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5 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “A lot of the designs I do are very much mood-based. I’m also inspired by online trends. There’s a been a huge baby hair trend recently, but I can’t do it because I cover my hair, so I hennaed baby hair on my hands instead.”

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4 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “Henna is an old cultural tradition in the Arab world and a part of my life. I first did traditional Emirati designs, like the Rawayeb, which is henna on the tips of the fingers, and the Rubeya, which is the circle on the palm. Then I experimented with Libyan and Tunisian designs. ⠀ “Henna also has a lot of healing benefits, but it’s one of those things which has been lost with the generations. People love seeing henna being brought back, it reminds them of their grandmothers. It’s nostalgic and it’s beautiful.”

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2 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “I like to explore different Emirati henna traditions and give them a contemporary spin, including geometric lines, optical illusions and minimalism. ⠀ “I was obsessed with crescent moons, so I drew some on my hands and managed to get a perfectly balanced map so that the hands look like textiles.”

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5 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “I think the process of letting go helped me create awesome work that I wouldn't have thought would even be possible. I learned to let go of my ego and understand that a lot of this work is not for me. You have to bring the best of the collaborators’ ideas with the aesthetic.” ⠀ “Stress is constant in everybody. I find that's the first thing you need to work on before you take any creative process. If you remove the stress then it's just a fun adventure.”

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4 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemagazine. ⠀ “I try to create things that are out of this world. How could I spice it up? How could I make it more fun? I think the fun aspect is very important for my work. Not take everything so seriously, you know?”

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2 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ How do you stay in a creative flow? Share in the comments. ⠀ “I started meditating when I was 16. I was a very confused teenager and my mom sent me to Transcendental Meditation. This was 18 years ago and it was a rare thing in Argentina, where I grew up. ⠀ “When I meditate I feel like I can shut off all the information I’m receiving constantly and find a center place to be in a creative flow.”

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6 of 6 Combining rigorous technique with a sense of release, Karim Naar ( @reemcat_) compares dancing to poetry. “Everybody talks, but not everyone knows how to write poems and describe the world like [French poet] Paul Éduard. Everybody can move, but not everyone knows how to dance,” says the 26-year-old. “Through my dancing, I try to share a certain vision of the movement, and make it poetic and pleasing to the eye.” ⠀ Today, the Bordeaux-based dancer collaborates with famous brands like Paco Rabanne, Maison Valentino and Linda Farrow. La Vie Est Belle is Karim’s first choreographic piece dealing with what he calls the notion of rebound. “It is a very sad show, but also one full of hope. I’ve often been sad in my life, but I’m also the most optimistic person I know. I love life and I want to make my mark in this world.” ⠀ What are you hopeful for? Share it with us in the comments. ⠀ See more of French choreographer @reemcat_’s story this week on @vogue. Original interview conducted in French. ⠀ // ⠀ 6 sur 6 En combinant une technique rigoureuse et un lâcher prise, Karim Naar (@reemcat_) compare la danse à la poésie. “Tout le monde parle mais tout le monde n’est pas capable d’écrire des poèmes et de décrire le monde comme peut le faire (le poète français) Paul Eluard. Tout le monde bouge mais tout le monde n’est pas capable de danser,” dit le danseur de 26 ans. “A travers ma danse, j’essaie de partager une certaine vision du mouvement, de le rendre poétique et agréable à l’oeil.” ⠀ Aujourd’hui, le chorégraphe Bordelais collabore avec des marques célèbres telles que Paco Rabanne, Maison Valentino et Linda Farrow. La Vie Est Belle est la première pièce créée par Karim dont le sujet de fond est ce qu’il appelle la notion de résilience. “C’est un spectacle très triste mais qui finit sur un message d’espoir. J’ai souvent été triste dans ma vie mais je suis aussi la personne la plus optimiste que je connaisse. J’aime la vie et je veux laisser une trace dans ce monde.” ⠀ Et vous, qu’espérez-vous ? Partagez vos motifs d’espoir dans les commentaires. ⠀ Retrouvez toute l’histoire du chorégraphe français @reemcat cette semaine sur @Vogue.

