The Washington Post - instagram lists #feedolist

WashingtonPost

Hundreds of thousands of protesters in Hong Kong, facing an intensifying police crackdown and threats of military force from Beijing, responded Sunday with a huge and peaceful march, underscoring continued mass support for the pro-autonomy movement here. Although authorities did not grant permission for a march and a torrential downpour soaked demonstrators, the spontaneous procession made its way haphazardly across the city, participants defiantly chanting calls for freedom and repudiating alleged police brutality. Organizers estimated the turnout at more than 1.7 million — among the largest demonstrations seen here in weeks. It was marked by restraint from protesters, who urged each other to avoid confrontations with police. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Chris Mcgrath/Getty Images)

WashingtonPost

Via @coveringpotus: White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow on Sunday confirmed that the Trump administration is exploring trying to buy the country of Greenland, noting that the self-governing country is a “strategic place” that is rich in minerals. “It’s developing. We’re looking at it,” Kudlow said on “Fox News Sunday.” “Denmark owns Greenland. Denmark is an ally. Greenland is a strategic place … I’m just saying the president, who knows a thing or two about buying real estate, wants to take a look.” President Trump’s desire to buy Greenland, which is part of the kingdom of Denmark, was first reported last week by the Wall Street Journal. Two people with direct knowledge of the directive told The Washington Post that Trump has mentioned the idea for weeks, and aides are waiting for more direction before they decide how seriously they should look into it. Go to the link in our bio to read more.

WashingtonPost

A beloved baby marine mammal in Thailand has died after consuming plastic and experiencing shock, Thai officials said Saturday. The young dugong, a relative of the manatee, was named Marium after marine biologists discovered her orphaned and lost in April in southern Thailand, the Associated Press reported. Soon, she captured hearts around the world as videos of her nuzzling up against caretakers circulated the Internet. Veterinarians found pieces of plastic blocking the young mammal’s intestines and said that Marium died of shock. Her intestines became inflamed, which caused gas in her digestive tract, an infection in her blood and pus in her lungs. The infection spread, causing shock, officials said in the announcement. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)

WashingtonPost

Via @bytheway: Welcome to Barcelona, a Mediterranean metropolis filled with museums, plazas, street fairs and neighborhood arroces (barbecues with paella). Pictured here is Casa Vicens, which mixes Arabic architecture with Gaudí’s colorful style. Enjoy the facade from the street, or step inside for a tour of the interior and gardens. Follow @bytheway for more. (Photo by @javier_luengo_photo for The Post)

WashingtonPost

Antonio Basco, overwhelmed by loneliness and grief after his wife, Margie Reckard, was slain in a mass shooting on Aug. 3, invited the El Paso community to attend her prayer service Friday night. The response shocked Basco, but probably not most El Pasoans. “Thank you, thank you,” Basco said softly as he arrived at the La Paz funeral home, clearly taken aback by the thousands of people who lined up for several blocks to pay their respects. People in line repeatedly said they came to show Basco and the world something important about the Texas border city of almost 700,000. “I just wanted to show my support because here in El Paso, we’re just a family,” said Alexandra Garcia, who works at a movie theater and attends New Mexico State University. “When [the shooting] happened, it’s one of my own people, you know.” Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photos by Ivan Aguirre/Reuters)

WashingtonPost

It’s easy to turn your cold storage into permanent, inefficient storage. But the freezer can also be a godsend when it comes to having versatile, ready-to-use ingredients and ready-to-eat meals.⁠ ⁠ We peeked into our own freezer and then surveyed Rachael Ray, Christopher Kimball and more to see what they like to have on ice. ⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio. Follow @eatvoraciously for more smart cooking tips.

WashingtonPost

With unswerving loyalty, Stephen Miller has singular control of an issue central to the presidency — immigration.⁠ ⁠ Barely a decade removed from college, Miller is at the seat of power. His authority has grown in recent months as he engineered a leadership purge at the Department of Homeland Security, removing or reassigning the head of every immigration-related agency in a span of just seven weeks.⁠ ⁠ And his long-sought policy goals are reaching fruition. On Monday, Miller secured tighter immigration rules that can disqualify green-card applicants if they are poor or deemed likely to use public assistance, cutting off a pathway to U.S. citizenship for those immigrants who could become a burden on taxpayers, or “public charges.”⁠ ⁠ In Trump, Miller has found a champion for his ideological goals. He is the force behind the Trump administration’s immigration agenda — making him a crucial White House figure on an issue central to the president’s reelection campaign.⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio. ⁠ ⁠ Part six of our "All The Best People" series detailing how President Trump’s inner circle has changed the way Washington works.

