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Time

Toni Morrison, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author who illuminated the joys and agonies of black American life through breathtakingly vital works like "Beloved," "Song of Solomon" and "A Mercy", died on Monday night, her publisher Knopf confirmed. She was 88 years old. Morrison widened the nation’s literary canon, serving as its conscience through trying times and establishing herself as the keeper of its marginalized histories. Through her inventive turns of phrase, graceful incorporation of African-American vernacular, textured character portraits, sharp historical gaze and tragic plot turns, she is one of the most accomplished and impactful writers in the history of American literature. Morrison appeared on the cover of TIME in 1998 following the release of her novel "Paradise". In the article, she talked about her new novel and her inauspicious origins: “The world back then didn’t expect much from a little black girl, but my father and mother certainly did.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @damonwinter—@nytimes/@reduxpictures

TIME

Rivers of meltwater carve into the #Greenland ice sheet near Ilulissat, Greenland on Aug. 4. Many of the globe’s far northern regions have been experiencing extreme weather events over the past two months. Greenland has seen several wildfires in July, and a heatwave that spread from #Europe to the Arctic country, causing 197 billion tons of ice melt in July alone. The Greenland ice sheet has been in a vulnerable position, and on Aug. 1 lost 12 billion tons, according to meteorologists. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @seangallup—@gettyimages

TIME

Shoes are piled outside the scene of a mass shooting that occurred on Sunday in Dayton, Ohio. The loss of at least 29 lives in El Paso and Dayton in less than 24 hours is just the latest additions to an ever-increasing national death toll. Since the Columbine shooting in 1999, there have been many U.S. massacres that have claimed dozens of victims. Mass shootings have become such a common occurrence, they have transformed American life — turning places that were once thought safe into areas where people now arrive worried about worst-case scenarios. Read more at the link in bio about the images that capture the fear, hurt and chaos from a dozen major mass shootings in the U.S. in the 20 years since Columbine. Photograph by John Minchillo— @apnews

TIME

The crisis at the border does not require us to choose between security and humanity, writes #AngelinaJolie, an Academy Award–winning actor and Special Envoy of the U.N. High Commissioner for @Refugees. "We in #America," writes Jolie, a TIME contributing editor, "are starting to experience on our borders some of the pressures other nations have faced for years: countries like Turkey, Uganda and Sudan, which host 6 million #refugees between them. Or Lebanon, where every sixth person is a refugee. Or Colombia, which is hosting over 1 million Venezuelans in a country slightly less than twice the size of Texas. There are lessons—and warnings—we can derive from the global refugee situation." Read more at the link in bio. In this photograph from Sept. 25, a border officer pats down a migrant from Honduras who had illegally crossed from #Mexico to McAllen, #Texas. Photograph by @jfpetersphoto for TIME

TIME

At least twenty people have been killed and 26 were wounded in a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas on Saturday, according to the Associated Press. A 21-year-old man is in custody and police said there is no longer an imminent threat to the city. #ElPaso police said they received reports of an active shooter about 10 a.m. local time at the Walmart at Cielo Vista Mall. El Paso police spokesperson Sgt. Robert Gomez said that the Walmart was “at capacity” at the time of the shooting and that between 1,000 and 3,000 people were believed to be inside. Beto O’Rourke, a former U.S. Congressman from El Paso who is running for president, said that he plans to return home to support his city and his family. “It’s very hard to think about this, but I will tell you that El Paso is the strongest place in the world,” he said on social media. “This community’s going to come together. I’m going back there right now to be with my family and to be with my hometown.” Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Ivan Pierre Aguirre—EPA-EFE/Shutterstock, Mark Lambie—@elpasotimes/@apnews, Joel Angel Jufarez—AFP/ @gettyimages

TIME

In March 2017, Amin Dzhabrailov was taken by three men in uniform from the salon in the Chechen capital of #Grozny where he worked. He was handcuffed and forced into a car. They took his phone, demanded his password and started scouring the device for messages and photos that would prove he was guilty of something considered deeply shameful in the conservative, predominantly Muslim republic: being gay. Dzhabrailov, now 27, is one of at least dozens of men who were detained and tortured in an anti-gay “purge” that took place in #Chechnya in 2017, according to news reports, #humanrights organizations and European agencies. He is one of the first to go on the record about his experience and reveal his identity in the media, reports Katy Steinmetz, though he fears retaliation against himself and his family. Dzhabrailov, who later fled to Moscow and then Canada, wants to draw attention to the ongoing persecution of gay people in his homeland. It’s dangerous to tell his story. But two years in North America, including participation in #NYC’s annual #pride march this year, have helped him summon the courage. “It’s also dangerous not telling,” he says, “because this is going to continue.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @heathersten for TIME

