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WSJ

Lydjay Acopio's 3-year-old girl, Myca, was slain after being caught in an exchange of gunfire between her father and police when officers burst into the family’s Manila home.⠀ ⠀ More than six weeks later, Myca remains the youngest known victim among thousands killed in Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs, where civilian deaths have become an almost nightly routine.⠀ ⠀ "Can you imagine, my daughter was just 3 years old?" said Acopio, whose husband was also killed in the raid. "She had more gunshot wounds than the years she had lived in this world."⠀ ⠀ The police, which did not respond to request for comment, told local media that the child had been shot when her father used her as a shield against undercover officers seeking to arrest him for alleged links to the drugs trade. Acopio said her husband didn't use or deal drugs, but about two years ago he provided security for someone she suspects was involved in drugs, which she believes may have made him a target for authorities. ⠀ ⠀ The government says more than 5,500 “drug personalities” have been killed during drug operations, almost all after allegedly opening fire on officers trying to arrest them. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @eloisalopez for @wsjphotos

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More than 40 years ago, director Francis Ford Coppola mortgaged his home to cover the budget for his Vietnam War epic “Apocalypse Now.” "I own 'Apocalypse Now.' I own a lot of my own films. Usually it's because no one wanted them," Coppola said. "I made them by risking and taking the chance myself, which was unnecessarily stressful and a struggle, but it was the only way I could see in how to do it." Weeks into shooting in the Philippines, he traded leading men, only to have his actor of choice, Martin Sheen, suffer a heart attack. A typhoon destroyed sets, making filming impossible for weeks. Coppola had planned to shoot the movie in six weeks; it ended up taking more than a year and a half to finish. The director prevailed, and his psychedelic exposition of the heart of darkness within America's most controversial war remains a classic. Now 80, the Academy Award winner is again revisiting the film with a new edit—entitled "Apocalypse Now: The Final Cut"—that he calls definitive. It was released in select theaters this week. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @austinhargrave for @wsjphotos

WSJ

In Srinagar, the largest city in the disputed Indian region of Kashmir, the government this week turned off internet and mobile-phone connectivity and blocked telephone land lines. In older neighborhoods, gun-wielding paramilitary forces were positioned every 100 yards, sometimes in large clusters, accompanied by police. Security personnel in the area said they had orders to make sure no one left their homes unless it was a medical emergency. The curbs were aimed at preventing protests against Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's decision last week to end the region’s long-standing special status, which gave it a degree of autonomy. Indian armed forces have long maintained a heavy presence in Muslim-majority Kashmir, which is home to a separatist movement and was at the center of three wars between India and Pakistan. Many here see the recent restrictions and massive deployment of security forces as a template for how New Delhi plans to govern Kashmir under the new arrangement. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: Vivek Singh for @wsjphotos

WSJ

The Chesapeake Bay has seen a rapid decline in its oyster population due to issues like water pollution, parasites and overfishing, leaving scientists racing to stem the losses. ⠀ ⠀ The amount of market-size mollusks harvested in the Maryland stretch of the bay fell from about 380,000 bushels in the 2015-16 season to 180,000 bushels in the 2017-18 season, according to state data. The losses have been compounded by heavy rainfall, which can increase the flow of fresh water into bays, lowering water salinity and making it uninhabitable for oysters.⠀ ⠀ “The current population baywide of oysters is estimated to only be a couple percent of what were here in colonial times,” said Will Baker, president of the advocacy group @chesapeakebayfoundation, citing recent studies.⠀ ⠀ The foundation is now working with a global aerospace and defense-technology firm to develop new remote-sensing technology to track oyster populations and the health of oyster reefs in the bay. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @gregkahn for @wsjphotos

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President Trump made his name on the world's most famous island. Now he wants to buy the world’s biggest.⠀ ⠀ The idea of the U.S. purchasing Greenland has captured the former real-estate developer's imagination, according to people familiar with the deliberations, who said Trump has, with varying degrees of seriousness, repeatedly expressed interest in buying the ice-covered autonomous Danish territory between the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans.⠀ ⠀ In meetings, at dinners and in passing conversations, Mr. Trump has asked advisers whether the U.S. can acquire Greenland, listened with interest when they discuss its abundant resources and geopolitical importance, and, according to two of the people, has asked his White House counsel to look into the idea.⠀ ⠀ Some of his advisers have supported the concept, saying it was a good economic play, two of the people said, while others dismissed it as a fleeting fascination that will never come to fruition. It is also unclear how the U.S. would go about acquiring Greenland even if the effort was serious.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Lucas Jackson/Reuters

