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A massive power outage hit #NewYorkCity on July 13, on the anniversary of the 1977 blackout that affected much of the city. Con Edison attributed the failure to a substation around 6:45 p.m., @apnews reports, but the exact cause wasn't yet known until an investigation is finished. Electricity was restored by about midnight. The blackout affected the whole subway system, with four major Manhattan stations closed, including Columbus Circle and Rockefeller Center. In these photographs: #RadioCityMusicHall is seen with lights out, and much of #Manhattan's Midtown West and Upper West Side neighborhoods are seen from above without power. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by David Dee Delgado (@dee_bx) and @scottheins—@gettyimages

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Within the interior of the fire-ravaged Notre-Dame cathedral in #Paris, remote-controlled earth-moving vehicles have ventured into the center of the nave, where the spire fell during the April blaze, to pick out pieces one by one from a large pile of charred debris. But it will take weeks more before the pile is removed. Each piece—including burned bits of the spire and roof, as well as busts and stonework—is being tagged and catalogued under a tent in the front yard of #NotreDame, Vivienne Walt reports. The rows of rescued pieces are separated by stonework and charred wood, including the spire, one of the most iconic landmarks of #Paris. “We know the spire is there but we will not try to find it,” chief architect Philippe Villeneuve says. “It is completely shattered.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

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The man responsible for overseeing the reconstruction of Notre-Dame, chief architect Philippe Villeneuve, tells TIME’s Vivienne Walt the risks of a catastrophic collapse are small, but that the true extent of the damage at the cathedral in #Paris will not be known until at least the end of the year. Until then, it will remain a triage site. Those assessing Notre-Dame’s damage are working to a tight deadline: President @emmanuelmacron has declared that the building should be rebuilt within five years. But Villeneuve says there remain some deeply worrying unknowns about what state #NotreDame is in. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

TIME

Nearly three months after a fire gutted Notre-Dame Cathedral in #Paris, the building’s chief architect warns there is still a risk that its ceiling arches might yet collapse, causing severe structural damage. “The risk is that all the vaults up there fall,” Philippe Villeneuve tells correspondent Vivienne Walt. "It is that simple." Villeneuve recently took TIME to the rooftop where the fire began in April 15, the first journalists to visit the spot. Some sections of #NotreDame have since been exposed to rainfall and high temperatures that #France has experienced. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

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President Trump listens to Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, who announced his resignation, at the White House on July 12. Acosta is leaving the administration amid criticism of a secret plea deal he negotiated a decade ago with Jeffrey Epstein, the financier recently indicted on sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. Two days earlier, a woman not included in the indictments said Epstein raped her when she was 15. Acosta, whose actions on the case was detailed in a @miamiherald investigation last year and who defended those actions this week, said Friday that he called the president this morning and "told him that I thought the right thing was to step aside." #Trump has now had more turnover in his Cabinet in the first two and a half years of his presidency than any of his five immediate predecessors did in their entire first terms. Read the latest on the Epstein case at the link in bio. Photograph by @bsmialowski—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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On the day TIME spent with Benjamin Netanyahu, one of the Israeli Prime Minster’s stops was to cut the ribbon on a history exhibit about the Israeli military. The exhibit dwelled on the country’s David vs. Goliath past, including a 1976 commando raid to rescue more than 100 hostages from a hijacked plane at Entebbe Airport in Uganda, partly led by Netanyahu’s older brother “Yoni,” the only Israeli commando killed in the operation. “It changed my life completely, and it directed it to its current course because Yoni died in the battle against terrorism,” #Netanyahu says. But it is history. Forty-three years later, Israel is the regional Goliath. The U.S. gives Israel more military aid than any other country, with a promise, mandated by U.S. legislation, that it will be assured a “qualitative military edge” over any other country in the Middle East. Netanyahu celebrates that advantage at every turn in his busy day, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev—@noorimages for TIME

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Benjamin Netanyahu in his #Jerusalem office, with portraits of Israel’s early Prime Ministers, starting with David Ben-Gurion, top left. Ben-Gurion’s #Israel had a utopian quality, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent. It built communes (the kibbutz), a socialist economy and a “new Jew”—strapping, self-reliant, nobody’s victim. Ben-Gurion was an atheist. His party, eventually known as Labor, dominated the first three decades of Israel as Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud has largely dominated the next four. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev—@noorimages for TIME

