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theoregonian

@mrfiveothree sent us this photo of a #verygoodboy named Turbo. ❤️ #dog #doggo #dogsofinstagram

theoregonian

Look at this amazing view! 📷by @paintedhillsoregon #regram Catching that last little bit of daylight at The Painted Hills #paintedhillsoregon #mitchelloregon #johndayfossilbeds | @paintedhillsoregon

theoregonian

Portland is a popular place for people to relocate. In 2018, SmartAsset found it to be the third most-popular moving destination for millennials in the United States. But what is Portland really like? Is it the liberal recycling utopia of “Portlandia” or is it the riot-filled hellscape that some national news networks make it out to be? Spoiler: It’s neither and both of those things -- and a lot of other things, too. So, if you're thinking of coming to beautiful #PDX, we put together a list of things you should know first. No. 15: When it snows, the whole city panics. Portlanders cannot drive in snow. They cannot function in snow. When it snows, the whole system breaks down. At least until it melts the next day. For the full list, go to the link in our bio. 📷 Bruce Ely/The Oregonian

theoregonian

Wildfire is a powerfully destructive force. And when it has its way with our #forests and #trails, it’s easy to get stuck on what’s lost, distracting us from discovering what rises from the ashes. As wildfire season returns to #Oregon, there are a few places to travel where we can see what lies in store for the future – forests that have burned and are in the stages of rebirth. We recently took a trip to explore the Eight Lakes Basin, a beautiful section of the Mount Jefferson Wilderness in central Oregon. It’s home to forests of Douglas fir and hemlock that rim clear, quiet lakes. The best way to access the area is by the #DuffyLake Trailhead, where hikers can make day trips or longer backpacking excursions. We were on a three-day horseback trip in the basin, which allowed us to explore the depths of the wilderness a little easier. The Eight Lakes Basin burned in the B&B Complex fires back in 2003. Two fires between Mount Jefferson and Mount Washington combined, eventually consuming more than 90,000 acres of forest. Firefighters battled the blaze for 34 days at a cost of $38 million. While some part of the basin appears to be untouched (including much of the forest around Santiam Lake) others clearly bear the scars of the fire: haunting gray and blackened snags, standing like tombstones on the hills. As our #horses walked single-file down the narrow dirt trails, we entered a stretch of burned forest between Mowich and Jorn Lakes. Our party suddenly fell silent as we passed, struck by the eerie beauty all around. It looked like an alien world had suddenly sprouted from the bones of a Cascade forest. 📷 @halejamesb

theoregonian

A gorgeous #sunset, as seen from above Timberline Ski Area on Saturday, Aug. 3. 📷 @jimryanphoto

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Little Tahoma is seen from camp at Ingraham Flats on Mount Rainier on Saturday, July 27, 2019. 📷 @jimryanphoto

theoregonian

Canard is Portland’s very best restaurant. If you’ve ever wondered what it was like to eat at Le Pigeon in the early days, before all the accolades and expectations, just head one door down to its youngest sister, the all-day restaurant/cafe/bar Canard. Here at The Oregonian’s 2018 Restaurant of the Year, chef Gabriel Rucker, chef de cuisine Taylor Daughterty and their team fire off cheeky high-low riffs on fast and frozen food quicker than you can grab them. Where else can you find a cheap bag of Tim’s potato chips sliced open and blasted with fancy sour cream, onion and caviar? A crispy calamari tartine that with tangy marinara and green bell pepper evokes the French bread pizza you heated up in a toaster oven as a kid? Some dishes are keepers: the classic bistro oeufs en mayonnaise livened up with trout roe and smoky maple syrup; the fantastic dry-fried chicken wings served on a wooden board with some truffled ranch; and the duck stack, golden pancakes smothered in duck gravy, a duck egg and seared foie gras. The burger is the restaurant’s raison d’etre, a slider-sized, White Castle-inspired steam burger with French onion soup mix blended into griddled beef, melted American cheese, spicy relish, caramelized onions and yellow mustard on a fluffy Hawaiian roll. It’s a work of art best enjoyed during the afternoon and late-night happy hours, when the price drops from $6 to $3. It can be dangerous to give yourself over to nostalgia too fully, but at least in 2019, there’s no place we’d rather eat than Canard. Photo by Mark Graves #Portland #Foodie #PDXEats #BestOfPortland #Canard #DuckStack #Cheeseburger

theoregonian

A new cycling, hiking trail in Columbia Gorge offers some great views! The long-awaited Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail is still at least a couple years from completion, but the latest trail segment to open to the public proves that patience can pay off. A new three-mile section of the trail opened to the public Saturday, connecting Wyeth State Park to Lindsey Creek where it meets up with another trail segment that opened in 2016. That means cyclists and hikers now have a designated, protected pathway that runs nearly six miles along the Columbia River Gorge, from Wyeth State Park to Viento State Park. That route runs past waterfalls, hiking trails, a campground and spectacular views of one of the most scenic destinations in the Pacific Northwest.

