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In 1941, #JacobLawrence, then just 23 years old, completed a series of 60 small paintings with text captions on the subject of the Great Migration, the mass exodus of black Americans from the rural South to the urban North that began during World War I. Before picking up a paintbrush, he spent months at the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library (now NYPL’s @schomburgcenter) studying historical documents. The resulting work, “The Migration Series” (1940–41), is a landmark in the history of modern art and a key example of the way that history painting was radically reimagined in the modern era. His panels were the first works by an African American artist acquired by MoMA. Explore this moment in #MoMAhistory: moma.org/momathroughtime (direct link in bio) … [Images: Jacob Lawrence. “The migration gained in momentum” (detail). 1940-41. Casein tempera on hardboard. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy. © 2019 Jacob Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

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Acclaimed artist and writer #ChrisWare brings a short subway ride to @MoMAPS1 to life in a new illustrated story for #MoMAmagazine's 15 Minutes—a series inviting artists of all disciplines to use the trip from MoMA to MoMA PS1 as a creative prompt for an original work. Follow a mother and daughter on their journey across the East River underground, privately reflecting on their relationship and the moments they hold in memory, in Ware’s “I Guess We’re Here”—read the full story: mo.ma/ware15 (link in bio)

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“What I essentially look for everywhere is poetry.” –#GracielaIturbide … See more works from this week’s #MoMAmagazine menu, showcasing food-inspired works from #MoMAcollection: mo.ma/menu (link in bio) …. [Credit: Graciela Iturbide. “Mercado de Sonora, Mexico City.” 1978. Gelatin silver print. Acquired through the generosity of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation. © 2019 Graciela Iturbide]

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“It’s part of black American culture to reuse things that would otherwise be discarded. That’s a big part of my art practice.” –#TschabalalaSelf … The real and imagined figures that populate Tschababala Self’s ( @tschabalalaself) Harlem streetscapes in the exhibition “MOOD: @studiomuseum Artists in Residence 2018–19," currently on view at @MoMAPS1, pay homage to the neighborhood where the artist grew up. Her figures, made up of various parts, speak to the multiple bodies (and their traces) that make up a metropolis, creating a narrative tapestry of everyday acts through purchased, found, and inherited fabrics. #MoMAmagazine spoke with the artist about where she finds her materials and how she embeds textiles into large scale paintings. Read more: mo.ma/readself (link in bio) … Experience Self’s work for yourself at #UNIQLOFreeFridayNights from 4–8 p.m. ... Photo by Matthew Septimus

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“Something that many people don’t know about is Alison Saar’s Harriet Tubman Memorial. But it is beloved and taken care of by the surrounding community. So much so, in fact, that 80-year-old community member and gardener Willie Morgan takes on a volunteer role every year, planting cotton in the planters surrounding the sculpture.” –Angelica Fox ( @angelicadangerfox), development assistant for Institutional Giving … As we await our reopening, discover New York City's hidden art gems with our staff #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: Alison Saar. “Swing Low: The Harriet Tubman Memorial.” 2007. St. Nicholas Avenue and 122nd Street. Photo: Jim.henderson. Used through Creative Commons open content license]

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“Her attention to photography’s role in the construction and reinforcement of stereotypes helped us adjust our collective eyes to the bias embedded in the humblest of images.” -@themomameister ... The loss of #ToniMorrison’s voice is felt not just within the literary community—her influence defies genre, critically shaping the way we understand images, racial politics, and American culture. Photography curator Sarah Meister shares her memories of being an undergrad deconstructing images in the classroom with Morrison, and how it shaped the way she sees photographs today on #MoMAmagazine: mo.ma/morrison (link in bio) … [Credit: Robert H. McNeill. Lula Cooper Beauty Salon. c. 1940. Gelatin silver print. Acquired through the generosity of The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art and Committee on Photography Fund]

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Illustrator Mohammed Fayaz ( @brohammed) captures a day of style and music at @MoMAPS1’s Warm Up for this month’s Drawn to MoMA. Explore the array of styles, performers, and audiences that drop in on the daylong dance party on summer Saturdays—and a few creative strategies for managing the NYC heat on #MoMAmagazine: mo.ma/drawn (link in bio) … Experience #WarmUp2019 for yourself: moma.org/warmup ☀️