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In mid-July, Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu will surpass David Ben-Gurion, the closest thing #Israel has to a founding father, to become the longest-serving Prime Minister in the country’s #history. Bibi, as he is universally known here, has won five elections and cultivated a U.S. President who appears intent on fulfilling @b.netanyahu’s every desire. So why isn’t he in a better mood? The unpleasant reality, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent, is that #Netanyahu approaches the career summit with his personal power arguably at its greatest risk. Prosecutors have threatened indictments on corruption charges. And he has failed to form a government following his most recent election victory, in April. Instead of spending the summer handing out ministries to allies, Bibi is preparing for yet another campaign, a September do-over election that will test yet again whether the Israel that has grown to resemble its Prime Minister—prosperous, powerful and resilient, yet insecure—still wants him. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @alexmajoliphoto—@magnumphotos for TIME

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Megan Rapinoe ( @mrapinoe) won both the Golden Ball award as the #WorldCup’s best player and the Golden Boot as its leading scorer. During the @uswnt's whirlwind tour of media appearances and a parade in #NYC following the #⚽️ victory in France, she chatted with TIME's @sgregory31 about patriotism, staring down pressure and coping with presidential criticism. Asked about her reaction to Trump's tweeting, during the tournament, that she disrespected the country, Rapinoe replied: "Look, I don’t follow the president on Twitter so I had to search to find it. I know it’s serious, I know it’s a big deal. But it seemed insane to me that this was happening. You skipped over 4,000 things on your to-do list to do this instead. Whatever. We have games to play." Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Seth Wenig and @rutlman—@apnews, Carl Glassman— @polarisimages

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Relatives and friends attend the funeral of Kateleen Myca Ulpina in Rodriguez, #Philippines, on July 9. The three-year-old was fatally shot by police officers during a drug raid that targeted her father, who authorities said was armed and may have used her as a human shield. The girl is one of the latest victims of President Rodrigo Duterte's "war on drugs," which #humanrights groups and and #activists estimate have left more than 6,000—and perhaps as many as 27,000—people dead since 2016. This week, @amnesty described Duterte’s drug war as a "large-scale murdering enterprise" and urged the @unitednations to investigate for crimes against humanity. Photographs by @ezra_acayan—@gettyimages

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Billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein was recently arrested on sex trafficking and conspiracy charges over allegations that he paid girls for sex and used them to recruit other girls between 2002 and 2005. Epstein is said to have abused girls in his homes in both New York and Palm Beach, Fla. He recruited them to give him “massages” that quickly turned sexual, prosecutors said. He paid his victims hundreds of dollars in cash, according to a criminal indictment unsealed on July 8 in Manhattan federal court. Epstein—whose friends included President Trump and former President Clinton—has pleaded not guilty to the charges of sex trafficking and conspiracy to commit sex trafficking. The 66-year-old faces a maximum prison sentence of 45 years if convicted. In these photographs: the damaged doors to his Upper East Side mansion that agents reportedly opened by force, and his picture is held up by protesters outside the courthouse. Read what to know about the case at the link in bio. Photographs by @kevinarvid and @steffikeith—@gettyimages

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Sunday's World Cup title win was a record-breaking victory for the elite athletes of @uwsnt, who made headlines both for their commanding play and their push for equal pay. Team USA's July 7 win against the Netherlands, at 2-0, marked the first time a women’s team has won four World Cup titles. Neither team scored in the first half—largely due to Dutch goalkeeper @sarivveenendaal, as the Netherlands vied for its first World Cup title—but the U.S. gained momentum in the second half. Co-captain @mrapinoe made the first goal in the 62-minute mark. Midfielder @lavellerose then brought the U.S. to its 2-0 victory. Rapinoe’s goal won her the Golden Boot (top goal-scorer) and Golden Ball (most valuable player) honors. Van Veenedaal’s hard work earned her the Golden Glove award, as the tournament's top goalkeeper. Read more about these #champions at the link in bio. Photographs by Gwendoline Le Goff— @reuters, @elsagarrison—@gettyimages, @lucynic—@reuters

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@sarivveenendaal of the #Netherlands dives for the ball during the Women's World Cup final match against the U.S. in Lyon, France, on July 7. Just after halftime, it was still 0-0. That was new territory for Team USA, which had scored a goal before the 13th minute in every game of this year's tournament. The Americans previously defeated Holland in six straight games, by a score of 22-2, but those blowouts are ancient history, writes @sgregory31. The teams haven't faced each other since 2016. Read more about this #⚽️ match-up at the link in bio. Photograph by @rheathcote—@gettyimages