theoregonian

Climbers are seen above the clouds on Mount Rainier on Saturday, July 27, 2019. 📷 @jimryanphoto

theoregonian

One of the best spots to watch a beautiful summer sunset in Portland is at Powell Butte. Another of Portland’s extinct volcanoes, Powell Butte is one of the best hiking areas in the city proper, with miles of trails running through the forests and grassy meadows that fill the 612-acre park. Views at Powell Butte are simply incredible. From the top of the butte there are great looks at Mount Hood and Mount St. Helens, but even the view from the parking lot is spectacular. 📸 by Jamie Hale #Portland #Sunset #PowellButte #Trails #Hiking #Views

theoregonian

Just LOOK at this magical shot of the #milkyway above #lostlake by @greendew23 Amazing! 💙

theoregonian

We recently put together a list of signs you are a longtime #oregonian. Do you remember...⁠ ⁠ ...when the actual @FredMeyer (also known as Frederick Grubmeyer) would sometimes show up at one of his stores.⁠

theoregonian

This weekend, Portland Pride is expecting 60,000 people for the downtown festival and parade. Pride Northwest, the organization that puts on Portland’s annual celebration of LGBTQ visibility and culture, has been around since 1994, but Portland has been celebrating Pride far longer. Portland’s first pride took place in 1975, when around 200 people came together for the Gay Pride Fair near Portland State University. The first parade happened two years later, and since then Portland has celebrated Pride with gusto every year. The parade on Sunday starts at 11 a.m. Sunday, June 16, at West Burnside and Northwest Park Avenue and ends at Tom McCall Waterfront Park. Photo by Stephanie Yao Long

theoregonian

The Bow & Arrow Culture Club celebrates its 49th Annual DELTA Park Powwow this weekend, with competition dancing, art and craft vendors, frybread, food booths and community honorings. No pets. Grand entries at 7 p.m. Friday, 1 and 7 p.m. Saturday and noon Sunday, June 14-16; East Delta Park, 10737 N. Union Court; free Photo by Kristyna Wentz-Graff

theoregonian

Looking to fall in love? Charlie is too. Shelter staff is still getting to know him, but he’s ready for a private visit if you are. Please bring in any children and/or dogs in the home to meet 8-year-old Charlie. He’s a German shepherd mix and a big guy at 113 lbs. Contact: Humane Society for Southwest Washington, 1100 NE 192nd Ave., Vancouver Web: www.southwesthumane.org Phone: 360-693-4746

theoregonian

@erikeagon sent us a beautiful photo of this morning’s #sunrise 💕

theoregonian

Step into eight, offbeat dwellings personalized by artists, hobbyists and over-the-top collectors during the 2nd annual Portland Weird Homes Tour from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturday, June 29. The one-of-a-kind abodes are on land, sea and air. Take the Hobbit Home’s secret passageways through nine odd domes. Feel the disco vibe at the Aqua Star floating mansion and wander from the cockpit to the wing of the Airplane Home. The shiny Aqua Star floating house looks like aluminum silos are rising from a wooden platform buoyed at the Oregon Yacht Club. Photo courtesy Portland Weird Homes Tour

theoregonian

The Willamette River was a very popular spot this afternoon as Portland hit a record-high temperature of 97 degrees. ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ The old record of 95 was bested later afternoon. Wednesday is expected to be another mega hot day.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ #Portland #WillametteRiver #Jetski #Swimming

theoregonian

The historic Poulsen House has a new coat of paint! ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ Everyone who frequently crosses the Ross Island Bridge has spotted the (former) beeswax yellow Queen Anne-style mansion with a corner turret, crowned by a conical roof, that rises 50 feet into the sky.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ We got word that they were also working on the inside. Hopefully, we will bring you a look inside next week or so.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ Photos by Ryan Fernandez and Janet Eastman⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ #OldPortland #historichomes #portland #castle