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📽️ TONIGHT: #MoMAFilm's summer collaboration with @rooftopfilms heads to Manhattan's Lower East Side for an evening of contemporary films directed by women from around the world presented by The Future of Film Is Female. Get tickets to "Crossing the Line": mo.ma/rooftop (link in bio) ... See it free as a #MoMAmember. Check your inbox for the discount code. ... [Image: "Call of Comfort." 2019. Germany. Directed by Brenda Lien]

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#AndyWarhol made this painting the year screen legend #MarilynMonroe committed suicide. He painted the canvas an iridescent gold and silkscreened the star’s face in the center of the composition. Warhol based this portrait on a publicity still from the 1953 film “Niagara,” duplicating a photograph known to millions. Even as Warhol canonizes Monroe, he reveals her public persona as a carefully structured illusion. See it this fall in the #newMoMA. … [Credit: Andy Warhol, “Gold Marilyn Monroe.” 1962. Silkscreen ink and acrylic on canvas. Gift of Philip Johnson. © 2019 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

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In a classroom tucked away on the third floor of @MoMAPS1 is James Turrell’s “Meeting,” inviting visitors to gaze through a rectangular void cut in the roof to an unobstructed view of the sky. It was created by using a heavy-duty jackhammer to excise a hole through four feet of thick concrete. The artist fully immersed himself in the work’s realization, going so far as to live in a tent inside the classroom over the course of the work’s installation. Explore this moment in #MoMAhistory: moma.org/momathroughtime (direct link in bio) #TBT ... Take a seat in Turrell’s portal to the sky at MoMA PS1. The sunset lighting program will be partially visible this summer during #UNIQLOFreeFridayNights and #WarmUp2019 when the museum is open late. Ticketed sunset viewings will restart in the fall. … [Images: James Turrell’s “Meeting” installation during construction, 1986; James Turrell. “Meeting.” 1980–86/2016. Installation view, MoMA PS1]

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“For me, it is a matter of whether the canvas allows me to breathe or not – if the canvas soars into space or if it is earthbound. When it is earthbound it irritates me enormously. I would like to soar in a canvas." –#LeeKrasner ... This week’s #MoMAmagazine menu reminds us it’s always a good time for breakfast. Get your weekly taste of food-inspired works from our collection: mo.ma/menu (link in bio) … [Credit: Lee Krasner. “Still Life.” 1938. Oil on paper. Acquired with matching funds from The Edward John Noble Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. © 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

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“‘Working artist’ is a redundancy. What counts as work?” –@heidijulavits ... Inspired by the work of artists like #OnKawara, and the diaries of artists like Louise Bourgeois and Eva Hesse, professor and author Heidi Julavits invited artists to share 24 hours of their life with #MoMAmagazine. Explore daily accounts that represent how they fill, experience, and account for time in the new series, “A Day.” Read more: mo.ma/aday (link in bio) … [Credit: On Kawara. “I Got Up….” 1970. Stamped ink on postcard. The Seth Siegelaub Collection. Gift of Richard S. Zeisler.]

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“One of the best things about Midtown is people-watching. There is a beautiful blend of workers, vendors, and visitors that is unique to this section of the city. The new @mtaartsdesign installation of #AlexKatz’s “Metropolitan Faces” in the 57th Street-Sixth Avenue station is an homage to the passing faces on the street and the subway. Stretching from 55th Street to 57th, the hallways are lined with Katz’s flowers and portraits, a nod to the everyday commuter and nearby Central Park. I like to think it’s also a reminder to stop looking at our phones and recognize our surroundings.” –Carly McCloskey ( @carlymmc), assistant director of tourism sales and marketing … As we await our reopening, discover New York City's hidden art gems with our staff #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: Alex Katz. “Metropolitan Faces.” 2018. 57th Street-Sixth Avenue subway station Photo: Tdorante10. Used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International]