WashingtonPost

Rashida Tlaib’s grandmother does not understand why her granddaughter, a sitting U.S. congresswoman, could not visit her as originally planned.⁠ ⁠ Muftiyah Tlaib — who says she is somewhere between 85 and her early 90s — lives in the village of Beit Ur al-Fauqa, about 15 miles outside Jerusalem and close to the seam line between Israel and the West Bank, territory that Israel occupied in the 1967 war and that Palestinians hope to see as part of an independent state someday.⁠ ⁠ She lives in the same elegant limestone house in the same sleepy village she has called home since 1974 — the house where the whole village once came to celebrate Rashida Tlaib’s wedding, and the house that looks directly onto an Israeli settlement with a visible military presence.⁠ ⁠ “She’s in a big position, and she cannot visit her grandmother,” she laughed, seated in her living room on Friday. “So what good is the position?”⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio. ⁠ ⁠ (Photo by James McAuley/The Washington Post)⁠ ------------

WashingtonPost

Throughout the summer, a distinctive feature of the Hong Kong protests, sparked by a proposal to allow extraditions to mainland China, has been their lack of visible leadership.⁠ ⁠ Strategies and mobilization have been openly discussed and voted upon by tens of thousands of people on LIHKG.com, a messaging board, and Telegram chats have directed demonstrators based on crowdsourced information at rallies.⁠ ⁠ More recently, however, as protests have entered an uncertain new phase, a few influential groups of coordinators have emerged to subtly steer a movement that otherwise lacks a nucleus.⁠ ⁠ One of these influential groups, whose activities can be pieced together through recruitment ads, public statements and interviews with members and other protesters, comprises about 1,000 contributors who analyze popular sentiment on the forum and communicate their consensus to the world through masked representatives and social-media pamphleteering.⁠ ⁠ The result, researchers of the Hong Kong movement say, is an almost platonic ideal of an Internet-driven movement: democratic, transparent, anonymous, without heroes or martyrs.⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio.⁠ ⁠ (Photo by Vincent Yu/AP)⁠

WashingtonPost

At an LGBTQ support group almost two years ago, Braiden Schirtzinger heard someone use a word that resonated: “non-binary.” It felt like the best way to describe who Braiden was — not a he or a she, but a “they,” part of what appears to be a growing group of Americans who identify as genders other than male or female. ⁠ ⁠ But right now, Braiden was about to take on one of the most gendered roles of all: motherhood.⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio. ⁠ ⁠ ( Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post)⁠

washingtonpost

Via @coveringpotus: President Trump appears genuinely worried about the economy, which is showing increasing signs of instability. But just as he has before, the president has found one man on which to focus his blame. This time it is Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome H. Powell, The Post's Aaron Blake writes. Powell could be in for a world of pain ahead of the 2020 election — especially if things do go south. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

washingtonpost

Minnesota's Maddy Freking is the only girl among the field of 16 teams playing in the Little League World Series, and she’s the first to play in the LLWS since Mo’ne Davis made headlines in 2014. Freking is only the 19th girl to play in the Series in its 72-year history. Freking is the starting second baseman for the Coon Rapids-Andover team that advanced to Williamsport as the Midwest champion. Described as a “vacuum” at second, she made headlines over the weekend when her double play in the regional final turned up on @sportscenter. Freking is a fan of her immediate predecessor, Davis, and realizes she might get the kind of attention Davis did. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

washingtonpost

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu reversed himself on Thursday and decided to prohibit Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) from visiting Israel during a trip scheduled to start Sunday. The move by Netanyahu followed an unusual intervention by President Trump and immediately opened up a new battle between the prime minister and Democrats, who had privately warned that such a decision would be unprecedented. Pro-Israel groups in the United States and well as senior Democrats in Congress swiftly rebuked the decision. In s statement, Netanyahu insisted that his government continues to respect the U.S. Congress but said there are limits to whom it will allow entry. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @melinamara/The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