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A wooden statue of First Lady Melania Trump ( @flotus) has been erected and unveiled near her hometown of Sevnica, Slovenia, and its creators are calling it the first-ever public monument in her honor. The idea came to conceptual #artist Brad Downey, who commissioned Sevnica local and “amateur chainsaw sculptor” Ales “Maxi” Zupevc to carve it from a tree, AFP reports. Critics of the statue, which depicts #Trump on Inauguration Day in Washington, D.C., in 2017, immediately began comparing it to a scarecrow. “I can understand why people might think that this falls short as a description of her physical appearance,” Downey said. Still, he called it "absolutely beautiful." Read more about the statue at the link in bio. Photograph by @juremakovec—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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Cori Gauff ( @cocogauff) celebrates beating Slovenia's @hercogpolona during their women's singles third round match at Wimbledon in southwest #London on July 5. Gauff, 15, defeated Hercog 3-6, 7-6, 7-5. “It was a long match and she was playing unbelievable. It was my first match on Centre Court,” Gauff said, according to WTA Tennis. “People were saying No. 1 Court was my court, but maybe it’s Centre.” Gauff will face @simonahalep of Romania in the Round of 16 on July 8. Read more about #Wimbledon's breakout star at the link in bio. Photograph by @lealolivas—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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The World Health Organization ( @who) recently labeled vaccine hesitancy one of 2019’s leading threats to global #health, and in the U.S. that threat is escalating. Every state except Alaska and West Virginia has at least one anti-vaccine organization, according to the Vaccine Liberation website, which tracks them. The most aggressive of the groups are not just demonstrating, but also actively challenging pro-vax legislators, running candidates against them in primaries. Their ubiquity, of course, does not change the misinformation they spread: that #vaccines are dangerous, even deadly; that they are linked not only to autism but also to ADHD, asthma, depression and other conditions. The near unanimous global consensus on the safety and lifesaving power of vaccines, they say, is a conspiracy driven by profits, on the part of governments, the pharmaceutical industry and even individual pediatricians. It’s not true—any of it—and the nonsense comes at a very bad time, writes Jeffrey Kluger. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @jesserieser for TIME

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An early morning airstrike on July 3 killed at least 53 people at a migrant detention center near Tripoli, only two months after the U.N.’s refugee agency had warned that detainees there were at risk. #Libya currently detains thousands of migrants and refugees in government-run facilities under conditions that #humanrights groups say contravene international law. Italian photographer Emanuele Satolli arrived at the Tajoura Detention Center on the outskirts of Libya’s capital hours after the attack destroyed the shelter that housed hundreds of people, mostly from Sub-Saharan Africa. At a hospital ward where some of the wounded had been taken for recovery, families of Libyans with ailments unrelated to the attack thronged the corridors. But in the room that housed the injured migrants, there was nobody in attendance. “That was what struck me the most,” he tells TIME. “They were completely alone.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @emanuelesatolli

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In 1777, the first Fourth of July commemoration was celebrated in Philadelphia with bonfires, bells, and fireworks. In 2019, it seems President Trump would like to celebrate with a grandiose military #parade. And a lot of people are upset about it, writes Elliot Ackerman. They are upset because of the cost. Because of the spectacle. Because these critics anticipate—as is likely—that #Trump will politicize the event in an inappropriate, even tawdry way. He’s already expressed his intention to stand on that hallowed ground in front of the Lincoln Memorial, where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have A Dream” speech, and deliver a speech of his own. Then flanked by all four of the service chiefs (who would surely rather be with their families at a backyard barbecue), he’s planned a massive military review, replete with supersonic fighter jets screeching past overhead and each service’s anthem blaring from the loudspeakers. Ackerman would bet about half the country loves the idea and about half the country hates it. Such a celebration is, like him, a polarizing prospect. And it is the perfect manifestation of our time. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @andyharnik and @jacquelynmartin—@apnews

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Immigrants, including many children, wait to be interviewed by U.S. Border Patrol agents after they were taken into custody in Los Ebanos, #Texas, on July 2. Hundreds of immigrants, mostly from Central America, turned themselves in to border agents after rafting across the Rio Grande from #Mexico to seek political asylum in the United States. They were to be sent to a processing center in McAllen. Photographs by @jbmoorephoto—@gettyimages

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Alex Morgan ( @alexmorgan13) celebrates scoring Team USA's second #⚽️ goal against England during a semifinal match on July 2. The top-ranked @uswnt emerged victorious, 2-1, sending the Americans to the #WorldCup final for the squad's third straight appearance in the title match, @apnews reports. The U.S. will face the winner of the semifinal game between the Netherlands and Sweden on Wednesday. Morgan’s goal marked her sixth of the tournament and occurred on her 30th birthday. Photograph by Richard Sellers—Press Association/AP