WSJ

When William Lyons married his wife Darleen in 1998, she gave him an ultimatum: restore his rare 1956 Jaguar XK-140 coupe, or sleep in the garage.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ He originally purchased the car in 1964 for $1,100, after spotting it for sale outside a Culver City, Calif., gas station.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ "I was 26, and that car became my daily driver," said Lyons, now 80. "It came with me to Oklahoma and Kansas, then back to California. I have over a quarter of a million miles behind the wheel."⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ After Lyons let the Jag sit in storage for a short time in the '90s, the couple began restoring it at Darleen's insistence. ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ "She would get underneath it, bust her fingernails and cuss like a mechanic," he said.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ They eventually started entering it into car shows, where it has earned more than 100 awards.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ 📷: @davidwalterbanks for @wsjphotos

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This month, truckloads of teams across India will celebrate the birthday of the Hindu god Krishna by assembling themselves into towering human pyramids as quickly as possible.⠀ ⠀ The effort, known as the Dahi Handi competitions, sees participants race to form their pyramids and smash an earthen pot suspended high in the air. ⠀ ⠀ While the contests usually feature young men, a female team in northern Mumbai has been training this year to come out on top. At a contest last year, their 11-person squad took under 30 seconds to arrange themselves into a four-tiered pyramid.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @thegobetweengoat for @wsjphotos

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Fancy a kangaroo dumpling? What if the meat was grown in a lab using a tissue sample from an Australian kangaroo farm?⠀ ⠀ Beef, chicken and tuna have been cultivated in labs before, but some scientists are now turning their attention to exotic, hard-to-find fare for adventurous eaters.⠀ ⠀ The Australian startup @vowforfood took four weeks to produce a few grams of lab-grown kangaroo, which is readily available in big Australian supermarkets but more difficult to find and more expensive overseas.⠀ ⠀ The efforts hint at a future where animals not fit for domestication could find their way to the plate—like a "Galapagos tortoise burger, but without any Galapagos tortoises needing to be harmed," the startup's co-founder said.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Mike Cherney for @wsjphotos

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"If anything, it's gotten worse."⠀ ⠀ Last week marked five years since the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., but some activists say police continue to target African-Americans in the small city on the outskirts of St. Louis.⠀ ⠀ "As long as they're black, they're going to get harassed," said 27-year-old @tdubbo, an activist and rapper who participated in the protests that followed and still lives in Ferguson. He and other protesters gained prominence during the unrest as part of the #BlackLivesMatter movement, and he was one of several who visited President Barack Obama.⠀ ⠀ Despite some signs of progress—arrest warrants in Ferguson have dropped 93%, according to recent data from the Missouri courts, and its police force is now 50% black—the city still faces high rates of poverty and unemployment.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @miketphotog for @wsjphotos

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Thousands of antigovernment demonstrators shut down Hong Kong's airport, one of the world's busiest, on Monday after a weekend that saw some of the worst unrest in more than two months of protests in the city.⠀ ⠀ Hong Kong's airport authority canceled more than 130 flights, stranding thousands of passengers, after demonstrators thronged arrival and departure halls, joining a sit-in at the terminal that has run since Friday.⠀ ⠀ The protest movement that began over a bill that would allow suspects to be tried in mainland China has snowballed into a wider movement demanding more accountability from police and for the government to respond to their issues.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

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Would you wear a bodysuit covered in sensors that uploads your measurements to a clothing company that makes custom fits? 👚👖 ⠀ ⠀ Last year, @zozotown—a fashion website that dominates online clothing sales in Japan—took on one of the biggest problems in the industry by offering the bodysuit to customers for free.⠀ ⠀ But the suit didn't spark higher clothing sales for the company and its billionaire CEO Yusaku Maezawa, with production and delivery costs helping driving down profits by 20% and leading Zozo's stock price to fall by half.⠀ ⠀ "I wanted to provide clothes that perfectly fit any body shape, but honestly it didn't work out very well," says the 43-year-old @yusaku2020, who attracted international attention when he spent $110.5 million on a Jean-Michel Basquiat painting and bought the first ticket to travel to the moon in 2023 with Elon Musk’s SpaceX.⠀ ⠀ The company recently scaled back the project, but Maezawa hasn't abandoned the idea entirely. The former punk-rock drummer spoke to us about the future of fit, competing with Amazon and how customers in the U.S. found use for his bodysuit.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Ko Sasaki for @wsjphotos

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Growing up on a ranch near Corpus Christi, Texas, @evalongoria and her family didn’t have much money. So to pay for her quinceañera, she secretly took a part-time job at a local Wendy’s when she was just 13. "My parents found out only when one of my teachers came in for a burger," says the actress, producer and director, who stars in the just-released film "Dora and the Lost City of Gold." A ninth-generation American whose family emigrated from Spain to Mexico in the 1600s, Longoria learned to hunt and fish before she was 7 and earned the label of "ugly duckling" from her family. By her senior year at Texas A&M, where she majored in kinesiology, Longoria was coaxed into competing for the title of Miss Corpus Christi USA and won. "The contest included a free trip to Los Angeles as one of the prizes," she says. "I thought Hollywood would be a fun vacation before going on for my master’s degree." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @shayanhathaway for @wsjphotos

