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WSJ

In Tapachula, Mexico, near the Guatemalan border, a line of Central American migrants stretches down the street and around the corner from the local office of the federal refugee agency. Entire families, single mothers carrying children and young men who say they are fleeing threats from criminal gangs wait for hours in the hot sun to start or continue their asylum paperwork, a procedure far fewer people pursued during the early months of this year. Many arrive at night and sleep on the street to be among the first attended to. Most are Guatemalans, Hondurans and Salvadorans, but they also include Cubans, Venezuelans, Haitians and Africans. Some say they want to stay in Mexico because getting into the U.S. is increasingly difficult. Others just want papers allowing them to move freely through Mexico on their way to the U.S. Many say they are seeking asylum in Mexico because they see it as protection from detention and deportation now that the Mexican government has stepped up enforcement. From January through May, asylum requests in Mexico almost tripled from the same period a year ago to some 24,400. The upsurge in asylum requests comes amid a shortage of resources: the Tapachula office alone has nearly 13,000 unresolved asylum cases, and just 35 employees to process the applications. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @daniele_volpe for @wsjphotos

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Homelessness has become such a big problem in the San Francisco area that waters outside the city are increasingly crowded with people living on makeshift boats.⠀ ⠀ The homeless population floating off the coast of wealthy Marin County, just north of San Francisco, has doubled in recent years to about 100, according to authorities. ⠀ ⠀ The ragtag collection of some 200 barges, sailboats, and other mostly decrepit vessels is a sign of an affordable-housing crisis in California and particularly in the San Francisco Bay Area, where the median price for an existing single-family home has nearly tripled since 2009, according to March data from the California Association of Realtors. ⠀ ⠀ See more in our Stories or at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @rachelbujalski for @wsjphotos

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@beatricedomond is one of skateboarding's most promising talents. The 24-year-old dropped out of college in her native Florida late last summer and moved to New York City to focus full-time on a career in the sport. So far, her decision is paying off. Domond, who describes skating as an “obsession,” is the first and only woman sponsored by Supreme and F—ing Awesome, two brands that employ today's most buzzed-about skaters. As a teen, she says she had no awareness of Supreme as a streetwear behemoth, but idolized the work of skate videographer @williamstrobeck and pro skater/FA co-founder @jason_dill. She would continually send them her skate videos, and eventually they developed a correspondence that blossomed into appearances in Supreme's skate videos and a sign-on to the FA team. "I could go back to school when [I'm] older. I know a lot of people say that and don't go back, but I would really like to go back," Domond says. "I just felt like 'Ok, I can do this now.'" She is on track to go pro in the near future, which would make her the second black woman ever to do so. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @janettephoto for @wsjmag

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Stone, wood and Japanese minimalism mark the aesthetic of this contemporary West Hollywood home.⠀ ⠀ The 3,600-square-foot property took about a year and roughly $2 million to construct—and its design is influenced by the business that helped build it.⠀ ⠀ Owner Arik Tender brought Caesarstone, the now ubiquitous brand of quartz used in countertops, to the U.S. from Israel in 1999. He and his wife Debra used the material throughout their home, which features an array of rock, wood and glass. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @jennifferroberts for @wsjrealestate

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Twin brothers Bill and Chris Sharples grew up in a family with a passion for racing cars. Their grandfather owned more than 30—including this 1965 Aston Martin. ⠀ ⠀ "The DB5 Vantage was his most prized, the car he drove the most," Bill said of his grandfather, who bought the car after seeing James Bond drive it in the 1964 movie “Goldfinger.”⠀ ⠀ He ordered the Aston Martin from a British factory for $14,432.15—“we have all the paperwork,” Bill noted—or roughly $118,000 in today's dollars.⠀ ⠀ After their grandfather passed away in 1990, the brothers pooled their money and purchased it for $50,000.⠀ ⠀ The pair have managed to maintain the car in its most pristine state, finding the same mechanics who took care of it 40 years ago, and have only replaced the two rods that hold up the hood. "Everything else is original down to the paint job and the emerald green leather," Chris said.⠀ ⠀ "We wanted to honor this car by not messing it up," Bill added.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @gordonmgrantphoto for @wsjphotos

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Hundreds of police in Hong Kong fired tear gas and rubber bullets to clear protesters demonstrating against a widely unpopular bill that would allow extradition of alleged criminals to mainland China.⠀ ⠀ Hours after thousands of mostly young protesters blocked streets and forced the city's legislature to postpone debate on the measure, police declared a riot and accused protesters of hurling metal rods and bricks at officers. ⠀ ⠀ The protest, which followed a mass demonstration by up to a million people on Sunday, is the biggest outbreak of public unrest in years and comes as the administration of Chinese leader Xi Jinping moves to bring the former British colony closer to the mainland. ⠀ ⠀ The extradition law has struck a nerve among locals in Hong Kong who view it as eroding their freedoms, and revived an opposition movement that was floundering just months ago.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @suzanneleephoto/Panos for @wsjphotos (1); Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images (2); Kin Cheung/Associated Press (3)

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Naomi Granger ditched her desk job after 12 years as a public accountant to launch a freelance accounting practice that helps marijuana startups. "A lot of these business owners have been operating in black markets for decades," said the 38-year-old, whose company @dopecfo prepares and assesses financial records for accuracy and compliance with the latest tax laws. "Now that they have the opportunity to do business legally, many are struggling to adjust because they've done things their own way for so long." Over the past several years, 33 U.S. states and Washington, D.C., have adopted laws that allow adults to smoke pot for recreation or to treat medical conditions, fueling the rise of thousands of new businesses like Granger's. She works out of her home in Las Vegas and says her pay can range from $5,000 to $30,000 a month, but that's not her favorite part of the job. "It feels like we're part of a movement," she said, "after seeing so many people benefit from the medical breakthroughs with marijuana, and using cannabis to overcome opioid addiction." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @rogerkisby for @wsjphotos