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As the new president and CEO of USA Gymnastics, Li Li Leung oversees an organization struggling to justify its existence. After major sponsors walked away following @usagym’s involvement in one of the worst sex-abuse scandals in #sports history, the group declared bankruptcy last December, and is now in danger of losing its status as the national governing body for the sport in the U.S. Leung, the fourth new USAG head in two years, inherits an organization that many gymnasts feel is working against them. Both gymnasts and USAG officials have revealed that under its previous leadership, it not only failed to immediately report sexual-abuse claims to law enforcement but also tried to keep those reports from becoming public. (In court, more than 150 women and girls, from local athletes to Olympic and world team members, said former national team doctor Larry Nassar sexually abused them over the past two decades; in 2018, Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison.) Some of them believe the only way forward is to raze the organization and create an entirely new body to represent #gymnastics. Leung, a former gymnast, is betting her career that she can rebuild USAG from the inside. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @andyspear for TIME

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At 15, Cori Gauff ( @cocogauff) just defeated one of her #tennis idols, @venuswilliams, in 6-4, 6-4 sets during the first round at Wimbledon on July 1. Gauff, who goes by “Coco,” is the youngest player to qualify for the tournament and, @espn notes, the youngest woman to win a match there since 1991. Her #🎾 career began at age eight. At 13, Gauff was the youngest to reach the U.S. Open girl’s final. Two years later, she became the youngest female to win in a qualifying match at the French Open. Gauff follows in the footsteps of Venus and @serenawilliams, who her family and coaches credit for paving the path for a young black teenage girl. Read more about Gauff at the link in bio. Photograph by @mike.egerton—PA Images/ @gettyimages

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Street clashes bookended the 22nd anniversary of #HongKong’s retrocession to China on July 1. In the morning, protesters occupied two major thoroughfares and armed themselves with bricks and metal poles from a construction site. Police responded with pepper spray and batons. Demonstrators began besieging the legislature by midday. In the afternoon, some used the poles as battering rams and broke through the glass doors at the building’s entrance. At around 9:00 p.m., local time, a heavy police presence cleared out and protesters shattered the public entrances. As they surged inside, they covered surveillance cameras and sprayed the facility with graffiti. Offices were ransacked. Large oil portraits of Hong Kong’s deeply unpopular leaders were destroyed. In the debating chamber, protesters unfurled the colonial Hong Kong flag over the president’s desk and defaced the emblem. With police again outside, the occupiers held a deliberation over whether to stay. One removed his face mask and stood up on the chamber desks, shouting, “We really cannot afford to lose anymore.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by Philip Fong, @antwallace and @daledelarey—@afpphoto/@gettyimages, @billyhckwok—Getty Images, @eduardoleal80 and @justinchinphoto—@bloomberg/Getty Images, and Philip Fong—AFP/Getty Images

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“I feel lucky to live in #NYC, where most places are safe and welcoming to me as a gay man. That freedom is the fruit of what in many ways began at Stonewall," says Matthew Pillsbury, who recently photographed the bar's interior. "However, when I travel with my boyfriend, gay bars are often the only places where we feel totally at ease being openly gay and affectionate with each other.” Fifty years after the #Stonewall riots, TIME commissioned photographers across America to document #LGBTQ bars throughout June. See more pictures at the link in bio. Photograph by @screenlives for TIME

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James Mashburn, left, and Robert Wilson at Finishline in Oklahoma City. “I’m not ashamed of who I am," says Mashburn. "I’m comfortable with myself and if someone isn’t comfortable with me that’s their problem.” Fifty years after the #Stonewall riots, TIME commissioned photographers across America to document #LGBTQ bars throughout June. See more pictures at the link in bio. Photograph by @septemberdawnbo for TIME

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"Where I come from in New Zealand we say, ‘He tangata, he tangata, he tangata,’ which means, ‘It is people, it is people, it is people.’ That is the meaning of everything," says Rachel, photographed recently at @theabbeyweho in West Hollywood. "This is people being people in a community supporting and loving each other and raising each other up so that we can be strong and we can go out into the world and support ourselves and make a difference in whatever field you choose to go to.” Fifty years after the #Stonewall riots, TIME commissioned photographers across America to document #LGBTQ bars throughout June. See more pictures at the link in bio. Photograph by @isadorakosofsky for TIME

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President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un stand on the North Korean side in the Demilitarized Zone at Panmunjom on June 30. #Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in the North. The leaders met for nearly an hour and agreed to restart talks on #NorthKorea’s nuclear program. (Swipe for their remarks.) In a joint news conference with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, Trump claimed his predecessor, Barack Obama, had tried to meet with Kim on multiple occasions, only to be rebuffed. Two former high-level White House officials flatly disputed Trump's story, including former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and Ben Rhodes, who served as Deputy National Security Adviser for Strategic Communications. “Trump is lying,” Rhodes tweeted. “I was there for all 8 years. Obama never sought a meeting with Kim Jong Un. Foreign policy isn’t reality television it’s reality.” Photograph by @kevin_lamarque—@reuters, video source: U.S. network pool