Across Maine, families are being hammered by two slow-moving demographic forces — the growth of the retirement population and a simultaneous decline in young workers — that have been exacerbated by a national worker shortage pushing up the cost of labor. The disconnect between Maine’s aging population and its need for young workers to care for that population is expected to be mirrored in states throughout the country over the coming decade, demographic experts say. Last year, Maine crossed a crucial aging milestone: A fifth of its population is older than 65. By 2026, Maine will be joined by more than 15 other states, according to Fitch Ratings. More than a dozen more will meet that criterion by 2030. Experts say the nation will have to refashion its workforce, overhaul its old-age programs and learn how to care for tens of millions of elderly people without ruining their families’ financial lives. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photos by Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) said Wednesday that humanity might not exist if not for rape and incest, prompting the latest round of outrage at the Iowa Republican, who has a long history of making inflammatory remarks. King was defending his position against laws allowing abortion exceptions in cases of rape and incest. “What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled out anyone who was a product of rape or incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that?” King said, according to @dmregister. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

washingtonpost

Weeks before the mass shooting in El Paso, 8,000 people jammed a Greenville, N.C. basketball arena to serenade President Trump with chants of “Send her back," a response to the president’s insistence that four minority congresswoman should “go back” to the land of their birth. Trump's visit that day, and the chants, continue to reverberate loudly nearly a month later, particularly for those in Greenville who see themselves as targets of a campaign to whip up xenophobia and hate. After the shootings in El Paso, in which 22 people were killed by a gunman who parroted the president’s warnings about an “invasion," the words carry a particularly ominous resonance: as a prelude to murder. Samar Badwan, a Palestinian American Muslim resident of Greenville (pictured above), watched that day. “In my heart, I knew what his message was going to be,” Badwan told The Post. “I didn’t know the extent to which it would impact our small town.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Eamon Queeney for The Post)

washingtonpost

New Jersey is one of the fastest-warming states in the nation. Its average temperature has climbed by close to 2 degrees Celsius (or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) since 1895 — double the average for the Lower 48 states. Over the past two decades, the 2 degrees Celsius number has emerged as a critical threshold for global warming. In the 2015 Paris accord, international leaders agreed that the world should act urgently to keep the Earth’s average temperature increases “well below” 2 degrees Celsius by the year 2100 to avoid a host of catastrophic damages. . A Post analysis of more than a century of data across the Lower 48 states and 3,107 counties has found that major areas are nearing or have already crossed the 2-degree Celsius mark. Today, more than 1 in 10 Americans — 34 million people — are living in rapidly heating regions. Read our analysis by clicking the link in our bio.

washingtonpost

Skipper and Ping look like a typical king penguin couple. But these two 10-year-olds at the Berlin Zoo are both male — and the latest in a long succession of same-sex penguins that have coupled-up to adopt an egg. Berlin has become the latest city to host a pair of “gay” penguins after Skipper and Ping showed an attraction to each other and a desire to become parents. Both unsuccessfully tried to hatch a stone for some time. Then zookeepers allowed them to adopt an abandoned egg. While Berlin Zoo officials said their penguin couple had so far only inspired positive reactions from visitors, similar instances have in recent years sparked fierce backlashes, governmental bans and religious protests around the world. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Omer Messinger/EPA-EFE/REX)

washingtonpost

Via @coveringpotus: President Trump enjoyed overwhelming support from white evangelicals in 2016, winning a higher percentage than George W. Bush, John McCain or Mitt Romney. That enthusiasm has hardly dimmed since then. Almost 70 percent of white evangelicals approve of Trump’s performance in office, according to a 2019 Pew Research Center poll. The Post's interviews with 50 evangelical Christians in three battleground states explain why. In conversation, evangelical voters paint the portrait of the Trump they see: a president who acts like a bully but is fighting for them. A president who sees America like they do, a menacing place where white Christians feel mocked and threatened for their beliefs. A president who’s against abortion and gay rights and who has the economy humming to boot. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Ilana Panich-Linsman for The Washington Post)

WashingtonPost

Self-described anarchist Cody Wilson tap-danced on the limits of the Second Amendment and criminal conduct when his downloadable gun designs for 3-D printers triggered fear that his on-demand firearms would give criminals untraceable killing tools.⁠ ⁠ But that is not what landed Wilson in court this time.⁠ ⁠ The 31-year-old accused of paying for sex with an underage girl last summer pleaded guilty Friday in a Travis County, Tex., courthouse to a reduced charge of injury to a child, the Austin American-Statesman reported. Wilson originally faced a charge of felony sexual assault.⁠ ⁠ The reduced sentence keeps Wilson out of prison but will require him to register as a sex offender for seven years of deferred adjudication probation.⁠ ⁠ And Wilson, an outspoken pioneer of firearm technology, cannot own a firearm during that time, the Statesman reported.⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio.⁠ ⁠ (Photo by Tamir Kalifa for The Washington Post)⁠

