016 memoir of the same name. In the Season 1 episode, main character Annie ( @aidybryant) covers a “fat babe” pool party. She ultimately decides to strip off her jeans and join the celebration. • The group’s second pool party, which they threw in Columbus, Ohio, on Aug. 10, was replete with colorful pool floats and @lizzobeeating tunes. One 21-year-old attendee said it was “one of the best nights ever”: “I felt like no one was staring at me, and if they were, it was because they wanted to compliment me.” Head to our link in bio to read more. (Photos by Megan Jelinger for @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

Women and girls are believed to use the term “like” more frequently, though overall, they don’t, said scholar Alexandra D’Arcy, who conducted a detailed analysis of urban North American speech. “We have a tendency to be really hard on women, to denigrate women, for being linguistic leaders, when in fact, if we simply listen to young women, they are laying out a road map for where language is going anyway,” D’Arcy said. • So what does it signify when young women are ridiculed for using a word already in common currency? Seemingly innocuous stereotypes, such as associating “like” with vapid women, have real consequences. Dismissing women’s speech makes it easier to dismiss their experiences — and to doubt them when they’re wronged. (Photos by Istock; Illustration by @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

In 1969, Debra Garvey, who was 14 at the time, was one of the half million people who attended Woodstock. She came of age at a time when women had historically been relegated to being housewives and secretaries. The festival was not so much about the music, several women who attended say. It was about freedom, and “peace and love.” • This weekend marks 50 years since Woodstock. Garvey remembers the general lack of food and water; she remembers being surprised by people walking around naked, which she’d never seen before. She says the sheer amount of people “really kind of freaked me out.” It was the first time she’d ever been away from home. It was an “awakening,” Garvey says. “It was beautiful.” Head to the link in our bio to read more of Lily multiplatform editor @lenakfelton’s interview with three women who were at Woodstock in 1969. (photos by Richard Gordon / The Museum at Bethel Woods; Annie Birch / AFP / Getty; AP; illustration by @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

Comic artist Sage Coffey talks about what went through their head when confronted with Facebook's mortality settings, which allow you control what happens to your profile when you die. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

theLilyNews

Having faced increased scrutiny regarding its treatment of pregnant athletes, Nike is changing its policy to guarantee a pregnant athlete’s pay and bonuses cannot be cut over the 18-month period covering eight months before an athlete’s due date through 10 months after. Under Nike’s previous policy, according to a spokesman, that period had lasted 12 months. • In a New York Times op-ed in May, decorated sprinter Allyson Felix wrote that contract renewal talks broke down after Nike offered to pay her 70 percent of her previous salary and refused to guarantee she wouldn’t be financially punished for performing below her standard in the months before and after her childbirth. In another Times op-ed, distance runner Kara Goucher said she felt forced to train, owing to financial pressure, rather than caring for her newborn. (illustration by @mariaalconadabrooks)

theLilyNews

A new law in New York allowing adult victims of child sex abuse to sue in the next year has already prompted over 400 lawsuits, including one from Jennifer Araoz, an alleged victim of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. Forty-five judges have been designated specifically to handle these cases. Still, victim-rights advocate Bridie Farrell cannot rest easy. One year, she told Lily staff writer @cakitche, is “not a lot of time at all.” “The clock is ticking,” she added. • The opportunity to sue in court gives Farrell a degree of power over her life she felt she had lost. In 2013, at age 31, she famously accused Olympic silver-medalist Andy Gabel of molesting her when she was 15. For 16 years, she did not tell anyone. “I view it as I lost agency over my body when I was 15,” Farrell said. “And now, at 37, for the first time, it’s back.” (Jason Szenes / EPA-EFE; iStock; illustration by @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

Meet Minnesotan Maddy Freking, a 12-year-old who is the only girl among the field of 16 teams playing at the Little League World Series, which started on Thursday night. She’s the first girl to play in the LLWS since Mo’ne Davis made headlines in 2014. Freking is only the 19th girl to play in the Series in its 72-year history. • “It’s a dream come true,” Freking told Minneapolis’s Fox affiliate. “Just to be there is really amazing.” Freking is the starting second baseman for the Coon Rapids-Andover team that advanced to LLWS as the Midwest champion. (Gene J. Puskar / AP; illustration by @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