TIME

What began as a #protest against a now-suspended extradition bill has since spiraled into a movement demanding greater democracy. Hong Kong’s civil servants symbolically turned against the city’s government Friday evening, joining forces with the protest movement that has rocked Asia’s financial center this summer. Read more about how the gathering at Chater Garden reflects just how far the sustained demonstrations have reverberated across #HongKong at the link in bio. Photograph by @billyhckwok—@gettyimages

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By the time the April fire at #NotreDame in Paris was extinguished, the roof had melted in the high heat. Made from hundreds of tons of lead, it had dispersed toxic particles across nearby streets and buildings, and into the cathedral itself. Environmental group Robin des Bois has accused authorities in #Paris of doing too little to mitigate the risks of lead poisoning after the blaze, alleging that city authorities and the diocese allowed residents, visitors and workers to be exposed to a “toxic fallout.” The lawsuit alleges the city knowingly put people in danger by doing too little to tackle the fallout. Now, several schools are reportedly being “deep cleaned” to remove lead. Go inside the fight over how Notre Dame should rise from the ashes at the link in bio. Photograph by @pzachmann—@magnumphotos for TIME

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One year ago, three Russian journalists were shot to death in the Central African Republic. The purpose of their trip was to film a documentary about the Wagner Group, a Russian private military company that has been active in several African countries and is believed to have ties with the Russian military and the state. Authorities in #Moscow say the journalists were killed in a random act of violence. Their colleagues have investigated the murders independently over the past year and have come to a different conclusion—that known associates of the Wagner Group were involved. Among the most vocal of the victims’ friends and families has been Irina Gordienko, one of #Russia’s most famous reporters and the ex-wife of Orkhan Dzhemal, a renowned conflict reporter among those slain. "I never realized what it really means to be a victim," she writes, "or as the cops like to call me, a 'terpila,' their heartless slang for someone who is made to endure." Read an edited translation of her account—first published in Novaya Gazeta, one of Russia’s last independent newspapers, where she is a correspondent—at the link in bio. Photograph by @davidemonteleonestudio for TIME

TIME

President Trump’s attacks on Rep. Elijah Cummings, from #Maryland's 7th congressional district, ignited yet another week of controversy, amplifying the debate over race in #America and the conditions of inner cities. The attacks have also highlighted Cummings’ effectiveness as chairman of the House committee with the broadest scope to probe the #Trump Administration. Most significantly, some of @repcummings' victories involve two of Trump’s red lines: his finances and his children. “We know that Trump doesn’t like oversight," said Molly Claflin, Chief Oversight Counsel at American Oversight, a non-partisan and anti-corruption watchdog group. "Elijah Cummings is not taking no for an answer.” And in an era of partisanship, writes Alana Abramson, Cummings has conducted himself while retaining respect from across the aisle. Adds Kurt Bardella, a former #Republican spokesperson for the House Oversight Committee, who has since disavowed ties with the party: "Even the most Republican of Republicans will tell you they respect Elijah Cummings." Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @justingellerson—@nytimes/@reduxpictures

TIME

In a normal world, the Democratic presidential candidates would spend their second round of debates this week talking about the big news. A mass shooting in California. An alarming spike in temperatures across Europe. The prospect of the Federal Reserve cutting interest rates for the first time since the financial crisis. But this isn’t a normal world; this is @realdonaldtrump’s world. The President spent his weekend writing racist tweets about Democratic @repcummings—who as chairman of the House Oversight Committee has been investigating Trump—and his majority-black #Baltimore district, just weeks after he unleashed a series of racist tweets attacking female lawmakers of color. As much as #Democrats may have wanted to talk up their plans for health care or education or climate change, Trump’s tweets have reset the narrative. Which leaves the candidates with a difficult choice, as @lissandravilla and @charlottealter write from #Detroit: Should they spend their precious moments of airtime at the Fox Theater condemning Trump’s racism, or outlining their policies to try to address racial inequality? Should they make a moral case against Trump, or a case for themselves? Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @bsmialowski—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