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Today we celebrate the legacy of Nobel Laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning author #ToniMorrison. Explore pages from her only book of poetry, “Five Poems” (2002), illustrated by #KaraWalker: mo.ma/fivepoems (link in bio) #MoMACollection … “It comes Unadorned Like a phrase Strong enough to cast a spell; It comes Unbidden, Like the turn of sun through hills Or stars in wheels of song. The jeweled feet of women dance the earth, Arousing it to spring. Shoulders broad as a road bend to share the weight of years. Profiles breach the distance and lean Toward an ordinary kiss. Bliss. It comes naked into the world like a charm.” ... [Credit: Kara Walker. Plate (page 22) from “Five Poems.” 2002. Author: Toni Morrison. One from an illustrated book with five relief prints. Gift of Agnes Gund. © 2019 Kara Walker]

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"My job is to find the human—and in this case, superhuman—stories behind the works on view. On this day, we were uncovering staff stories of ghostly encounters at the Museum. On our way to speak with Louis Bedard—a longtime member of the security team and a true believer in the paranormal—the lens fell off the camera. It cracked. Louis insisted it was a MoMA ghost at work. Of course, we made use of the shot, with some visual effects, in our final edit. I hope our stories help people feel less intimidated by art and use it to marvel at and question the world around them." –Natasha Giliberti (@tanasha_g), video producer … As we prepare for the reopening of a #newMoMA, photographer #RosalindFoxSolomon captures portraits of the people and personalities that make MoMA possible. See her work: mo.ma/solomon (link in bio)

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Ida Lupino had “it”—the looks, the talent, and the screen presence to become a major movie star in the earliest decades of American cinema—but she didn’t necessarily want it. Instead, Lupino yearned to unleash her creativity behind the camera, to take on a role very few women laid claim to within the studio system: director. … Learn more about how this independent writer, producer, and director challenged a systemic status quo to tell stories often ignored by major studios—or, as she put it, “films that had significance, yet were entertaining”—with #MoMAfilm curator Anne Morra on #MoMAmagazine: mo.ma/lupinoherway (link in bio) … [#IdaLupino, 1941. Photo: Scotty Welbourne]

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“What’s more fun than a giant Kusama Pumpkin? (Maybe crossing the street and climbing and sliding on a Tom Otterness sculpture.)” –Tania Toro, assistant manager of merchandise planning … As we await our reopening, discover New York City's hidden art gems with our staff #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: #YayoiKusama. “Pumpkin.” 2016. 605 West 42nd Street]

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“The paintings live in two worlds, the way that we do. They have one life in the gallery and one life online, and we do too.” –@gina_beavers … Artist #GinaBeavers uses internet content to create visceral paintings of our digitally mediated lives. Explore @MoMAPS1’s exhibition “Gina Beavers: The Life I Deserve” IRL at #UNIQLOFreeFridayNights from 4–8 p.m. mo.ma/gina … [Image: Gina Beavers. “Mona Lisa Nail” (detail). 2015. Acrylic on linen panel. Courtesy the artist.]

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“Black Girl’s Window” (1969) is a pivotal work from the first decade of #BetyeSaar’s now six-decade career, marking the moment when her practice shifted from primarily printmaking to collage and assemblage. Deeply autobiographical, the work weaves together references to the private, the public, and the mystical. See it when a #newMoMA reopens this fall in our exhibition “Betye Saar: The Legends of Black Girl’s Window’”—an exploration of Saar’s experimental print practice and the evolution of her artistic language tracing themes of family, history, and mysticism. Take a closer look: mo.ma/saarwindow (link in bio) … [Credit: Betye Saar. “Black Girl's Window.” 1969. Wooden window frame with paint, cut-and-pasted printed and painted papers, daguerreotype, lenticular print, and plastic figurine. Gift of Candace King Weir through The Modern Women's Fund, and Committee on Painting and Sculpture Funds]

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"Everything is slightly frayed in the corners; everything is hesitant, impermanent, rendered in Becker’s witty, intimate and melancholic style." @frieze_magazine lists #JulieBecker's "I must create a Master Piece to pay the Rent" at @momaps1 as a must-see this summer in NYC! Read more: mo.ma/frieze … Photos by: Matthew Septimus