WashingtonPost

“Would not recommend. Tour was all about how hard it was for the slaves,” wrote one reviewer of the Whitney Plantation in Louisiana.⁠ ⁠ Slaves who lived on plantations typically worked 10-16 hours a day, six days a week, according to the University of Houston’s Digital History. Children as young as 3 were put to work.⁠ ⁠ “I was depressed by the time I left and questioned why anyone would want to live in South Carolina,” read one review posted to Twitter about the McLeod Plantation in Charleston.⁠ ⁠ In 1860, 402,406 people were living in South Carolina not because they wanted to, but because they were enslaved. They made up 57 percent of the state’s population, according to census data.⁠ ⁠ “I felt [the African American tour guide] embellished her presentation and was racist towards me as a white person,” another McLeod visitor wrote.⁠ ⁠ In 1993, historian Clarence J. Munford estimated the value of the labor performed by black slaves in the United States between 1619 and 1865, compounded with 6 percent interest, to be $97.1 trillion. In today’s dollars, without further compound interest added, that would be $172 trillion.⁠ ⁠ Read the full Retropolis story, link in bio.⁠ ⁠ (Photo by Edmund Fountain/Reuters)⁠ ⁠

WashingtonPost

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Thursday he spoke to President Trump about the Senate working on legislation to tighten the nation’s gun laws after the August recess, as both men face heightened public pressure to do something about gun violence following last weekend’s two mass shootings.⁠ ⁠ The Kentucky Republican, in his first interview since the shootings left 31 dead and dozens injured, specifically mentioned expanding background checks on gun purchases and “red-flag” laws, which would allow authorities to confiscate a firearm from someone deemed a risk to themselves or the public.⁠ ⁠ “Those are two items that will be front and center as we see what we can come together on and pass,” McConnell said on a Kentucky radio station.⁠ ⁠ At the same time, McConnell, who faces reelection next year, underscored the difficulty in reaching consensus on a divisive issue. Congress has not passed significant gun-control legislation since the 1990s.⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio.⁠ ⁠ (Photo by Susan Walsh/AP)

WashingtonPost

Welcome to Vancouver, touted as one of the world’s most livable cities. Locals may hunker down in the rainy winter, but still emerge in the spring, cameras poised to document every cherry blossom. Follow @bytheway for more. Photo by @jackiedivesphoto/For The Washington Post)

WashingtonPost

For three years, Ratan Miah had lived legally in Italy. He worked kitchen jobs, when he could find them. He split rent with six others on a cheap apartment. He pursued his asylum case, telling officials about extortion and political violence in Bangladesh and saying, “I’m asking the Italian state for help.” Then, in late June, Miah sat down with his lawyer and got Italy’s response. His last appeal for protection had been rejected. In seven weeks, after his existing permit expired, he would become Europe’s latest undocumented migrant. Miah is just one among the millions who arrived at Europe’s shores in a historic migration wave, asking for asylum. But as those claims now wind their way through court systems, Europe is beginning to deal with a different kind of migration challenge: one focused not on new arrivals, but rather on the people who are told they can’t stay. Across the European Union, according to official data, hundreds of thousands of migrants are being rejected in their bids for protection. But, for a range of knotty logistical and geopolitical reasons, the migrants handed orders to leave are overwhelmingly not being sent home. Most rejected migrants tend to fall into a legal no man’s land — one where they have no right to housing, no work permits and scant opportunity to go elsewhere. The only option for many is to remain where they are and scrape by furtively. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photos by @lorenzotug/The Washington Post)

WashingtonPost

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents swept through seven work sites in six cities across Mississippi on Wednesday, arresting approximately 680 people the agency said were undocumented immigrants in what officials said is the largest single-state workplace enforcement action in U.S. history. The raids targeted agricultural processing plants, part of a year-long investigation into illegal employment of immigrants in the state, officials said. They did not say how many individuals they were targeting in the operations, nor what proportion of those taken into custody were what ICE calls “collateral” arrests — those who were swept up along with those ICE was seeking. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Gregory Bull/AP)

WashingtonPost

via @coveringpotus: President Trump has repeatedly told lawmakers and aides in private conversations that he is open to endorsing extensive background checks in the wake of two mass shootings, prompting a warning from the National Rifle Association and concerns among White House aides, according to lawmakers and administration officials. Trump, speaking to reporters Wednesday before visiting Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, where weekend shootings left 31 dead, said there “was great appetite for background checks” amid an outcry over government inaction in the face of repeated mass shootings. Trump’s previous declarations of support for tougher gun controls, including after the deadly Parkland, Fla., shooting in February 2018, have foundered without a sustained push from the president and support from the NRA or Republican lawmakers. Even Trump’s advisers question how far he will go on any effort. NRA chief executive Wayne LaPierre spoke with Trump on Tuesday after the president expressed support for a background check bill and told him it would not be popular among Trump’s supporters, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to freely discuss internal talks. LaPierre also argued against the bill’s merits, the officials said. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post; @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post; iStock)

