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“... this piece is about in some way, transition and transitoriness. I had an idea: what if you did a work of art that was really like a conversation. As we talk, we drift from one subject to another. And I'm drifting from subject to subject about my idea of art.” –#JenniferBartlett on “Rhapsody” (1975-76), now on view in our Marron Atrium … Hear the artist share more about the work which consists of 987 one-foot-square steel panels stretching over an expanse of more than 150 feet: mo.ma/rhapsody (link in bio) … [Credit: Jennifer Bartlett. “Rhapsody.” 1975-76. Enamel on steel, 987 plates. Gift of Edward R. Broida. © 2019 Jennifer Bartlett. Photos: Jonathan Muzikar]

themuseumofmodernart

“Balanchine famously said that there are no new steps, just new combinations...We have the traditional French names for all of those steps, it's just the angles at which they are being attacked and the combination in which they’re unfolding was new, and still feels new. It's…it’s radical.” –Adrian Danchig-Waring, principal dancer at the @nycballet and the director of the New York Choreographic Institute … Hear more perspectives on the artists of #LincolnKirstein’s Modern in our audio guide: mo.ma/kirsteinaudio (link in bio) … [Credit: George Balanchine. “The Four Temperaments.” 1946. Excerpt presented in “Kirstein and Balanchine’s New York City Ballet: Four Modern Works” in the Marron Atrium at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 16, 2019, in conjunction with Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern (March 17–June 15). Dancers, from left: Peter Walker, Miriam Miller. Digital image © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Julieta Cervantes]

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“...instead of showing you an example of that work realized as an object, only the text was presented. You could therefore make the work in your mind, or at home, or in the space. That was a really radical move, because it was one of the very first instances where the idea itself was the work of art.” –Chief curator Christophe Cherix on #YokoOno's “22 Instructions for Paintings” … For Ono, the concept and the potential for a work to be made are just as important as the object itself. Learn more about how this recent #MoMACollection acquisition—a group of small texts written in Japanese describing works to be realized—fits into Ono’s career and invites viewers to collaborate with the artist in making a work: mo.ma/instructions (link in bio) #WomenInCulture … [Credit: Yoko Ono. “Instructions for Paintings.” 1961–1962. Ink on paper. 22 sheets. Gilbert B. & Lila Silverman Collection, Detroit]

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“Trembling sun Open signal and signal like a fan-shaped dial Like the united caresses of one hand on the sky With birds opening up the book of the blind And of one wing after the other between this hour and the next Drawing the horizon, reshifting the shadows Which limit the world when I lower my eyes.” –Excerpt of Paul Éluard’s “A Côté (2)” from “Répétitions” (1922) … Avant-garde poetry had a profound impact on #JoanMiró’s visual language. Create a work of your own that engages with Paul Éluard’s poem—one of Miró’s favorites. Share your poetry-inspired work with the tag #PoetryofMiro for a chance to be featured on MoMA's account. … SUBMISSION RULES: Tag your work with #PoetryofMiro. Please do not tag work that is not your own, or you have not received permission to share. Any tagged image is eligible to be featured on the Museum’s channels. … [Image: Joan Miró. "Hirondelle Amour." Barcelona, late fall 1933-winter 1934. Oil on canvas. Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller. © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris] #joanmiro

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Our ability to discern the truth seems to be increasingly more difficult to achieve. We are bombarded, daily, on television, in print media, and most particularly on the Internet, with a growing mountain of information and images - how can we begin to address and understand all of this information and its relationship to the truth? 💭 How do we define the truth? 💭 Would you be more likely to believe something that you see or something that you read? 💭 Are there any differences in the truth that is presented in an image versus that which is defined in a text? 💭 Can looking at works of art help us to build a better understanding of the truth? How? 💭 Can looking at and discussing works of art help us to think about pressing social matters and concerns? How? 💭 How have images (works of art) been used in past to support or obscure the truth? 💭 What role might museums play in all of this? … Jane Royal ( @jklroyal) leads tomorrow’s agora—group discussions examining questions around art, design, and society in #MoMAGarden—asking: How can art and technology help us tell the truth? Add your questions and comments for Jane in the discussion below, and join us in searching for answers in the Sculpture Garden this Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. mo.ma/agora (link in bio) … [Image: Crispin Jones. “Tengu.” 2007. ABS plastic and electronics, 2 3/4 x 1 11/16 x 9/16" (7 x 4.3 x 1.5 cm). Gift of the designer]