Muftiyah Tlaib, @rashidatlaib’s grandmother, doesn’t understand why her granddaughter, a sitting U.S. congresswoman, couldn’t visit her as originally planned. Tlaib’s grandmother, who says she’s somewhere between 85 and her early 90s, lives in the village of Beit Ur al-Fauqa, about 15 miles outside Jerusalem. On Friday, Israel partly reversed its decision from the day before to deny entry to @rashidatlaib (D-Mich.) and fellow congresswoman @repilhan (D-Minn.) from a planned tour of the Palestinian territories. Israeli Interior Ministry Aryeh Deri said Friday that he would approve a separate humanitarian request for Tlaib to visit her grandmother, in part because she agreed not to promote boycotts against Israel during her visit. For many Palestinians, the fact that Tlaib accepted these terms was troubling. Tlaib appeared to agree by Friday morning. “Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me. It would kill a piece of me,” @rashidatlaib tweeted. “I have decided that visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in — fighting against racism, oppression & injustice.” (photo by James McAuley / The Washington Post; illustration by @thelilynews)

theLilyNews

Born in '89? Turning 30 soon? Know anyone who is? Tag your 30-year-old friends in the comments. This fall, we're launching @thejessicasareturning30, a look at what it's like to be 30 in the United States today. Help us find as many 30-year-olds as we can before we launch. (Type by @jessicahische; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Today, cartoonist @kagwheeler opens up about the grief she and her partner experienced after finding out that their foster daughter wouldn't be staying with them anymore. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

thelilynews

Post contributor Julie Matlin says she and her husband agreed to always be open with their kids about sex and their bodies. That's why when Matlin's 11-year-old daughter approached her about what it'll be like when she gets her period, Matlin was especially proud. “She’s growing up. But she came to me when she needed to talk. With zero fear, hesitation or shame. It was amazing,” writes Matlin. “And if she came to me with this, maybe she’ll come to me when she has her first kiss, is ready to have sex or is just feeling insecure about her body. At the very least, she knows I’m here, I’ve got her back and I’ll always be honest.” (photo by iStock; illustrations by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Japanese “salaryman” culture is marked by long hours and drinks late into the night. Increasingly, women like Yuko, a 25-year-old accountant for one of Japan’s biggest trading houses, are standing out among the groups of dark-suited men. They’re young “salarywoman” strivers who hope their generation will be the first to have it all — big careers and also fulfilling home lives. More women in Japan now work — about 70 percent, up several percentage points since 2000 — as a result of changing norms, a greater need for dual incomes and government efforts to increase female participation in the workforce. Still, gender roles remain deeply ingrained. Click the link in our bio to read more about Yuko and other salarywomen. (Shiho Fukada for @thelilynews)

thelilynews

GIVEAWAY | We are giving away three signed copies of our July book club pick. “Patsy” by Nicole Dennis-Benn, the Jamaican author of “Here Comes the Sun,” again explores themes of sexuality and belonging among the working class in her second novel, about a woman who leaves her 5-year-old daughter in Jamaica to track down the woman she loves in the United States. To enter to win, you must (1) follow @lilylitclub and @thelilynews, (2) like this post and (3) tag three friends you think would like this book. We'll announce a winner on Tuesday by updating this post. (photo by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Married Americans have been getting creative with surnames for decades. In heterosexual relationships, it’s no longer assumed that a woman will adopt her husband’s last name when they get married: She might keep her name, he might change his, or the two might hyphenate, writes Lily staff writer @cakitche. But some couples are now doing something different: fashioning a new name — often out of pieces of their old ones — that is entirely original. Click the link in bio to read more. (photo by iStock; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Last month, Pragya Singh Thakur, a Hindu ascetic who has boasted of her role in destroying a medieval mosque and valorized the man who murdered Mohandas Gandhi as a “patriot,” was elected to India’s Parliament. The 49-year-old is an unlikely legislator. She renounced family life in her 30s to become a “sadhvi,” an honorific for a Hindu nun. But later she would be charged under an anti-terrorism statute for conspiring to target Muslims in a deadly 2008 bomb blast. She denies the charges. Her controversial candidacy and comfortable victory epitomize the growing influence of a militant brand of right-wing Hindu ideology in India, a country of more than 1.3 billion people that its founders envisioned as a secular republic. (photos by Manish Swarup / AP; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