TIME

Julissa Contreras, 30, of Oakland, Calif., was with her father and boyfriend at the Gilroy Garlic Festival on July 28 when she saw a gunman start firing into the crowd, about 15 feet away from her. Contreras ran to a nearby tent for cover. The shooter was not aiming at anyone or anything in particular, she recalls, but was near a bouncy slide filled with children. “He was spraying left to right, right to left, like an oscillating fan,” she tells TIME. “He was very tactical in what he was doing. A lot of the kids were scrambling to get out.” The shooting left three people dead and at least 15 others wounded. Among the fatalities were a man in his 20s and two children, a 6-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl. In this July 29 photograph, Gilroy City Council member Fred Tovar, center, wears a #GILROYSTRONG shirt while attending a vigil for the victims. Read the latest updates at the link in bio. Photograph by Noah Berger— @apnews

TIME

A youth helps to unfurl a Romanian flag measuring 328 feet (100 meters) during National Anthem Day celebrations in #Bucharest on July 29. Photograph by Vadim Ghirda— @apnews

TIME

Appearing in the Rose Garden of the White House with more than 60 first responders from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, President Trump signed into law an extension of the victims’ compensation fund through 2092, essentially making it permanent. The bill passed through Congress on a bipartisan basis, @apnews reports, but only after delays by some Republicans led to criticism from activists including Jon Stewart. "You inspire all of humanity,” said Trump. The president noted he "was down there also, but I'm not considering myself a first responder." A number of Trump's recollections about his personal experiences on that day in 2001 cannot be verified, AP adds. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @alex_brandon—AP

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Zach Spaulding and Farzad Alikozai embrace at Stonewall in Huntington, #WestVirginia. The pair was photographed for a recent project on #LGBTQ bars. Fifty years after the #Stonewall riots, TIME commissioned photographers across #America to document these spaces. "They’re the staging grounds for our dreams—of connection, family, a night’s glory or a lifetime of it," author and poet Alexander Chee ( @cheemobile) writes in an accompanying essay. "Movements have formed within them, and families, too, the kind that don’t know each other until they meet. And as long as we need all of this, we’ll need these places too." See more of these bars, and read the full essay, at the link in bio. Photograph by @rebecca_kiger for TIME

TIME

In the fractious battle over #immigration policy, most of the attention has been directed toward the southern border. Some #tech executives and economists, however, believe that growing delays and backlogs for permits for skilled workers at #America’s other borders pose a more significant challenge to the U.S.’s standing as a start-up mecca. Many tech companies are now deciding to expand because Canada’s immigration policies have made it far easier to hire skilled foreign workers there compared to the U.S., reports Alana Semuels. #Canada permits companies with offices there to hire for positions such as computer engineers, software designers and mathematicians, and have their visas processed within two weeks. These workers can soon after apply to be permanent residents and, within three years, become full-fledged citizens. Enter: Harbour Air. When it launched a Vancouver-Seattle route last year, one pilot said tech companies bought tickets in bulk so their employees could easily go back and forth. In this photograph, a crew member prepares for take-off on a seaplane flying to #Vancouver on July 11. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @ian_allen for TIME

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More than 1,700 people have died from the #Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. "In order to keep pace with the virus," writes Gayle E. Smith, "the United States and the international community must start treating this outbreak like the crisis it is." In 2014, Smith—a former administrator of USAID and president and CEO of The ONE Campaign—helped lead America's response to a crisis that ultimately claimed more than 11,000 lives. "The challenges of this outbreak are unprecedented: poor infrastructure, distrust in #health workers and lack of access to basic medical care. A big enough barrier on their own, together they make containing this outbreak in the #DRC harder and more complex than the last outbreak in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea." Read more about her biggest regret at the time, and what she thinks this @whitehouse needs to do, at the link in bio. In these #pictures from Beni: health workers treat six-week-old Amani Musanga on July 15; a woman waits at the morgue for a relative's body to be cleared for burial on July 14; Congolese #journalists broadcast an Ebola awareness program from a local radio station on July 13; workers bury the remains of Mussa Kathembo, an Islamic scholar who had prayed over those who were sick, and who himself died of Ebola, on July 14; sunlight shines on freshly dug graves on July 16. Photographs by @jeromedelay—@apnews

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Scenes from the Game Fair, an annual #festival for people who are passionate about the Great #British Countryside and everything it includes—from shooting and falconry, to fishing and hounds—held in Hatfield, north of #London, on July 26. Photographs by @denchphoto—@gettyimages

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Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir, at 43, is the youngest #woman to lead a European country. Iceland may be small, with just 350,000 people, but it’s home to big ideas that are turning the heads of international policymakers, writes Ciara Nugent. #Iceland is already ranked the best country in which to be a woman by the World Economic Forum, and @katrinjakobsd’s government is rolling out the world’s toughest equal-pay legislation. One of the only government heads from an environmentalist party, Jakobsdóttir wants to make the country a leader in climate action too, with an ambitious plan to make Iceland carbon neutral by 2040, 10 years before the target set for Iceland’s neighbors in the E.U. “It can be an advantage to be small,” she tells TIME. “You can do things bigger and faster. You can actually change everything in a very short time.” Read our full interview at the link in bio. Photograph by @oliviaharris_shoots for TIME