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3 of 6 Follow French choreographer @reemcat_’s story this week. Original interview conducted in French. ⠀ “As a hyperactive kid, I used to calm myself down by listening to classical music, so it was natural for me to include that, and the moves – ballet positions and arm work – into my style. My dance became softer, more graceful, and more sensitive.” ⠀ // ⠀ 3 sur 6 Suivez l’histoire du chorégraphe français @reemcat_ cette semaine. ⠀ “En tant qu’enfant hyperactif, j’écoutais beaucoup de musique classique pour me détendre. C’est donc naturellement que j’ai intégré des mouvements classiques à mon style tels que des positions de bras et de jambes issues de la danse classique. Ma danse est devenue plus gracieuse, plus douce, peu à peu plus sensible.”

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1 of 6 For Karim Naar ( @reemcat_), dancing is a remedy. “When I discovered dance, it helped me forget about my pain because it’s deeply anchored in the present moment,” says the choreographer. “I couldn’t control myself, emotionally or physically. I had something to say, but I couldn’t express myself. This situation led to some health problems.” ⠀ Karim, who lives in Bordeaux, France, discovered breakdancing at the age of 10. “Seeing these free dancers blew my mind,” he explains. “I was fascinated by the way they perfectly controlled every movement and every muscle. When we’re conscious about our body and about the movement we create, we can also control our mind. Knowing our body is fundamental to being free.” ⠀ What is your remedy? Share your story in the comments. ⠀ Follow @reemcat_’s story this week on @vogue. Original interview conducted in French. ⠀ // ⠀ 1 sur 6 Pour Karim Naar (@reemcat_), la danse est un remède. “Quand j’ai découvert la danse, cela m’a aidé à oublier ma souffrance parce que le fait de danser est profondément ancré dans le moment présent,” dit le chorégraphe. “Je ne pouvais pas me contrôler, émotionnellement et physiquement. J’avais quelque chose à dire mais je n’arrivais pas à m’exprimer. Cette situation a eu des conséquences sur ma santé.” ⠀ Karim, qui vit à Bordeaux, a découvert le breakdance à l’âge de 10 ans. “Voir ces danseurs m’a complètement bouleversé,” explique-t-il. “J’ai été fasciné par la manière dont ils contrôlaient chacun de leur mouvement et chaque muscle de leur corps à la perfection. Quand on est conscient de son corps et des mouvements que l’on crée, on peut aussi contrôler son esprit. Connaître son corps est essentiel à la liberté.” ⠀ Quel est votre remède ? Partagez votre histoire dans les commentaires. ⠀ Suivez l’histoire de @reemcat_ cette semaine sur @vogue.

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6 of 6 Venezuelan artist Isabela Alvarez ( @isaboleta) wants to demonstrate pursuing a career in the arts in Latin America isn’t an out-of-reach dream. With a new exhibition showcasing her paintings, she plans to build her reputation beyond fashion illustration. ⠀ “I want to inspire people from Latin America and encourage them to make use of their talents. Everything I have achieved has been made possible because I set out to prove that everything and anything is possible.” ⠀ Follow Venezuelan artist @isaboleta’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemexico. Interview conducted in Spanish. ⠀ // ⠀ La artista venezolana Isabela Alvarez (@isaboleta) quiere que su historia sirva para demostrar que desarrollarse como creativo en Latinoamérica no es un sueño inalcanzable. Ahora mismo, se centra en organizar una exposición para presentar sus pinturas, un proyecto muy personal, con la que espera reforzar su reputación más allá de la ilustración de moda. ⠀ “Quiero inspirar a gente de Latinoamérica para que despeguen y exploten su talento. Todo lo que he logrado ha sido porque mi meta siempre fue demostrar que todo es posible” ⠀ No te pierdas la historia de la ilustradora y pintora venezolana @isaboleta esta semana en @vogue y @voguemexico.

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5 of 6 Follow Venezuelan artist @isaboleta’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemexico. Interview conducted in Spanish. ⠀ “I dream of publishing a book of my illustrations and creating a line of my own painting materials. That way, hopefully, the future creative generations of my country will have all the resources that they need to work and to pursue their dreams.” ⠀ // ⠀ No te pierdas la historia de la ilustradora y pintora venezolana @isaboleta esta semana en @vogue y @voguemexico. ⠀ “Quiero hacer un libro ilustrado por mí, y crear mi propia línea de pinturas y suplementos de arte para que las generaciones siguientes a la mía de mi país tengan los materiales que necesitan para trabajar y dedicarse a su verdadera pasión”.