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For $60 million, you can live like a prince in this Renaissance-era Tuscan villa once owned by the Machiavelli family. ⠀ ⠀ The 40-room estate dates to the Golden Age of Florence, when families like the Medicis and Machiavellis lived in the hills around the city. ⠀ ⠀ The property first appeared on the Italian land register in 1427, with relatives of Niccolò Machiavelli known to be its earliest owners. The 21,000-square-foot home’s current owners, the Zamparini family, are perhaps best known for once owning the Palermo soccer club. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @francescolastrucci for @wsjrealestate

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On the sharpest edges of the global war on terror lurks a U.S.-aided program that is low in technology but high in effectiveness: bomb squad training.⠀ ⠀ From the Sahara to East Asia, hundreds of small bomb-disposal units are taking on the hair-raising assignment of disabling improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. In a gruesome turn, these bombs are often strapped to children—mostly girls—by jihadist terrorist groups.⠀ ⠀ The bomb squads’ work is especially intense in northern Nigeria and the Lake Chad basin, where the Islamist group Boko Haram is leading the way in the use of child bombers. Its insurgency, which first flared exactly a decade ago, has left tens of thousands of people dead and forced millions from their homes.⠀ ⠀ A few years ago, there were only a few dozen men and women trained to do this work in Nigeria. Now there are hundreds.⠀ ⠀ See more in our Stories, and read the full story at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @torgovnik for @wsjphotos

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During the 25 years he edited @vanityfair, Graydon Carter relied on this 1951 Chevrolet woodie for weekend getaways with his kids in Connecticut.⠀ ⠀ He first spotted the car for sale in front of a house in Litchfield County, Conn., and learned the owner wanted $10,000 for it. Having just co-founded Spy magazine, he couldn't afford the price tag but gave the owner his number just in case.⠀ ⠀ "For the next year, I kicked myself because I wanted that car so badly," Carter says. "Then my phone rang." The owner had lowered the price to $5,000, so he bought it.⠀ ⠀ The Chevy—which was built before interstate highways and it doesn't go over 40 mph—could fit his children, their friends and two adults on trips to the beach. Carter had it redone seven years ago, with all the new features hidden so it looks original.⠀ ⠀ "Now 30 years after I bought the woodie, I have five kids and almost every Sunday, they come up and we take out the Chevrolet," he says. "We love it as much as we did decades ago. I would say that it was $5,000 well-spent."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @juliebidwellpix for @wsjphotos

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@habengirma is the first deafblind person to graduate from Harvard Law School, but she would prefer not to be called “inspiring.” The problem with the word, she explains, is that the conversation usually ends there—and it often feels like a euphemism for pity. "I ask people, 'What are you inspired to do?'" says the 31-year-old disability rights lawyer, who published a memoir this week. “Use inspiration as a verb: I'm inspired to make my website accessible; I'm inspired to learn salsa dancing. Frame it in terms of something positive you want to do in the world." As an attorney with a nonprofit equal-rights group, she helped win a precedent-setting case in which a court affirmed that the Americans with Disabilities Acts covers online businesses. Now, she travels the world to promote accessibility and has earned accolades from world leaders like Barack Obama and Justin Trudeau for her efforts to further disability rights. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @celestesloman for @wsjphotos

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Steakhouses looking for the next big thing are hoping to lure diners with a new hook: old beef, like this 10-year-old ribeye at Colorado's @corrida_boulder. American restaurants have traditionally served meat from cattle that are no more than two years old, as older animals can be tougher and more susceptible to disease. But the meat tends to have a richer flavor. Taking a cue from restaurants in Spain—especially the Basque region, where serving beef from older cows is commonplace—steakhouses from Chicago to Las Vegas are getting in on the trend. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @james.stukenberg for @wsjphotos

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Last week, Ashprihanal Aalto completed one of the world's hardest footraces, requiring runners to cover 3,100 miles over 52 days—along a single block in Queens, N.Y. It was the 48-year-old Finn's eighth time winning the Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race, which is often compared to ultramarathons in the Arctic Circle and Death Valley. Aalto ran more than 60 miles on each of 48 consecutive days, following the half-mile course around the same block of concrete sidewalk. The late Indian athlete and philosopher Guru Sri Chinmoy started the race with one goal: to achieve the seemingly impossible while transcending the limitations of the mind through meditation and persistence. Not to mention, New York City's summer heat, exhaust from nearby traffic and crowds of children walking to school. "I'm very happy," Aalto said after finishing the race for the 15th time. "I can go do other things, rather than run, run, run." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @jackiemolloy13 for @wsjphotos