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Housing reserved for migrant farmworkers is sparking tension among lower-income residents of California's Central Coast.⠀ ⠀ Motels, apartments and single-family homes in Santa Maria, Calif., and other nearby towns are being converted to dormitory-style residences for temporary guest workers, tightening the supply of housing and pushing up already high rents.⠀ ⠀ As border security has gotten more strict in recent years, agricultural companies in Santa Maria are relying less on illegal immigrant laborers and instead turning to a visa category called H-2A. Employers are required to provide housing that meets minimum standards as part of the H-2A program.⠀ ⠀ Illegal immigrants have long been a backbone of the labor force on the Central Coast, where agriculture employed an average of 70,900 workers last year. They usually find their own housing and are among those concerned about being pushed out as more H-2A workers arrive and rents rise.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @brianlfrank for @wsjphotos

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Shilpa Yarlagadda started her fine jewelry company, @shiffonco, in her Harvard dorm room. It's become a celebrity favorite loved by @nicolekidman, @michelleobama and @serenawilliams—and she hasn't even graduated yet. 💍 During her freshman year, she read online that fine jewelry is typically marked up several times the cost of production. If she went direct-to-consumer, she reasoned, she could take half of the profits to fund other businesses led by women. "When I started, I really did not know what I was doing, which made it seem possible," said the 21-year-old, who adds that she wasn't taken seriously by vendors in the New York City's Diamond District because she was still in school. "Google makes everything seem easy." Today, Shiffon sells a single piece: a one-size adjustable pinky ring that circles twice around, topped off with a sapphire or diamond alongside a minuscule, barely visible diamond. The two stones represent a "pinky promise" for women to support one another, and half of the profits from each ring go to the company's non-profit venture capital arm, @startupgirldaily. "There aren't enough women in the C-suite. There aren't enough women starting companies," Yarlagadda says. "Not every start-up is going to succeed, but women need to be given more opportunities to fail and to succeed." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @leabwinkler for @wsjmag

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The @nba Finals have never seen a coach like the Toronto @raptors' Nick Nurse 🏀.⠀ ⠀ The people in his position are usually longtime NBA coaches, former NBA players or both. Nurse is neither. ⠀ ⠀ He's a first-year NBA head coach at the age of 51. He spent his formative years in the British Basketball League, where the sport is niche compared to snooker, after stints coaching in the @nbagleague and at small college programs. As the owner, general manager and coach of the @bblofficial's now-defunct Brighton Bears, he once signed Hall of Famer @dennisrodman as a one-game publicity stunt to sell tickets.⠀ ⠀ Nurse is also the guy who brings his guitar on road trips to strum Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan. He has been creative and inventive during the Finals, and that's in part because of his peripatetic background.⠀ ⠀ "He looks young," said Raptors guard @kyle_lowry7, "But he's pretty old."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: Roger Bamber/Alamy

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At this high school, students draw blood from their teachers. 💉 ⠀ ⠀ As more students nationwide pursue career training on campus, pupils at the Birdville Center of Technology and Advanced Learning in suburban Dallas are taking hands-on learning to another level—practicing everything from phlebotomy and cooking to caring for barnyard animals.⠀ ⠀ Students at the 110,000-square-foot, $16.75 million public school can choose from 13 career areas with multiple disciplines, and there is no academic requirement for admission.⠀ ⠀ Most of the programs have a waiting list, and a lottery system is planned next school year for the health-science program due to its popularity.⠀ ⠀ The campus is doing what school districts around the country are striving to achieve as more focus shifts to graduates who are skipping college and going right into the workforce. Nationally, the number of high-school students concentrating in career and technical education has risen 14% over the past decade, according to education data.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @louisdeluca for @wsjphotos

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"Lots of award shows are groups of millionaires giving each other gold statues," says James Corden, who returns to host @TheTonyAwards Sunday after emceeing the celebration of Broadway's best in 2016. "Whereas here is a show that is a celebration of massive numbers of people who are doing it eight times a week."⠀ ⠀ Growing up in a working-class suburb west of London, @j_corden knew early on that he wanted to be in the theater. When he started working professionally, "Broadway became this sort of far and exotic land that the better performers would go to perform, and you hoped that someday, you would be able to do such a thing."⠀ ⠀ His first major success came in 2004 with "The History Boys" in London, whose Broadway incarnation would go on to win six Tonys. In 2011, he starred in "One Man, Two Guvnors" in the U.K., returning to Broadway in 2012 to reprise that performance and winning a Tony of his own for it.⠀ ⠀ All of this before Corden, who was a virtual unknown in the U.S., got the nod to take over hosting duties for the @LateLateShow in 2014.⠀ ⠀ "For a while, you sit and say, 'This is hard. No one knows what I can do,'" the 40-year-old says of his debut on the late-night stage. "And then you have to change your mind-set. Nobody knows what I can do? That's great."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @shayanhathaway for @wsjphotos