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“For me, architecture is a fantastic art, but very different from painting or sculpture. People tend to see them in the same way, but I love the differences—the nitty-gritty that’s involved in architecture. I love it. Less perfect, but perfection is secondary in architecture.” –#CésarPelli ... With news of Pelli’s recent death, MoMA reflects on the legacy of the architect and the mark he left on MoMA’s architectural form in his designs for the Museum Tower. Explore his legacy on #MoMAmagazine with Peter Reed, senior deputy director for curatorial affairs, Martino Stierli, our chief curator of architecture and design, and museum director Glenn D. Lowry: mo.ma/pelli (link in bio) … [Image: Foreground: The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden, designed in 1953 by Philip Johnson; Background: Garden Hall, designed in 1984, and Museum Tower, designed in 1982, by César Pelli & Associates. Color transparency. Photographic Archive. The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York. © The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Scott Frances]

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“The South has an interesting set of narratives, not just one....these legacies of labor and landscape are the other side of the coin of this narrative of beauty and fertility and promise of the region.” –#AllisonJanaeHamilton ... Artist Allison Janae Hamilton ( @allisonjanaehamilton) discusses the legacies of labor and landscape in the South, and the ways she uses natural elements as totems of her Southern heritage in her immersive installation now on view in “MOOD: @studiomuseum Artists in Residence 2018–19” at @MoMAPS1: mo.ma/totems (link in bio) … [Credit: Allison Janae Hamilton. “Sisters, Walkulla Country,” FL. 2019. Archival pigment print, 24 × 36". Courtesy the artist] #MoMAmagazine

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“Louise Nevelson’s Chapel of the Good Shepherd is the only still-existing complete sculptural environment by the artist. It’s one of New York City’s hidden gems. Housed within Saint Peter’s Church, the work is undergoing comprehensive restoration. Visitors can peek into the space while HVAC work is underway (scheduled for completion by early September 2019) and learn about the art conservation process in an adjacent room.” –Anne Umland (@anne_umland), senior curator in our Department of Painting and Sculpture … As we await our reopening, discover New York City's hidden art gems with our staff #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: Louise Nevelson. Chapel of the Good Shepherd. 1977. Saint Peter’s Church, 619 Lexington Avenue. Photo: Jared Stahler]

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“Nestled between UNIQLO and the 53rd Street entrance to the E/M subway station is an oasis of calm: a lobby designed by the sculptor Isamu Noguchi in 1957. Although much has changed since then—you used to be able to access the space from Fifth Avenue and Noguchi’s brushed aluminum wall relief was even more amazing as a waterfall—I still cherish the experience of walking through it, past the perfectly preserved undulating ceiling. If you need an added incentive, my favorite coffee shop is just outside the 52nd Street entrance.” –Sarah Meister ( @themomameister), photography curator … As we await our reopening, discover New York City's hidden art gems with our staff #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: #IsamuNoguchi. Ceiling and Waterfall. 1957. 666 Fifth Avenue. Photo: Erika Mosier]

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This weekend is the perfect opportunity to dance along to new artists, hang out in the courtyard in a #YAP2019 hammock, enjoy a frozen drink, and explore @MoMAPS1's summer exhibitions. Get your #WarmUp2019 tickets now: mo.ma/july27 (link in bio) ... You won't want to miss these acts: Michael Brun ( @michaelbrun), Aj Tracey ( @ajtracey), Plastician ( @plastician), Rosa Pistola ( @djrosapistola), Fuego ( @fuego), SCRAAATCH ( @mhysa301 + @lawdkn_ws), and Marginal Men (@marginal_men). … Warm Up 2019 is organized by a curatorial committee led by Taja Cheek ( @turrelljames), Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1, with Eliza Ryan(@eliza__ryan), Naomi Zeichner ( @nomizeichner), Dean Bein ( @truepanther), Isabelia Herrera ( @jabladora), Jonas Leon ( @mrjonasleon), and Matt Werth ( @rvngintl).