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4 of 6 Follow Venezuelan artist @isaboleta’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemexico. Interview conducted in Spanish. ⠀ “I think that fashion illustrator’s work should reflect something beyond what we can immediately see. We have to capture our most personal perception and interpretation of what happens around us while remaining true to the designer’s vision." ⠀ “Gucci is one of the brands that I find most inspiring. Alessandro Michele has such an original and magical point of view. He always tries to tell a story through his designs and his collections are always poetic and romantic.” ⠀ // ⠀ No te pierdas la historia de la ilustradora y pintora venezolana @isaboleta esta semana en @vogue y @voguemexico. ⠀ “Considero que los ilustradores de moda debemos llevar nuestro trabajo más allá de lo que está a simple vista, mostrar nuestra percepción e interpretación de la realidad, sin dejar de hacer justicia a la visión los diseñadores”. ⠀ “Gucci es una de las marcas que más me inspira. Alessandro Michele tiene un punto de vista muy original y mágico. Siempre trata de contar una historia y sus colecciones son muy poéticas y románticas”.

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2 of 6 Follow Venezuelan artist @isaboleta’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemexico. Interview conducted in Spanish. ⠀ “I strongly believe that we should have more spaces for young creatives to network, to collaborate, to learn and to show their work. This is what any community of talents really needs to emerge and set up in a country like Venezuela.” ⠀ // ⠀ No te pierdas la historia de la ilustradora y pintora venezolana @isaboleta esta semana en @vogue y @voguemexico. ⠀ “Creo que debería haber espacios de encuentro para hacer networking, para colaborar, para aprender y para mostrar nuestro talento. Eso es lo que hace falta para que una comunidad de creativos alce el vuelo en un país como Venezuela”.

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1 of 6 “I am a self-taught artist. Everything I know, I learned myself. I learned how to draw through YouTube tutorials and practicing every single day.” Venezuelan artist Isabela Alvarez’s ( @isaboleta) chosen career path defied practical barriers of living in her country. “In Venezuela, fashion schools are practically extinct. Without a safe space in which to learn, the creative industry cannot flourish,” says the 24-year-old. ⠀ Born and raised in Valencia, the country’s third largest city, Isabela left her marketing degree to pursue fashion illustration and painting, besides all the difficulties. “The situation here is complicated. We are in the middle of a social, economic, and cultural crisis. Working here is almost impossible given the limitations, such as unstable electrical services, poor access to the Internet, shortage of resources, and overall insecurity.” ⠀ Follow Venezuelan artist @isaboleta’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemexico. Interview conducted in Spanish. ⠀ // ⠀ “Yo soy autodidacta. Todo lo que sé, lo he aprendido por mí misma. Aprendí a dibujar con tutoriales de YouTube y practicando todos los días”. Isabela Alvarez (@isaboleta) escogió su carrera para desafiar a todas las trabas de su país, Venezuela. “En Venezuela, la escuela de moda venezolana está casi extinta y si no tenemos dónde aprender, es más complicado que se desarrolle la industria creativa”, confiesa la joven de 24 años. ⠀ Nacida en Valencia, la tercera ciudad más extensa del país, Isabela abandonó su carrera de Marketing para dedicarse a la ilustración de moda y la pintura, a pesar de las circunstancias. “La situación en Venezuela es muy difícil por la crisis social, política, económica y cultural que estamos viviendo. Trabajar se hace casi imposible por limitaciones como el servicio eléctrico inestable, internet de baja calidad, escasez de materiales, inseguridad, etc”. ⠀ No te pierdas la historia de la ilustradora y pintora venezolana @isaboleta esta semana en @vogue y @voguemexico.

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6 of 6 Aside from visiting the sea or going to the forest, Sooyeoun ( @sooyeounvv) finds inspiration in reading poetry and watching films. “My favorite book is ‘Empty as a Deserted Boat’ by Choi Seung-ja because [of the way] she describes life and love in frank and intense detail,” says the jewelry designer. “I also want to mention the movie ‘In the Mood for Love’ directed by Wong Kar-Wai. It takes place in Hong Kong, which is my favorite place, and the movie describes the gloomy mood of the city so well.” ⠀ Sooyeoun also enjoys creating makeup looks to match her jewelry. “Fashion and beauty are the ways people implicitly express themselves. I believe there is no better way to express oneself without saying a word than this.” ⠀ See more of @sooyeounvv’s story this week on @vogue. Original interview in Korean.