theoregonian

Step into eight, offbeat dwellings personalized by artists, hobbyists and over-the-top collectors during the 2nd annual Portland Weird Homes Tour from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturday, June 29. The one-of-a-kind abodes are on land, sea and air. Take the Hobbit Home’s secret passageways through nine odd domes. Feel the disco vibe at the Aqua Star floating mansion and wander from the cockpit to the wing of the Airplane Home. Weird Homes Tour ticket holders ($30 and up) can go inside a Boeing 727-200 airplane where Bruce Campbell, an electrical engineer, not the actor, has lived for two decades after parking it among Douglas fir trees in Hillsboro. Photo courtesy Portland Weird Homes Tour

theoregonian

How are you planning to beat the heat today? 😆 #itshot #portland #summer #dog #doggo

theoregonian

The Wallowa Mountains dominate the horizon on the Horned Lark Trail. Wildflowers bloom in the green grassy hills of the Zumwalt Prairie in June. The northeast Oregon preserve is managed by the Nature Conservancy, which allows hikers to explore it on four different trails. ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ 📷 @halejamesb

theoregonian

It is going to be mega hot over the next few days. Make sure you stay cool out there, Portland! Jesse Cavalieri, visiting from Bristol, Rhode Island, drenches himself at Keller Fountain Park, Aug. 12, 2016. 📸 by Mike Zacchino #Portland #Heatwave #Fountain #KellerFountain #StayCool

theoregonian

Don't forget to keep your furry friends cool during this little heat wave! "Lucky," a two-year-old West Highland White Terrier tried to attack the water at the Beaverton City Fountain Park on July 2, 2015. 📸 by Kristyna Wentz-Graff #Oregon #Beaverton #Fountain #Doggo

theoregonian

A boardwalk leads through the dunes to the beach at South Beach State Park. 📷 @halejamesb/The Oregonian

theoregonian

At least a hundred people attended a memorial service Saturday night at the Muslim Educational Trust in Tigard to commemorate the two year anniversary of the Max Attack. Community members honored victims Taliesin Myrddin Namkai-Meche and Erik Best, who were both killed, and Micah Fletcher who was seriously injured. The men were stabbed when they intervened with a man yelling slurs at two teenagers, one who was black and the other who was wearing a hijab. Asha Deliverance, the mother of Namkai-Meche, was the keynote speaker. Fletcher's father, Michael Fletcher, read a letter written by his son who was absent. Photos by @mark_w_graves

theoregonian

A snail crosses the trail on a rainy day at Oxbow Regional Park. 📷 @halejamesb/The Oregonian

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Beauty Falls, seen from a viewpoint just off the trail. The 7.5-mile hike to Ice Lake heads through the Eagle Cap Wilderness in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. 📷 Jamie Hale/The Oregonian

theoregonian

We've got lakes, rivers, festivals, beaches, music and food. There's almost always something going on to get you outside, even on those hot days in the middle when you start thinking you might actually miss the rain. Start planning your epic summer of adventure now with our list of 53 events you won't want to miss. For the full list, follow the link in our bio. Pictured here: @oregoncountryfair The Oregon Country Fair will celebrate 50 years of music, food and yes, some nudity, in the woods this summer. Paint your face, put on your sandals and join the fun. July 12-14; Veneta; $29-$36; oregoncountryfair.org 📷 Jamie Hale/The Oregonian

theoregonian

Doors to two brick buildings that share the same address at 416 N.W. 13th Ave. opened in 1909 and 1911 during Portland’s biggest population boom. Their use? As storage for a land transportation company. Over decades, Northwest Portland’s old River District, which contained what was known as the interconnected Oregon Transfer Buildings and other worker-laden warehouses and industry facilities, slowly transformed into the design-centric Pearl District. Commercial space morphed into living spaces renamed Chown Pella Lofts. The top floor, Southeast corner penthouse at 416 N.W. 13th Ave #604 is for sale at $1,295,000. The condo has two bedrooms, two bathrooms and 2,170 square feet of living, say listing agents Sasha Welford and Susan Suzuki of Debbie Thomas Real Estate. Homeowners association fees are $1,211 a month.