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For his journey to Syria, Patricio Galvez packed a suitcase full of children's clothes, including a tiny yellow T-shirt emblazoned with the word "Sweden."⠀ ⠀ Five years ago his daughter, a Swedish convert to Islam, also traveled to Syria with her husband. They were among tens of thousands of foreigners who gravitated toward Islamic State, and both were killed as U.S.-backed forces battered the group's last redoubts, ⠀ ⠀ But their seven children—aged between 1 and 8—survived. Galvez's quest to rescue them from the wreckage of Islamic State's collapsed caliphate succeeded. Now he faces difficult questions about how to raise and integrate them into Swedish society.⠀ ⠀ Our photographer followed the grandfather's journey for four months, tracking his trip from Sweden to Iraq and Syria, and ultimately their flight back home. ⠀ ⠀ See more in our Stories and read the full piece at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @renaeffendiphoto for @wsjphotos

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Down a country road in Monroe, Va., Woodruff’s Cafe and Pie Shop slings history by the slice 🥧.⠀ ⠀ Beyond the blueberry crumble and strawberry icebox, it’s the eatery’s 102-year-old matriarch, Mary Fannie Woodruff, who keeps customers coming back.⠀ ⠀ “It’s like they’re sitting in their grandma’s kitchen,” said Woodruff’s daughter, Angela Scott, who owns the shop. ⠀ ⠀ Woodruff’s late husband built the place 67 years ago, on land purchased by his grandfather using the pension he earned fighting in the 15th U.S. Colored Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. For three decades, Woodruff ran it as a general store with a filling station and post office before it closed in 1982. Sixteen years later, Scott revived it—and her pies took off. ⠀ ⠀ The shop typically sells 25 pies on a weekday and 50 on a Saturday, and the strawberry icebox barely has time to set before diners demand slices.⠀ ⠀ Still, Scott credits her success to her mother’s constant presence. ⠀ ⠀ “After I retire, I’ll be sitting in there like Mama, I know it,” she said. “I’ll be telling everyone what to do and making sure the customers are waited on properly.”⠀ ⠀ 📷: @staceyvanberkelphoto for @wsjphotos

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As recently as a decade ago, home buyers in Kitzbühel, Austria, mostly sought easy access to the slopes and a rollicking après-ski scene at local inns. ⠀ Now, year-rounders are pushing prices up—the number of home sales over €1 million has roughly tripled over the past five years—turning the city into an "Alpine version of Monte Carlo.”⠀ ⠀ The residential market is centered in the town of Kitzbühel proper, with its medieval churches and designer boutiques, and extends to villa-laden villages and mansion-lined mountain roads.⠀ ⠀ The surrounding area, which has a population of about 12,500, typically attracts more than 160,000 visitors in the ski season. An enhanced hiking-trail network, scenic alpine golf courses, plus a surge in e-bike riding, have established a second high season, from June to October. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Stefan Fuertbauer for @wsjrealestate

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"Growing up, I had an epic fantasy life,” says actress @brycedhoward of her childhood in Greenwich, Conn., where she would escape into the woods next to her home to find “a hidden kingdom—silent but alive.” Her parents, director @realronhoward and actress and writer Cheryl Howard, moved there from Los Angeles when she was 4 to give her and her twin-sisters a "normal, grounded childhood,” she recalls. “Land was important, since we were big animal lovers. By big, I mean we had dogs, cats, a pig, sheep, miniature donkeys, horses, a turtle, two birds and 20 chickens named Jennifer.” The 38-year-old—who has starred in 27 films, including the just released Elton John biopic @rocketmanmovie—also decided to forgo L.A. with her own husband and children, settling instead in the upstate New York countryside. “I still walk in the woods behind our house and feel the same sense of magic and mystery that I did as a child,” she says. “There’s a depth of feeling and presence there, like a walking meditation without distraction.” Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @dylan_location for @wsjphotos

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On June 6, 1944, an armada carrying 75,000 British and Canadian troops and 57,000 American soldiers landed on the shores of Normandy to push back Adolf Hitler's forces.⠀ ⠀ Thursday will mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, which laid the foundations of the trans-Atlantic alliance that has underpinned decades of trade and security ties across the West.⠀ ⠀ This year only a few dozen American D-Day veterans are returning to the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, which honors American troops who died in Europe during World War II. Less than 4% of WWII veterans are still alive, and few can muster the strength to travel.⠀ ⠀ "It will be our last opportunity to tell a good number of them thank you for what they've done," said Scott Desjardins, the superintendent of the cemetery and memorial.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @agnes_dherbeys for @wsjphotos

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Jess Sims' job would give many people nightmares: It requires working out in front of thousands of people. ⠀ ⠀ As a fitness instructor for @onepeloton, which streams her Iive workout sessions to people's home exercise equipment around the world, she appears on camera for 60 minutes, talking while running on a treadmill.⠀ ⠀ "At first I was apprehensive, like, 'What if I mess up? What if I look silly?'" she said. "But it's OK to stutter over your words, everyone does."⠀ ⠀ It was an unexpected career path for the former school principal, who now makes six figures, plus stock options. "[W]e are treated like professional athletes," she said.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @amylombard for @wsjphotos

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Doctors told Megan Crowley she'd die before high school. But last month, she donned a black cap and gown and wheeled herself across the stage at @notredame to receive her college diploma.⠀ ⠀ Megan suffers from Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles so she cannot walk, sit unassisted or take a single breath without a ventilator. Weak finger muscles meant she had to rely on tutors to take notes and type out papers from her dictation. Whenever she wanted to go anywhere, one of the nurses who provided round-the-clock medical care had to accompany her, even to parties.⠀ ⠀ Yet 3½ years after a rough start to her college career, Megan emerged more independent and self-confident, earning a 4.0 average in her final semester.⠀ ⠀ "I'm ready to meet new people, to meet new challenges," she said, chatting in her room with her friends as graduation approached. "I want to be my own person."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @lucyhewett for @wsjphotos