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A purplish-brown slurry called “Supplements” features Rogaine, blueberries, and Viagra, while “Big Data” contains fragments of Google Glass eyewear, shredded Verizon phone bills, Omega-3 fish oil, Purell, and porn. These are some of the formulas that make up the 15 different “juice” flavors in the light box–encased commercial refrigerator that is Josh Kline’s “Skittles.” @joshklinejoshkline says, “The work comes out of thinking about Downtown New York’s class problems and the meaning of $15–$20 luxury juice in the wake of the financial crisis." … Take a look inside our #MoMAConservation lab to see how these indigestible drinks were mixed ahead of going on view in our #ArtTechMoMA exhibition: mo.ma/strangebrew (link in bio)

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Happy #MothersDay from MoMA! German artist Paula Modersohn-Becker is believed to be the first woman to paint herself while pregnant. A pioneering figure of the 20th-century German avant-garde, her career was cut short when she died in her early thirties, three weeks after giving birth to the daughter she carries in this portrait. Learn more about her self-portrait at mo.ma/2EbMLVZ (link in bio). ... [Image: Paula Modersohn-Becker. "Self-Portrait with Two Flowers in Her Raised Left Hand." 1907. Oil on canvas. Jointly owned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Gift of Debra and Leon Black, and The Neue Galerie, Gift of Ronald S. Lauder]

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This #MothersDay, join artist Danica Novgorodoff ( @novgorodoff) in contemplating the complex relationship between the creation of life and art as she recounts her visits to our #LouiseBourgeois and #AdrianPiper exhibitions for “Drawn to MoMA.” See more: mo.ma/drawn (link in bio)

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Artists who “tried to assert their feeling for their time and place” interested #LincolnKirstein the most. In 1942, Kirstein traveled for almost five months across seven South American countries, acquiring approximately 140 works for #MoMAcollection. The works Kirstein acquired in Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia reflected his taste for meticulous craftsmanship and emphasized local expression. This painting by #AntonioBerni is the largest and most expensive picture that Kirstein acquired on that trip. Now on view. … [Credit: Antonio Berni. “New Chicago Athletic Club (Club Atlético Nueva Chicago).” 1937. Oil on canvas. Inter-American Fund. © 2019 Fundación Antonio Berni and Luis Emilio De Rosa, Argentina]

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Q: What common object would you redesign 🤔 … “We must analyze and question the simple gadgets we use in our daily lives–our glasses, our dishes, our pots and pans, our shoes, our dresses, our radios, our chairs, our lamps etc.” –Elizabeth Mock, Curator of Architecture and Industrial Art, MoMA, 1945 Share how you would improve the design of a common object in the comments below and explore more iconic objects in #ValueofGoodDesign. … [Credits: Max Bill. “Tripod Chair.” 1949. Birch and laminated wood. Alexander Schärer Purchase Fund. Photographer: John Wronn; Stig Lindberg. “Lemon Squeezer.” 1951. Plastic. Gift of the manufacturer. Photographer: Thomas Griesel]

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“The painter works like the poet: the word comes before the thought...Make a scribble. For me, it will be a point of departure, a shock. I attach great importance to the initial shock” –#JoanMiró, now on view in "Joan Miró: Birth of the World" mo.ma/joanmiro … [Credit: Joan Miró. Untitled from “Black and Red Series” (“Série noire et rouge”). 1938. One from a series of eight etchings. Purchased with the Frances Keech Fund and funds given by Agnes Gund and Daniel Shapiro, Gilbert Kaplan, Jeanne C. Thayer, Reba and Dave Williams, Ann and Lee Fensterstock, Linda Barth Goldstein, Walter Bareiss, Mrs. Melville Wakeman Hall, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert D. Schimmel. © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris] #joanmiro

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Party in the Garden returns Tuesday, June 4! We’re thrilled to announce this year’s honorees: Alice and Tom Tisch, Yvonne Rainer and Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Don’t miss the chance to send off an incredible evening at our after-party in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden featuring music by Maggie Rogers ( @maggierogers) and DJ sets by The Knocks (@the_knocks) and Nina Sky (@yourfavoritetwins)! … Proceeds benefit the Museum’s operating fund, supporting our award-winning education programs and the care, study, and exhibition of our collection. Tables and tickets are available at moma.org/partyinthegarden2019 (link in bio). #partyinthegarden … [Image Credits: Olivia Bee; Andrew Sokolow; Jason Rodgers]

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The Hampton Album contains photographs by one of America’s first female photojournalists, Frances Benjamin Johnston, documenting the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now #HamptonUniversity) in Virginia, which was founded after the Civil War to provide education and practical training to African Americans and Native Americans. Johnston’s photo series, carefully composed to showcase the students’ hard work and virtue, was commissioned by the school and exhibited at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris. … #LincolnKirstein donated Johnston’s mesmerizing photo album to MoMA in 1965, and the work is now published in its entirety for the first time. Read the behind-the-scenes efforts that make this book such a treasure in an interview with curator Sarah Meister @themomameister and Marc Sapir, production manager in our Department of Publications: mo.ma/hamptonalbum (link in bio) … [Images: “The Hampton Album,” limited and trade editions; Frances Benjamin Johnston. “Physiology: Class in Emergency Work.” 1899-1900. Platinum print. Gift of Lincoln Kirstein; Frances Benjamin Johnston. “Drawing: Simple work from the object.” 1899-1900. Platinum print. Gift of Lincoln Kirstein]