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Toni Morrison, the first black woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature, has died at age 88. Morrison's publisher announced that she died Monday night in New York. Her family issued a statement through the publisher saying she died after a brief illness. In addition to authoring such works as the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Beloved," Morrison was also a teacher, an editor, and a cherished friend and mentor to other writers. In June, @wsjmag talked to a few who knew her best about her extraordinary life and career. "Toni invented a whole avenue for other types of books," writer Fran Lebowitz said. "She literally widened the idea of literature." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: Jack Mitchell/Getty Images

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Cate Blanchett is obsessed with icebergs. Her drink of choice is tap water. And her guilty pleasure is German sausages. We asked the two-time Academy Award-winning actress about everything from her favorite piece of clothing and what she's binge-watching to who she would invite to her ideal dinner party. Read her answers at the link in our bio. 📷: ian_patterson for @wsjphotos

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Not even old enough to apply for a driver's license, a group of young basketball players will step onto their high school courts this year with giant Instagram followings meant to flag them as stars to watch. 🏀👀⠀ ⠀ There's @rodney.gallagher, a 14-year-old from Uniontown, Pa., with more than 92,000 followers. At 15 years old, @mikey counts more than 893,000 followers, including the rapper @champagnepapi. Perhaps the most closely watched of them all, with 3 million followers, is @bronny, the 14-year-old son of @kingjames.⠀ ⠀ To be a youth-basketball sensation on Instagram requires personality; social media savvy; and, often, a boost from basketball media outlets such as @SLAMonline and @Overtime, which hunt for young players with flashy highlights to post on their feeds. The right sneakers and the ability to throw down dunks helps, too.⠀ ⠀ But social-media fame isn't a guaranteed ticket to a Division I program. Some players who are being showered with attention now will fight for scholarships that never come, in front of thousands of people ready to criticize them for not living up to their Instagram-generated hype.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Dan Lyon for @wsjphotos

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Two mass shootings in less than 24 hours left at least 29 people dead and 53 injured in Texas and Ohio, shaking a nation that seems to have grown accustomed to the toll of gunfire in public places.⠀ ⠀ In El Paso, Texas, a lone gunman walked into a crowded Walmart Saturday morning, shooting with an AK-style semiautomatic rifle. Authorities were investigating the shooting, which killed 20 and injured 26 more, as a possible case of domestic terrorism and a hate crime because officials believe the suspect, a white man, was targeting Hispanics. He has been charged with capital murder.⠀ ⠀ Barely 13 hours later in Dayton, Ohio, in a downtown neighborhood crowded with bars and restaurants, a man wearing body armor and a mask opened fire with a .223-caliber semiautomatic rifle with a 100-round drum magazine. The suspect arrived at the scene with his sister, whom he killed in addition to eight others, police said. The gunman was killed by police about 30 seconds after he fired his first shot, police said.⠀ ⠀ Both suspects used guns that they purchased legally, law-enforcement officials said. Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: Mark Ralston/Agence France-Presse/Getty Image (1); Jorge Salgado/Reuters (2); John Minchillo/Associated Press (3, 4)

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While many people fixate on the ooze of melted cheese, "grilling cheeses"—high-protein slabs that resist melt no matter the temperature—remain underutilized, despite the delicious options now available. 🧀⠀ ⠀ Take this Bread Cheese (origin name: Juustoleipä), a Wisconsin favorite with a browned top like the crust on bread, which borrows from Norwegian and Finnish cheese traditions.⠀ ⠀ Check out other great grillable options at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @fmrphoto for @wsjphotos

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@maya_hawke, the daughter of actors @UmaThurman and @EthanHawke, is becoming a star in her own right.⠀ ⠀ She just made her big-screen debut in Quentin Tarantino's "Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood," though the famously challenging director has known her since she was two years old. Her mother, after all, starred in Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction" and "Kill Bill" films.⠀ ⠀ "To me, the way he pushes just feels like joy and love of the movie business and relishing in the opportunity to get another take," the 21-year-old tells @wsjmag. "He loves the movies so much, and he wants you to be so good in it."⠀ ⠀ Her role as a drifting '60s flower child only builds on her critically acclaimed turn as Robin in the third season of "Stranger Things," a character she says evolved as the season progressed, becoming more and more like the actress in real life.⠀ ⠀ Hawke, who grew up in New York City and spent a year at Juilliard before dropping out, says she's close with both of her parents and knows she has an advantage in learning about their different experiences in the business. ⠀ ⠀ "Hopefully it'll keep me from making some mistakes that young actors can make," she says.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @mirandabarnes for @wsjmag