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Thirty years after the massacre at #TiananmenSquare, survivors like Rose Tang still often think back to the chaos of 1989.⠀ ⠀ Tang, 50, who has lived in Brooklyn for the past decade, still has her diary recounting the attack, written in English in case police seized it.⠀ ⠀ "I fell down and was beaten by a soldier," she wrote. "I felt choked, nearly dying. Lucky enough, I went atop a tank, then fled away, with shoes lost, glasses broken."⠀ ⠀ Liu Jan, who was a student in 1989, spent every day for weeks photographing the protests and scenes around him. After the crackdown, as he roamed streets littered with the bloodied dead, he stopped photographing, too horrified to capture what he saw. ⠀ ⠀ "I wanted to forget what happened," said Liu, 50. "It would be inconvenient to remember."⠀ ⠀ For three decades, he told no one about the nearly 2,000 images he had taken. But in 2016 he moved to the U.S. with his daughter, then 15, and last year he broached the topic of Tiananmen with her. He was astonished to find that she knew nothing about what occurred, pushing him to share his photos publicly for the first time. ⠀ ⠀ "We don't have the ability to change things," Liu said. "But we need to let young people understand what happened."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @dorothypunk and @timothy_archibald for @wsjphotos⠀ Additional photos courtesy of Rose Tang and Liu Jian

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Fashion designer @virgilabloh believes that "the future of fashion isn't going to be fashion." Amid concerns about the environment and a growing awareness of sustainability, the former creative director for Kanye West and current creative director for @louisvuitton is looking beyond labels. "Nowadays, the younger generation is very keen on reselling clothes as much as buying, or buying vintage," he said. "What's the role of the designer when the environment changes? That's very much what I'm researching and participating in." His shape-shifting as a creator is the motivation for his career retrospective, "Virgil Abloh: 'Figures of Speech,'" opening June 10 at @mcachicago. The show includes a 496-page catalogue featuring essays and interviews about the designer with architect Rem Koolhaas and others, as well as statements by Anna Wintour and Jenny Holzer. It's Abloh's desire to transcend fashion that drives the retrospective. "It's for the 17-year kid whose parents are like 'What do you want to do? Do you want to be a doctor or a lawyer, or a dentist?'" he said. " … or the kid turning around and saying 'I want to be an artist like Virgil and work for Louis Vuitton, work on a Nike line,' start his own brand, have an art career as a fine artist." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @_lyndonfrench_ for @wsjphotos

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This year Ben Congleton took three months of paternity leave from the 30-person company he founded to care for his newborn daughter. So did his cofounder — at the exact same time. Their employees found that life at work didn't go off the rails with the bosses gone. "When employees see the CEO and COO use our parental-leave policy and have faith that it's going to work, they think, 'Hey, I can do the same thing if I need to.' " said Mandy Smith, the company's director of people operations. Few men take more than a few days' parental leave without an explicit endorsement of their right to it, according to the 11-nation study. Many face social stigma and career damage if they do. In the U.S., only 15% of civilian workers have access to paid family leave, skewed toward high-paid workers in white-collar jobs at companies with 500 or more employees, according to an annual federal survey. More new fathers are now getting a taste of what working mothers have faced for decades. "A lot of it is societal pressure around what it means to be a mom," Congleton said, adding that women sometimes chide other mothers, asking how they can go back to work when they have two small children at home. "No one ever says that to a dad." Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @angeladecenzo for @wsjphotos

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When The Red Rooster drive-in first opened on Route 22 in Brewster, N.Y., in 1963, it became an essential stop for travelers. 🚗🍔🍦 The roadside restaurant was known for its bacon cheeseburger with a fried egg on top, red metal picnic tables filled with families and high-school sports teams, and a miniature golf course that was added sometime in the ‘70s. ⛳️ In recent years, an ATM was installed and an addition completed to seat 80 more patrons — but little else has changed. Andy Lintzeris, a manager and part-owner who’s worked at the year-round burger joint for 33 years, did notice a few years ago that while dads were still bringing their kids for burgers and fries, moms were staying away. “They’re vegan now and going to the gym.” Read more about the restaurant and other classic drive-ins across the U.S. at the link in our bio. 📷: @mesiryan for @wsjoffduty

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Since her breakout role in the 2000 horror parody "Scary Movie," @MoreReginaHall has never wanted for work, but her ascent has been slow and steady. The 48-year-old Washington, D.C., native has been acting since her 20s, after graduating from New York University with a master's degree in journalism. But it was the one-two punch of the surprise 2017 box office hit @GirlsTripMovie and the critically acclaimed 2018 indie film "Support the Girls" that garnered her a new level of recognition. Next month, she stars alongside Samuel L. Jackson in "Shaft," a sequel to the 1971 hit blaxploitation film of the same name. In some ways Hall's life has changed with her higher profile, but in other ways it’s the same. "My mom still has me going down to the grocery store all the time. I'm like, 'Mommy, I don’t want [people] to take pictures.' She’s like, 'Nobody’s gonna want any pictures. Just go down and get me some butter!'" @wsjmag spent the day with Hall as she did a full day of press interviews to promote her latest film @LittleTheMovie. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @celestesloman for @wsjmag