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Face to screen, face to face: our relationships with technology are thriving but at the expense of human interaction. How can art help us connect to each other (even if the artwork is a screen)? Has a work of art ever connected you to another or a wider world? If so, describe the work and how it shaped your connection. What forms of art are most productive for connecting us to each other? Why? Why should art bear the responsibility of bringing us together? What does art offer that other fields lack? How have art and technology altered each other? How can museums play a role this relationship? How can art direct us towards a better future? … Paula Stuttman ( @pstuttman) leads this week’s agora—group discussions examining questions around art, design, and society in #MoMAGarden—asking: How can art bring us together in a mediated world? Add your questions and comments for Paula in the discussion below, and join us in searching for answers in the Sculpture Garden this Wednesday at 3:00 p.m, and Friday at 6:00 p.m. mo.ma/agora (link in bio) … Paula says, “The work I chose to accompany this Agora is Edward Hopper’s ‘ House by the Railroad’ (1925). It is on display in ‘Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern’ (SWIPE to view). Hopper’s painting makes me aware of loneliness and loss. I understand it in myself and accept it in others. The text I chose to accompany this Agora is ‘The Machine Stops’ by Oliver Sacks (mo.ma/readmachinestops). Sacks is critical of social media and communication technologies. He believes science rather than art will save us.” … [Image Credit: Gallery photo by Ryan Lowry; Edward Hopper. “House by the Railroad.” 1925. Oil on canvas. Given anonymously]

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Is data is the new oil? The massive quantities of information being uploaded, aggregated, and exchanged today are crucial to contemporary technologies, making it arguably one of the world’s most valuable resources. Artist Trevor Paglen traces the development of facial recognition to its military origins in “It Began as a Military Experiment,” now on view in #ArtTechMoMA. ... The artist selected ten photographs from a database of thousands of images taken of military employees in the mid-1990s used to develop Face Recognition Technology (FERET) by the US Department of Defense. Before social media, Paglen shows us, military research had begun to convert human bodies into ever-growing data sets that could power vast systems of surveillance and control. “Even if it’s not abused right now—the infrastructure basically creates the potential where someone can literally flick a switch and form a totalitarian society...” says @TrevorPaglen. “ I say, don’t build that switch in the first place.” … [Credit: Trevor Paglen. “It Began as a Military Experiment.” 2017. Ten pigmented inkjet prints. Photography Purchase Fund. © 2019 Trevor Paglen, courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York]

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Still hunting for the perfect Mother’s Day gift? This year, share your love of art with a special Mother’s Day tour at the Museum, complete with breakfast overlooking #MoMAGarden 💐. Tickets are available at mo.ma/momtour (link in bio) ... [Photo by Martin Seck]

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“...I completely worship [George Platt Lynes’s] work. His work gave me a kind of language to try to look at gay culture in the 30s and 20s. And I looked at the photographs here as the kind of benchmark, really, for how I’m thinking about the male body in relationship to black-and-white photography and queer desire.” –Isaac Julien ( @isaacjulien), filmmaker and installation artist … Hear more perspectives on the artists and culture of #LincolnKirstein’s Modern in our audio guide: mo.ma/kirsteinaudio (link in bio) … [Image: George Platt Lynes. “Lew Christensen in ‘Apollon Musagète’.” 1937. Gelatin silver print. Gift of Russell Lynes © 2019 Estate of George Platt Lynes]

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Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes the course of what follows. #TheLongRunMoMA provides another view: by chronicling the continual experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking and countless hours in the studio. … Don’t miss the chance to explore late-career works by #LouiseBourgeois, #DavidHammons, #OnKawara, #AgnesMartin, #JoanMitchell, #GerhardRichter, and more. “The Long Run” closes this Sunday, May 5: mo.ma/thelongrun … [Credit: Venturi and Rauch, Robert Venturi, John Rauch, Denise Scott Brown. “Façade Panels from Best Products Showroom, Langhorne, Pennsylvania.” 1973-79. Porcelain-enameled steel. Gift of Carlin McLaughlin, Nalin Patel, Rajnikant Shah and Gregory Zollner. © 2019 Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown]

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"And while the band above the picture is composed of the revolving and rushing hum of seashells and of human nights, The flowering sweetness of the stars and of the night and all the rest descends, opposite the knoll, like a basket,—against our face, and makes the abyss perfumed and blue below." –Excerpt of Arthur Rimbaud’s “Mystic,” from Illuminations (1886) … Explore the profound influence of avant-garde poetry on #JoanMiró’s visual language: mo.ma/joanmiro … [Credit: Joan Miró. “Mural Painting” (detail). Barcelona, October 18, 1950-January 26, 1951. Oil on canvas. Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund. © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris]

