T$CH@B@LALA S£LF - instagram lists #feedolist

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@fulathela

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@kimarirh

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🚶🏿‍♀️

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Window, 2019

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@nakyuni #repost

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🧡⁣⁣ Opening reception 4 - 6 ⁣⁣ Saturday, July 27 ⁣⁣ Followed by #FreeRange ⁣⁣

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@juxtapozmag

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🤲🏿

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@vanityfairfrance

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@cultured_mag ⁣ .......... ⁣⁣⁣ wonderful article by @itheabstract on @abdu__ali performance at #freerange in Hudson, NY last month. It has been super rewarding bring this idea to life with @fulathela and @itheabstract for a second year in a row ✨⁣thank you @abdu__ali for bringing your energy to Hudson. ⁣read the article in #print in @cultured_mag second annual music issue. ⁣⁣⁣ ....... ⁣⁣⁣ photography @tommmmmmyboy

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Happy Juneteenth

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@deathfonte

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@msn_warszawa ⁣ ........⁣ #paintalsoknownasblood ⁣ ⁣ Tschabalala Self grew up in Harlem, New York, where as a young African-American artist she developed a distinct style of working with the issues surrounding the black, feminine body. Her paintings are in fact collages based on various media. Self portrays the bodies of black women and exaggerates their stereotypical appearance: protruding buttocks, powerful thighs, and perky breasts. Some elements are painted, some are made of pieces of printed canvas sewn onto the painting, and others are drawn with a crayon. The use of such different techniques reflects the artist’s process of deconstructing process the cultural cliché that forces us to perceive the black body as exotic, wild, and sexually licentious. Self not only reveals the conventionality of this stereotype, but also gives the black body, reconstructed in the picture, the power of self-determination. The violence of the white male gaze is transformed into the power of the black body.

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@ellefr

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@studiomuseum⁣ - opening 6/9 _________⁣ MOOD explores site, place, and time as they relate to American identity and popular culture, past and present. The exhibition resituates the often trending social media hashtag (#mood), which describes moments both profound and banal: anything can be “a #mood.” Working across a range of media and materials, each artist manifests their perception of the present moment in the United States, while creating passageways to new worlds. MOOD maps out each artist’s psychic landscape, presenting distinct snapshots that travel through and beyond the fabric of digital culture.⁣ ________ ⁣ ⁣ Tschabalala Self’s new series, Street Scenes, pays homage to the energy of the city, from the frenetic visual culture of bodegas to the communal experience of waiting at a bus stop. These large-scale printed, painted, and collage works create a cityscape that brings the vibrancy and energy of Harlem into focus. Growing up nearby and inspired by her return to Harlem through this residency, Self creates fictional figures rooted in daily rhythms and routines in and around the neighborhood. ⁣ _______⁣ ⁣ Red Dog⁣ Fabric, embroidered patch, newsprint, photo-transfer, gouache, acrylic, flashe and painted canvas on canvas⁣ 8'(H) x 7' (W)⁣ 2019⁣

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@nytimes ⁣⁣ An Artist on Paying Homage to Harlem, and Using Found Fabrics in Paintings⁣⁣ Tschabalala Self’s textile works — which will go on view at MoMA PS1 next month — are inspired by people on the streets of Harlem.⁣⁣ @studiomuseum ⁣⁣ @momaps1⁣⁣ ........⁣⁣ “𝘖𝘯 𝘢 𝘥𝘳𝘪𝘻𝘻𝘭𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘪𝘯 𝘈𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘭, 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘛𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘣𝘢𝘭𝘢𝘭𝘢 𝘚𝘦𝘭𝘧, 𝟸𝟾, 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘬𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘱𝘢𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘱𝘶𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘣𝘢𝘤𝘬 𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘣𝘳𝘢𝘪𝘥𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘬𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘭 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘷𝘦 𝘢 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘭𝘵-𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘱𝘢𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨. 𝘏𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘦𝘹𝘵𝘪𝘭𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘴 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘸𝘯 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘧𝘢𝘣𝘳𝘪𝘤 𝘴𝘤𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘴 — 𝘣𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘬-𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘮𝘱𝘦𝘥 𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘷𝘢𝘴, 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘣𝘦𝘳𝘭𝘢𝘯𝘥-𝘤𝘰𝘭𝘰𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘣𝘦𝘪𝘨𝘦, 𝘢𝘤𝘪𝘥-𝘸𝘢𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘥 𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘮 — 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘮𝘢𝘨𝘪𝘯𝘦 𝘣𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬 𝘸𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘪𝘯 𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘩𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘣𝘰𝘳𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘏𝘢𝘳𝘭𝘦𝘮 𝘢𝘴 𝘦𝘹𝘢𝘨𝘨𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴.” @annalisefurman ⁣⁣ #linkinbio

