NASA Exploration Systems - instagram lists #feedolist

ExploreNASA

Breanne Stichler, a mechanical engineer, is photographed inside the cab of NASA’s Crawler-Transporter 2 (CT-2) at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Aug. 8, 2019. CT-2 will carry our mobile launcher with the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B for the launch of Artemis 1. 🙌 Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky #NASA #artemis #exploration #groundsystems #sls #rocket #orion #spacecraft #spacecoast

ExploreNASA

Imagine seeing the Earth, Moon, and stars all in one view, as was captured by the crew of the International Space Station ( @iss). They could see the Earth's atmospheric glow, highlighted by the Moon and a starry orbital nighttime background while orbiting 256 miles above the Pacific Ocean, southeast of the Hawaiian island chain. Happy #spacesaturday folks! 💫 More as always on nasa.gov. Credit: NASA #nasa #earth #space #iss #stars #explore #internationalspacestation #twinklestar

ExploreNASA

On Artemis 2 the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket will send astronauts on their first flight aboard the Orion spacecraft farther into the solar system than humanity has ever traveled before.  This mission will mark a significant step forward in our plans to return humans to the Moon for long-term exploration and future missions to worlds beyond, including Mars. Here you can see the work already underway on the Core Stage-2 Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility. This photos shows 1 of 5 barrels being loaded in the Vertical Assembly Center tool where it will be welded. 🚀 Credit: NASA/ Eric Bordelon #NASA #artemis #sls #rocket #orion #spacecraft #moon #astronauts

ExploreNASA

A flow test of the Ignition Overpressure Protection and Sound Suppression water deluge system is underway on the mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on July 25, 2019. The testing is part of a series of tests that Exploration Ground System is doing to verify the system is ready for the new Space Launch System rocket. Modifications were made to the pad after a previous wet flow test, increasing the performance of the system. During the launch of Artemis 1 and subsequent missions, this water deluge system will release about 450,000 gallons of water across the mobile launcher and Flame Deflector to reduce the extreme heat and energy generated by the rocket during ignition and liftoff. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett #nasa #mobilelauncher #pad39B #nasakennedy #engineering #groundsystems #space #artemis1

ExploreNASA

A drone moves high above downtown Reno, Nevada on the afternoon of June 23, 2019 as part of NASA’s TCL-4 (Technology Capability Level) operation. TCL-4 involves flight testing multiple Unmanned Aerial Systems in higher-density urban areas for tasks such as newsgathering, package delivery and large-scale contingency mitigation. The next and final test site will be Corpus Christi, Texas in August. The challenges associated with the safe flight of drones – piloted or unpiloted – are a big topic in aerospace. NASA, with its partners including the FAA, is researching and planning ways to address the biggest barriers including noise, safety, certification, and public acceptance. Learn more about NASA Aeronautics at nasa.gov/aero. Credit: NASA/Andrew Carlsen #nasa #drones #dronestagram #faa #aeronautics #technology #techtuesday #flynasa

ExploreNASA

A close-up aerial view of Launch Complex 39B with Exploration Ground Systems’ mobile launcher for the Artemis 1 mission on the pad. The mobile launcher, atop crawler-transporter 2, made its final solo trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building on June 27, 2018, and arrived on the surface of pad B on June 28, 2019, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The mobile launcher will remain at the pad over the summer, undergoing final testing and checkouts. Its next roll to the pad will be with the agency’s Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft in preparation for the launch of Artemis 1. Credit: NASA/Frank Michaux #nasa #mobilelauncher #pad39b #space #exploration #nasakennedy #launch #atlanticocean #spacecoast

ExploreNASA

As we reflect on the #Apollo50th and look ahead to an exciting future in space, we think of all of you. What captivates you about Earth’s Moon? Tag #explorenasa in your favorite Moon photos to be featured (and be thoughtful in your description!) 🌙 “It was dawn in New York as the ethereal fog slowly dissolved, revealing the crescent Moon in its hypnotizing allure—floating in the vast expanse of space. Witnessing this quiet celestial moment in time was surreal and magical. As I gazed into the night sky, I was overcome with deep emotions as I reflected on the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 mission...” Image credit: urbanxkoi #nasa #moon #crescentmoon #space #lookup #nightsky

ExploreNASA

Every now and then, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope glimpses a common object — say, a spiral galaxy — in an interesting or unusual way. A sharply angled perspective, such as the one shown here, can make it seem as if we, the viewers, are craning our necks to see over a barrier into the galaxy's bright center. In the case of NGC 3169, this barrier is the thick dust embedded within the galaxy's spiral arms. Cosmic dust comprises a potpourri of particles, including water ice, hydrocarbons, silicates and other solid material. It has many origins and sources, from the leftovers of star and planet formation to molecules modified over millions of years by interactions with starlight. Learn more about this picture and our universe at nasa.gov/Hubble. Happy #spacesaturday folks! 💫 Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency) Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Ho #nasa #space #exploration #universe #hubble #galaxies #farfaraway #starstuff

ExploreNASA

Yesterday NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced that the agency will do a Green Run test for the Space Launch System (SLS) prior to Artemis 1. Here’s why: • Astronaut safety is our #1 priority • Increases probability of a successful Moon landing in 2024 • It’s important to discover issues earlier rather than later. The first eight minutes of every Artemis mission with the SLS rocket will begin with core stage and solid rocket boosters producing 8.8 million pounds of thrust to launch NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon. We will test the rocket’s 212-foot tall core stage with a “Green Run” test at the B-2 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Flight Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.  We’ll test on Earth before launch day to help ensure mission success and pave the way for future Artemis missions carrying crew to the Moon. Missions at the Moon will be a stepping stone to prepare for human exploration of Mars. Credit: NASA #NASA #sls #rocket #greenrun #artemis #orion #moon #exploration