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Democratic presidential hopefuls arrive to participate in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season in Miami. In the early moments of the debate, a couple candidates ducked the moderators’ attempts to get them to criticize fellow Democrats. Former Representative Beto O’Rourke declined to say whether he supported a marginal individual tax rate of 70% — first proposed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — on individuals who earn more than $10 million per year. He briefly spoke in Spanish, and then said he would “take that corporate tax rate up to 28%,” when pressed on the issue. Moderator Lester Holt asked the candidates to raise their hands if their answer was yes to this question: “Who here would abolish their private health insurance in favor of a government-run plan?” Senator Elizabeth Warren shot her hand up first, followed by Mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio. None of the other candidates on stage raised their hands. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by Christopher Morris (@christopher_vii)—VII for TIME

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Today, Randolfe Wicker is wearing a suit with a cartoon Lady Liberty tie and a button of Stonewall activist Marsha P. Johnson pinned to his lapel—accented by a pair of earrings made out of screws. But for several decades, Wicker, now 81, was never seen in public without his suit-and-tie uniform in a much more traditional black. He was wearing that black suit and tie at what’s thought to be the first U.S. picket for gay civil rights, which took place in #NewYorkCity in 1964. He wore it when he answered questions on-air in 1965 as one of the first openly gay men to appear on television. And he donned that suit again when he protested New York’s prohibition against serving gay patrons during a “sip-in” in 1966. Wicker jokes that he looked like a preacher for most of the 1960s—but for one of the earliest #LGBTQ activists, it was a political choice. It was also a choice that went hand-in-hand with the work Wicker did with the Mattachine Society, which he joined in 1958 when he was age 20. The Mattachine Society—considered one of the earliest gay #activist groups in U.S. history—had already existed for nearly a decade at that point, and its work in advocating for equal civil rights for gay people predated the Stonewall Uprising by nearly 20 years. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Sasha Arutyunova ( @sashafoto) for TIME

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In 1963, when “I Want to Hold Your Hand” came out, Richard Curtis was a 7-year-old New Zealand-born Brit living in Sweden. His parents had the same records every grownup in those days had—one copy of 'My Fair Lady' and two of 'The Sound of Music.' But he had older sisters. And he had teenage babysitters. So when the #Beatles exploded, he was on the front line and his hungry ears took the full force of the blow. Having stepped away from full-blown feature movies for a few years, the now 62-year-old writer of the romantic-comedy classics 'Four Weddings and a Funeral,' 'Notting Hill' and 'Bridget Jones’s Diary' is back with a #movie that doubles down on the nostalgia. @yesterdaymovie, out June 28, is an uncomplicated work of wish fulfillment about Jack ( @himeshjpatel), a down-on-his-luck singer, and his best friend and manager, Ellie ( @lilyjamesofficial), who he can’t tell is in love with him. After a momentary global blackout, everybody except Jack forgets every Beatles song. He gets to introduce some of the world’s most pure and polished pop confections as if he had written them. “I’ve always felt that what I was trying to do as a writer was to feel like the Beatles in trying to bring people joy,” Curtis says. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @vincenttullo for TIME

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An empty information kiosk after a conference with Pacific leaders on #climatechange in Fiji in May. This coming September, @unitednations Secretary-General @antonioguterres will convene a summit before the meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, bringing together heads of state along with business and civil-society leaders. To participate fully, Guterres is requiring leaders make new commitments to reduce countries’ emissions. “I know it’s very hard for the Secretary-­General to get 200 nations to come together and decide on one thing, but we need the political will, the political commitment to fight this,” says Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama. “If we don’t get through this, the crisis will turn into chaos, and chaos means the end of the world for us.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

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A bodyguard stands watch as Pacific island leaders meet to discuss their #climate agenda during a special meeting with U.N. Secretary-General @antonioguterres in Fiji in May. #Fiji marked the second stop on a four-country tour of the region for Guterres, who is working to position the tiny nations not just as the political center of the #climatechange debate, but as its moral center, too. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

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People participate in a #pride march in #Kiev, Ukraine, on June 23. The parade, estimated to be the city's largest ever, has been marked by anti-LGBTQ violence in the past, but a heavy police presence has been generally effective at discouraging direct attacks on parade participants. In the second photograph, officers link arms to create a barrier between marchers and counter-protesters. Photographs by @hoffmanbrendan—@gettyimages