In this week's edition of #LilyLines, we asked three writers to tell us about their most defining moment traveling alone. For Meg Bernhard ( @megbernhard), 24, her journey sprang from the loss of her friend, Haley, who Meg had spent the summer of 2014 backpacking around Europe with. Last summer, Meg decided to spend two weeks in Vienna and Budapest, following a travel guide Haley had written for the two cities. “I couldn’t reconstruct her time in Europe, nor did I want to. What I wanted was something intangible, to pay homage to a friend who had been with me on my own journey four years earlier. I wanted to find Haley in the places that she had loved. She took me there.” (photo courtesy of @megbernhard)

thelilynews

@taylorswift’s new overtly political single, “You Need to Calm Down,” has been dubbed a “Pride anthem.” Its accompanying music video released Monday features a slew of LGBTQ celebrities such as @lavernecox, @theellenshow and the Fab Five of @netflix’s @queereye. But in the past, Swift been an almost entirely apolitical figure in the pop culture universe. Lily contributor Garrett Schlichte ( @gschlichte) argues Swift’s support of the LGBTQ community is positive — but she presented her message wrong. Instead, what queer people want, Schlichte argues, “is to be able to write and perform our own anthems. Taylor Swift is not making space for queer people in the industry, she is taking up space that would be better occupied by LGBTQ voices.” (photos by Rich Fury / Getty; iStock; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Today, cartoonist @tldorjee talks about how she responded when a middle school bully messaged her on Facebook years after the fact. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

thelilynews

Joy Harjo was appointed 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States on Wednesday. As a member of the Muscogee Nation, she will be the first Native American to serve in that honorary position when she begins this fall. “My role as a poet is as a healer,” says Harjo. “Poetry is a healing force.” The 68-year-old writer first felt that restorative power during a difficult time early in her life. “Poetry came to me at a point in which I had no words to express the depth of experience of being Native in this country,” she says. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, who made the selection, said in a statement, “Joy Harjo has championed the art of poetry — ‘soul talk’ as she calls it — for over four decades. To her, poems are ‘carriers of dreams, knowledge and wisdom,’ and through them she tells an American story of tradition and loss, reckoning and mythmaking.” (photos by Shawn Miller / @librarycongress; iStock; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Leiomy Maldonado ( @wond3rwoman1) is a ballroom icon known as the Wonder Woman of Vogue. She's also the choreographer for “Pose,” a series that centers on the trans women and gay men of color in New York’s underground ballroom culture. The show, which began its second season June 11, is part family drama, part musical extravaganza. The first season, inspired by the 1990 documentary “Paris Is Burning,” was set in the late 1980s as the characters forged their chosen families — “houses” — and tried to put the hardships of nonconforming life behind them by competing in voguing and runway contests under a glittering disco ball. Season 2 jumps to the early ’90s, as the HIV/AIDS crisis builds and Madonna’s “Vogue” video brings the trans-ball culture and voguing into the mainstream. Washington Post dance critic @sarahlkaufman had a behind-the-scenes look at the filming of season 2. Click the link in our bio to read more. (photos by Chris Sorensen for The Washington Post)

thelilynews

If you venture to Britain anytime soon, you might notice something different: There will be no more gender stereotypes in British commercials, social media campaigns or online ads. Those new guidelines come after an ad peddling a weight-loss product got a huge response. Plastered throughout London’s subway system, the posters showed a model clad in a tiny yellow bikini, her rib cage clearly visible, asking, “Are you beach body ready?” More than 70,000 people signed an online petition insisting the ads be taken down. The campaign also helped kick-start a review by the United Kingdom’s Advertising Standards Authority. The new guidelines prohibit ads that play up roles deemed more feminine or male, as well as derogatory messages around body image. (photos by iStock; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