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Whenever a hurricane, wildfire or tornado destroys homes, disaster investors arrive looking to profit. Natural disasters offer a rare chance for a certain type of risk-taker to buy properties on the cheap and flip them for a profit, often after fixing them up. These real-estate speculators can face hostile locals, a shortage of contractors and materials, and volatile property prices. In Santa Rosa, Calif., Gregory Owen has spent the last year buying properties ravaged by the 2017 wildfires. The lots cost him an average of $250,000, and he intends to spend another $700,000 or so building each house. He hopes to turn a profit of about $50,000 on each one. Owen also plans to buy lots in Paradise, Ca., which was devastated by a wildfire last November. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @rachelbujalski for @wsjphotos

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This year, the @boyscoutsofamerica's World Scout Jamboree was projected to be the largest ever, with an estimated 45,000 scouts and volunteers from around the world gathering in Mount Hope, W.Va.⠀ ⠀ The U.S. last hosted the world meetup in 1967, when the Boy Scouts was in its heyday and had about six million members. The two-week event, which ends Friday, comes as the national organization is going through some of the most transformative changes in its history, while confronting decadeslong declining membership numbers, shifting cultural norms and a possible bankruptcy.⠀ ⠀ The U.S. organization this year began welcoming girls into its flagship program, known as Scouts BSA, after allowing girls into the Cub Scouts in 2018. That followed allowing gay youths to join in 2013, and later gay leaders. In 2017, the Boy Scouts began accepting transgender youth.⠀ ⠀ "So many things that were done years and years ago fit the constituencies that we were trying to serve. And our society has changed," said Ellie Morrison, the national commissioner, one of the top three officials. "We have now changed, and come more aligned and are better prepared to serve our communities and our nation."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @andyspear for @wsjphotos

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Geneva Long has owned this 1990 Citroën Deux Chevaux since she was a newborn.⠀ ⠀ Her father, a vintage car collector, bought it for her the last year it was made, 1990, which was also the same year she came into the world.⠀ ⠀ "There are pictures of me at age 2, pretending to drive it," says the Los Angeles resident.⠀ ⠀ The French-made car, one of many Citroëns in the family, sat in the garage throughout her childhood, until the time finally came for her to truly get her hands behind the wheel.⠀ ⠀ "When I turned 16, my parents decorated the car with pink balloons," Long says, adding her dad took her to the DMV in the Deux Chevaux. "Once I had my license, I drove it home."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in out bio.⠀ ⠀ @ianspanier for @wsjphotos

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The cherry-growing region near Traverse City, Mich., has crowned itself the cherry capital of America, producing two-thirds of the country’s supply of tart cherries. Last year, the state produced about 300 million pounds of the fruit—which is used in pie filling, juice, cereal and breakfast bars—worth about $56 million. But farmers here are struggling amid a flood of low-price dried cherries from Turkey, forcing some to mow down dozens of acres of cherry trees because harvesting the fruit would be more expensive than selling it. The industry petitioned the U.S. government to impose duties on the imports, claiming Turkish importers underprice the fruit and the country's government unfairly subsidizes the industry. The U.S. government said in June that there was enough evidence to proceed with an investigation. "If we don't have luck with the tariffs," one farmer said, "I don't know how any of us can survive." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @keithkingphoto for @wsjphotos

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Warsaw’s luxury real-estate market is outpacing European counterparts like Munich and Dublin, and American markets like Boston and Miami.⠀ ⠀ Locals benefiting from the robust economy, especially in Poland’s expanding service industry, are buying up prime properties in and around the capital. In the city center, luxury living is going high-rise, including projects tied to prominent international architects.⠀ ⠀ The surge in residential development pushed prices up 20% last year in the high-end sector and has led to a dramatic change to the city’s skyline.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Stefan Fuertbauer for @wsjrealestate

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Capital One said Monday that a hacker accessed the personal information of approximately 106 million card customers and applicants, one of the largest-ever data breaches of a big bank.⠀ ⠀ The alleged hacker, Paige A. Thompson, is a former employee of Amazon Web Services. Federal agents in Seattle arrested her on Monday.⠀ ⠀ The breach stands to be one of the worst for U.S. consumers because of the type of financial information that was accessed. The stolen information can be used by criminals to figure out the identities of the most creditworthy or affluent consumers and open a card or loans in their names.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Kevin Hagen for @wsjphotos

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With its birdlike pavilion and impressive "wings," the @milwaukeeart Museum designed by Santiago Calatrava is just one of the Midwest metropolis's fresher diversions. ⠀ ⠀ The industrious city of Milwaukee has long been regarded as fixated on baseball, brats and beer. These days, Wisconsin's largest municipality has formed some new obsessions.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @kevinmiyazaki for @wsjoffduty