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The nearly 50-year career of Bronx-born filmmaker #AbelFerrara took root during the dark, fertile 1970s era of fiscal crisis, amid the Downtown club scene of New York City, on scarred streets populated by impoverished immigrants, artists, musicians, and students. This urban environment, rife with threat and intoxicants, has shaped Ferrara’s sensibility, his eye for landscape, and his choice of subjects across genres and mediums. … Join #MoMAFilm May 1-31 for a retrospective spanning early features that established the director’s reputation to his most recent feature “The Projectionist.” For tickets to screenings and Q&As with Ferrara collaborators Lili Taylor, Willem Dafoe, The Safdie Brothers, and more visit mo.ma/ferrara (link in bio) … [📽️ Credit: “The Driller Killer.” 1979. USA. Directed by Abel Ferrara. Cinematography by Ken Kelsch. Image digitally manipulated by Ryan Silveira. Courtesy American Genre Film Archive and Ryan Silveira; “Body Snatchers.” 1993. USA. Directed by Abel Ferrara. Courtesy Warner Bros/Photofest; “King of New York.” 1990. Italy. Directed by Abel Ferrara. Courtesy Seven Arts/Photofest; “Ms. 45.” 1981. USA. Directed by Abel Ferrara. Courtesy American Genre Film Archive; “The Projectionist.” 2019. Greece/USA. Directed by Abel Ferrara. Courtesy Faliro House]

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“[It] always struck me as funny that any piece of canvas with some pigment on it is called art, and some movies or forms of music are considered art and some aren’t. It’s complicated, and I don’t know the answers. But I do know that art is the creation of commentary. I think that art is the ability to textualize or visualize or musicalize one’s experience of the world...in a way that creates a commentary about what it feels to live another day.” –Barbara Kruger … Submitted by Leah Asha Allen ( @leahsonthegram), Program Coordinator, The Friends of Education. Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Credit: #BarbaraKruger. "Whose justice? Whose morality? Whose community? Whose family? Whose values?,” cover for “Newsweek” magazine (detail). 1992. Offset lithograph, composition and sheet. Purchase. © 2019 Barbara Kruger]

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Q: What problems in society can design help solve? 🤔 … These two little lights have big intentions—SolarPuff and Little Sun were designed to harness the energy of the sun to provide clean, safe light to the 1.6 billion people worldwide without access to the electrical grid. Proceeds from purchasing either product in the @momadesignstore help provide light sources for people who need them most. ... Share your thoughts on design in the comments below and explore more iconic objects in #ValueofGoodDesign. … [Credit: Alice Min Shoo Chun. SolarPuff. designed 2011 (this example manufactured 2018) LED light bulb, lithium ion solar battery panel, PET sailcloth; Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen. Little Sun Solar Light. designed 2012 (this example manufactured 2018). Plastic and electronics. Gift of the designer]

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Writing and reading were essential activities for #LincolnKirstein. Aside being a cofounder of @nycballet, a curator and patron of visual art, Kirstein was a writer, editor, and critic. He surrounded himself with books that ranged in subject matter from dance history to religion, philosophy, poetry, biology, and witchcraft. … Drawings and Prints research assistant Elizabeth Welch selects 10 works Kirstein owned or published that reflect the vast scope of his curiosity, from war journalism to one of the first novels to address homosexuality openly to a cultural history of the cat. Read more at mo.ma/2DwLVow (link in bio) … Illustrations by Jennifer Tobias ( @ideasintopictures)

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While the majority of the modern art world was enamored with the abstract, #LincolnKirstein set out to amplify work that was connected to the past, and focused on figuration and the body. Sculptor Elie Nadelman was one of the artists he championed, organizing retrospective exhibitions at MoMA after his death and urging the Museum to acquire his work. Now on view. … [Featured artwork: Elie Nadelman. “Man in the Open Air.” c. 1915. Bronze. Gift of William S. Paley (by exchange). © Estate of Elie Nadelman; Installation photo by: Robert Gerhardt]

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The igloo was a signature structure in #MarioMerz’s art from 1969 until 2003, the year of his death. He saw it as “the ideal organic shape,” “both a world and a small house.” In addition to drawing inspiration from the simplicity of Minimal art and incorporating natural materials alongside the industrial ones, Merz was interested in using systems as strategy to guide his designs. A segment of the Fibonacci sequence—a potentially infinite series in which each number is the sum of the two numbers preceding it—appears in neon in this work, as both a tribute to Fibonacci, the thirteenth-century Italian mathematician and monk who introduced it to Europe, and a means of uniting nature and culture. ... Don’t miss the final weeks of #TheLongRunMoMA—a celebration of innovation sustained late into artists’ careers. More at mo.ma/thelongrun … [Mario Merz. “Places with No Street.” 1987. Aluminum, wire mesh, stones, twigs, neon tubing, and wires. Sid R. Bass Fund and Enid A. Haupt Fund. © 2019/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome]