WashingtonPost

Via @coveringpotus: On a day when President Trump vowed to tone down his rhetoric and help the country heal following two mass slayings, he did the opposite — lacing his visits Wednesday to El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, with a flurry of attacks on local leaders and memorializing his trips with grinning thumbs-up photos.⁠ ⁠ In his only public remarks during the trip, Trump lashed out at Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, both Democrats, over their characterization of his visit with hospital patients in Dayton.⁠ ⁠ Trump falsely accused them of “totally misrepresenting” the reception he received at Miami Valley Hospital in Ohio. He alleged that their news conference immediately after the president’s visit “was a fraud.”⁠ ⁠ Yet, Brown and Whaley described the visit by the president and first lady Melania Trump in favorable terms.⁠ ⁠ “They were hurting. He was comforting. He did the right things. Melania did the right things,” Brown told reporters. “And it’s his job in part to comfort people. I’m glad he did it in those hospital rooms.”⁠ ⁠ Whaley added: “I think the victims and the first responders were grateful that the President of the United States came to Dayton.”⁠ ⁠ Read the full story, link in bio.⁠ ⁠ (Photo by Evan Vucci/AP Photo)

WashingtonPost

Via @coveringpotus: President Trump remained largely out of public view as he visited Dayton, Ohio, the first of his two scheduled stops Wednesday intended to console cities recovering from a pair of mass shootings over the weekend. Aside from brief appearances on the airport tarmac as he arrived and departed, Trump did not speak publicly or allow himself to be photographed. The visit to Dayton, a city of about 140,000 people, was a marked break with tradition, as presidents visiting grieving communities typically offer public condolences and use the opportunity to try to comfort the nation. Trump was greeted by scores of protesters in downtown Dayton and was expected to encounter more upon arriving Wednesday afternoon in El Paso, where 22 people died Saturday in a massacre that appeared to target immigrants. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by John Minchillo/AP)

WashingtonPost

Years into the mass exodus from crumbling Venezuela, a fresh swell of the country’s most vulnerable — impoverished women and children, the elderly, ill and disabled — are now pouring out, overwhelming the capacity of Colombia, by far the single largest host nation, to absorb them. Six months after the Venezuelan opposition began its U.S.-backed effort to drive President Nicolás Maduro from office, conditions for the people have perhaps never been worse. They’re struggling under ever-deepening shortages of medicine, food, gas and water, and widespread power blackouts in a disintegrating socialist state plagued by one of the world’s highest homicide rates. From November to June, the most recent period for which data is available, petitions for legal status from women and the elderly in Venezuela, for instance, have outpaced those of Venezuelan men. Shelters and charities working in Colombia are warning of sharp increases in the numbers of pregnant women, children and elderly migrants, many of whom are entering the country via dangerous, illegal routes. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photos by Charlie Cordero/For The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

"None of us said when we went to pre-K, ‘You know what I want to be when I grow up? I want to be a drug addict.’ Nobody thought that," said Amber Wood, who abused drugs since the age of 13. "But the fact that these drugs were so accessible, everyone knows what doctors to go to." She’s in recovery now, and has been for precisely 25½ months, she said. Wood, 26, a single mother with a 6-year-old child, detoxed in jail after getting arrested in June 2017 on drug charges she can’t fully remember. She was diverted to drug court, a program in which she gets drug-tested and sees a judge on a regular schedule to avoid being put behind bars. She’s training as a peer counselor for people with addiction. Though apprehensive about sharing her story in public, she wants to spread a positive message to other people in her situation: “There’s hope. There’s another side of addiction. You can get clean and have a productive life.” Southwest Virginia, where Wood lives, is among the regions in the United States hardest hit by the opioid epidemic, which has roots in prescription painkillers. The pills don’t tell the whole story of the crisis, but the crisis can’t be described without reference to the pills. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @melinamara/The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