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Los Angeles real-estate developers have a big problem: There are too many new megamansions. So builders and brokers are throwing blowout bashes and testing an array of elaborate marketing stunts amid the bubble. At a party earlier this year, a camel greeted guests at the entrance of a home listed for $39.995 million. Developers will pay anywhere from $20,000 to hundreds of thousands to throw such events, said Alexander Ali, whose marketing and PR firm the Society Group organized the bash. "People come to us because they want to stand out," he said. "There are so many new homes coming to the market every day." Real-estate experts estimate that there are about 50 ultra high-end spec houses under construction in the area, from Beverly Hills to Bel-Air and Brentwood. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: The Society Group

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Nikita Kumar and her daughter Vani recently traveled on a sleek, high-speed passenger train called the Vande Bharat (“Hail India”) Express, the new star of the largest rail network in the world and a transportation lifeline for many Indians. The train travels 466 miles between Delhi and Varanasi, an ancient temple city on the banks of the river Ganges. The fastest train on this very busy route formerly took 11 and a half hours. It now takes eight. “[P]reviously, this was almost always an overnight journey on the rail network, and I needed someone to accompany me,” Kumar said. "Now, I can travel solo without any worry." The train also links the priorities of recently reelected Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who adopted Varanasi as his own parliamentary constituency when he was first elected in 2014. He has promised that there will soon be express trains like this between scores of Indian cities. Our essayist writes that the route of the Vande Bharat is like a journey between the two poles of Modi's psyche—from modernizer in Delhi to Hindu nationalist in Varanasi. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @sarahyltonphoto for @wsjphotos

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On Thursday, a group of college kids will see if their crazy attempt to be the first-ever independent team of students to send a rocket into outer space succeeds. 🚀 What started as a bored 18-year-old's idea will culminate at a spaceport in New Mexico, where the mostly teenage amateurs will use explosives and a high-grade launch rail to reach for the stars.⠀ ⠀ "We can't just go to the back of an elementary school and light a 17-foot rocket," said Joshua Farahzad, the @dukeuniversity double major who initially conceived of the plan, recruiting students from places like @princeton and @westpoint_usma to join him.⠀ ⠀ The group undertook the mission on a shoestring budget without the guidance of professors or the support of big-budget universities. The experiment almost died multiplied times, and at one point they assembled parts in a secret location to avoid upsetting school officials. But they did get approval from the @faa. ⠀ ⠀ "It's truly a miracle that we even got here," Farahzad said.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: @sstjohnphoto for @wsjphotos

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Down a dusty road in California's agricultural belt, 100 miles from the nearest beach, is a man-made wave as powerful as any produced by the ocean. 🌊 ⠀ ⠀ The Surf Ranch, designed by surf champion @kellyslater, is one of a growing number of wave-making projects betting that people will embrace a new future for the sport. Slater has spent 12 years transforming the former water-skiing lake into what is now a high performance practice pit for accomplished surfers.🏄🏄‍♀️ ⠀ ⠀ New machines allow visitors to dial up "air" sections that let them soar above the lip of the wave. The pools can also can mimic the "tube," a rarity that normally takes years of trial and error to find in the ocean.⠀ ⠀ Beyond this location, there are at least 13 other surfable artificial waves from Waco, Texas, to Yeppoon, Australia, while another 10 are under construction in places like Melbourne, Australia, and Siheung, South Korea. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @codypickens for @wsjphotos

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Ever since Esmé Savoie came into the world, limp, blue and struggling to breathe, doctors had been searching for the cause of her problems. They were certain the answer was hidden in the little girl's DNA.⠀ ⠀ A genetic test performed when she was almost 2 years old revealed a variant in one of Esmé's genes, which doctors thought might explain her delayed walking and talking, and epilepsy.⠀ ⠀ The findings gave her family an answer, leading Esmé's mother Hillary to throw herself into research and friendships with families of similar children. Then a subsequent DNA test pointed to a variant in a different gene as the culprit, upending everything.⠀ ⠀ "The ground kept shifting," her mother said. "It was a crisis of identity, as well as a crisis of faith in science to tell us something we could rely on."⠀ ⠀ Now 8 years old, Esmé has had three different diagnoses based on differing interpretations of her DNA. While testing has created a wealth of information for patients and doctors, the medical world is still trying to understand what it all means, bringing uncertainty and anxiety for families like the Savoies.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @lrnlncstr for @wsjphotos

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Carl Shackleford Jr. carries his father's memorial flag out of a storm-damaged apartment just outside of Dayton, Ohio, on Tuesday, after powerful tornadoes swept through the state and killed at least one person, officials said.⠀ ⠀ The storm that struck the north side of Dayton hit around 11 p.m. Monday, @nws officials said, leaving a miles-long path of devastation with downed trees, homes with their roofs torn off and many damaged vehicles. Investigators were being dispatched Tuesday morning to survey the wreckage and determine the strength of the storm.⠀ ⠀ One person was reported dead and several injured in a second possible tornado about 60 miles north of Dayton in Celina, Ohio, authorities said. The weather service is also looking at several other possible tornadoes across the state. ⠀ ⠀ 📷: Doral Chenoweth III/ @columbusdispatch / @apnews