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At 17 years old, Caroline Marks is surfing's youngest champion. 🏄‍♀️ In April, she beat the three-time champion of the @wsl’s Women's Championship Tour, in the finals at the Boost Mobile Pro Gold Coast in Australia. The win made @caroline_markss the top-ranked surfer on the tour, the youngest woman ever to hold that distinction. "Best week, best day of my life," she said. Marks, who is away from her home in San Clemente, Calif., 10 months a year, is making a name for herself during a time of growth and evolution for the sport. Her $100,000 win in Australia was also the first event at which women were guaranteed equal winnings with men. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @austinhargrave for @wsjphotos

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Remember VisiCalc, the world's first spreadsheet? It was the first killer app, the spark for @apple's early success and a trigger for the broader PC boom that vaulted @microsoft to its central position in business computing. And within a few years, it was tech-industry roadkill. The story of VisiCalc, a humble spreadsheet program that set the tech world ablaze 40 years ago, has reverberated through the industry and still influences the decisions of executives, engineers and investors. Its lessons include the power of simplicity and the difficulty of building a hypergrowth company in a hypergrowth industry. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: Dan Bricklin

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America has regional pizza styles all its own, and each one has a fascinating story to tell. 🍕⠀ ⠀ We went on a cross-country quest to sample them all—from the Detroit style with its singular crunch and Milwaukee’s cracker-thin crusts to the new wave of innovators using pizza as an "expression of agriculture."⠀ ⠀ Read more about today’s most meaningful pies at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @marvinshaouniphoto, @nschinco, @extracelestial and @adamryanmorris for @wsjoffduty

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Faced with coastal erosion, the owners of this 10,000-square-foot Nantucket home had two options: tear it down, or pick it up and move it.⠀ ⠀ Not wanting to demolish the property, its owners opted to have it separated from its foundation using a hydraulic jacking system and placed on a series of steel moving rails, with two excavators pulling the massive structure along its track. The house began its very slow, very short trip to safety over a week in June. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @_tonyluong for @wsjrealestate

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As a kid, David Lee dreamed of owning a Ferrari. Now he has 30 of them. ⠀ ⠀ An avid collector, Lee approached the Italian carmaker in 2016 with an idea: build out a new model as a tribute to the 1964 250 GT Lusso Competizione that he already owned. ⠀ ⠀ As it happened, the company had planned to make 70 new cars as tributes to 70 classic Ferraris through the years for its 70th anniversary.⠀ ⠀ “So they loved my idea,” said Lee, of San Gabriel Valley, Calif. “We went back and forth on the specs for six months. Then they started to build the car at the factory in Maranello, Italy.”⠀ ⠀ The resulting model F12tdf took its inspiration from the ’64 classic, from the paint to the racing No. 8. ⠀ ⠀ “Like all my cars, I drive these at least once a month,” Lee said. “Each time I drive a car, I am taken back to the year when that car was built, and through the windshield, I see the world as it was then—even up to today.”⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @davidwalterbanks for @wsjphotos

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For the world’s most famous bicycle race, @letourdefrance, making sure the road surface is fit for a global TV audience falls to a two-man team of “Erasers” who wake up at the crack of dawn each day to inspect the tarmac for graffiti. Armed with a bucket of paint and some rollers, they’re on the lookout for political messages, rude words and worse. “People draw genitals, and I have no idea why, but that’s every year,” said Patrick Dancoisn, who works alongside Martial Brasselet to ensure viewers don’t spot anything untoward. “You can’t stop human stupidity.” Dancoisn deals with some crude graffiti by simply painting white boxes over it. But after nine years at the Tour, he also has developed an artistic streak, often turning larger renderings of the male anatomy into butterflies or owls. Aside from vulgar drawings, the team also covers messages accusing Tour de France cyclists of doping and those targeting French President Emmanuel Macron. Some scrawls, however, remain uncensored. “We leave anything that’s encouraging,” Dancoisn said. “Especially little love notes. We would never touch those.” Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: Joshua Robinson/The Wall Street Journal

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Facebook agreed to pay a record $5 billion fine and better police its data-privacy practices to settle a long-running investigation by the Federal Trade Commission.⠀ ⠀ The fine "is the largest ever imposed on any company for violating consumers' privacy and almost 20 times greater than the largest privacy or data security penalty ever imposed worldwide," the FTC said.⠀ ⠀ Under the settlement, CEO Mark Zuckerberg will be required to personally certify privacy compliance, and could be subject to civil and criminal penalties for false certifications.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.