Via @coveringpotus: Special Counsel Robert Mueller opened his session with the House Intelligence Committee pushing back against President Trump’s criticisms of his prosecutors’ work. “It is not a witch hunt,” Mueller said, after he was asked by Chairman Adam Schiff if Trump’s repeated statements about the special counsel investigation were accurate. Mueller agreed that Russia interfered in the 2016 election and that the Trump campaign appeared to welcome that help. Trump, he agreed, had publicly called on the Russians to hack Hillary Clinton’s emails. Trump also pursued a business deal in Moscow while running for president. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

washingtonpost

Boris Johnson has formally become British prime minister following an audience with the queen and has delivered his first speech at Downing Street. “The doubters, the doomsters, the gloomsters are going to get it wrong again,” Johnson said in his first remarks as prime minister. “The people who bet against Britain are going to lose their shirts, because we’re going to restore trust in our democracy.” Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Victoria Jones/Pool via REUTERS)

washingtonpost

A vast and intense heat wave is underway in Europe as an unusually strong area of high pressure, also known as a “heat dome,” tightens its grip across much of the continent. This event is similar in its causes, but in many ways more intense than the heat wave that enveloped much of Europe in late June and early July. Since peak summer temperatures typically occur in mid-July, it is difficult to set all-time records during this time. However, such records are falling, which demonstrates the historical magnitude of this extreme weather event. Already on Tuesday, some all-time high temperature records had fallen across France. In Bourdeaux, for example, the high reached at least 106.2 degrees (41.2 Celsius) Tuesday, breaking the record for that location by nearly a full degree, according to Meteo France meteorologist Ettiene Kapikian. Pictured, baby elephant Ben Long cools off in his pool at the zoo in Leipzig, eastern Germany, where temperatures reached 35 degrees Celsius. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Jens Kalaene/AFP/Getty Images)

washingtonpost

The U.S. government on Wednesday issued an unprecedented rebuke of Facebook after a year of massive privacy mishaps, charging the company deceived its users and “undermined” choices they made to protect their data as part of a settlement that requires the tech giant to pay $5 billion and submit to significant federal oversight of its business practices. The Federal Trade Commission alleged that Facebook had repeatedly misled its 2.2 billion users. The agency argued that the social-networking company was not upfront about the ways app developers, advertisers and others gained access to users’ personal data — from the content they “liked” to the phone numbers they stored — in breach of Facebook’s previous promise to improve its privacy protections online. As a result, the settlement between the FTC and Facebook includes the largest fine in U.S. history for a privacy violation, and it grants federal regulators unparalleled access to the social-networking giant’s business decisions for the next two decades — allowing regulators to scrutinize the actions of Facebook’s leaders, including chief executive Mark Zuckerberg, and its efforts to launch new products and services. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Image via iStock)

washingtonpost

Former special counsel Robert Mueller rejected claims by President Trump that his report cleared him from wrongdoing and confirmed that he could be charged after he leaves office. In the first back-and-forth, Nadler, the committee chairman, listed a series of basic yes-or-no questions – or inquiries that could be answered in a few words—to get Mueller to confirm that he did not exonerate Trump. “Did you actually totally exonerate the president?” the New York Democrat asked. “No,” Mueller said. “Does that say there was no obstruction?” Nadler said, reading an excerpt from the report where Mueller’s team discussed they could not “exonerate” Trump on the matter. “No.” Mueller went on to talk about Justice Department rules that say a sitting president cannot be indicted. The president has repeatedly claimed the report showed there was “no collusion” and “no obstruction.” Asked if “under DOJ policy the president could be prosecuted for obstruction of justice crimes after he leaves office,” Mueller responded: “True.” Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @mattmcclainphoto/The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

Special Counsel Robert Mueller has arrived. Mueller is scheduled to testify publicly before two separate congressional panels Wednesday and for the first time address questions about his investigation of President Trump and Russian interference in the 2016 election. Follow our coverage by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @salwangeorges/The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

The Senate on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly to add billions of dollars to a fast-dwindling compensation fund for 9/11 workers who are now sick or dying. The legislation, championed by gravely ill first responders and former “Daily Show” comedian Jon Stewart, will extend the compensation program for decades. It passed 97 to 2, drawing cheers and applause from first responders and their families in the Senate gallery. The measure has already passed in the House, so it will now head to the White House for President Trump’s signature. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Matthew Daly/AP)

washingtonpost

It’s possible that in the history of American politics, no one has done more with less experience at the seat of power than Anthony Scaramucci. The short-lived former White House communications director spent just 11 days on Pennsylvania Avenue in July 2017. Thinking he was off the record (according to widely understood media protocol, he wasn’t), he launched into a profanity-laced screed while talking to a reporter. He was out of a job days later after what he said went viral. Two years later, has turned his moment of public humiliation into a rousing comeback tale, rising (at least in some circles) above his status as a national punchline. He successfully converted his 15 minutes of fame into a steady stream of speeches, talks and cable news appearances. You could attribute it to pure persistence, pure ego or a complete absence of shame. But at heart, it’s a triumph of self-deprecation. In a political climate where absolute certainty is rewarded and no one ever apologizes about anything, Scaramucci is creating a second act simply by being in on the joke. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Mark Mann for The Post)