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Hong Kong has become increasingly polarized, as protesters say Beijing is eroding the autonomy it maintains under the “one country, two systems” model. Beijing-appointed leader Carrie Lam has declared the extradition bill “dead” but has not officially withdrawn it. On July 21, #protesters clashed with police, who fired tear gas and rubber bullets. That night, police were nowhere to be seen when men armed with wooden sticks stormed a train station near the Chinese border and terrorized commuters. Believed to be members of #HongKong’s “triad” gangs, they indiscriminately attacked pro-democracy protesters, journalists and bystanders in the most brutal protest-related incident to date. If violence becomes more common, Beijing may be more likely to step in to quell the protests, which have turned into a revolt against its hold over the region. But for now, writes Amy Gunia, it looks set to be a long summer of rebellion. In this photograph, protesters rally against the bill in the international airport on July 26. Photograph by @billyhckwok—@gettyimages

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The destruction of the #NotreDame cathedral in April seemed to many like a turning point. It was “the drop of water that made the vase overflow,” Thierry Paul Valette, one of the Yellow Vest leaders in #Paris, tells Vivienne Walt. With the French in collective grief, President Macron went on television the next day to appeal for national unity and vowed to have it rebuilt within five years. The weekly protests have abated, with demonstrators exhausted from eight months of battle. But the place of worship that 14 million #tourists a year once visited remains a shuttered wreck. The fraught discussion around what comes next for the beloved building cuts to #France’s most sensitive matters of #history and culture, class and political ideology, with questions that will likely take months to resolve. In this photograph, a rope-access technician installs a wooden arch to support a flying buttress on July 22. Read more, and see more #pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by @pzachmann—@magnumphotos for TIME

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In early spring, the fractures in #France were playing out in the most violent street demonstrations in decades, with the so-called #YellowVest movement protesting President Macron’s plans to remake the country’s economic model. Demonstrators marched and agitators trashed and burned stores and banks. Then came the #NotreDame fire on April 15. The sight of smoke billowing from one of its most treasured icons seemed to deepen a sense of a country under strain, writes Vivienne Walt. The realization that #NotreDame came close to collapsing—and the prospect that it might still face an existential threat—haunts those now working to rebuild it. In these photographs: burnt scaffolding that will be removed; rows of chairs remained in place on July 4, unmoved since the blaze; a technician clears rubble inside the cathedral on July 11; and florets are removed from pinnacles, so a wooden arch can be installed to support a flying buttress, on July 2. Read more, and see more #pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @pzachmann—@magnumphotos for TIME

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The cause of the blaze at #NotreDame in #Paris is still unknown. Yet, writes Vivienne Walt in this week's International cover story, what it exposed is clear—the fragility of our most cherished buildings and the wistful attachment we hold to the spaces within their walls. The cathedral’s spire snapped off like a twig just before the sun set on April 15, crashing 314 ft. into the nave, through the ceiling that carpenters painstakingly carved by hand in the Middle Ages, using 5,000 oak trees. Within #France itself, the fire laid bare another, more complicated fragility: a tension rippling through the country, pitting the urge to preserve the past, and traditions of an exceedingly proud nation, against the need to overhaul its hidebound ways and modernize its system. Go inside the fight over how Notre Dame should rise from the ashes, and see more #pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by @pzachmann—@magnumphotos for TIME

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For many American Muslims, Ilhan Omar's election was a sign they were inching toward full acceptance in American society. But for all the attention on @repilhan, the 36-year-old former #refugee who became the first Somali American to serve in Congress (and who has been embroiled in controversy since she arrived to Washington), little is known about her background, political ascent and work on Capitol Hill. Interviews with the Congresswoman and over a dozen of her associates and constituents reveal a complex portrait. She is neither the radical bogeywoman portrayed by President #Trump, nor is she the savior some on the left want her to be. At her core, writes Alana Abramson, she is an ambitious freshman member of Congress with a unique #history that simultaneously propels her forward and pushes her back, a subject of interpretation and fascination by all sides. Her story may end up saying more about the state of politics in #America than that of virtually any of her colleagues. Read our full profile at the link in bio. Photograph by @gdemczuk for TIME