@nike has added new mannequins to its flagship store in London. “Highlighting a full range of athlete figures, the space shows multiple plus-sized and para-sport mannequins, a first for the city’s store,” @nike said in a press release. (photo by @nike)

thelilynews

On Sunday at @thetonyawards, @alistroker made history as the first actor in a wheelchair to capture a Tony Award. She earned the trophy for her portrayal of Ado Annie in Daniel Fish’s dark revisionist revival of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic “Oklahoma!” • “This award is for every kid who is watching tonight who has a disability, who has a limitation or a challenge, who has been waiting to see themselves represented in this arena,” Stroker, who won for best featured actress in a musical, said on stage. “You are.” (photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

thelilynews

Today, cartoonist @csuggsillustration opens up about her Mexican heritage. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

thelilynews

On Saturday, the annual Capital Pride Parade took place in Washington, D.C. Representatives and members of more than 200 organizations marched the 1.5-miles-long route. The parade was organized by Capital Pride Alliance with the intention to “celebrate, educate, support, and inspire” about the LGBTQ community. (photos Astrid Riecken / @washingtonpost)

thelilynews

In this week's issue of #LilyLines, 10 readers and members of #TeamLily told us what books remind them of summer. Swipe to see No. 6-10 from the list.

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#Repost from @lilylitclub: It's June, which means it's time for a new book. Are you new to @lilylitclub? Head to the Instagram Highlights row for a week-by-week breakdown of how our Instagram-only book club works. This month's pick, “The Spectators” by Jennifer duBois follows Matthew Miller, the ellusive host of a sensationalist, Jerry Springer-esque ’90s talk show that some find vulgar and many others find addictive. When a school shooting grips the nation’s attention, an inconvenient truth emerges: The shooters were avid fans of his program, “The Mattie M Show.” Amid the controversy, secrets bubble up from Matthew’s past as a New York City lawyer and politician. We examine his character through the eyes of two narrators: Cel, his cynical publicist, and Semi, a past lover. With deft writing and frequent dashes of humor, duBois takes us on a journey that spans decades and considers the ache of loss, the danger of spectacle and the costs of reinventing who you are. (photo by iStock; Ross May for @thelilynews)

thelilynews

In 2015, zookeepers at @smithsonianzoo in Washington, D.C., wanted to do a study, so they incubated all eggs that were laid by female reptiles that were not bred. After two weeks of incubation, the zookeepers “candled" them, a process in which they hold each one up to a light to see if there are veins. It turned out that there were, and experts said it was a “telltale sign that the eggs were fertile and embryos were developing.” The first two batches did not survive. But the third batch happened to have what scientists call a “breakthrough,” and a female hatchling came out of her shell on Aug. 24, 2016. After a lot of analysis, scientists figured out the egg had developed “without assistance from a male,” said Robert Fleischer, head of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute’s Center for Conservation Genomics. (photo by Skip Brown/Smithsonian's National Zoo)

thelilynews

In this week's issue of #LilyLines, 10 readers and members of #TeamLily told us the books that remind them of summer. Swipe to see No. 1-5 on the list. Tell us what you’re reading this summer in the comments.

thelilynews

Even as abortion laws are being rewritten across the country, access to abortion is also expanding across parts of the South. In Charlotte, N.C., Jill Dinwiddie worked quietly for nearly three years. She talked to potential donors about how desperately the Planned Parenthood needed a new health center, one large enough to add abortion to the clinic’s services for the first time in three decades. She needed to raise $10 million, find a building in the city’s competitive real estate market and renovate it — all without media outlets or protesters finding out. As of last month, she and her co-chairs of the capital campaign committee, Crandall Bowles and Linda Hudson, had already raised $8.5 million, and the operational clinic will open in July. • “We’ve seen this coming for years,” Planned Parenthood South Atlantic chief executive Jenny Black said of newly enacted restrictions. “And we really wanted to put our stake in the ground in Charlotte, and say that access to these services is very important to us and we are going to do what it takes to bring it to fruition for Charlotte.” (Travis Dove for The Washington Post; iStock; Lily illustration)