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Marc Robbs and his daughter, Tehila-Rahel, two, in the Jewish quarter of Sarcelle, outside Paris. In #France, with the world’s third biggest Jewish population, government records showed a 74% spike in anti-Semitic acts between 2017 and 2018. And yet, for all the grim statistics, there are signs of hope across #Europe. As anti-Semitism has risen, the fight against it has intensified, both among regular Europeans and their politicians. E.U. leaders now describe the battle as one they cannot afford to lose, as though it encapsulates the struggle for Europe’s very soul, writes Vivienne Walt. “Anti-Semitism is a negation of what France is,” French President Emmanuel Macron said in February, after visiting a Jewish cemetery where swastikas had been daubed on some 80 graves. Read more about how Europe's Jews are resisting a rising tide of anti-Semitism at the link in bio. Photograph by @magnuswennman for TIME

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Attacks on Jews doubled in the U.S. from 2017 to 2018, according to the @adl_national, but the trend is especially pronounced in #Europe, the continent where 75 years ago hatred of Jews led to their attempted extermination. In an E.U. poll of European Jews across the Continent, published in January, 89% said anti-Semitism had significantly increased over five years. A separate survey in 12 E.U. countries concluded that Europe’s Jews were subjected to “a sustained stream of abuse.” A complex web of factors have combined to create this moment in time for one of Europe’s oldest communities, reports Vivienne Walt. Anti-Semitism has found oxygen among white supremacists on the far right and #Israel bashers on the far left. Millions of new immigrants are settling in Europe, many from Muslim countries deeply hostile to Israel and sometimes also Jews. Exacerbated by the Internet’s ability to spread hatred, anti-Jewish feeling is surging in way that experts fear could result in a conflagration, if governments and communities fail effectively to tackle its causes. “Parents say to their kids, ‘Don’t tell your friends you are Jewish.’ Jewish teachers are afraid to tell kids they are Jewish,” says Shneur Kesselman, the Chabad-Lubavitch rabbi of Malmo, #Sweden, who moved from his native Detroit in 2004. Kesselman recently installed bulletproof glass on his office window in the #synagogue, which dates from 1903. He says Jews have steadily adapted to low-level hostility. “We feel so long as our names are not on a list, we are O.K.,” he says. “There is a danger that we are accepting much too much.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @magnuswennman for TIME

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When Ida Dickens last saw her younger brother, he was waving from the back of a taxicab, a lanky 18-year-old farm boy headed to Korea, a place he knew nothing about. Hoover Jones had enlisted as an infantryman in one of #America’s last segregated units, even though he had never handled a weapon. In his mind, joining the #military was a chance for a better life, an escape from the bitter racism of central North Carolina, Ida tells TIME's W.J. Hennigan. But Hoover soon found himself in a poorly trained unit struggling with equipment that would fall to pieces in numbing subzero temperatures. In a Nov. 17, 1950, letter to his mother from inside his foxhole, Hoover hoped he would be on his way home by Christmas. Nine days later, he vanished. The U.S. Army believed he had been killed in a surprise attack, but his commanders couldn’t say for certain. Last year, #NorthKorea turned over 55 boxes containing remains of American service members killed during the war. Jones' remains were among them. In these photographs: two of Private Hoover Jones’ sisters, Dickens and Elizabeth Jones Ohree, both in their 90s, in North Carolina in February; and Jones lies in honor at the State Capitol in Raleigh on June 21. Read about how cutting-edge science brought Pvt. Hoover Jones home at the link in bio. Photographs by @benjaminras for TIME, @apgerrybroome—@apnews

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Everyone knows #Rome is the eternal city, the passage of time palpable at every turn within its decaying walls and labyrinthine streets. The city’s iconic Pantheon—named for “every god”—evokes this continuum of time. @elizabethbick first photographed there at age 20 while studying abroad in #Italy. Fourteen years later she embarked on “Every God,” a decade-long photographic exploration or “endurance piece” documenting visitors to the #Pantheon amidst the dazzling light that floods the oculus, or eye, during the #summer solstice. In Bick’s capable hands, this dramatic, high contrast series calls to mind a complicated dance enacted by a host of unconscious players who find themselves spontaneously bathed in light and shadow, almost as if choreographed by time itself. “It is a one-part endurance piece,” she says, “and one-part preoccupation with an evolving visitor response to the space.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @elizabethbick for TIME

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The mantra of #Trump 2020 is “turnout, turnout, turnout,” as campaign manager Brad Parscale puts it. Parscale, a lanky 43-year-old digital-marketing entrepreneur from San Antonio, engineered Trump’s targeted online-ad blitz in 2016. “People all think you have to change people’s minds. You have to get people to show up that believe in you.” The 6 ft. 8 in. former college basketball recruit sees his role as @realdonaldtrump’s facilitator. Indeed, he has designed an operation that’s responsive to Trump’s impulses. “He’s the real campaign manager, the real finance director, the real director of everything,” Parscale says. “My job is to build a team that’s ready to deal with whatever happens.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