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5 of 6 Follow Korean jewelry designer @sooyeounvv’s story this week. Original interview in Korean. ⠀ “Though I am not religious myself, I often visit Buddhist temples – most recently Haedong Yonggungsa [in Busan, South Korea] – in order to see the big trees, and take in the fresh air. I also like the delicate scent which temples give off. It is so nice there.”

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2 of 6 Follow Korean jewelry designer @sooyeounvv’s story this week. Original interview in Korean. ⠀ “I didn’t study jewelry design professionally: I am a qualified dancer, specialising in modern dance. [Storytelling in] dance is abstract, but in jewelry it is far more tangible, which is what drew me towards it.”

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1 of 6 For Sooyeoun Jeong ( @sooyeounvv), jewelry design and modern dance are similar. “They both express their beauty using elements they already have,” she says. “Modern dance delivers the message by using the human body and props.” ⠀ In the same way, Sooyeoun uses natural gemstones in her designs to express the delicate serenity of nature. “In a busy modern society, nature is a gift which gives us peace and coziness. Once I came back from the sea and made an earring using a big clam shell,” says the 28-year-old, who lives in Seoul. ⠀ Follow @sooyeounvv’s story this week. Original interview in Korean.

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5 of 6 Follow Barbadian artist @sheenaroseartist’s story this week. ⠀ “There have been many incidences when I have known that my art pushes people. It is not usual to see this kind of art in Barbados. Once, I stripped off and told very personal stories in the nude. Viewers said that I was actually [more] naked through the stories [rather than for the actual nudity]. That was my first performance art piece, titled “One Person, Many Stories.”

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2 of 6 Follow Bajan artist @sheenaroseartist’s story this week. ⠀ “I start my work in different ways. Sometimes I write out thoughts of how I see myself in the Barbadian space and draw in my small sketchbooks, listening to music, which also sparks emotions. Then I have a conversation with my best friends about politics, the everyday condition, the social structures. Finally I go to my studio and dance, paint on canvas, or create costumes. It is a never-ending process.”

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6 of 6  See more of @feebfashion’s story on @vogue. ⠀ Sustainable fashion isn’t Phoebe’s (@feebfashion) only passion. “Music is a true hobby of mine,” she says. “I learned to play the guitar and piano when I was younger, and whenever I am faced with a dilemma or stuck with designer’s block I play music to clear my head.” ⠀ The thing Phoebe loves most right now is saying yes. “The more you put yourself out there, the more opportunities will arise. Graduating from university is a scary but exciting prospect, as it is now time to experience fashion in the real world. ⠀ “With regards to a job, while graduates can’t always afford to choose, I hope I am lucky enough to find a position from the get-go with a company whose driving force is sustainability, where I can continue my exploration into sustainable fibers and work with others to bring them to life.”

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5 of 6  Follow English designer @feebfashion’s story this week. ⠀ “Nature often inspires my work and as part of my degree I studied fine art on the far-away French island of Réunion [in the Indian Ocean]. ⠀ “The warmth of the people, the vibrancy of the colors in the sunsets, the tropical plants and ocean life, as well as the textures of the volcanic rock and the shapes of the mountain skylines all come together to inspire my most recent work. ⠀ “Sadly, undeserving islands like this incredible paradise will be the first to be hit by global warming, which inspires both the title of my graduate collection – No Man is an Island – and has further embedded my determination to be sustainable as a designer and a human being.” ⠀ Photo by Danny Ovens

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4 of 6  Follow English designer @feebfashion’s story this week. ⠀ “Research is one of my favorite parts of the design process because I want everything I do to mean something and tell a story. ⠀ “My first source of inspiration is usually a passing thought from which I explore many different sources, begin to create a story and envision my outfits as the characters. Much of my primary research is literature-based, as I often find it easier to imagine detail and silhouette by taking different meanings from words, rather than directly looking at imagery.”

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3 of 6  Follow English designer @feebfashion’s story this week. ⠀ “My tools have become more scientific than I would ever have imagined in my quest to perfect the recipes and methods for my bioplastics. I now include saucepans, thermometers, hot plates and syringes in my toolbox. ⠀ “Much of my work involves knit, a brilliant example of zero waste as it can be constantly unpicked and reinvented. While I am also recycling other types of plastic, such as bubble wrap, in my most recent collection, certain outfits will be fully biodegradable by using bioplastics along with natural yarns and fibers.”