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Six months before the Iowa caucuses, @joebiden looks like the shakiest front runner in years. Though every poll still shows him running atop the Democratic field, since he joined the race in late April, Biden’s support has been cut almost in half. His campaign message has been unfocused, with the candidate caught between advice dispensed by a raft of hired guns, a cadre of old friends and his own instincts. “Biden’s gonna Biden” is how staffers have come to shorthand it, reports Philip Elliott. After the drubbing he took in the first round of debates, when @kamalaharris pummeled his record on busing and school desegregation, the pressure is on the former Vice President to perform better in his second one, on July 31. He has plenty of time to fix things, and plenty of advantages: the ties to Obama, loyal relationships across the party, a deep bench of big-money donors and more. But before Biden can take on #Trump, he has to convince restless Democrats that he can unite the party and win back the White House. And for now, he seems determined to do it his way, whatever the cost. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @al_drago—Bloomberg/@gettyimages

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Following weeks of #protests demanding his ouster and facing planned impeachment proceedings, #PuertoRico's embattled Gov. Ricardo Rosselló announced late on July 24 that he would resign, effective on Aug. 2. Rosselló's decision follows the territory's largest demonstrations in decades, which kicked off this month amid "Chatgate," a scandal involving leaked, even crude, messages between the governor and several cabinet members. Around that time, several high-ranking officials were indicted on charges of fraud and money laundering. The leak uncorked years of pent up anger over mismanagement, corruption and the recovery efforts after Hurricane Maria. Protesters chanting #RickyRenuncia amassed in San Juan, where this graffiti was photographed last week, to try and force his hand. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

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Having for years cultivated an aura of buffoonery, Boris Johnson’s campaign for leader of the U.K.'s Conservative Party was by contrast a slick operation. He and his team developed an optimistic refrain—yes, his story went, #Britain had been betrayed by Prime Minister Theresa May’s inability to pull the U.K. out of the E.U. as promised. But if the country just believed in itself a little more, and rallied behind a strong new leader, things didn’t have to be that way. He sealed victory comfortably, beating rival Jeremy Hunt with 66.4% of party members’ votes. On July 24, he traveled to Buckingham Palace to be formally appointed as the new Prime Minister by Queen Elizabeth. In this photograph, he addresses the media outside No. 10, Downing Street in #London. The first and most pressing item on his checklist, naturally, Billy Perrigo writes, is #Brexit. Unless a deal can be negotiated, the U.K. is still scheduled to leave the E.U. on Oct. 31, a date which Johnson pledged to stick to, “do or die.” May’s Brexit deal, roundly rejected by lawmakers, took two years. Johnson has just three months. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @dan_kitwood—@gettyimages

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Robert Mueller called President Trump’s tweets in 2016 about WikiLeaks “problematic,” marking a rare moment of direct criticism of the President during the former FBI chief’s public testimony before Congress in #Washington, D.C., on July 24. It was an example of one of the strongest criticisms of #Trump offered in a day of testimony, during which the former Special Counsel said little more about his office’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election than what was publicly known. Appearing before the House Judiciary Committee and House Intelligence Committee, #Mueller publicly faced questions for the first time about the investigation, fielding attacks from Republicans and questions from Democrats on obstruction of justice. As he promised during his opening statement, his answers stuck to the text of his report. Read the latest updates at the link in bio. Photograph by @gdemczuk for TIME

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In testimony before the House Judiciary Committee in #Washington, D.C., on July 24, former Special Counsel Robert Mueller reiterated the findings of his report that his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election did not exonerate President Donald Trump. "No," Mueller replied, after being asked by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the committee's chairman, about whether the investigation “totally” exonerated the President—something #Trump has repeatedly claimed. Mueller’s testimony isn’t expected to deliver bombshells. But, at the link in bio, read why it still matters. Photograph by @gdemczuk for TIME

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A ceremonial staffer holds up an American flag during the medal ceremony for the women's 100-meter breaststroke at the world #swimming championships in Gwangju, #SouthKorea, on July 23. @_king_lil won gold with a time of one minute, 4.93 seconds. Photograph by @quinnrooney13—@gettyimages

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Lety Perez, an asylum-seeker from #Guatemala, embraces her son Anthony while asking to members of #Mexico's National Guard to let them cross into the United States, as seen from Ciudad Juárez, on July 22. Photograph by @jose_luis_gonzalez_fotografia_—@reuters