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At its core, @realdonaldtrump's campaign is a kind of a perpetual outrage machine. It uses algorithms—automated settings on Internet platforms like Google and Facebook—to place massive digital ad buys anytime #Trump creates a firestorm. The cycle is simple: Trump says something controversial or offensive; that drives a surge of search interest in the topic; and that gives his campaign an opening to serve up online ads. The ads encourage supporters to text the campaign, take single-question campaign-generated polls, and buy Trump hats, yard signs, beer coolers and WITCH HUNT decals from the campaign online store, all of which rakes in voter contact data. Never before has an incumbent President run a campaign this way. “It is a strategy built for the new partisan era,” says Princeton University presidential historian Julian Zelizer. “Candidates are always doing things to turn out their supporters. What has not been tested, at least in modern times, is a strategy in which all the rhetoric and all the policy is just tailored around the turnout crowd and there is no effort to go beyond it.” Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

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A “progressive” will probably win the Democratic primary, President #Trump predicts during a wide-ranging discussion in the Oval Office, the day before formally kicking off his 2020 re-election bid. He runs down the competition with evident relish. @joebiden “is not the same Biden,” he says, adding later, “Where’s the magic?” @kamalaharris, he notes, “has not surged.” @berniesanders is “going in the wrong direction.” @elizabethwarren’s “doing pretty well,” he allows, but @pete.buttigieg “never” had a chance. Why? “I just don’t feel it,” Trump says. “Politics is all instinct.” Trump has already smashed the norms of American #politics, remade the Republican Party into his cheering gallery and taken the national news cycle hostage. Can he win a second term on the basis that’s he’s governed in the first, by playing to his base? Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @paridukovic for TIME

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Once again, @realdonaldtrump is putting his own instincts at the center of his campaign. The political mercenaries who tried to discipline his impulses in 2016 have been shown the door. The 2020 campaign is unmistakably #Trump’s show. “We all have our meetings,” the President tells a group of TIME journalists during a wide-ranging discussion in the Oval Office, the day before he formally kicks off his re-election bid. “But I generally do my own thing.” Campaign staff have been hired to follow his lead, and the President has made it known that when he tweets a new policy or improvises an attack at a rally, everyone had better be ready to follow along. Gone is the rickety operation that eked out an upset victory over Hillary Clinton. In its place, advisers boast, is a state-of-the-art campaign befitting an incumbent President. Despite the trappings of convention, however, Trump has for the most part thrown out the playbook for incumbency. "My whole life is a bet," he says. Read this week's full cover story—inside Trump’s gamble on an untested re-election strategy—at the link in bio. Photograph by @paridukovic for TIME

TIME

@realdonaldtrump officially kicked off his re-election campaign at a rally attended by thousands and held at Orlando, #Florida, on June 18. The president's approval rating has never cracked 50% in Gallup polls, but he argues that it would be several points above that if it weren’t for Special Counsel Robert Mueller‘s investigation. “Based on the economy, I should be up 15 or 20 points higher,” Trump told TIME in the Oval Office one day earlier, arguing that he has a natural base of 45% or 46%. “The thing that I have that nobody’s ever had before, from the day I came down the escalator, I have had a phony witch hunt against me … I think it’s cost me.” #Trump, who discussed his campaign, current tensions with Iran and other issues, is the only president in the #history of Gallup polls to have never earned a majority approval rating for even a single day in office. At the same time, his support among #Republican voters remains historically high, with a May poll by Gallup showing it at 87%. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

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With arms raised and a hard hat on his head, #Paris Archbishop Michel Aupetit leads the first Mass held inside #NotreDame since a fire in April destroyed parts of the roof and felled its majestic spire. The June 15 service commemorated the dedication of the French cathedral’s altar. “We stepped into another world,” said photographer Guillaume Poli, who was among a small group of people allowed to witness the Mass, of the fire-damaged interior. “It was a familiar and unknown place altogether.” Photographs by @glmpoli—@agence_ciric for TIME

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The Muslim Brotherhood was founded in 1928 to bring Islam into modern politics. For decades the party existed largely underground, but it was ready and waiting when the uprisings known as the Arab Spring abruptly produced free elections. Mohamed Morsi was the Brotherhood’s candidate for Egyptian president, and its archetype: middle-class, professional (engineering degree from USC), with a neat beard and self-confidence verging on smugness. On June 17, 2012, Morsi—seen above in #Cairo in that all-important year—became the first democratically elected president in Arab #history. Seven years to the day later, Morsi died in a Cairo courtroom, at age 67. He had been imprisoned after only 13 months in office, a victim of Brotherhood insularity, mounting public distrust and an Egyptian security apparatus accustomed to being in charge. The coup was announced by General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, whose forces slaughtered at least 800 Morsi supporters in the street. Al-Sisi now heads a government that international human-rights groups, noting Morsi was deprived of crucial medical care in prison, call responsible for his death, too. Photograph by @nadavkander for TIME