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“I go through rolls of that tape a week in the studio. It is standard painter’s tape, which I buy in my local hardware store...I discovered a long time ago that I needed to be able to see as many images at once...and this was the system I arrived at...The tape is a practical solution, in other words, but it also references productive labor of all kinds.” –@carmen.winant … Finding art in the unconventional—artist Carmen Winant and #MoMAconservation’s Erika Mosier and Krista Lough discuss the use of blue painter’s tape in Winant’s “My Birth” (2018), a collection of approximately 2,000 prints, photographs that appeared in last year’s #NewPhotography2018: mo.ma/bluetape (link in bio) ... [Credit: Carmen Winant. "My Birth." 2018. Approx. 2,000 found papers and photographic prints with tape, dimensions variable. The Modern Women’s Fund. ©2019 Carmen Winant. Photo: Martin Seck; Erika Mosier and Krista Lough. Photo: Rose Liu]

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“Things are constantly happening in the world and we are totally interconnected and we wanted to play with that idea…that’s why we brought the jungle into Queens.” –Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo and Mecky Reuss of @pedroyjuana invite you to a new environment of cultural exchange ... Find relief from the sweltering city in this year’s Young Architects Program winner “Hórama Rama” on view in @MoMAPS1’s courtyard through September 2. See it for yourself at #UNIQLOFreeFridayNights from 4–8 p.m. ☀️🌴😎 … #YAP2019 Photos by Ryan Muir and Gabriela Urbina

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Cars and pedestrians crossing the Queensborough Bridge on the morning of June 23, 2002, were greeted by a strange sight. Inspired by the tradition of festive and religious processions in Belgium and Mexico, Mexico City-based Belgian artist #FrancisAlÿs staged the work “The Modern Procession”—a parade of people carrying artworks (and a woman, seated on a throne) on palanquins, while others scattered rose petals and blew bubbles, all set to the tunes of a live brass band. The march from midtown to Long Island City signaled the Museum’s temporary relocation to Queens while its main building underwent construction. #TBT … Explore this work and more moments from #MoMAhistory: moma.org/momathroughtime (link in bio) … [Credit: Francis Alÿs. “The Modern Procession.” 2002. Two-channel video (color, sound). Gift of the Silverweed Foundation. © 2017 Francis Alÿs]

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Join #PopRally in Staten Island this Saturday, July 27 at 7:00p.m. to celebrate the borough and the surrounding sea with a special @RooftopFilms and #MoMAFilm screening of the 1984 mermaid classic “Splash” at @snugharborccbg. Get your ticket: mo.ma/poprally (link in bio) … $10 admission includes open bar, a set by DJ Tom of Maker Park Radio, special appearances by The Gotham Easy Brass Band ( @gothameasy, @honknyc) and the Wu Tang Clams mermaid krewe, festivities, and film screening. A free shuttle bus will run between the Staten Island Ferry terminal and Snug Harbor before and after the film. Aquatic costumes highly encouraged, but not required. 💦🧜‍♀️ … [Credit: “Splash.” 1984. Directed by Ron Howard. Courtesy of Touchstone/Photofest; Snug Harbor by Lance Reha]

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“I am for an art that embroils itself with the everyday crap & still comes out on top. I am for an art that imitates the human, that is comic, if necessary, or violent, or whatever is necessary. I am for an art that takes its form from the lines of life itself, that twists and extends and accumulates and spits and drips, and is heavy and coarse and blunt and sweet and stupid as life itself.” –#ClaesOldenburg … Get a taste of food-inspired works from our collection on this week's #MoMAmagazine menu: mo.ma/junkfood (link in bio) … [Credit: Claes Oldenburg. “Flying Pizza from New York Ten.” 1964, published 1965. Lithograph from a portfolio with seven screenprints, one etching, one lithograph, and one embossing, composition (irreg.). Law Foundation Fund]

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It’s hard to know where to first look in #DeanaLawson’s photograph “Nation” (2017). At the figure on the left, sitting on the couch, pointing his fingers like a gun at the camera? At the man next to him wearing a terrifying mouth brace? Or at that second image: a startling picture of George Washington’s dentures. The set of teeth, formed in part from the mouths of slaves, is a haunting metaphor for the history and legacy of the African American experience in the United States. … Explore this new addition to #MoMACollection—Lawson details the clash of history and the present in her photograph with senior curator Roxana Marcoci ( @roxanamarcoci) on #MoMAmagazine: mo.ma/lawsonnation (link in bio) … [Credit: Deana Lawson. Nation. 2017. Pigmented inkjet prints. Committee on Photography Fund. © 2019 Deana Lawson]