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Don’t be shy, give it a try! The Good Design Lab in our #ValueofGoodDesign exhibition offers visitors the chance to try out a few “good design” classics like this Eames’ prototype for a chaise lounge alongside twenty-first-century counterparts, some launched and produced by MoMA. Since good design will always mean different things to different people, we invite you to interact with design objects, and judge their “value” for yourself. More at mo.ma/gooddesign … Photo: John Wronn

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“Pope.L has consistently used wordplay to mark language’s slips, stutters, and breakdowns. Titled ‘Mal Content’—a bad translation from French as ‘troublemaker’ or ‘happy guy’—it places a photograph of a young Malcolm X in a field of peanut butter.” –Thomas J. Lax ( @thomaslax), Curator, Department of Media and Performance ... Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Pope.L. “Mal Content.” 1992. Acrylic, gel medium, newspaper, and peanut butter on plastic laminated board. Acquired through the generosity of Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, Jill and Peter Kraus, and Catie and Donald Marron. © 2019 William Pope.L]

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Revisiting the strategy of collage, #JoanMiró began this work by nailing a hefty bundle of rope to a cardboard support. The three painted figures around it were then formed in relation to the shape of the rope, which he described as “binding and torturing them.” These grimacing figures with glaring eyes and saw-like teeth, communicate a sense of violence and aggression. “Rope and People, I” seems to be filled with the deep political unease that marked this period in Spain and that would soon break into civil war. Now on view: mo.ma/miro .... [Credit: Joan Miró. “Rope and People, I” (detail). Barcelona, March 27, 1935. Oil on cardboard mounted on wood, with coil of rope. Gift of the Pierre Matisse Gallery. © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris]

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This Wednesday at 6 p.m., join us at @MoMAPS1 for the first of two free panel discussions that will consider the ways in which the infrastructure of #LongIslandCity has been impacted by the rapid growth of #NewYorkCity’s tech workforce, and how these conditions are emblematic of the city’s present confrontations with the #urbanplanning legacies of the past century. Info & tickets can be found at mo.ma/LIC (link in bio) #lic #nyc … The second discussion will focus on tech and gentrification, and takes place on April 30 at MoMA. More info at mo.ma/LIC2 … [Madoka Takagi’s “Long Island Railroad Yard from Queens Boulevard, Queens” (1990) and “Long Island City, Queens” (1990). Platinum/Palladium print. Gift of Jessica and Robert Solomon. © 2019 Madoka Takagi]

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“Our elegance…[is] functional, meagre, thin, tight, but strong, delicate and austere.” –#LincolnKirstein … What makes an artwork uniquely American? Lincoln Kirstein set out to define American modern art, spearheading projects that reflected social conditions in the United States, and championing realists and magic realists with meticulous craftsmanship and an uniquely homegrown point of view. Now on view. … [Credit: #GeorgeTooker. “Sleepers, II.” 1959. Tempera on wood panel. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Larry Aldrich Foundation Fund. © 2019 Estate of George Tooker. Courtesy of DC Moore Gallery, New York]

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The Modern Mondays spring season is in full swing! Join #MoMAFilm for screenings and intimate conversations with artists exploring technology, poetry, and changing the way we think about film with new work from around the world. ... Tickets are on now sale for this April's programs with Jen Liu on April 22 and Metahaven and April 29. Mark your calendars for an evening with an Evening with Bernadette Mayer and Morgan Ritter on May 6 and a special presentation from Wakaliwood Uganda Productions on May 13. Details and more at moma.org/modernmondays (link in bio) ... [Credits: Jen Liu. "The Pink Detachment" (detail) 2015. Single channel HD video, 19 minutes, 40 seconds. Courtesy the artist; Metahaven. "Information Skies" (detail) 2016. Single-channel video (color, sound), 24 min. Courtesy the artists; "Memory," (detail). 1971. Courtesy Bernadette Mayer Papers, Special Collections & Archives, University of California, San Diego; "Bad Black" (detail). Uganda. 2016. Directed by Nabwana I.G.G. Courtesy the filmmaker]