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The @uswnt's victory in the 2015 @fifaworldcup generated millions for the U.S. Soccer Federation, but the players say it didn't bring a financial windfall for them personally.⠀ ⠀ Now, players @mrapinoe, @christenpress and @tobinheath—who are headed to the 2019 World Cup in France and are among 28 plaintiffs in a pay-equity lawsuit against @ussoccer—are joining former national-team player @meghankling in launching a company that will start by selling clothing but aims to expand to beauty, wellness and tech, the women say.⠀ ⠀ The larger goal of the company, called Re-Inc, is to increase the ranks of female business owners and seek investment from women and minorities in the largely male-dominated fashion and venture-capital worlds. The founders plan to use sustainable materials and take a gender-inclusive approach to product design.⠀ ⠀ "We want to be intentional because the goal isn't just to make money," Press said of @re__social. "The goal is to change the structure."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @erinpatriceobrien for @wsjphotos

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"It is harder to live with the medal than it was to earn it."⠀ ⠀ Former Green Beret medic Gary Beikirch received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a North Vietnamese attack on a U.S. Special Forces outpost near the Laotian border in 1970.⠀ ⠀ After being presented the award by President Richard Nixon, Beikirch returned to where he had been living in seclusion in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, put the medal in his duffel bag and didn't take it out for another seven years.⠀ ⠀ "Here I had gone into a cave to try to forget about Vietnam," he said, "and now they're going to give me a medal for something I'm trying to forget."⠀ ⠀ Beikirch is one of 70 living recipients of America's highest award for combat valor—which is both a gift and a constant reminder of what is often the worst day of a veteran's life.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @libbymarch for @wsjphotos; Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, NARA

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The key to easy homemade Danishes may be stashed in your freezer. ⠀ ⠀ With a little help from frozen puff pastry, it's surprisingly simple to produce these impressive breakfast treats. The store-bought stuff is actually reliably excellent, especially if you seek out a brand that lists real butter, not oil, as a primary ingredient.⠀ ⠀ For a sweet treat, try this wild-blueberry Danish with honey mascarpone. If you prefer savory, go for a braided pastry with asparagus, prosciutto and Boursin cheese.⠀ ⠀ Get both recipes at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @ryanliebe for @wsjoffduty

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Building a home on stilts is an ancient architectural practice.⠀ ⠀ But as climate change makes coastal flooding a rising threat, elevated homes are an increasingly popular weapon against storm surges and routine flooding. Studies on climate change's impact on cities dating back a decade have called for incorporating stilt homes into housing plans.⠀ ⠀ In Florida, a state that has more properties vulnerable to tidal flooding than any other, these types of homes have a foundation in Native American construction practices, said Miami architect Rene Gonzalez. Tribes in South Florida raised their homes so that breezes could flow under the property, bringing grain off the ground and keeping it away from rodents, he explained.⠀ ⠀ While stilts are most common in homes located right on the coast, they also have benefits for properties in low-lying areas, while others can take advantage of scenic views.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Brad Knipstein (1); Detlev von Kessel/Pix360 (2); Fotosold (3)

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@beaniefeldstein never thought she'd act in films.⠀ ⠀ Now, the younger sister of actor/director @jonahhill is front and center in @booksmart, @oliviawilde's critically acclaimed directorial debut about two high-school best friends that packs emotional heft with the nonstop jokes of a teen comedy.⠀ ⠀ "There are so many people that are naturally gifted or intensely talented and don't get to do what I get to do," said the 25-year-old. "I'm not taking this for granted, any little step of it."⠀ ⠀ Feldstein wanted to be on Broadway since she was 5 and realized her dream when she was cast in a revival of "Hello, Dolly!" But the part was set up by her role in 2017's "Lady Bird," whose producers were also in charge of the play. "Talk about turning points," she said.⠀ ⠀ Her brother—who starred in 2007's "Superbad," a film "Booksmart" is bound to be compared to—said if their career trajectories were reversed, he wouldn’t have tried to follow her with a similar role.⠀ ⠀ "I would worry about anyone else about to go through what she's about to go through in the world," he said, "except for her."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @katiemccurdy_ for @wsjmag

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Catherine Norcom used to build prototypes of tech tools for aircraft pilots. Now she's working on gadgets to hack into ATMs—and getting paid by IBM to do it.⠀ ⠀ As companies struggle to fill hundreds of thousands of open cybersecurity jobs around the U.S., they are casting a wider net to find and develop experts. This includes pursuing workers without traditional four-year degrees or formal experience to help them protect computer networks and customer data.⠀ ⠀ @ibm's head of offensive-security-services, Charles Henderson, said his team has more music majors than graduates with cybersecurity degrees. He said he often looks for people who are passionate about strategy videogames, as they may be more inclined to spend hours in front of a computer looking to solve a puzzle.⠀ ⠀ "If I'm hiring for an entry-level position on my team, what are they supposed to tell me?" Henderson said. "That they broke into some network and robbed a bank last week?"⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @brenthumphgreysphoto for @wsjphotos

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A powerful tornado hit Missouri's capital Jefferson City late Wednesday and three people were killed in a separate weather-related incident in the state's southwest, as dangerous storms continued to wreak havoc across the Great Plains this week.⠀ ⠀ The Jefferson City tornado ravaged a three-square-mile area and sent at least 20 people to the hospital, officials said. There were no immediate reports of fatalities in the city of about 43,000.⠀ ⠀ Violent weather has claimed at least four lives in recent days across a swath of the Great Plains and into Texas and Oklahoma.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: Charlie Riedel/Associated Press