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2 of 6  Follow English designer @feebfashion’s story this week. ⠀ “I feel like people might be surprised at first glance to learn that my work is sustainable because in fashion the word [can be] associated with a plain hemp, baggy T-shirt. I hope my designs encourage people to put enormous effort into finding eco options so that it becomes the rule rather than the exception. ⠀ “The aim of my work is to show that being sustainable can be fun, exciting, interesting, colorful, alive and positive.”

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1 of 6 The sound of sewing machines and the feeling of fabric surrounded Phoebe Constable ( @feebfashion) as a child growing up in the village of West Wittering on the English south coast. But it wasn’t her mother’s job as a curtain maker that inspired her to study fashion - it was her desire to affect environmental change. ⠀ “The damage we are causing to our world, specifically the oceans, terrifies me,” says Phoebe, who recently graduated in fashion design at Norwich University of the Arts. “Knowing that my chosen industry is one of the biggest polluters of our natural world makes me a little ashamed to be entering it, which is why I am so determined to be another voice in the call for change.” ⠀ Follow @feebfashion’s story this week on @vogue.

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5 of 6 Follow NYC fashion designer @gogograham’s story this week for #Pride. ⠀ “In the beginning, I couldn’t pay people because I didn't have any money, so people were offering to model for me – which is amazing, and I wouldn't be where I am today without them. ⠀ “As my brand started to build momentum I have been able to raise funds to be able to put on shows and get everyone paid. Modeling is great, but there are many other professions that I would like to see more trans people being employed in, such as the fashion industry.”

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4 of 6 Follow NYC fashion designer @gogograham’s story this week for #Pride. ⠀ “A lot of my work has to do with the ways in which – just me existing in the body that I have – is so often sexualized by people. I think about how I can use that to empower myself, rather than all the other ways that I could use that energy. And I think that resonates a lot with people in my community. ⠀ “For [the collection] Dragon Lady I was thinking about how I'm confronted with people using my appearance to satisfy their desires. I'm half-Japanese and half-white and people – specifically men on dating apps – will just see what I look like and make lots of interesting analyses.”

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3 of 6 Follow NYC fashion designer @gogograham’s story this week for #Pride. ⠀ “I've always used found objects, because I don't have a lot of money to buy new materials to work with. I don't necessarily believe in producing more waste than I need to. ⠀ “There's so much aside from the human labor exploitation that's involved in producing new materials – it's destroying our planet as well.”

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2 of 6 Follow NYC fashion designer @gogograham’s story this week for #Pride. ⠀ The body-positive movement sparked Gogo’s inspiration: “I began to see a more body-positive movement in the fashion industry. People with different bodies were being accepted, instead of just the standard sample size situation that everyone in the fashion industry is familiar with. So I started making clothes that fit my body.” ⠀ However, she says, there’s still more understanding needed around diversity in fashion. “Even me saying, ‘I make clothes for trans women’, or saying that something works for me, doesn't mean it's going to work for another trans person or a cisgender person, because all our bodies are different. I think oftentimes people want a specific answer to how my clothing is different from clothing that's geared towards cisgender people.”

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1 of 6 Gogo Graham ( @gogograham) found her North Star when she found her community. She started her brand as a way to use her skills – making clothing from discarded objects – and to create work for other trans women. “I noticed there were less people in my community being employed and I wanted to address that,” the 28-year-old fashion designer explains. “The best way to celebrate an underserved community is to economically empower them.” ⠀ Originally from a rural suburb outside Houston, Texas, Gogo moved to New York City after graduating from university. She learned how to sew while working for the theater at university, which led to a job with a costume designer, and finally a role in a fashion production factory in Manhattan’s Garment District. “I noticed how much fabric was being wasted and thrown into the garbage, so I took things out of the trash and start making clothes from them.” ⠀ Follow @gogograham’s story this week for #Pride.

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5 of 6 Follow nail artist @frederiqueolthuis’s story this week. ⠀ “I’ve been collaborating with my friend Alma Mathijsen for her book. While the collaboration started in 2013, we recently presented the nail art project during the Het Boekenbal gala (the Book Ball). ⠀ “We made [a nail set of] 10 custom vajayjays, each representing one of the female characters from Alma’s books. The world is afraid of vaginas, so I gave vaginas a personality.”