thelilynews

Today, cartoonist @brytning tells us about her experiments with lucid dreaming. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

thelilynews

At its annual awards ceremony at the Brooklyn Museum, the Council of Fashion Designers of America ( @cfda) gave Barbie its Board of Directors’ Tribute, which in recent years has gone to former first lady @michelleobama, equal rights advocate @gloriasteinem, entertainer and activist @janellemonae and former head of Planned Parenthood @cecilerichards. Washington Post fashion critic, @robingivhan, questioned the board's decision, writing, “the problem with bestowing a CFDA award on Barbie is not about popularity. It’s not that Barbie is bad. It’s this: Barbie, despite all the marketing and platform-blah-blah-blah, is still a doll. And women are not. They are not objects or infantile or without agency.” And while Barbie has increased the diversity in its range of dolls, “celebrating the fact that a doll company is finally doing what a doll company should have been doing all along is a sign of an industry that doesn’t seem to grasp the depth and breadth of its responsibility — and, more important, its potential,” argues Givhan. (photos by iStock; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Today, cartoonist @kagwheeler talks about her complicated relationship with her body and what training in martial arts has done for her body image. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

thelilynews

Six days a week, Suzelle Poole, a willowy 78-year-old Dallas ballet instructor laces up her pointe shoes and teaches classical ballet, as she’s done for decades. Madame Poole, as her students call her, also regularly performs on pointe throughout the Dallas area as a guest artist with local dance companies. And she dances at retirement communities and assisted-living centers along with her students. “People in care centers can relate to me because I’m about the same age,” Poole said. “I hope to get them interested in exercise. Plus, I enjoy showing them that it’s never too late to do something you love.” (photo by Ellen Harold)

thelilynews

On Tuesday, @nickelodeon released a trailer for a reboot of Blue’s Clues. But this time, the lead role is played by @itsjoshdelacruz, a Filipino American. Reaction on social media has been overwhelmingly positive. Rapper and comedian @timothydelaghetto took to @twitter to express his support for Dela Cruz and the show.

thelilynews

In December, @speakerpelosi strode out of the White House looking victorious in a brick-red wool coat and sunglasses. Her swagger went viral. So did the coat. But publicly, Pelosi hasn’t embraced the attention on what she wears, and she isn’t alone in this stance, writes fashion journalist Christina Binkley. Female leaders often reject scrutiny of their appearance, which can be inherently sexist and distract from their accomplishments. But it’s clear that Pelosi puts thought into her clothing. While the speaker may not acknowledge it, her safe yet well-cut choices do convey a message. “She’s conservative without being boring. She’s an alpha woman who is not afraid to show her feathers,” says Jill Totenberg, a communications consultant who has coached executives on their presentation strategies. “It evokes strength.” (photos by Marvin Joseph and Bill O'Leary / @washingtonpost; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

Burnout is officially a disease according to the International Classification of Diseases. @cnn reports that doctors may diagnose patients with burnout if they exhibit the following symptoms related to work or unemployment: 1. feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion 2. increased mental distance from one's job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job 3. reduced professional efficacy (illustration by @thelilynews)

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“The secret they don’t tell you when you’re young — or maybe they do, but you’re too green to hear it — is that the messy bit isn’t what’s standing between you and your real life; the messy bit is life itself,” writes Lily contributor Melissa Batchelor Warnke (@velvet_melvis). That message, she argues, also shines through “Fleabag,” the British series that dropped its second season on Amazon Prime earlier this month. (Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post.) • “The series, which has been hailed for its depiction of grief, sisterhood and the inner workings of women’s bodies, from miscarriage to menopause, is a representation of a full life — a young woman’s efforts, sexual experiences, memories and regrets. In her story, you may see glimmers of your own. While the specifics will differ, the obstacles Fleabag encounters as she seeks to manage or improve her life are likely to connect,” Batchelor Warnke writes. (photo by Amazon Studios; illustration by @thelilynews)

thelilynews

For a special project ahead of our second birthday, we want to know what you hope to see women do in the future. Comment below by completing this sentence: Women will _______. (Ex.: Women will walk on the moon, women will win the election for U.S. president, etc.)