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The casket of late Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is carried into the Great Hall of the Supreme Court in #Washington, D.C., on July 22. Stevens, who sat on the bench for 35 years and became the third-longest serving justice in #history, died at age 99 on July 16. Over the course of his long career, writes Tessa Berenson, Stevens would have a role in shaping most areas of the law, influential in majority opinions and firm in his dissents, marked by a practical jurisprudence and an increasingly liberal sensibility. From left: Associate Justice Elena Kagan; Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor; Associate Justice Samuel Alito; Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; and Chief Justice John Roberts. In the second photograph: President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stop to look at a painting of Stevens as he lies in repose. Read TIME's full obituary at the link in bio. Photographs by @andyharnik—@apnews

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Sara Teristi watched a man transform from doctor to predator, starting decades ago when he gained access to a gym full of little girls. She was one of those girls. She may have been his very first target. She first met Larry Nassar—the most prolific known sex criminal in American sports history—at a gym in Michigan in late 1988. She was a young gymnast in a vulnerable state, she says, having been emotionally trampled by her hard-driving coach, John Geddert, a man who made her feel worthless. Nassar, who was volunteering as team doctor, zoomed in on her right away. Like many survivors of childhood sexual abuse, she did not tell anyone at the time, because she did not recognize it as abuse. For Sara and many other Nassar survivors, it was not until after the former doctor’s arrest and sentencing that they realized what had been done to them. Now in her 40s, Sara shares her experience publicly for the first time, much of it recently pieced together after repressing the memories for decades. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by Irina Rozovsky ( @yabliko) for TIME

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Many Democratic voters say they genuinely like @corybooker. He nerds out with fans about being a #Trekkie, snaps selfies and films clips saying hi to a family member who couldn’t be there. And yet support for Booker, photographed in Cedar Rapids, hasn’t solidified into the coalition he needs to be competitive, writes Lissandra Villa. Voters will say he’s on their short list, yet there’s always a But. But @elizabethwarren has a plan. But @berniesanders is my guy. But @joebiden is more electable. “He’s probably in the top five right now,” a 33-year-old website designer from Davenport, Iowa, said of Booker. “It’s just hard to commit.” Booker believes he’s still introducing himself to the electorate. He told TIME that after a recent speech in California, a voter came up to him and said, “I didn’t know you were black.” He presented it as evidence the campaign is still in its opening innings. “We are building, building, building to win in Iowa, win in New Hampshire, win in Nevada and South Carolina,” he says. “And I’m very confident I’m going to be the nominee of the party.” Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @dannywilcoxfrazier—@viiphoto for TIME (Correction, July 22: The original version of this caption tagged the wrong Biden)

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A massive power outage hit #NewYorkCity on July 13, on the anniversary of the 1977 blackout that affected much of the city. Con Edison attributed the failure to a substation around 6:45 p.m., @apnews reports, but the exact cause wasn't yet known until an investigation is finished. Electricity was restored by about midnight. The blackout affected the whole subway system, with four major Manhattan stations closed, including Columbus Circle and Rockefeller Center. In these photographs: #RadioCityMusicHall is seen with lights out, and much of #Manhattan's Midtown West and Upper West Side neighborhoods are seen from above without power. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by David Dee Delgado (@dee_bx) and @scottheins—@gettyimages

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Within the interior of the fire-ravaged Notre-Dame cathedral in #Paris, remote-controlled earth-moving vehicles have ventured into the center of the nave, where the spire fell during the April blaze, to pick out pieces one by one from a large pile of charred debris. But it will take weeks more before the pile is removed. Each piece—including burned bits of the spire and roof, as well as busts and stonework—is being tagged and catalogued under a tent in the front yard of #NotreDame, Vivienne Walt reports. The rows of rescued pieces are separated by stonework and charred wood, including the spire, one of the most iconic landmarks of #Paris. “We know the spire is there but we will not try to find it,” chief architect Philippe Villeneuve says. “It is completely shattered.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

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The man responsible for overseeing the reconstruction of Notre-Dame, chief architect Philippe Villeneuve, tells TIME’s Vivienne Walt the risks of a catastrophic collapse are small, but that the true extent of the damage at the cathedral in #Paris will not be known until at least the end of the year. Until then, it will remain a triage site. Those assessing Notre-Dame’s damage are working to a tight deadline: President @emmanuelmacron has declared that the building should be rebuilt within five years. But Villeneuve says there remain some deeply worrying unknowns about what state #NotreDame is in. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

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Nearly three months after a fire gutted Notre-Dame Cathedral in #Paris, the building’s chief architect warns there is still a risk that its ceiling arches might yet collapse, causing severe structural damage. “The risk is that all the vaults up there fall,” Philippe Villeneuve tells correspondent Vivienne Walt. "It is that simple." Villeneuve recently took TIME to the rooftop where the fire began in April 15, the first journalists to visit the spot. Some sections of #NotreDame have since been exposed to rainfall and high temperatures that #France has experienced. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by Patrick Zachmann (@pzachmann)—@magnumphotos for TIME