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4 of 6 Follow nail artist @frederiqueolthuis’s story this week. ⠀ “Whatever you preach, you have to practice. You have to speak up, but not just when you’re on an internet stage. I am still learning. I am learning to always speak up. ⠀ “If you think the fashion industry is a liberal and racist-free workspace, you’re probably not paying attention.”

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2 of 6 Follow nail artist @frederiqueolthuis’s story this week. ⠀ “Nails are a frame that is already there. You can be completely intuitive or you can work on a whole concept beforehand. ⠀ “At school, I learned to think concept first – instead of nail art in a decorative way. This frees me from the struggle and it lifts a certain heaviness. Don’t get me wrong – I love the struggle.”

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1 of 6 Frédérique Olthuis ( @frederiqueolthuis) never thought of becoming a nail artist, it just happened. “Nail art is interesting because it’s all about extremes,” says the Dutch artist. “It’s a part of beauty that can either be completely ignored, or go way more over the top.” ⠀ After studying at the Arts Academy of Amsterdam, Frédérique spent a year in Jamaica. “I became fascinated by nail art, so I did some projects that were picked up by big brands. My first couple of gigs were more like art performances, before I was comfortable enough to start doing shoots.” ⠀ She has most recently collaborated with @vogueportugal and @vogueczechoslovakia. “What I like the most about teaming up with artists, makeup artists and hair stylists is their freedom of working and creation,” she says. “Nail art has no limit.” ⠀ Follow nail artist @frederiqueolthuis’s story this week. @vogueczechoslovakia cover photography by Michal Pudelka.

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6 of 6 Today, Mous ( @mouslamrabat), who lives in Belgium, considers his role as a photographer is to showcase the Muslim community’s rich diversity. “I represent not only Moroccans, but also Muslims and Arabs,” he explains. “Everything we do as one, we do it all together. So it is important for me to put us in a better light in order to make the world a better place. Be happy and be good and it’s gonna be contagious in a way.” ⠀ See more of Moroccan-Belgian photographer @mouslamrabat’s story on @vogue.

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5 of 6 Follow Moroccan-Belgian photographer @mouslamrabat’s story this week. ⠀ “I believe Africa in general is growing. There’s a new platform today called social media and now we can be visible. Through my photography, I want to say something regarding the diversity and inclusion within fashion. ⠀ “I try to work with the youth in order to push them in a way that they don’t have to run away from their identity and culture. That’s the only thing that makes them unique.”

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4 of 6 Follow Moroccan-Belgian photographer @mouslamrabat’s story this week. ⠀ “It was important for me to create a DNA that people first of all would recognize. So I created a name for this movement. ‘Welcome to Mousganistan’ was the name of my first solo exhibition earlier this year. I love M.I.A so I drew this name from her song Freedun, in which she sings 'from the People's Republic of Swaggerstan’. ⠀ “During my exhibition, I learned so much from my own work listening to other people’s interpretations. Everybody sees emotion in my work. Some see humor, some others see sadness. There’s always a message.”

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3 of 6 Follow Moroccan-Belgian photographer @mouslamrabat’s story this week. ⠀ “The thing I like the most about djellabas (long dresses worn in the Maghreb region of North Africa), uniforms and traditional clothing is that they are able to hide people’s social class – codes suddenly disappear. You get a blank canvas and can start from zero. ⠀ “When you look at images of the pilgrimage to Mecca, everybody is dressed the same way. You can’t tell poor from rich and I think that’s beautiful.”

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2 of 6 Follow Moroccan-Belgian photographer @mouslamrabat’s story this week. ⠀ “In Morocco you have a mix of what the world is right now. In Marrakech, there’s a McDonald’s, but if you go 2km further, people live in houses made of earth, cooking traditional pancakes. This is the world we’re living in and I like to show Morocco how it really is. ⠀ “There’s also a lot of creativity in Morocco that no one can see. There’s the guy that makes chairs or the guy who sells cans. Everything is so styled and beautiful, but they don’t call themselves artists.”