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Fifty years ago today, the Apollo 11 space mission climaxed when astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed and walked on the moon. “To me, the real importance of this anniversary is the overall reality of human beings first stepping off planet Earth into the cosmos; not in imagination, not via a robotic spacecraft, but human beings moving through the birth canal of mother Earth and into the universe,” said Apollo 9 astronaut Russell “Rusty” Schweickart. “That is a historic moment that will be remembered for a thousand years.” At the link in our bio, look back at the people and technology that made the moon landing happen, the impact of the journey, and what the revived race to return to the moon means for business, the country and the world. 📷: Corbis via Getty Images

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The real-estate market in Malta is among the strongest in the world, thanks to an influx of foreign buyers discovering the tiny island nation.⠀ ⠀ Living on the Mediterranean archipelago about 50 miles south of Sicily offers residents easy access to continental Europe, terrific weather and the perk of citizenship in the EU for overseas buyers.⠀ ⠀ While these buyers generally opt for turnkey apartments or high-end villas, Malta also has a rich trove of historic farmhouses, villas and palazzo.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @francescolastrucci for @wsjrealestate

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This is Ringo. He got his head stuck in a trash-can lid, and his human neighbors in Ely, Minn., have been doing all they can to free the collared bruin. ⠀ ⠀ The state Department of Natural Resources started receiving reports of a bear with an unusual accessory in late May, making Ringo a walking, sniffing, foraging embodiment of what happens when wildlife and people move into each other’s neighborhoods.⠀ ⠀ Capturing Ringo to remove the collar has been a challenge. Officials have tried to lure him into a live trap using black sunflower seeds, peanuts, pastries, candy and peanut butter, but he hasn't taken the bait.⠀ ⠀ Locals have begun logging Ringo sightings, with some deploying trail cameras and drones in the bear’s usual haunts to keep authorities apprised of his whereabouts.⠀ ⠀ “He’s a character. There are lots of characters in Ely,” said Susan Laine, a resident who has spearheaded much of the Ringo awareness campaign. “He needs us.”⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: Eric Sherman

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Hilary Howes, a transgender woman in Greenbelt, Md., converted to Catholicism in 2003 after transitioning in 1995. ⠀ ⠀ She said the priest who received her into the church was happy to baptize her as a woman, and she now worships with a lay-led congregation not officially recognized by the local archdiocese.⠀ ⠀ "Every priest, nun and bishop that I've talked with has been sympathetic and affirming," Howes said.⠀ ⠀ Churches all across the world are trying to heed Pope Francis’s call to respect transgender people while rejecting the idea of gender as fluid.⠀ ⠀ In June, the Vatican published its first document addressing the boundaries of gender, criticizing the idea that a person’s biological sex at birth can be separated from their gender identity.⠀ ⠀ The document was the first major public statement from the church to address the topic even indirectly, but it didn’t pronounce on the morality of sex reassignment.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @melissalyttle for @wsjphotos

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From the outside, this may look like just another Volkswagen Beetle. But the classic 1968 bug is known to turn heads—whenever its owner pulls up to a charging station instead of a gas pump.⠀ ⠀ Kris Whitten, who bought the car as a college student over 50 years ago, converted it to battery power a year ago after thinking about making the switch for a decade. ⠀ ⠀ "I was interested in the idea because of pollution and climate change," says the 70-year-old, of Kensington, California, "but I did not have the courage to plunk down the money." Last year, a health scare prompted him to shift his perspective. "I was lying in a hospital bed thinking, what am I waiting for?"⠀ ⠀ Whitten found a garage to do the conversion for about $25,000, and he has put 7,000 miles on the bug since going electric.⠀ ⠀ “When I take it on road trips, I pull up to a charging station next to a bunch of Teslas and the Beetle draws a crowd,” he said. ⠀ ⠀ “This car was iconic in the 1960s. Now it is emblematic of the current era for a whole new reason,” he added.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @angeladecenzo for @wsjphotos

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On Tuesday, exactly 50 years after Apollo 11 lifted off on a mission to the moon, astronaut Neil Armstrong's space suit returned to display at the Smithsonian's @airandspacemuseum.⠀ ⠀ The made-to-measure suit—intended for a single-use trip to the lunar surface and back—was sewn from about 20 layers of then-state-of-the-art synthetic fibers. Armstrong donned it for about 12 hours in total, including when it was worn at testing, during the launch on July 16, 1969, over about two and a quarter hours on the moon's surface on July 20, and finally splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.⠀ ⠀ It had remained on display at the museum for more than three decades before the Smithsonian removed it for study, digital imaging and conservation against decay.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @gregkahn for @wsjphotos

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“They’re not your average killers.”⠀ ⠀ In Venezuela, violent guerrilla rebels have been given free rein by the government of President President Nicolás Maduro to become a criminal organization that traffics drugs and runs illegal mining operations in exchange for providing muscle for Maduro’s regime, U.S. and Colombian authorities say. ⠀ ⠀ Maduro’s government, weakened by U.S. sanctions and diplomatically isolated, is deepening its ties with the National Liberation Army, or ELN, which began as a Cuban-inspired rebel group in the 1960s. In the ELN, Venezuela’s radical leftist regime sees an ultraviolent ally that will defend Maduro in the event of an outside military incursion or popular uprising.⠀ ⠀ ELN guerrillas have been battling Colombian governments for half a century, but sanctuary and open support in Venezuela is helping them thrive as never before. ⠀ ⠀ “They’re using Venezuela as a place for recruitment,” said Adm. Craig Faller, commander of U.S. forces in Latin America. “They’re using Venezuela as a place to get finances, via narcotrafficking, via illegal mining, via money laundering, via extortion and kidnapping.”⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @stephenedwardferry for @wsjphotos