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Composed of Vinylite and manufactured by a chemical company, this chair is the embodies the application of innovative materials and production techniques—heightened during wartime—to domestic products. Its designer was an employee of Gallowhur Chemical Corporation. During World War II, he collaborated with a cousin of Franklin D. Roosevelt to design a pocket-sized water- desalination device that became standard equipment for Army and Navy fliers. Explore more iconic and unexpected designs in #ValueofGoodDesign. … [Credit: William H. Miller, Jr. Inflatable chair c. 1944. Vinylite (polyvinyl chloride) tube ring, plywood frame, aluminum legs, and string netting Manufactured by Gallowhur Chemical Corp., Windsor, VT. Gift of the manufacturer]

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“Atget would place his camera across the Seine to get a full view, knowing this majestic structure could hold its own through a scrim of bare branches.” … In the aftermath of Notre Dame’s fire, our curators discuss works by Eugène Atget, Henri Matisse, Ernest Fiene, and László Moholy-Nagy that depict #NotreDame not only as an enduring work of art, but as a landmark for modern artists. Read more at mo.ma/notredame … [Eugène Atget’s “Notre-Dame” (1925) and “Notre-Dame (portail), detail” (1921–22). Gelatin silver printing-out-paper print. Abbott-Levy Collection. Partial gift of Shirley C. Burden]

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Music, for me, is a love bewitched. Fame as a painter? Writer, modern poet? Bad joke. So I have no calling, and loaf. ... “Artist Paul Klee wrote this short poem in his diary during his first year of study in Munich in 1898–99 (from The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918). Written at a moment when he was still unsure about his future career, this poem reveals Klee’s lifelong interest in music and writing, both of which would serve as inspiration for many of his artworks, including MoMA’s Vocal Fabric of the Singer Rosa Silber.” –Charlotte Healy ( @cahealy88), Museum Research Consortium Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture … Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) ... [Credit: Paul Klee. Vocal Fabric of the Singer Rosa Silber. 1922 Watercolor and ink on plastered fabric mounted on board, with watercolor and ink borders, 24 1/2 x 20 1/2" (62.3 x 52.1 cm). Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Resor. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn]

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"...Celestial activity explored for the first time. The planets furtively drew near and gloomy silences thronged the stars. The hills gather round them the least delays. On the marshes remain only the memories of flights. My eyes belong to me alone and I pin them up on my cheeks so fresh and so ravaged by the wind of your words." –Excerpts from André Breton’s “Les Champs Magnétiques” (1920) ... Explore the profound influence of avant-garde poetry on #JoanMiró’s visual language: mo.ma/joanmiro … [Credit: Joan Miró. “The Beautiful Bird Revealing the Unknown to a Pair of Lovers (Le Bel oiseau déchiffrant l'inconnu au couple d'amoureux) (from the Constellation series)” (detail). 1941. Gouache, oil wash, and charcoal on paper Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest (by exchange). © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris]

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#EllsworthKelly first developed his distinct, resolutely abstract vocabulary of line, form, and color when he was in his mid-twenties. He eventually became interested in the way that a painting engages with the space it inhabits, increasing the scale and intensity of his hard-edged, loosely geometric compositions, all the while preserving his longtime interest in the relationship between figure and ground. … Kelly considered the wall a kind of “ground,” the painting itself a “figure” upon it. This approach endured throughout Kelly’s nearly seventy-year career, even as he experimented with new formats, structures, and materials. ... #TheLongRunMoMA celebrates continual creativity with works made later in artists careers. Learn more: mo.ma/thelongrun … [Credit: Ellsworth Kelly. “Red-Orange Panel with Curve.” 1993. Oil on canvas. Gift of the Committee on Painting and Sculpture in honor of Richard E. Oldenburg; Ellsworth Kelly. “White Relief over White.” 2003. Oil on canvas, two panels. Gift of Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr. Photo: John Wronn; Ellsworth Kelly. “Black Form II.” 2012. Painted aluminum. Gift of James and Kathy Goodman in memory of Kirk Varnedoe (by exchange). Photo: John Wronn; All works © 2019 Ellsworth Kelly]

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“I think that the role of the artist is really, quite frankly, as much as a scientist, to define what life is and what life can be.” –#AnickaYi ... Tempura-battered flowers, bacteria growing in petri dishes, and a living colony of ants may seem like surprising finds in an artist’s studio. But, @anickayi’s studio is something special—a place where art and science come together to explore matter, space, time and perception. ↖️ Check out our Story to learn more about Yi’s practice, the philosophy of her work on view in #ArtTechMoMA, and how art can lead to scientific innovation. Full interview: mo.ma/yistudio (link in bio) ... Photos: Rose Liu

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“Sometimes the absence of words can speak just as loudly. Neuenschwander reproduced pages of the Walt Disney–produced Brazilian comic book Zé Carioca, banishing figures from each frame with a monochrome background and draining the word balloons. The result, a comic reduced to its most basic formal elements, is a response to Disney’s erasure of Brazilian culture through the use of racial stereotypes—and an opportunity for viewers to write their own stories.” –Jason Persse ( @jasonpersse), Editorial Manager, Creative Team … Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Credit: Rivane Neuenschwander. “Zé Carioca no. 4, A Volta de Zé Carioca (1960). Edição Histórica, Ed. Abril,.” 2004. Acrylic and ink on printed paper, each: 7 1/2 x 5 1/4" (19.1 x 13.3 cm). Fund for the Twenty-First Century. © 2019 Rivane Neuenschwander]