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1 of 6 Mous Lamrabat ( @mouslamrabat) works with a certain emotion regarding his Moroccan heritage. “My biggest dream was to make my parents proud,” says the self-taught photographer. “My dad has been working in a factory all his life, waking up at 3.50am everyday. My mom couldn’t go to work because she had to stay home raising my nine brothers and sisters, so I feel I’m obliged to make something out of my life.” ⠀ Photography is a way to explore his dual identity. “One day, I travelled to Morocco and it was in front of me,” explains Mous, who lives in Belgium. “I was running away from my culture every day. The traditions of my own culture are the only things that make me different. So I used them to make pictures that stayed.” ⠀ Follow @mouslamrabat’s story this week on @vogue.

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5 of 6 Follow Taipei creative consultant @sunles’s story this week on @vogue and @voguetaiwan. Interview part-conducted in Mandarin. ⠀ “I surround myself with open-minded people and everyone feels [same sex marriage equality in Taiwan] should be a natural progression of our society. ⠀ “There are friends who are particularly vocal about how they feel – they are celebrating, they're so happy – but then there are friends who are happy, but don't feel the need to express this. I think this is because we all feel that it is an obvious next step – like ‘Okay it has happened... great!’ But I do think this is a wonderful sentiment because it means that this is a logical progression.” ⠀ // ⠀ 【#LoveWins彩虹故事 5/6】婚姻平權對你而言最大的意義是______? ⠀ 「我周邊都是觀念開放的人,因此大家都覺得這個 [台灣婚姻平權] 是社會上理所當然的進程。」 ⠀ 「有些樂於表達自己感受的朋友大肆慶祝,非常開心,但也有其他人覺得內心的喜悅不用昭告天下。我想這是因為我們都感到這是必然的下一步—就像是「歐這真的發生了...很好!」但我確實感到滿滿的正能量,因為這代表我們還在理性的道路上。」 ⠀ 想知道更多@sunles的心路歷程,請關注 @vogue 和 @voguetaiwan。

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4 of 6 Follow Taipei creative consultant @sunles’s story this week on @vogue and @voguetaiwan. Interview part-conducted in Mandarin. ⠀ “I'm actually very vulnerable because I'm a hopeless romantic. I feel like I'm a giver in a relationship. I can get very clingy, people often say I have a cool demeanor, but I'm actually like a little goat – soft, naive, gentle. ⠀ “If I'm the one pursuing, I can be quite romantic. I won't wait for the other person to make a move first. I'm a fan of big gestures, so the other person will need to be a fan of receiving big gestures too. Because the best reward is when I get to see how happy I've made someone.” ⠀ // ⠀ 【#LoveWins彩虹故事 4/6】 ​你身邊也有這樣的朋友嗎?🌈遇到愛情,酷妹變小綿羊? ⠀ 「我其實常常是弱勢的一方,因為我是無可救藥的浪漫主義者。我常會覺得自己是感情中的付出者。我會變得非常黏人,大家常說我散發冷酷氣場,但我實質上比較像隻小棉羊:柔軟、天真又溫和。」 ⠀ 「如果我要展開追求,會展現出非常浪漫的一面,不會等待對方主動出擊。我偏好浮誇的追求手段,因此對方也需要能吃這一套。因為當我費盡苦心發出攻勢時,最棒的回報就是看到對方開心的樣子。」 ⠀ 想知道更多@sunles的心路歷程,請關注 @vogue 和 @voguetaiwan。

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3 of 6 Follow Taipei creative consultant @sunles’s story this week on @vogue and @voguetaiwan. Interview part-conducted in Mandarin. ⠀ “I don't shout: ‘Yay, same sex marriage,’ because love is something only you need to understand for yourself. ⠀ “Heterosexuals don't need to explain to the world why they're heterosexual right? If a girl likes a guy she doesn't need to explain: ‘Oh by the way…’ ⠀ “You never have to explain your relationship, you don't have to explain your marriage and you don't have to defend it. So I think true equality will be when we don't have to defend it either.” ⠀ // ⠀ 【#LoveWins彩虹故事 3/6】 ​ 🌈你同意嗎? 愛情是自己懂就好的事情 ⠀ 「我不會大肆張揚說:『耶!同性婚姻,』因為愛情是自己懂就好的事情。」 ⠀ 「異性戀不需要向世界解釋自己的性向,對吧?如果一個女生喜歡男生,她不需要解釋:『歐其實我...』」 ⠀ 「你從不需解釋自己的感情關係,不需要解釋自己的婚姻,更不需要為其辯解。所以我認為真正的平權是當我們不再需要為此多費唇舌的時候。」 ⠀ 想知道更多台北創意顧問 @sunles的心路歷程,請關注本週 @vogue 和 @voguetaiwan。