WashingtonPost

Most Democratic presidential hopefuls have yet to experience a moment like the surge of interest in Mayor Pete Buttigieg or Beto O'Rourke or Elizabeth Warren, let alone the preexisting support afforded the two candidates approaching their 80th birthdays. But Sen. Kristen Gillibrand’s lack of anointing seems conspicuous. On paper, she’s set herself up to succeed: She's never lost an election in her 13-year career in politics. She’s an advocate for women and families at a time when the law has been lapped by societal sentiment. She’s progressive enough to have supported Medicare-for-all since 2006, but has shown that she has bipartisan reach. Yet Gillibrand is currently polling between 0 and 1 percent in national surveys. What is going on? Could it be because she is what some would call ... boring? Gillibrand’s brand — motherly, responsible, pragmatic, experienced — is going to be a tough sell if what Americans really want, at some level, is for politicians to entertain them. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Stephen Voss for The Post)

WashingtonPost

For decades, President Trump has cited his attendance at what was then called the Wharton School of Finance as evidence of his intellect. But Trump, who questioned the academic standing of then-President Barack Obama, has never released records showing how he got into the school — or how he performed once he was there. And, until now, James Nolan, who was working in the school's admissions office at the time, had never publicly disclosed his account of Trump’s admission process. While Nolan can’t say whether his role in Trump's admission was decisive, it was one of a string of circumstances in which Trump had a fortuitous connection. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @king_marvino/The Washington Post)

WashingtonPost

The biggest question in the minimum-wage debate has shifted. Economists once asked, “Will raising the wage floor kill jobs?” They now ask, “Just how transformative could a higher minimum wage be?” New high-quality research has pushed economists to acknowledge that raising the minimum wage hasn’t, in recent decades, destroyed jobs by making workers too expensive. But there are some other surprising society-wide benefits too, according to research. Here are a few: - Suicides fall -Workers are more productive -Poverty rates fall -Older folks work longer Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

WashingtonPost

Federal prosecutors on Monday unsealed new sex trafficking charges against Jeffrey Epstein, alleging the politically connected multimillionaire abused dozens of young girls at his homes in Manhattan and Florida. Epstein had previously pleaded guilty to Florida state charges of soliciting prostitution to resolve allegations he molested dozens of girls. That arrangement has been widely criticized as too lenient. As part of the deal, he had to spend just more than a year in jail and was allowed to leave daily for work, and he never faced any federal exposure. The new charges could lead to a much harsher penalty. Epstein is charged in a two-count indictment with sex trafficking and sex trafficking conspiracy, for crimes alleged to have occurred between 2002 and 2005. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

WashingtonPost

The economic expansion recently became the longest in U.S. history, surpassing the 1990s boom, which lasted exactly a decade. The stock market is at record levels and President Trump has made the economy’s strong performance a centerpiece of his reelection campaign. But this expansion has been weaker and its benefits distributed far more unevenly than in previous growth cycles, leaving many Americans like Sommer Johnson (above) in a vulnerable position. About 40 percent have seen paltry or volatile wage growth, rising expenses for housing, health care and education, and increased levels of personal debt. They tend not to own homes or many stocks. Most, like Johnson, are able to eke by until they faced an unexpected crisis such as a job loss, cancer, car trouble or storm damage. The extra expense causes them to get behind on their bills, and they never fully rebound. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage for The Washington Post)