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The failure to acknowledge the reality of women's bodies is one of fashion's weirdest, most stubborn blind spots.⠀ ⠀ The approximate clothing size of an average American woman is a 16 to 18 at 5 feet 3 inches tall, yet only 7% of womenswear stocked at multibrand retailers is a size 14 or above.⠀ ⠀ As the radical idea of "inclusive sizing" takes hold, upscale brands are dramatically extending the limits of chic to address the deep disconnect between women's actual sizes and the clothing available to them.⠀ ⠀ Today, direct-to-consumer brands are built around extended sizing; new labels are launching with extended sizing as a matter of course; and established outfitters are modifying their strategies to meet demand. The first 30 Nordstrom locations that added a broader range of sizes performed much better than the stores that didn't, the company said. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @katiemccurdy_ for @wsjphotos

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In the once-thriving town of Barão de Cocais in the heart of Brazil’s mining region, there is one question on everybody’s minds: Will I still be alive by Sunday?⠀ ⠀ After the January collapse of iron-ore giant Vale SA's mining-waste dam in Brumadinho, Brazil, killed 270 people, the company has warned authorities that its Sul Superior dam in Barão de Cocais could rupture at any moment this week, likely burying the town.⠀ ⠀ "It's the uncertainty that is pushing people over the edge," said José Apolinário, deacon of a local church. "This town is no longer the same—the dam is the only thing people talk about."⠀ ⠀ The 280-foot-high dam is one of Vale's nine remaining dams built via a cheaper method that has come under intense scrutiny following the collapse of the similarly constructed Brumadinho dam on Jan. 25. Engineers now believe the dam here to be so fragile that any small vibration could cause it to come crashing down.⠀ ⠀ Vale has already evacuated about 1,000 people living in the immediate vicinity of these nine dams, but tens of thousands of others nearby are now living on standby, ready to run. Many people in Barão de Cocais have left, but others can’t afford to or have nowhere to go. ⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @victormoriyama for @wsjphotos

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Milo is a 2-foot robot designed to look like a real little boy. He moves his hands and eyebrows, talks and even has dance parties with students like third-grader Anthony Zambrano at his school in Union, N.J.⠀ ⠀ Human-like robots like Milo, or the female version Robon, are one example of the technology being used in research, schools and clinics for children with autism spectrum disorder. They teach emotional, social and communication skills and serve as an effective tool for repetition, a key aspect of learning for children with autism. ⠀ ⠀ South Carolina launched a pilot program two years ago putting the robots in about 15 districts across the state. Still, experts emphasize such technology isn't a cure-all.⠀ ⠀ "We're not replacing teachers with robots," says Lisa Raiford, education associate for autism in the South Carolina's education department. "They support the lesson."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @benlens for @wsjphotos

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Joy Brown, 32, earns $75,000 a year as a compliance officer for the city of Chicago. She also owes $102,000 in student loans and $10,000 in credit-card debt. "If I can't afford a home, I definitely can't afford kids," she said. "Myself and a lot of my peers still feel like we're playing catch-up in the game of life." New data shows millennials are in worse financial shape than every preceding living generation and may never recover. They have less wealth, less property, lower marriage rates and fewer children, according to new data that compare generations at similar ages. Even with record levels of education, the troubles of millennials have delayed traditional adult milestones in ways expected to alter the nation's demographic and economic contours through the end of the century. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @alyssaschukar for @wsjphotos

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If this "Crystal device" works as advertised, it would achieve something that has eluded great minds from Leanardo da Vinci to Nikola Tesla.⠀ ⠀ Dennis Danzik, the science and technology officer for Wyoming-based Inductance Energy Corp., says he has invented a magnetic generator, a flywheel system that extracts usable energy from the interplay of exotic magnets—also known as a free-energy device, a cousin to the fabled perpetual-motion machine.⠀ ⠀ Danzik has found a way to squeeze enormous, unexpected energy from permanent magnets—"nature’s batteries," he calls them. Such a discovery would rank with the harnessing of steam, electricity and the atom.⠀ ⠀ But his work is not without its skeptics, including a scientist who called perpetual-motion machines "bunk" and magnets "the refuge of charlatans."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in the bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @jesserieser for @wsjphotos

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Marcia Baker took parts from three ancient Fords to build this one-of-a-kind jalopy.⠀ ⠀ The 63-year-old from Boonton, N.J., had been living in Maine, where she owned a land-speed racing car and set her fastest speed of 192.9 mph driving someone's Corvette.⠀ ⠀ She had a friend, Frank Walka, who visited her once a month to help work on the car, and when she retired he asked her to move to New Jersey with the plan of building a jalopy race car.⠀ ⠀ They got to work buying parts from all over, and out came "The Flying Seven"—a composite of a 1932 Ford engine, a 1928 Ford Model A chassis and a 1923 Model T body. The car was named after the land-speed racing car Baker used to own, as well as the No. 7 billiards ball used for a gearshift handle.⠀ ⠀ She raced the car for the first time a year ago at @bapsmotorspeedway in York Haven, Pa. "It was very bouncy, and performed better than we expected. Top speed so far is 53 mph." Since then, Baker's raced it in New Jersey, Long Island and Pennsylvania.⠀ ⠀ "Frank has his jalopy and I have mine and we travel together. We started out as business partners and now I can say he is my boyfriend," she said. "We are also building a new land-speed racing vehicle. Retirement has been great. I could not imagine having any more fun."⠀ ⠀ 📷: @mattrothphoto for @wsjphotos