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“One of my favorite sayings is ‘protect your peace of mind.’ I learned how to protect my peace of mind while protecting artwork. It means focusing on why I’m here. It’s a way for me to navigate the Museum and not be frazzled by the range of personalities and energy I come in contact with everyday. One of my favorite places for meditation is Monet’s 'Water Lilies.' It will be back in the galleries this October. But you can find your peace with whatever artwork speaks to you.” –Chet Gold ( @chetgoldchet), security supervisor … As we prepare for the reopening of a #newMoMA, photographer #RosalindFoxSolomon captures portraits of the people and personalities that make MoMA possible. See her work: mo.ma/solomon (link in bio)

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“Standing at the center of the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) main campus, the Icarus sculpture always reminds me to stay humble, honest, and hardworking and to use my knowledge for good. I’m committed to using my creativity and self-expression to influence the next generation of youth to evolve into a more accepting society, with equality for all.” –Enrique Hernandez ( @3hr98), @momateens Digital Advisory Board member … Discover New York City's hidden art gems with our #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: #RoyShifrin. “Icarus.” 1976. Borough of Manhattan Community College, 199 Chambers Street. Photo: Enrique Hernandez]

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We're keeping @MoMAPS1 open late just for our members this Wednesday. See current exhibitions, explore this year’s Young Architects Program winner, and enjoy drinks in the courtyard. Join us for #MoMAmember After Hours on July 24, 6:30–9:00 p.m.: mo.ma/afterhours (link in bio) … Photo: Ryan Muir

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Take a refreshing break with the freshly picked fruits on this week’s #MoMAmagazine menu, a weekly taste of food-inspired works from our collection: mo.ma/freshfruit (link in bio) 🍍 … [Credit: #DiegoRivera. “Pineapple. Costume design for the ballet H.P. (Horsepower).” 1927. Watercolor, pencil, and colored pencil on paper. © 2019 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

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“In thinking about some of these larger conversations around violence, the examples that people point to are always the most extreme things that are undeniably violent. The objects, words, or conversations that I’m interested in are those that become a lot more murky.” –#SableElyseSmith … Instant ramen, Hennessy, the color blue; Sable Elyse Smith (@sable_elyse) spent a yearlong residency at the @studiomuseum in Harlem investigating the inherited violence of mundane objects and details. #MoMAmagazine sat with the artist to discuss the significance of her materials in the works currently on view in the “MOOD: Studio Museum Artists in Residence 2018–19” exhibition at @MoMAPS1, and documented her hands-on approach to the installation process: mo.ma/weightofobjects (link in bio) … Photo: Matthew Septimus

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Paula Modersohn-Becker, pioneering figure of the 20th–century German avant–garde, is believed to be the first woman to paint herself while pregnant; this painting is one of only a few such portrayals. She gave birth to a daughter on November 2, 1907, and died of complications on November 21, at age 31. See it this fall in the #newMoMA. Learn more: mo.ma/beckerportrait (link in bio) … [Credit: #PaulaModersohnBecker. “Self-Portrait with Two Flowers in Her Raised Left Hand.” 1907. Oil on canvas. Jointly owned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Gift of Debra and Leon Black, and Neue Galerie New York, Gift of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder]

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“How do I put something new into painting when everything has been done?” This is the question #GinaBeavers asks herself when working. @gina_beavers transforms images taken from the Internet into paintings composed from thick layers of acrylic medium. She focuses on the repeating fetishes of social media, including ”food porn,” bodybuilder selfies, and makeup tutorials. Join @MoMAPS1 curator Oliver Shultz ( @olivershultz) on a trip to the artist’s studio to discuss life in Newark, New Jersey, the paintings in the show, and the struggle for originality in an image-saturated world: mo.ma/beaversstudio (link in bio) #MoMAmagazine … See the “Gina Beavers: The Life I Deserve” for yourself at MoMA PS1’s #UNIQLOFreeFridayNights from 4–8 p.m. … [Photos by Ellie Burck]