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President Trump listens to Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, who announced his resignation, at the White House on July 12. Acosta is leaving the administration amid criticism of a secret plea deal he negotiated a decade ago with Jeffrey Epstein, the financier recently indicted on sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. Two days earlier, a woman not included in the indictments said Epstein raped her when she was 15. Acosta, whose actions on the case was detailed in a @miamiherald investigation last year and who defended those actions this week, said Friday that he called the president this morning and "told him that I thought the right thing was to step aside." #Trump has now had more turnover in his Cabinet in the first two and a half years of his presidency than any of his five immediate predecessors did in their entire first terms. Read the latest on the Epstein case at the link in bio. Photograph by @bsmialowski—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

TIME

On the day TIME spent with Benjamin Netanyahu, one of the Israeli Prime Minster’s stops was to cut the ribbon on a history exhibit about the Israeli military. The exhibit dwelled on the country’s David vs. Goliath past, including a 1976 commando raid to rescue more than 100 hostages from a hijacked plane at Entebbe Airport in Uganda, partly led by Netanyahu’s older brother “Yoni,” the only Israeli commando killed in the operation. “It changed my life completely, and it directed it to its current course because Yoni died in the battle against terrorism,” #Netanyahu says. But it is history. Forty-three years later, Israel is the regional Goliath. The U.S. gives Israel more military aid than any other country, with a promise, mandated by U.S. legislation, that it will be assured a “qualitative military edge” over any other country in the Middle East. Netanyahu celebrates that advantage at every turn in his busy day, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev—@noorimages for TIME

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Benjamin Netanyahu in his #Jerusalem office, with portraits of Israel’s early Prime Ministers, starting with David Ben-Gurion, top left. Ben-Gurion’s #Israel had a utopian quality, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent. It built communes (the kibbutz), a socialist economy and a “new Jew”—strapping, self-reliant, nobody’s victim. Ben-Gurion was an atheist. His party, eventually known as Labor, dominated the first three decades of Israel as Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud has largely dominated the next four. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev—@noorimages for TIME

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In mid-July, Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu will surpass David Ben-Gurion, the closest thing #Israel has to a founding father, to become the longest-serving Prime Minister in the country’s #history. Bibi, as he is universally known here, has won five elections and cultivated a U.S. President who appears intent on fulfilling @b.netanyahu’s every desire. So why isn’t he in a better mood? The unpleasant reality, writes @bybrianbennett, our Senior White House Correspondent, is that #Netanyahu approaches the career summit with his personal power arguably at its greatest risk. Prosecutors have threatened indictments on corruption charges. And he has failed to form a government following his most recent election victory, in April. Instead of spending the summer handing out ministries to allies, Bibi is preparing for yet another campaign, a September do-over election that will test yet again whether the Israel that has grown to resemble its Prime Minister—prosperous, powerful and resilient, yet insecure—still wants him. Read this week’s full cover story at the link in bio. Photograph by @alexmajoliphoto—@magnumphotos for TIME

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Megan Rapinoe ( @mrapinoe) won both the Golden Ball award as the #WorldCup’s best player and the Golden Boot as its leading scorer. During the @uswnt's whirlwind tour of media appearances and a parade in #NYC following the #⚽️ victory in France, she chatted with TIME's @sgregory31 about patriotism, staring down pressure and coping with presidential criticism. Asked about her reaction to Trump's tweeting, during the tournament, that she disrespected the country, Rapinoe replied: "Look, I don’t follow the president on Twitter so I had to search to find it. I know it’s serious, I know it’s a big deal. But it seemed insane to me that this was happening. You skipped over 4,000 things on your to-do list to do this instead. Whatever. We have games to play." Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Seth Wenig and @rutlman—@apnews, Carl Glassman— @polarisimages

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Relatives and friends attend the funeral of Kateleen Myca Ulpina in Rodriguez, #Philippines, on July 9. The three-year-old was fatally shot by police officers during a drug raid that targeted her father, who authorities said was armed and may have used her as a human shield. The girl is one of the latest victims of President Rodrigo Duterte's "war on drugs," which #humanrights groups and and #activists estimate have left more than 6,000—and perhaps as many as 27,000—people dead since 2016. This week, @amnesty described Duterte’s drug war as a "large-scale murdering enterprise" and urged the @unitednations to investigate for crimes against humanity. Photographs by @ezra_acayan—@gettyimages