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This painting is made entirely out of text. Artist #GlennLigon uses an oil stick to stencil each letter of a paragraph over and over to the point where it is entirely blacked out. The paragraph is taken from Richard Dyer’s essay “White,” a reflection on the difficulty of analyzing whiteness due to its operation as a social norm—things that seem normal are difficult to see, he argues. ... “I find this work so interesting on many levels: the artist’s technique of building up a rich, velvety surface over time that evolves into something almost sculptural; the text, obscured yet palpable, inviting the viewer to really look hard to decipher meaning; and its relation to other artists I admire in the collection, whose work also incorporates text, like Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg.” –Michael Duffy ( @mcdnyc), Paintings Conservator … Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) ... [Credit: Glenn Ligon. “White #19” (detail) 1994. Oilstick, gesso, and acrylic on canvas mounted on wood, 7' x 60" (213.3 x 152.4 cm). Committee on Painting and Sculpture Funds. © 2019 Glenn Ligon]

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Q: How does good design enhance our lives? 🤔 ... “The quality of objects that are in daily use by everyone cannot fail to affect the taste and visual imagination of society as a whole.” –Serge Chermayeff, Curator of Design For Use exhibition at MoMA, 1944. Share your thoughts on design in the comments below and explore more iconic objects in #ValueofGoodDesign. … [Credit: L.M. Ericsson Telephone Company, Sweden, Hugo Blomberg, Ralph Lysell, Hans Gösta Thames. Ericofon Telephone. 1949–1959. ABS plastic, rubber, and nylon housing. Given anonymously; Emilio Cerri. “BF Sewing Machine (model 562457).” 1934. Enameled metal casing. Gift of Necchi Sewing Machine Sales Corp.]

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“The choice to render this message in a bronze plaque elevates and transforms a piece of good advice into something official, serious, permanent, and not-to-be-dismissed.” –Kaitlyn Stubbs ( @kstubbz), Petrie Fellow, Teen and Community Programs … Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Credit: Jenny Holzer. “Living: You should limit the number of times…” 1980–82. Bronze. Gift of Agnes Gund. © 2019 Jenny Holzer/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

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“the arts of the Theatre are visual arts and have legitimate subjects for study, research, and encouragement…” –#LincolnKirstein ... Kirstein’s innovative vision for the possibilities of dance included cofounding the New York City Ballet—and several precursor companies like the Ballet Caravan—with choreographer George Balanchine, in addition to founding the first scholarly publication in the United States devoted to dance. Throughout these endeavors, he enlisted the contributions of visual artists. His donations of costume and set design works helped create MoMA’s Dance Archives and the curatorial department of Dance and Theatre Design. Now on view. … [Credit: Pavel Tchelitchew. The Muscle System. Costume design for the ballet The Cave of Sleep. 1941. Watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper. Gift of the artist. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art, New York]

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“As I work on a canvas I fall in love with it, love that is born of slow understanding. Slow understanding of the nuances—concentrated—which the sun gives. Joy at learning to understand a tiny blade of grass in a landscape. Why belittle it? A blade of grass is as enchanting as a tree or a mountain.” –#JoanMiró, now on view. … [Credit: Joan Miró. “Person Throwing a Stone at a Bird.” Montroig, mid-August-December 1926. Purchase. © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris] #joanmiro

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“Seeing the word ‘love’ in print (on a poster, on a card, as a sculpture, in a letter, etc.) always warms the heart and brings smiles. It’s so needed now to override all the hate and negativity that is appearing in all forms of media. Per Nelson Mandela, ‘People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, then they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.’” –Submitted by Mary Oliver ( @Citygirl117), Assistant Manager, Finance, Credit, and Collections Support Operations, Retail … Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Credit: Robert Indiana. “LOVE.” 1967. Screenprint. Riva Castleman Fund. © 2019 Morgan Art Foundation Ltd. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

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“The 26 galvanized iron pieces of Richard Tuttle’s wall sculpture can be mounted in any configuration; the artist leaves it up to chance or to the installer to decide. The constellation of forms evokes the 26 letters of the English alphabet, yet its haphazardness and intentional illegibility challenges the very idea of language. Tuttle once said of art that ‘it has no rules, no morality, no ethics. I like art where I feel the artist knows the rules—and then breaks them.’” –Lily Goldberg, Collection Specialist, Department of Painting and Sculpture … Explore our staff’s #MoMApicks of #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Credit: Richard Tuttle. “Letters (The Twenty-Six Series).” 1966. Galvanized iron, 26 parts. Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest (by exchange). © 2019 Richard Tuttle