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To get to this car-free Los Angeles enclave, you may need to ride a 100-foot-tall antique elevator—but only if you have the keys. The High Tower neighborhood perched above the heart of Hollywood is one of the most unusual in LA. Residents must climb one of two walkways cut into hundreds of steps, or have a private key to access the five-story elevator crafted in the style of an Italian campanile. "It's like a little magical land," said resident Ari Heckman. The whimsical nature of the neighborhood, combined with its location in the Hollywood Hills, has made it a magnet for creative types. Renters have included illusionist @d_copperfield, film director @timburton_ and, briefly, musicians @courtneylove and Kurt Cobain. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: @michalczerwonka for @wsjrealestate

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Two months after record floods swept down the Missouri River, several bridges remain closed along a 150-mile stretch between Omaha, Neb., and St. Joseph, Mo., choking off travel for thousands of people. A middle-school teacher's round-trip commute has gone from 70 minutes to 200. A Nebraska man's trip to his Missouri farm that normally takes 15 minutes now takes over 2 1/2 hours. A convenience store owner in the tourist town of Brownville, Neb., says sales are down because customers from Missouri and Iowa are unable to cross, and delivery drivers can't make the trip. Most of the bridges along the Missouri River are structurally sound, but continued flooding has made them inaccessible. Getting the bridges reopened could take weeks or months because the roads leading to them remain saturated or are strewn with debris. Read more at the link in our bio. 📷: Christopher Smith for @wsjphotos

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It's been a long time since flying commercial in the United States has been glamorous.⠀ ⠀ The @twahotel, which debuted in the landmarked TWA terminal at JFK airport earlier this week, wants to smash the cynicism associated with air travel. ⠀ ⠀ The hotel, originally opened as the airline's New York terminal in 1962, played host to our columnist on opening night—and did not disappoint. ⠀ ⠀ "This is pure Jet Age stylishness, and the effect is transporting," he writes. ⠀ ⠀ Read the full review at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @agatonphoto for @wsjphotos

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Taxidermist Ingrid Houwers' spent eight years filling orders for coyote skins, antlers and stuffed game birds to feature on @gameofthrones. ⠀ ⠀ Her work for the blockbuster @hbo series provided as much as half her business’s yearly revenue, making up a small piece of the Iron Throne economy in Northern Ireland, where the show is shot.⠀ ⠀ Blacksmiths, jewelers, hotels and restaurants there cashed in on #GOT fever as the show's producers used their services and tourists flocked to popular shooting locations. Some 350,000 visitors cited the series as a reason for visiting the country last year, according to Tourism Northern Ireland.⠀ ⠀ Spending on goods and services associated with the series added an estimated £251 million ($328 million) ⠀ to the national economy since the show began filming, according to Screen NI.⠀ ⠀ "We will never see its like again," Houwers said.⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @christopherbarrphotography for @wsjphotos

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"I didn't come for the sphere. I came for the security."⠀ ⠀ The "Caracas Sphere" in Venezuela was created by artist Jesús Soto to honor what he saw as a rising oil nation in the '90s.⠀ ⠀ These days, the celebrated work is less a symbol of hope than a well-lit and guarded spot that serves as an impromptu refuge from crime and economic need. The giant orange orb suspended in the air, seemingly defying gravity, is now a reminder of a country—and an art scene—that have fallen from grace.⠀ ⠀ Just 17% of Venezuelans feel safe walking outside at night, according to Gallup's 2018 Global Law and Order report, which ranked Venezuela last, even below Afghanistan, on perceived safety.⠀ ⠀ With subsidized gasoline nearly free, motorists from across the city fill the lawn that surrounds the art installation at sundown for a mass hangout.⠀ ⠀ "This was a symbol of progress, a metaphor of transcendence," Ariel Jiménez, an art historian and curator, said of the sphere. "But it's converted into something very sad, a form of nostalgia for a country that maybe we could become again someday."⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @fabiolaferrero for @wsjphotos

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Will Maxwell has been using a ride-hailing service since he was 13 years old. The New York City resident, now 16, still takes app-based cabs home three days a week after sports practice—but not through @uber and @lyft, which forbid drivers from picking up any unaccompanied children under 18. When not openly defying those rules, overbooked children and their overworked parents are turning to new services that have cropped up in recent years to transport children. Companies like @hopskipdrive, created by three moms and designed for the 6-and-up-set, requires all drivers to pass a rigorous background check, have five years of child-care experience and tell the child a code word at pickup. The driver then asks the child for their birth date, so they know they're picking up the right kid. Services like @ridewithvia, which requires riders be at least 13 years old, have seen a 20% to 25% increase in demand around school opening and closing hours, according to the company’s general manager. Read more about these new services and get tips for riding safely at the link in our bio. 📷: @benlens for @wsjphotos

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Michael Jenkins had been out of prison about 18 months when an aunt told him about a Chicago job-training program for people with criminal records.⠀ ⠀ Today he works at Progressive Coating in the North Lawndale neighborhood, "something to brag about" for an ex-convict who says he has been arrested more times than he can remember.⠀ ⠀ "We might be ex-offenders," Jenkins said, “but that doesn’t mean we are necessarily bad people, lazy or unemployable.”⠀ ⠀ In America’s tight job market, former inmates can be an attractive talent pool for smaller firms like Progressive. Since October, company owner Stephen Walters has hired three men, including Jenkins, from the job-training program. Walters said hiring people with criminal records is a way for the firm to help its neighborhood, which reported 31 murders last year. ⠀ ⠀ "If we can't be part of the solution, providing people with opportunity," he said, "how can we be surprised when people repeat the same cycle?"⠀ ⠀ Read more at the link in our bio.⠀ ⠀ 📷: @tayloremrey for @wsjphotos