theoregonian

The sun rises into a hazy orange sky near Lava Butte, Ore., on Tuesday morning. Sept. 16,2008. Photo by Andy Tullis/The Bulletin via AP Photo #Oregon #LavaButte #Sunrise #LensFlare

theoregonian

A bee on a yellow balsamroot blossom near Dalles Mountain Ranch, a section of Columbia Hills State Park on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge. 📷 @halejamesb/The Oregonian

theoregonian

A sign at a junction on the Dog Mountain Trail offers a "difficult" path and "more difficult" path. 📷 @halejamesb/The Oregonian

theoregonian

An explosive fireworks show over the Willamette River kicked off the 2019 Portland Rose Festival Friday, May 24, 2019. The fireworks attracted hundreds of onlookers and lasted for about rain-free 20 minutes. Photos by @Mark_W_Graves⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ #Portland #RoseFestival #PDXRoseFest #Carnival #CityFair #thisisportland

theoregonian

Natural beauty abounds in the forests, rivers and gorges around Portland, but you don’t have to go far to find a good trail. Portland itself is a beautiful place to hike, with trails running up extinct volcanoes, through dense forests, neighborhoods and protected natural areas in the city. But while many of our urban hikes are legitimate exercise, there are several that offer nice, easy excursions. WASHINGTON PARK LOOP Distance: 3.9 miles Elevation gain: 585 feet Amenities: Restrooms, visitor center, water at Hoyt Arboretum Wheelchair accessible: No Washington Park is home to some of Portland’s best attractions – the Portland Japanese Garden, International Rose Test Garden, Oregon Zoo and Hoyt Arboretum are all there, among others – but you can also explore the park on the sidewalks and trails that wind through it. A four-mile loop hike can be started at the arboretum, rose garden or Sacagawea statue, with many sites and stops along the way. 📷 Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian

theoregonian

@RicksCoastalPics sent us this photo of a bald eagle on the #OregonCoast. ❤️

theoregonian

Our travel writer and photographer @halejamesb talks about how to photograph a sunset on the Oregon coast: What do you need to get a good picture of a sunset on the coast? A good sunset, for starters. Luck is the biggest factor when it comes to photographing sunsets, requiring photographers to be patient and nimble, ready to go when the conditions are just right. The difficulty comes in knowing what conditions will create a good sunset, and composing a picture that’s more than just pretty colors in the sky. This winter, I was fortunate enough to witness a particularly spectacular sunset over Cannon Beach. While that provided a dozen colorful photos, the picture above is what I was aiming for, and illustrates the work that can go into a successful sunset shoot. Because while luck is often the most important factor, there’s a bit more to it than that. Tip 1: Planning This particular sunset shoot took very little in the way of planning. I knew from past experiences that winter sunsets are usually more spectacular than those in the summer – thanks to a variety of factors including air temperature and the presence of haze – so I figured that mostly clear skies in January would probably produce a good show. For more tips, follow the link in our profile.

theoregonian

It's Wooden Shoe Tulip Fest time again! 🌷 Photo originally taken in 2018. 📸 by Dave Killen/The Oregonian #Oregon #TulipFestival #WoodenShoe #Woodburn #Tulips #Color #doggo #dog #hotairballoon

theoregonian

Cherry blossom petals during a rainy weekend. 🌸 ☂🌸 Photo by @BethNakamura #Oregon #Salem #CherryBlossoms #CantRainAllTheTime #ICantStandTheRain

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Happy Birthday to one of the Trail Blazer greats! Have a good one, TP. Photo from 1990 by Steve Nehl Follow our Blazers account for more throwback pics: @ForeverRipCity #Portland #Blazers #TrailBlazers #RipCity #NBA #BallDontLie #BallIsLife #BustABucket #BingoBangoBongo #ForeverRipCity

theoregonian

Oregon is a strange and magical place. Ice caves form in glaciers. Ancient forests appear on the beach. Volcanoes erupt without warning. These natural phenomena are occurrences of place and time. When the conditions are just right, you can bear witness to experiences strange, beautiful and occasionally terrifying. We made a list of the 12 most awe-inspiring natural phenomena in Oregon. 6. Mount Hood shadow effect Standing at more than 11,000 feet tall, Mount Hood is imposing on its own, so when the early morning sun casts the mountain’s shadow against the clouds it’s really a sight to behold. Conditions need to be just right for the effect to happen, usually occurring at the break of dawn on a winter morning with high clouds. In 2016, Portland was treated to two days of the shadow effect in February, when photos of the event quickly spread across social media.