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“When you think about his circle...whether it's dancers...whether it's the Rockefellers...whether it’s sailors on leave downtown...any member of cultural and political life at that time, he found a connection to. And part of what allows him to make things happen is this incredible network that he's a part of and really in many ways at the center of.” –Samantha Friedman, associate curator … Drawings by Pavel Tchelitchew, Paul Cadmus, and Jean Cocteau, and photographs by George Platt Lynes trace a predominantly queer network of friends, lovers, and colleagues who depicted themselves and each other in the 1930’s and 40’s. Explore the world of #LincolnKirstein. Now on view: mo.ma/lincolnkirstein … [Credit: Paul Cadmus. “Katherine Anne Porter.” 1942. Pencil on paper. Gift of Monroe Wheeler. © 2019 Estate of Paul Cadmus; Pavel Tchelitchew. “George Platt Lynes.” 1935. Colored ink on paper. Gift of Monroe Wheeler; Installation view of the exhibition "Lincoln Kirstein's Modern." Sunday, March 17, 2019 - Saturday, June 15, 2019. Photo: Robert Gerhardt]

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“There is something ironic about a massive, bold billboard in the center of a city, calling for more poetry. Poetry will (unfortunately) never take up the space in society that the billboard’s massive presence seems to call for. But still, we should listen to Jeremy Deller because a little poetry, or at least poeticism, can do much to lighten up our world.” –Sophie Golub, Department Manager, Publications … Inspired by the profound influence of avant-garde poetry now on display in "Joan Miró: Birth of the World," our staff members share #MoMACollection works that use words to challenge artistic convention. Explore our #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks ... [Credit: Jeremy Deller. “More Poetry Is Needed, Swansea, 2014 from Odds and Sods (for Parkett no. 95).” 2014. One from a portfolio of five screenprints. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Saper (by exchange)]

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In #RobertGober’s work, familiar things are made strange. By isolating everyday objects from their original contexts, Gober gives them unexpected dignity, and in some cases irony. For example, a mass-produced political pin from 1940, part of Wendell Willkie’s unsuccessful presidential bid against Franklin Delano Roosevelt, is recreated in glazed porcelain. Gober also works with original imagery—the drawing on vellum, a fine parchment, currently on view speaks to the fragility of the human condition using concepts that reappear throughout his career, like a the prison-cell window. ... #TheLongRunMoMA celebrates continual creativity with works made later in artists careers. Learn more: mo.ma/thelongrun … [Credit: Robert Gober. “Untitled.” 2012. Multiple of glazed porcelain with imbedded pigments, brass, and paper in artist's frame. Acquired through the generosity of The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art in honor of Franny Heller Zorn; Robert Gober. “Untitled.” 2017. Graphite and pastel on vellum. Gift of Jack Shear; Robert Gober. “Untitled.” 2011. Potato print in artist's frame. Partial gift of Leslie Miller and partial purchase through the Committee on Prints and Illustrated Books Fund; © 2019 Robert Gober]

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“...a lot of the work comes out of thinking about this transition, about the transformation of creative people into mass-produced or mass-distributed goods, services, or advertising. It’s also about a generation in the process of being deprecated by the market as trend forecasters look to the tastes of the young people of today for this season’s sounds and colorways.” –@joshklinejoshkline … Fifteen different smoothie flavors line the shelves of Josh Kline’s light box–encased commercial refrigerator. Each bottle lists the unorthodox ingredients contained within, including latex gloves, octopus ink, Ritalin, and fragments of Google Glass eyewear. Evoking specific locations, contemporary lifestyles, industries, and brands with titles like “Big Data” and “Supplements,” the indigestible “drinks” in this glowing cooler make plain the ways in which our bodies have been transformed by technologies of consumption. Now on view in #ArtTechMoMA: mo.ma/arttech … [Credit: Josh Kline. “Skittles.” 2014. Commercial refrigerator, light box and blended liquids in bottles. Fund for the Twenty-First Century]

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MoMA stimulated new works of good design, in part, through open competitions. Its first, Organic Design in Home Furnishings, included a section for Latin American designers. Based in São Paulo, Bernard Rudofsky—who later went on to curate several exhibitions in MoMA—submitted this colorful panel to the 1940 competition. The main structural components of Rudofsky’s outdoor furniture designs made use of both wood and metal, combined with a variety of knitted and woven fabrics made from Brazilian fibers such as jute, caroa, and hemp. Now on view in #ValueofGoodDesign. ... [Credit: Bernard Rudofsky. Entry Panel for MoMA Latin American Competition for Organic Design in Home Furnishings. c.1940. Gift of the designer]