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Calling all mermaids, mermen, and salty sea captains! 🧜‍♀️ On July 27, #PopRally washes up on Staten Island’s north shore at @snugharborccbg for evening of trivia contests, prizes, local food vendors, and music, culminating in a screening of the 1984 mermaid classic “Splash” with @rooftopfilms and #MoMAFilm. Get your ticket: mo.ma/poprally (link in bio) … This is the second event of MoMA PopRally × New York, a creative journey across New York City. Enjoy free admission as a #MoMAmember. Check your inbox for your Rooftop Films discount code. ... Illustration by Grace Robinson, @grack7

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“Malcolm Cochran’s ginormous wine bottle in Hudson River Park’s Clinton Cove is definitely worth the walk west. Made of a combination of steel and zinc, it has the textured green patina you’d imagine a wine bottle would get if left on the ocean floor for a long spell. And it would be A-OK with me if that was all there was to it. But step closer and peer into one of its portholes...you’ll see an all-stainless-steel interior, inspired by a stateroom from the British ocean liner Queen Mary, that looks both futuristic and old-school, like a dream apartment for The Wizard of Oz’s Tin Man.” –Jocelyn Meinhardt ( @joceloon), associate writer/editor on our Creative Team … Discover more of New York's hidden art gems with our #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Credit: Malcolm Cochran. Private Passage. 2005. Hudson River Park at 55th Street. Photo: Scott Beale and Nick Normal. Used under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic]

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Behind the young boy in this 1943 photograph by #GordonParks hangs a poster for one of the “Double V for Victory” campaigns—racial equality at home along with victory abroad—organized by Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. It serves as a symbol of the emerging forms of civil-rights activism seen in Harlem in these years, and suggests hopes for the future. See it this fall in the #newMoMA. … [Credit: Gordon Parks. “Harlem Newsboy, Harlem, New York.” 1943. Gelatin silver print. Acquired through the generosity of The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art and Committee on Photography Fund. © 2019 Gordon Parks Foundation]

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Tickets to the #newMoMA are now on sale for the fall and holiday season! Be part of this historic moment and be among the first to see our completely reimagined Museum. With expanded galleries, a state-of-the-art performance studio, and new spaces for conversation and art making, you’ll see more art in new ways. Get your ticket: moma.org/tickets … Members get exclusive previews, unlimited admission, and special access all year long. Don’t miss out—join today! moma.org/join ... [Featured Images: Hervé Télémaque. “No Title (The Ugly American).” 1962/64. Oil on canvas, in two panels. Gift of Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis in honor of a lovely American, Jerry Speyer. © Hervé Télémaque. Courtesy of the artist; Tarsila do Amaral. “The Moon (A Lua) (detail).” 1928. Oil on canvas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase; Wu Tsang. “We hold where study.” 2017. Two-channel video (color, sound). The Modern Women's Fund. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 Wu Tsang; Exterior view of The Museum of Modern Art on 53rd Street © 2019 Diller Scofidio + Renfro]

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“Largely an unknown artwork by #MayaLin, this conceptual clock tells time based on the movement of light. It’s somewhat obscurely located on the ceiling of Penn Station. Next time you’re there try and find it. Good luck!” –Angelica Fox, development assistant in Institutional Giving … While we await our reopening, our staff members take to the streets to share their favorite art and design spots in and around Midtown Manhattan. Explore our city with #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Image: Maya Lin. “Eclipsed Time.” 1994. Long Island Rail Road main concourse, Penn Station. Photo: Angelica Fox]

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“Installation is terribly dangerous. It’s full of terribly seductive temptations” –René d’Harnoncourt, artist, collector, curator, and director of The Museum of Modern Art for two decades (1949–68) … Learning from his many travels, in which he met art makers in a range of environments, d’Harnoncourt revolutionized the way exhibitions were conceived. He thought deeply about the visitor’s experience of the art on display, carefully considering every aspect of its presentation. Explore his sketches on moma.org/momathroughtime (direct link in bio) #TBT … [Credit: René d’Harnoncourt. Hand-drawn circulation plan of the exhibition Timeless Aspects of Modern Art. 1948]