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After months of futile efforts, House Democrats have finally procured a top witness from President #Trump’s inner orbit, but they won’t be grilling her on live television. Hope Hicks, Trump’s 30-year-old former communications director, arrived on Capitol Hill in #Washington on June 19 for a closed-door interview with members of the House Judiciary Committee. A key witness for former Special Counsel Robert Mueller, Hicks was present or involved in major events that factored into his investigation, including Trump’s issuing of a misleading statement on a meeting with Russian nationals at Trump Tower in 2016, his efforts to compel then-White House Counsel Don McGahn to fire Mueller in 2017 and his anger at then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recusal. In total, Mueller mentioned Hicks’ name over 180 times in the report. Read more about what the committee hopes to learn from Hicks at the link in bio. Photograph by Pablo Martinez Monsivais (@pablo3names)—@apnews

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Like so many musicians from New Orleans, Malcolm John Rebennack Jr.—known as Dr. John—played #music for the pure love of it. “That love allowed him to be himself,” writes @terence_blanchard, the Grammy-winning trumpeter and composer. “I first encountered him when I was on tour in Japan in the 1980s; he was doing a double bill with the Neville Brothers, and when we saw those guys, it was almost like we were back home. Mac was a sweetheart, and when I would see him, we’d talk about #NewOrleans and the things New Orleanians talk about, which is mostly food and parties,” Blanchard recalls. “It broke my heart to hear that he passed away, on June 6 at age 77, because he was such a typical illustration of what it means to be from the city: he was a combination of Cajun, blues and jazz—a little of everything, and you can hear it in the way he played piano, in the bluesy style of how he sang. He created music that touched people around the world, but he didn’t allow the world to change who he was.” Photograph by Jacob Blickenstaff (@jacobblick)—@reduxpictures

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Swimmers rest beside a wave pool at the Munsu water park in Pyongyang, #NorthKorea, on June 16. Photograph by @edjonesafp—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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#Venezuela’s unprecedented energy crisis has left residents of its second largest city, #Maracaibo, without power for long periods in the past three months. In these photographs in May, people sleep on the sidewalk to escape the sweltering heat there and a dog is illuminated by a car during a blackout. Photographs by @abdrodrigo—@apnews

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A heavily armed, masked gunman opened fire at a federal courthouse in downtown #Dallas on June 17. The shooter, identified as a 22-year-old, was fatally shot in an “exchange of gunfire” with federal officers, according to the city's police department. Veteran @dallasnews photographer Tom Fox, who was at the scene for a routine assignment, captured intense images as the shooting unfolded. “I squeezed off a few frames as he picked something up—a clip, I think—and then I turned and ran,” he recalled in an account to his newspaper. Fox hid behind a column and “just kept thinking, 'He's going to look at me around that corner and he's going to shoot.” In these photographs: a security guard and a civilian run for cover as bullets ricochet off the building as a shooter (far background, left) fires towards them; federal employees take cover behind a car in a parking lot; security officers, left, and a member of the U.S. Marshals Service, right, head towards the downed gunman; and the shooter is tended to in a parking lot. No officers or citizens were reported injured. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Tom Fox (@weatherfox)—@dallasnews/@apnews

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Prominent freedom campaigner Joshua Wong ( @joshua1013) was released from prison on June 17, a day after one of the largest street protests in #HongKong’s history forced an apology from the city’s top official over a divisive extradition bill. Wong, 21, was completing a three-month sentence for his role in the 2014 #democracy protests. His release offers a morale boost to youthful protesters and has the potential to make the authorities nervous. Huge numbers of Hongkongers again brought the city’s downtown areas to a standstill as they peacefully marched against a legislative amendment that would allow fugitives to be extradited to #China for the first time. The death of a 35-year-old man on Saturday, who fell from scaffolding after hoisting a banner denouncing the extradition bill, gave added emotional force to the marchers, who hailed him as a martyr to the Hong Kong #freedom movement. In these photographs: demonstrators clear a path for an ambulance; post-it notes carry protest messages on the wall of a stairway near the Legislative Council building; Wong speaks to the media shortly after his released; and a yellow raincoat is held up in memory of the protester who fell to his death. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @lamyikfei—@nytimes/@reduxpictures, @carl_court—@gettyimages, @antwallace—@afpphoto/@gettyimages