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Billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein was recently arrested on sex trafficking and conspiracy charges over allegations that he paid girls for sex and used them to recruit other girls between 2002 and 2005. Epstein is said to have abused girls in his homes in both New York and Palm Beach, Fla. He recruited them to give him “massages” that quickly turned sexual, prosecutors said. He paid his victims hundreds of dollars in cash, according to a criminal indictment unsealed on July 8 in Manhattan federal court. Epstein—whose friends included President Trump and former President Clinton—has pleaded not guilty to the charges of sex trafficking and conspiracy to commit sex trafficking. The 66-year-old faces a maximum prison sentence of 45 years if convicted. In these photographs: the damaged doors to his Upper East Side mansion that agents reportedly opened by force, and his picture is held up by protesters outside the courthouse. Read what to know about the case at the link in bio. Photographs by @kevinarvid and @steffikeith—@gettyimages

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Sunday's World Cup title win was a record-breaking victory for the elite athletes of @uwsnt, who made headlines both for their commanding play and their push for equal pay. Team USA's July 7 win against the Netherlands, at 2-0, marked the first time a women’s team has won four World Cup titles. Neither team scored in the first half—largely due to Dutch goalkeeper @sarivveenendaal, as the Netherlands vied for its first World Cup title—but the U.S. gained momentum in the second half. Co-captain @mrapinoe made the first goal in the 62-minute mark. Midfielder @lavellerose then brought the U.S. to its 2-0 victory. Rapinoe’s goal won her the Golden Boot (top goal-scorer) and Golden Ball (most valuable player) honors. Van Veenedaal’s hard work earned her the Golden Glove award, as the tournament's top goalkeeper. Read more about these #champions at the link in bio. Photographs by Gwendoline Le Goff— @reuters, @elsagarrison—@gettyimages, @lucynic—@reuters

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@sarivveenendaal of the #Netherlands dives for the ball during the Women's World Cup final match against the U.S. in Lyon, France, on July 7. Just after halftime, it was still 0-0. That was new territory for Team USA, which had scored a goal before the 13th minute in every game of this year's tournament. The Americans previously defeated Holland in six straight games, by a score of 22-2, but those blowouts are ancient history, writes @sgregory31. The teams haven't faced each other since 2016. Read more about this #⚽️ match-up at the link in bio. Photograph by @rheathcote—@gettyimages

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A wooden statue of First Lady Melania Trump ( @flotus) has been erected and unveiled near her hometown of Sevnica, Slovenia, and its creators are calling it the first-ever public monument in her honor. The idea came to conceptual #artist Brad Downey, who commissioned Sevnica local and “amateur chainsaw sculptor” Ales “Maxi” Zupevc to carve it from a tree, AFP reports. Critics of the statue, which depicts #Trump on Inauguration Day in Washington, D.C., in 2017, immediately began comparing it to a scarecrow. “I can understand why people might think that this falls short as a description of her physical appearance,” Downey said. Still, he called it "absolutely beautiful." Read more about the statue at the link in bio. Photograph by @juremakovec—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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Cori Gauff ( @cocogauff) celebrates beating Slovenia's @hercogpolona during their women's singles third round match at Wimbledon in southwest #London on July 5. Gauff, 15, defeated Hercog 3-6, 7-6, 7-5. “It was a long match and she was playing unbelievable. It was my first match on Centre Court,” Gauff said, according to WTA Tennis. “People were saying No. 1 Court was my court, but maybe it’s Centre.” Gauff will face @simonahalep of Romania in the Round of 16 on July 8. Read more about #Wimbledon's breakout star at the link in bio. Photograph by @lealolivas—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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The World Health Organization ( @who) recently labeled vaccine hesitancy one of 2019’s leading threats to global #health, and in the U.S. that threat is escalating. Every state except Alaska and West Virginia has at least one anti-vaccine organization, according to the Vaccine Liberation website, which tracks them. The most aggressive of the groups are not just demonstrating, but also actively challenging pro-vax legislators, running candidates against them in primaries. Their ubiquity, of course, does not change the misinformation they spread: that #vaccines are dangerous, even deadly; that they are linked not only to autism but also to ADHD, asthma, depression and other conditions. The near unanimous global consensus on the safety and lifesaving power of vaccines, they say, is a conspiracy driven by profits, on the part of governments, the pharmaceutical industry and even individual pediatricians. It’s not true—any of it—and the nonsense comes at a very bad time, writes Jeffrey Kluger. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @jesserieser for TIME