thelilynews

Today, cartoonist @biancaxunise shares why she is reconsidering how much value she places on her relationships. Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

thelilynews

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court agreed to a compromise on a restrictive Indiana abortion law that keeps the issue off its docket for now. The court said a part of the law dealing with disposal of the “remains” of an abortion could go into effect. But it did not take up a part of the law stricken by lower courts that prohibited abortions because tests revealed an abnormality. The court indicated it would wait for other courts to weigh in before taking up that issue. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor would have upheld the 7th Circuit’s decision keeping all of the law from going into effect. (illustration by @thelilynews)

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@repkimschrier (D-Wash.) – one of the 40 freshmen House Democrats who flipped GOP-held seats – is the only female doctor in Congress. The Washington state pediatrician narrowly captured her seat, defeating Republican Dino Rossi in the most expensive House race in the state’s history. Last week, @washingtonpost national reporter Paige Winfield Cunningham asked her about the mania surrounding @repocasiocortez (D-N.Y.). Here's what she said. (photos by AP and @washingtonpost)

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MacKenzie Bezos has committed to giving away at least half her estimated $36 billion fortune to charity. Bezos, a novelist and one of the driving forces behind @amazon, announced that she has signed on to the Giving Pledge, whose international roster includes Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Mark Zuckerberg, and Michael Bloomberg. The move comes just months after she finalized her divorce from @amazon founder and chief executive @jeffbezos, the world’s richest man. ( @thelilynews is part of @washingtonpost, which is owned by @amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos.) (photo by Danny Moloshok / Reuters; illustration by @thelilynews)

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Abolitionist Harriet Tubman was slated to replace slave owner Andrew Jackson — President Trump’s favorite commander in chief — on the $20 bill in 2020, as part of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote. But on Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the design process has been delayed until 2028. “The primary reason we have looked at redesigning the currency is for counterfeiting issues,” Mnuchin said during a hearing before the House Financial Services Committee. “Based upon this, the $20 bill will now not come out until 2028. The $10 bill and the $50 bill will come out with new features beforehand.” • Tubman reveled in defying men, defying governments, defying slavery, defying Confederate armies and slave catchers who put a $40,000 bounty on her head. “I had reasoned this out in my mind,” Tubman once said, “there was one of two things I had a right to, liberty or death; if I could not have one, I would have the other.” (photo by World History Archive/Alamy Stock; illustration by @thelilynews)

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Amanda Eller, a 35-year-old physical therapist and yoga instructor who lives on Maui, vanished May 8. She had set out on a three-mile hike in the Hawaiian island’s Makawao Forest Reserve, leaving her phone, water, wallet and keys in her car. But she got turned around after veering off the trail — and ended up fracturing her leg. She ultimately spent 16 days stuck in the forest, eating insects and wild strawberry guavas to survive; she used ferns and leaves for warmth at night. • Eller’s disappearance set off a wave of search parties. On Friday, a helicopter search team contracted by her family found Eller, sunburnt and smiling, in a deep ravine four miles from her car. She was airlifted to a hospital. “I wanted to give up,” she later told the New York Times. “But the only option I had was life or death.” (photo by Javier Cantellops/illustration by @thelilynews)

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Today, cartoonist @sparespear talks about those six words women say to their friends at the end of the night: “Text me when you get home.” Note: All views expressed are the opinions of the artist.

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Chiquita Evans ( @chiquitae126) made video game history in March when, grinning with her arm up in a Rosie the Riveter pose, she became the first woman to join the professional gaming NBA 2K League ( @nba2k). The league, now in its second year, has 21 gaming squads that are associated with their corresponding NBA teams. While the press about Evans’s selection was overwhelmingly positive, critics were quick to question whether she’d actually earned the right to be there, or if her draft were simply a canny public relations move. But Evans tries not to think about being a standard-bearer too much. “It was never my intention to be the first anything,” Evans says, though she’s settling into the idea of being a role model. “I just wanted to play. I just wanted to compete. It was never about being a trailblazer.” (photos by @hatnimlee for The Lily; iStock; llustration by @thelilynews)