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The parking lot is tiny. There isn’t a campground. And if you’re driving down U.S. 101, there aren’t any signs to tell you it’s there. Like its namesake animal, Otter Point is one of the most elusive state parks on the Oregon coast. It’s a beautiful slice of public land that somehow maintains an air of secrecy, making it a great destination for seasoned coastal travelers who are looking for something new. Located just a few miles north of Gold Beach, the 121-acre state park features short hiking trails along crumbling sandstone bluffs. Just below is a stretch of sandy beach that extends all the way down to the north jetty on the Rogue River, accessible from a small pullout just down the road from the main park entrance. 📷 @halejamesb

theoregonian

One of the most spectacular public art events in Oregon is back for another year, bringing dozens of beautiful sand labyrinths to the southern coast. Circles in the Sand, a project helmed by artist and religious practitioner Denny Dyke, has set a full schedule for 2019, with 55 draws planned through the beginning of September, each one taking place at Face Rock State Scenic Viewpoint in Bandon. Dyke and his team of volunteers spend hours drawing each labyrinth – which he calls a “dreamfield” – in the hard sand of low tide, before inviting the gathered crowds to walk the snaking paths, creating a unique public space for meditation and introspection. Here’s the 2019 schedule: APRIL: 20, 21, 22 MAY: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 19, 20, 21, 22 JUNE: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 JULY: 4, 5, 6, 7, 18, 19, 20, 21 AUGUST: 2, 3, 4, 5, 16, 17, 18 SEPTEMBER: 1, 2 📷 @halejamesb

theoregonian

Abby’s Closet is offering up more than 8,000 prom dresses free of charge this weekend at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, and all you’ll need to get in is a high school ID. Young women lined up for the event as early as 8 p.m. Friday outside the Oregon Convention Center, though volunteers for the giveaway didn’t begin processing attendees until 5:30 a.m. Saturday. Hours for the giveaway are Saturday until 4 p.m. and from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday. Photos by @bethnakamura

theoregonian

Mount Hood at sunset, seen from the Jonsrud Viewpoint in Sandy. 📷 @halejamesb

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Hundreds of alpacas are packing the Clark County Event Center in Ridgefield, Wash., to show off their fleeces and compete at Alpacapalooza 2019. Alpacas, which are related to camels and llamas, but smaller and more Muppet-like, were originally domesticated in the high altitudes of the Andes in South America. The animals are prized for their coats. Breeders say the fleece is warmer and softer than wool, dries faster after being wet and is hypoallergenic. The event, organized by the Alpaca Association of Western Washington, is located at 17402 N.E. Delfel Road, Ridgefield, Wash. It ends Sunday, April 7, 2019, at 3 p.m. and is free and open the public. Parking is $6, cash only. Photos by @mark_w_graves

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A black and tan bulldog smiles at the Pacific Northwest Bully Showdown. The event was held at Clark County Event Center last weekend Saturday, March 30, 2019, in Ridgefield, Wash. The competition featured American Bulldogs and Bullys, French Bulldogs, English Bulldogs and Shortys. Photo by @mark_w_graves

theoregonian

Saturday's sunset via local photog @cliffordpaguio_ was another beauty! 😍 #Portland #Sunset #PinkSky #Colors #Cityscape

theoregonian

The Heceta Head Lighthouse shines through the dusk light, pictured here in 2007. While the Heceta Head Lighthouse was vital in its early days, its importance began to wane as technology allowed ships to better navigate the coast. Over time, the lens and its rotating mechanism wore out, forcing the U.S. Coast Guard to make a tough decision: Should it deactivate the lighthouse or spend the money to repair it? Public outcry came swiftly in favor of the historic light, so officials removed and repaired the lens, reactivating it in 2001. Ten years later, the Heceta Head Lighthouse got a $1.3 million top-to-bottom renovation, with funds from the federal government and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. By that point, the state park site attracted nearly 800,000 visitors each year and had become an iconic landmark on the Oregon coast. The only thing people have seemed to disagree about is the pronunciation of Heceta Head. The most accepted way is “Ha-SEE-ta,” though some locals say it “HECK-a-ta.” According to reference book “Oregon Geographic Names,” the original Castillian pronunciation of the surname Hezeta would be “Ay-THAY-ta,” but that stood little chance of sticking with the English-speaking settlers. 📸 by Steven Gibbons/The Oregonian #Oregon #OregonCoast #HecetaHead #Lighthouse #PNW #ThisIsOregon

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The Oregon high school dance and drill championships took place Friday and Saturday at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Portland, with Tigard (6A), Pendleton (5A), Stayton (4A/3A/2A/1A) and Canby (show) claiming state titles. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ Here's a look at some of the most memorable images from the two days of competition. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 📷 Leon Neuschwander⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ #dance #drillteam #danceteam