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@documentjournal // @sasha.bonet ......... Harlem-born artist Tschabalala Self possesses the rare quality of being keenly sensitive to the impact of environment and the way it shapes human social behavior. Self creates and positions black figures to serve as a decoding device of circumstance, allowing each individual perspective to speak to the community from which it has derived. Her empathetic and intellectual density guides the creation of a black universe assembled with great distance from white ideology. Both Self and her subjects communicate a disregard for the white gaze in its limited linear imagination. Her subjects’ solemn eyes never peer directly into you; they are indifferent, averted, or looking only to one another. They’re in avoidance of your voyeuristic gaze, which has made spectacles of the black body for centuries—from Serena Williams to Saartjie Baartman, a South African Khoikhoi woman who was touted across Europe in a 19th-century “freak show” as the Hottentot Venus. Self’s figures play with hypersexualization as a tool that forces the viewer to ask oneself: What is my relationship to black sexual fantasy? They are not dainty or faint beings. They are heavy and deliberate and delicate at once—always firmly grounded, unless being propped up by a black woman, demonstrating the endless labor black women have endured in the Americas and beyond. But past the fat ass and full lips there is much more to discover, and these levels can be disorienting to those not familiar with the multiplicity that blackness holds. Self’s layering and collaging of cottons with threads hanging bare like the lace-trimmed slip of a sister in church on Sunday tells the story of beauty resting within the crevices of imperfection. These suspended threads shift like poetry, revealing humanity and the will to persevere in spite of circumstance. The composite mix of terrains—steep slopes along the lower back, sharp turns around cheek bones and curved nostrils—maps the intricacy of the black aesthetic. These contemporary beings are not Self’s signal toward a post-racial world, but a movement toward black beings existing without compromise. That is, the freedom to just be.

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@documentjournal

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@cultured_mag⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ @abdu__ali⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ #FreeRangeHudson ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ 5.25.2019⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ 🔗🔗🔗 ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Link in bio ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ @cultured_mag⁣⁣⁣ ........⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Abdu Ali is an avant-garde electronic music artist, writer, and curator based in Baltimore whose work is an idiosyncratic blend of punk, jazz, Baltimore club music, and rap. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ........⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ curated by⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ @tschabalalaself⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ @fulathela⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣@itheabstract ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ ........ ⁣⁣ artwork by @rafiasworld ⁣⁣& @amirahb_art

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Please join us for an artist talk by Tschabalala Self followed by a panel on the social role and histories of food within urban communities of color. ⁣ ⁣ The evening will begin with a lecture by Self focusing on her Bodega Run series, currently on view at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Against the tide of increasing gentrification, the bodega functions as a site of conversation, commerce and consumption. Self renders the store a persistent environment of sustenance. ⁣ ⁣ Drawing from themes established in her artistic project, Self has invited afro-centric vegan chef and artist Salimatu Amabebe, anthropologist Sayida Self and public health practitioner Nicholas Freudenberg to engage in a discussion on the various dietary histories of people of color. ⁣ ..........⁣ #bodegarun ⁣ ⁣

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@luisrburgos 👛

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🌈

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🚶🏿‍♂️

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Loosie in the Park, 2019⁣ ........⁣ “New York City’s first bodegas were founded in the 1940s, primarily by Puerto Rican entrepreneurs. Today, approximately thirteen thousand stores dot the city, and the bodega has become “a lighthouse in an ocean of gentrification,” as Harlem-born artist Tschabalala Self puts it—“a relic from times past.” In “Bodega Run,” the artist’s site-specific installation at the Hammer Museum, Self riffs on common elements in these small establishments, welcoming viewers with neon signs that read “ABIERTO/OPEN” and “COFFEE/TEAS,” a convex security mirror, and wallpaper with line drawings of cans and shelves.” - #SophieKovel⁣ @artforum

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✨⁣⁣ LOS ANGELES⁣⁣ Tschabalala Self⁣⁣ HAMMER MUSEUM ⁣⁣ 10899 Wilshire Boulevard⁣⁣ February 2–April

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No, 2019

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@art.kunstmagazin

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🧷

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@thestrangerseattle⁣ ⁣ “What is rarely depicted is the boringness, the embodied reality. My body and how I experience it is different from how my body is perceived in a club or a museum, or how it's represented in a bank or a coffee shop. This difference is one of Self's subjects: the in-between, the state of rest, of leisure, of desire, of quiet repose of the black body. Her self-titled exhibition represents five years' worth of work, encompassing sculpture, prints, and giant fabric-based "paintings." - @jasmynekeiming

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@studiomuseum ⁣ OPEN STUDIOS ⁣ 1-4pm ⁣ 429 West 127th

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Loner, 2017

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💌⁣ TS: The avatar actually allows one to transcend subjectivity, to become an icon. The avatar allows the subject to toy with a fantastical idea about themselves. You can choose your identity through an avatar. This freedom is power. This freedom subverts subjectivity and allows an individual to escape the cultural attitudes they are subject to. Some aspects of my work relate to my beliefs, and some relate to my circumstance. I do not believe in the basis of my subjectivity but I am aware of it.⁣ ⁣ For individuals who have been made to feel marginalized, representation is particularly important. One is constantly searching for a reflection of themselves in the abyss of popular culture. Individuals, images, and aesthetics become landmarks for self-identification and self-esteem. One will hope to embody this image, from a moment or photo/IG post … that reminds them of the self they’d like to be. These aspirational representations relate to the avatar as well. I admire my painting’s subjects. I aspire to have their power, beauty, sensuality, and femininity. They are my avatars, my vehicles for self-realization and my escape.⁣ @hyperallergic