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This Friday, #PopRally heads to Queens! Don’t miss a festive, genre-bending evening at @trans.pecos in Ridgewood. Performances start at 7:45 p.m. and include a participatory performance by ray ferreira ( @xxrayferreiraxx) and Miatta Kawinzi ( @mkawstudio), plus live music by the Indo-Latin funk jam band Salsa Masala. Enjoy an open bar until 8 p.m. and treats available for purchase from @queensnightmarket. Get your $10 ticket: mo.ma/poprally (link in bio)

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“Completed in 1958, architect Mies van der Rohe’s magisterial Seagram Building established a model for corporate skyscrapers that was emulated across the United States and beyond. The prestigious building also housed the Philip Johnson–designed Four Seasons restaurant, which was the ultimate New York City power lunch venue for over 50 years.” –Paul Galloway, Collection Specialist, Department of Architecture and Design … While we await our reopening, our staff members take to the streets to share their favorite art and design spots in and around Midtown Manhattan. Explore our city with #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: Mies van der Rohe. Seagram Building. 1954–58. 375 Park Avenue. Photo: Tom Ravenscrodt. Used under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic]

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“Now that we’re closed for the summer, we can finally do so many of the conservation treatments we’ve wanted to do—on works by lesser known artists like Séraphine Louis (her ‘Tree of Paradise’ (1928) is on the left), and on more well known works like the earliest painting in the Museum's collection, Cézanne's ‘The Bather’ (1888-90), shown in the middle. Like the Cézanne, Chagall's ‘I and the Village’ (1911), to the right, is almost always on view. They’ll both look their best for our visitors when they go back on view in October at our reopening.” –Anny Aviram, Senior Conservator, #MoMAConservation … Inside and outside of the galleries, countless staff members are working to make the display and preservation of #MoMACollection possible. As we prepare for the reopening of a #newMoMA, photographer #RosalindSolomon captures portraits of the people and personalities that make MoMA possible. See her work: mo.ma/solomon

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By day, Paul Galloway is a collection specialist in our Architecture and Design department. By night (and lunch breaks), he is an expert on Midtown eats and picnic spots. After years of careful lunch hour research, he’s put together what he calls his “peckish peregrinations”—easy and delicious spots around our neighborhood of Midtown Manhattan to grab a good bite and eat outdoors. Check out his favorite haunts illustrated by Jennifer Tobias, MoMA’s Reader Services Librarian: mo.ma/midtownfeast (link in bio)

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“When I was little, visits to New York City Ballet included elaborate routines my sister and I choreographed in the lobby during intermission. I was struck by the sculptural relief—somewhere between a giant archeological face and a spaceship entering a black hole—hanging to the right of the entrance, past the ushers. Lee Bontecou’s artwork stretches more than 20 feet and is made, in part, from a World War II fighter plane cockpit found downtown on Canal Street. Bontecou used to watch planes taking off and landing for inspiration. The work might at first seem a strange match for the home of ethereal ballet. But in its own way, a plane’s feat of flight is as unbelievable as a dancer’s.” –Prudence Peiffer, #MoMAmagazine managing editor … While we await our reopening, our staff members take to the streets to share their favorite art spots in and around Midtown Manhattan. Explore our city with #MoMApicks: mo.ma/picks (link in bio) … [Details: #LeeBontecou. Untitled. 1964. David H. Koch Theater, 20 Lincoln Center Plaza. Image courtesy DHKT]

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“The feeling of communication is very elusive...In being seen by another, there’s always an incompleteness to that understanding.” –#WuTsang ... Often working collaboratively, Tsang combines text, image, dance, music, and activism to create hybrid artforms that question traditional concepts of representation. This installation draws inspiration from an essay by poets and critical theorists Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, which explores how ideas of black, queer, and trans identities are intertwined and constantly in formation. Two videos intermittently overlap, creating an entanglement of images and living bodies. On view this fall in the #newMoMA. Learn more about her work: mo.ma/wutsang (link in bio) … [Credit: Wu Tsang. “We hold where study.” 2017. Two-channel video (color, sound). The Modern Women's Fund. © 2019 Wu Tsang]