WashingtonPost

"Upon winning the country’s fourth Women’s World Cup title Sunday with a 2-0 victory over the Netherlands, the U.S. women's soccer team celebrated as it had competed the entire four-week tournament — wholeheartedly and unapologetically," Sally Jenkins writes. "With Sunday’s victory, the Americans have won four of the eight World Cup titles contested since 1991 and four of the six Olympic gold medals awarded since 1996. But Sunday’s win was about far more than sports. Three months before the tournament kicked off in Paris on June 7, the members of the U.S. women’s team sued their employer, the U.S. Soccer Federation, for gender discrimination, citing wages and working conditions that are inferior to those of their less successful male counterparts. In doing so, the athletes knowingly and deliberately made their burden greater heading into the World Cup. Whether the lawsuit was a post-match talking point or not (and it rarely was), each goal and each victory the U.S. women scored became a statement about their prowess on the field and their leverage off it." Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Francisco Seco/AP)

washingtonpost

Timmy Couvillion's small marine construction company was recently hired by the U.S. Coast Guard for its biggest job in years: Containing the longest offshore spill in American history. To prepare, his crew dropped a submersible robot 450 feet below the ocean surface in the Gulf of Mexico to view the source of the pollution through its cyclops eye. The pictures it sent back were chilling. Over the nearly 15 years since Hurricane Ivan knocked down a production platform operated by Taylor Energy Co., the company has claimed that less than three gallons a day were seeping out. But video obtained by The Post, and verified by federal officials familiar with the site, shows a large volume of oil pouring out of an erosion pit where the tower was destroyed. The government is relying on Couvillion (, a former fishing boat captain turned engineer, to contain the spill and recover some of the oil. And the amount he has captured so far is proving Taylor Energy wrong. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photos by Bryan Tarnowski for The Post)

washingtonpost

Tensions are running high in Phoenix, as the relationship between the city’s police force and some members of the community has frayed, spinning into a mess of lawsuits, protests and angry public hearings. The city of 1.6 million led the country in officer-involved shootings last year, eclipsing much larger cities such like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. Edward Brown (pictured above) was one of the 44 people shot by Phoenix police last year, among the 22 who were not killed. A hollow tip bullet fired from an officer’s gun in August exploded inside of him, shattering his spine. The 36-year-old now must use a wheelchair and is paralyzed from his upper stomach down. Brown, who is black, had run away from the police, who were responding to a call about drug activity. No one disputes he was unarmed and shot in the back, though police say he doubled-back and “swiped” at the officer’s handgun, possibly hitting its tip. Police records indicate Brown’s DNA was not found on the officers’ gun. “The officer, he took a lot from me,” said Brown, who is being represented by former Arizona attorney general Tom Horne in a $50 million lawsuit against the city. “More than he knows. I just want justice.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photos by Caitlin O'Hara/for The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

While in the hospital for a month following the Easter Sunday attacks in Sri Lanka, Naresh Denilson's relatives would come to visit. His parents were recovering, they would say, and his elder sister was in the intensive-care unit. They wanted him to focus on getting better. They could not bring themselves to tell him the truth. His parents were dead, their bodies found at the morgue in Colombo in the hours after the attacks. His sister clung to life for a week. In the devastation of the April attacks that killed more than 260 people, Naresh’s situation was not unique. The bombers struck places where families had gathered — churches packed with worshipers, weekend breakfast buffets at hotels. In several families, only one person survived. For three Sri Lankan families, there were no survivors. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Benislos Thushan/The Washington Post)

washingtonpost

Via @bytheway: The briefcases and blazers the rest of the world sees are just covers for a vibrant, creative community. Whether it’s the food scene or murals tucked away in historic alleys, the city D.C. residents know is quirky — and inspiring. Our local guide @austinkgraff will show you around our town. Follow @bytheway for more. #BTW #BTWWashingtonDC #BTWDC (Photo by @melinamara)

washingtonpost

Via @eatvoraciously: The Fourth of July just so happens to fall smack in the middle of berry season, meaning blackberries, strawberries, cherries and more are all ripe for picking and eating. Even better: Their colors just so happen to fit the patriotic theme. You should definitely incorporate berries into the spread at your Fourth of July cookout. Head to the link in our bio to check out six recipes that are a great place to start. Follow @eatvoraciously for more. #happyfourth (Photo by Jennifer Chase for The Post/Food Styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Post)

washingtonpost

As a community activist and entrepreneur with a background in tech start-up, Richard Glaser, who lives in in Rochester, N.Y., said he’s “fundamentally opposed to relying on government.” So when he had the idea to make one of the town's crosswalks into piano keys, he thought he could make happen in a grass roots way. So he recruited local artist Shawn Dunwoody, and they were able to get some fast-dry street paint donated by Sherwin Williams. Then the two men went to the Rochester community and asked: Want to paint with us on Sunday? No experience required. About 75 people, most of them strangers, showed up. About three hours after it started, the piano keys were done. They ended up painting four enormous keyboards around an intersection. At first pedestrians were afraid to walk on them, but once they figured out it was safe, the dancing and selfies began. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photos by Quajay Donnell)