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SEATTLE — Scraps of bright turquoise, yellow, and salmon fabric encircle a swatch of denim imprinted with a building’s image; this delineates a figure’s thigh. It is part of up “Bellyphat” (2016), a textile-and-paint collage by artist Tschabalala Self. Elsewhere in the work, black, pink, and rosewood fabric swatches define the figure’s face, while ebullient strips of white and yellow delimit her belly. When I step back from admiring the textured detail, I notice how thread from figure’s edges wisps and meanders across the canvas.” -#JasmineJamillaMahmoud @hyperallergic

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Swayze, 2016 [the voyeur]

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👛⁣ ————⁣ Sugarfoot, 2017 ⁣ [reclining nude]

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@whitewall.art

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💌

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@jewseum⁣ ⁣ The Contemporary Jewish Museum (The CJM)⁣ 736 Mission Street⁣ San Francisco, CA 9410⁣ ⁣ Show Me as I Want to Be Seen ⁣ ⁣ Show Me as I Want to Be Seen presents the work of groundbreaking French Jewish artist Claude Cahun and her lifelong lover and collaborator Marcel Moore in dialogue with ten contemporary artists to examine the complex and empowered representation of fluid identity. ⁣ ⁣ On view through 7 July 2019⁣ ⁣ Artists include: Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, Nicole Eisenman, Rhonda Holberton, Hiwa K, Young Joon Kwak, Zanele Muholi, Toyin Ojih Odutola, Gabby Rosenberg, Davina Semo and Isabel Yellin.

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NYC 🔙

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@hammer_museum ⁣ ⁣ Self's project Bodega Run examines the neighborhood convenience store as both a gathering place for community and a microcosm of how current economic and political issues are impacting people’s lives. ⁣ Curated by @anneellegood ⁣ Feb 2 - April 28 ⁣ ⁣

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@ladygunn ⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ In conversation w/ @kokontuen ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣ “Tschabalala Self’s art dances around the eye in the way feet must have moved to music in the Harlem Renaissance era. Exuding from her canvas and mixed media are chaotic and fast musings. It ’s a vortex of unabashed visions rooted in resilience, pride, and nostalgia. Her work brings forth an emotional, visceral, almost childlike appreciation in the viewer. Are you supposed to laugh or cry? Is this you? “Do you remember that time?” I ask myself. Memories of my young black adulthood come flooding back while studying a drawn Presidente bottle in the Bodega Run series. Corner store crates and Goya products leave an imprint on the back of my darkened eyelids long after the original image has ceased. It’s an abstract-realism-noir approach to art that resonates but also delightfully confuses the viewer with its bright colors and middle-class signifiers. Tshabalala’s brush swirls and dances around topics like black women bodies–reclaiming as well as politizing them and in raw undulated primal snapshots.”⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣ PHOTOS / @deathfonte ⁣⁣⁣⁣ STYLING / @colinlocascio ⁣⁣⁣⁣ MAKEUP / @duchessnatalia ⁣⁣⁣⁣ STORY / @kokontuen ⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣

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☕️⁣ January 26th - April 28th ⁣⁣ “In collage-paintings, sculptures and video installations, Tschabalala Self creates exuberant, multilayered “avatars” that engage with the intersectionality of race, gender, and sexuality and the iconographic significance of the black body in contemporary culture.” ⁣ @fryeartmuseum

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💗

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#50coversproject

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@dazed ⁣🎟 . ⁣ . ⁣ . ⁣ Last Friday night, as part of the 777 International Mall at Free Range Miami during the city’s annual Art Week, Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary artist RAFiA Santana took to the stage. She wore a black bustier and thigh high boots, her bright, tight cropped curls accented by touches of fuschia coloured fluff at her wrists and around her waist, as she performed a six-song set in front of vibrant projections of pink and purple audio-reactive geometric patterns that she designed for a show.⁣ ⁣ “It was a crazy Miami night, and there was so much going on that there was a crazy ebb and flow, and every thirty minutes there would be almost a different crowd of people” - @raf_i_a

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@artsy⁣⁣ .⁣⁣ .⁣⁣ .⁣⁣ 28-year-old artist Tschabalala Self has turned Thierry Goldberg’s booth into a bodega. A checkerboard floor lines the ground, and a round, convex mirror—generally used to catch shoplifters and thieves—hangs in the back corner. In keeping with the theme, Self has created two medium-density fiberboard sculptures that resemble milk crates, one blue and one red. A painting on the wall, entitled Racer (2018), depicts a man crouching in front of a shelf full of Tide bottles. (His jacket itself features a Tide bottle on its back.) It’s a neat trick, as Self makes a small space within the bustling art fair resemble your average corner shop and egg-and-cheese purveyor. And yet the gallery has done brisk business; within the first hour of opening, it had sold everything on offer, with one painting heading to the Art Institute of Chicago. - @alinacohen