vogue

2 of 6 Follow Taipei creative consultant @sunles’s story this week on @vogue and @voguetaiwan. Interview part-conducted in Mandarin. ⠀ “Passing this law [same sex marriage equality in Taiwan] means so many things beyond equal rights: it's about compassion and being able to understand love in all its forms. ⠀ “It’s the ability to embrace diversity, encourage tolerance, and push society forward which makes me so proud to be living here. It provides a sense of security, and even hope for many who may not have been confident enough to embrace their sexuality, and most importantly, a basic level of respect for everyone in the LGBTQ+ community.” ⠀ // ⠀ #Vogue雙語讀時尚 【連載 2 of 6 】 🌈 一起慶祝愛的勝利!― 孫怡 ⠀ 「這個 [台灣同性婚姻平權] 法案的通過,其中意義已超越平權層面的勝利:這包括如同理心的提升,以及大家開始暸解愛情的各種面貌。」 ⠀ 「擁抱多元化、倡導包容理念、以及推動社會進步的這些思潮,讓我很自豪身處此地。這個改變為更多族群提供了保障,甚至給予還無法自信接受自身性向的人希望。最重要的是,這也是對 LGBTQ+ 社群中每個成員最基本的尊重。」 ⠀ 想知道更多台北創意顧問 @sunles的心路歷程,請關注本週 @vogue 和 @voguetaiwan。

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1 of 6 On May 17, 2019, Taiwan became the first place in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage. “I was literally in tears reading the news coverage and friends’ happy posts on social media on Friday,” says art lover and collector Leslie Sun ( @sunles). “It’s cultural progress, it’s a progression of love.” Leslie grew up in Taipei before moving to Los Angeles at 18 years old to follow a creative path working in fashion and design, which eventually led her back home to open her dream shop-turned-creative agency Sunset. ⠀ “I’m extremely lucky because I came out in Los Angeles, and when I did everyone was super supportive,” she says. “I was actually quite late to realize my preference for girls. I was 28 when I discovered this about myself.” ⠀ Follow @sunles’s story this week on @vogue and @voguetaiwan. ⠀ // ⠀ 「當我禮拜五看到新聞和朋友們在臉書上的推文時我幾乎喜極而泣,」藝術愛好者和收藏家Leslie Sun(@sunles)說道,對於很多台灣人而言,這是改變生命的一週,因為台灣在亞洲內首先合法化了同性戀婚姻。 Leslie從小在台北長大,後來搬去了LA從事時尚設計相關的創意工作,這也引導著她之後回到台灣實現她的夢想,開一間店鋪和創意工作合一的事務所Sunset。 ⠀ 「我是極其幸運的,」她對她過去十年的歷程如此坦言道,「我是在洛杉磯出櫃的,我意識到我對女生的偏好是比較晚的。當我發現這一面的自己時我已經28歲了。」 ⠀ 想知道更多@sunles的心路歷程,請關注 @vogue 和 @voguetaiwan。

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5 of 6 Follow Spanish artist @ernestoartillo’s story this week. ⠀ “To me, love is beauty, divinity, the reason why we are here, and art is the way to conceptualize it. ⠀ “I love classical sculpture, Cubism, and Renaissance portraits. [The ancient Greek statue of] Laocoön and His Sons and Las señoritas de la calle Avinyó [by Pablo Picasso] have been an obsession since I was a child.”

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4 of 6 Follow Spanish artist @ernestoartillo’s story this week. ⠀ “When I feel I already know how to use one discipline, I stop using it and start with another technique to keep learning and challenging myself. That is the best way for me to evolve personally and artistically.”

Vogue

3 of 6 Follow Spanish artist @ernestoartillo’s story this week. ⠀ “My own fragility inspires a lot of my work. To me, to be fragile is part of human nature as we are not emotionally independent beings. ⠀ “We are nothing without other people’s love, just as art wouldn’t be art if there was no one in front of the artwork.”

Vogue

2 of 6 Follow Spanish artist @ernestoartillo’s story this week. ⠀ “To begin my creative process I always start writing – maybe a sentence, a word or a short story. Then I choose which media would be the best to represent it and start from there. ⠀ “Your own identity is the best inspiration you can have.”