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From towns in southern California to rural Texas and suburban Minneapolis, Hispanics are experiencing the largest home ownership gains of any ethnic group in the U.S. While Hispanics comprise only 18% of the U.S. population, the group accounted for nearly 63% of new U.S. homeowner gains over the past decade, according to @nahrep. The group’s homeownership has risen alongside gains in income and education, as well as a growing familiarity with the U.S. mortgage market. The Latin community, the population hardest hit by the housing bust, also has a large millennial population entering the age of homeownership. Read more at the link in our bio. 📊: Lindsay Huth

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Welcome to the new age of glamping, where homeowners are putting tricked-out tents on their properties to help them unplug or to use as glorified guesthouses. 🏕💅 ⠀ "It's my version of camping—it's the most special spot to sneak away to, whether it's for a nap or a cocktail or a bonfire," says Ken Fulk, who set up two themed tents with his husband Kurt Wootton on their Napa, California, ranch. "It's like a mini-vacation within a vacation."⠀ ⠀ For those who want to glamp year-round in severe climates, there are yurts. David Maren's 16-foot dome-shaped tent in Evergreen, Colorado, features big windows, French doors and a tinted dome skylight, and is set on an elevated platform with a pair of ziplines connecting to the deck of his house.⠀ ⠀ "We set the goal of spending one night of every week in the yurt as a family—to get away from screen time," said Maren, who has two young children.⠀ ⠀ Sweetwater Bungalows, the company that manufactured Fulk's cabins, sells four basic models and three sizes ranging from $4,900 to $10,250. Furnishing them and adding outdoor accessories can easily cost tens of thousands of dollars.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @alannahale for @WSJphotos

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There are few in Hollywood with as unusual a résumé as @awkwafina.⠀ ⠀ A rapper first and actor second, she went from netting a few hits on YouTube to carving out a niche as a comedic actress to anchoring one of this summer's buzziest indies, @thefarewell.⠀ ⠀ The 31-year-old, given name Nora Lum, drew raves at the Sundance Film Festival for her equal parts funny and tearful performance in the movie. Unlike her braggadocious rap persona and zanier characters, the role marks her first dramatic turn in a film that keenly captures the way family life can dance between humor and pain.⠀ ⠀ "I learned comedy as a defense mechanism when I was young, and so I used it to keep things light, and essentially I depend on it in my performances, right? Like it's a muscle that's overworked," she tells @wsjmag.⠀ ⠀ "And so what I learned from 'The Farewell' is not so much this grand acting class, but there's a component of empathy…of really living in that moment in the realest way possible."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in the bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @katiemccurdy_ for @wsjmag

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"If ever a mammoth surfaces somewhere in the world, it will actually have Yakut roots," says Sergei Fyodorov, the head of exhibitions at the World Mammoth Museum in Yakutsk, Russia, proudly underscoring that the region is the hereditary home of so many of these beasts.⠀ ⠀ Over the years, the warming climate has flushed dozens of woolly mammoth parts to the surface in this vast territory on the Arctic Ocean. Their emergence has turned the remote area into a magnet for scientists, tour operators and ivory traders, creating a legal challenge for authorities who want to regulate the recovery and use of the frozen remains.⠀ ⠀ Mammoth tusks—known as ice ivory—can fetch anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a kilo and are used to create items ranging from knives and jewelry to musical-instrument parts and decorative inlays. The main market for these tusks is in China, where a ban of the elephant-ivory trade has accelerated the prospecting rush.⠀ ⠀ Some conservationists fear the ice-ivory business will enable traders to pass off illegal elephant tusks as those of their extinct cousins, further endangering elephants.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @arthurbondar for @wsjphotos

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The scene inside this gymnasium would be familiar to most: new graduates queuing nervously as their names were called.⠀ ⠀ But this was no ordinary graduation. The gym is located in the prison complex at Parnall Correctional Facility in south central Michigan, and underneath their robes, the students wore dark-blue prison jumpsuits.⠀ ⠀ The ceremony was an attempt by the prison and the local community college to alter the inmates' trajectory via a college education.⠀ ⠀ People who have served prison time face notoriously difficult odds readjusting to society, and many return to prison within a few years.⠀ ⠀ One analysis of available research conducted by the Rand Corp. in 2013 suggests that inmates who enroll in college education are 43% less likely to return to prison.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @trilliumproductionco for @wsjphotos