ExploreNASA

This photo taken fifty years ago today shows the three Apollo 11 crewmembers awaiting pickup by a helicopter from the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The fourth man in the life raft is a United States Navy underwater demolition team swimmer. All four men are wearing biological isolation garments. Apollo 11, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, onboard, splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the USS Hornet. Credit: NASA #nasa #history #apollo50 #moon #exploration #astronauts #otd #artemis

ExploreNASA

Teamwork makes the dream work. Yesterday the fourth and final structural test article for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) core stage was unloaded from barge Pegasus at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The nearly 70-foot-long liquid oxygen (LOX) tank structural test article was manufactured at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans and is structurally identical to the flight version. Next, crews will load it into a test stand at Marshall for critical testing. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two propellant tanks in the rocket’s core stage that will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch Artemis 1, the first flight of the Orion spacecraft and SLS rocket, to the Moon. Testing ensures the success, not only of the initial flights, but also those SLS flights that will carry American astronauts to the Moon and ultimately to Mars. Credit: NASA #nasa #artemis #moontomars #sls #rocket #orion #spacecraft #moon #deepspace #exploration

ExploreNASA

😍CubeSats. A set of three CubeSats are ejected from the Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to a robotic arm outside of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory module. The tiny satellites from Nepal, Sri Lanka and Japan were released into Earth orbit for technology demonstrations. The International Space Station was orbiting 256 miles above the Amazon River in Brazil when an Expedition 59 crewmember took this photograph. Credit: NASA #NASA #cubesat #astronaut #spacestation #space

ExploreNASA

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows bright, colorful pockets of star formation blooming like roses in a spiral galaxy named NGC 972. The orange-pink glow is created as hydrogen gas reacts to the intense light streaming outwards from nearby newborn stars; these bright patches can be seen here amid dark, tangled streams of cosmic dust. Astronomers look for these telltale signs of star formation when they study galaxies throughout the cosmos, as star formation rates, locations, and histories offer critical clues about how these colossal collections of gas and dust have evolved over time. New generations of stars contribute to — and are also, in turn, influenced by — the broader forces and factors that mold galaxies throughout the universe, such as gravity, radiation, matter, and dark matter. German-British astronomer William Herschel is credited with the discovery of NGC 972 in 1784. Astronomers have since measured its distance, finding it to be just under 70 million light-years away. ✨Happy #spacesaturday folks! ✨ Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, L. Ho #nasa #esa #hubble #stars #space #science #exploration

ExploreNASA

“Our gateway to space, from space. The next people looking up from their rockets at Cape Canaveral will be aiming toward us. The people after them will be aiming for something even farther: the Moon. #Artemis #Moon2024” Tweeted by NASA Astronaut Christina Koch, we couldn’t have said it better ourselves! Credit: NASA | Christina Koch #NASA #orion #spacecraft #SLS #rocket #exploration #groundsystems #astronauts #moon

ExploreNASA

Throwback Thursday Fourth of July style!🇺🇸 The STS-121 crewmembers, having donned their shuttle launch and entry suits, waved flags for July 4, 2006 as they headed out of the Operations and Checkout Building at Kennedy Space Center to the transfer van awaiting to take them to Launch Pad 39B. Steven W. Lindsey (right front), commander, and Mark E. Kelly, pilot, lead the way. Other crewmembers - Lisa M. Nowak, Michael E. Fossum, Stephanie D. Wilson, Piers J. Sellers and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter of Germany - follow. Their launch is viewed from the top of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Space Shuttle Discovery shoots like a roman candle into the blue sky, kicking off the fireworks with its own fiery display. 🎇 It was the third launch attempt in four days; the others were scrubbed due to weather concerns. Liftoff was on-time ‪at 2:38 p.m. EDT‬. Have a safe and happy holiday, folks! 🚀 Credit: NASA #NASA #tbt #spaceshuttle #astronauts #fourthofjuly #spacecoast #liftoff #fireworks

ExploreNASA

We’re still flying high after yesterday’s successful test of the Orion spacecraft’s launch abort system! This test demonstrated that the Orion spacecraft’s launch abort system can outrun a speeding rocket and pull astronauts to safety during an emergency during launch. A test version of the Orion crew module launched at 7 a.m. EDT from Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a modified Peacekeeper missile procured through the U.S. Air Force and built by Northrop Grumman. The Orion test spacecraft traveled to an altitude of about six miles, at which point it experienced high-stress aerodynamic conditions expected during ascent. The abort sequence triggered and, within milliseconds, the abort motor fired to pull the crew module away from the rocket. Its attitude control motor flipped the capsule end-over-end to properly orient it, and then the jettison motor fired, releasing the crew module for splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean. A team is collecting the 12 data recorders that were ejected during the test capsule’s descent. Analysis of the information will provide insight into the abort system’s performance. Credit: NASA #NASA #artemis #orion #spacecraft #astronaut #safety #moon #exploration

ExploreNASA

👋🏼The last of four structural test articles for our Space Launch System (SLS) rocket was loaded onto NASA’s Pegasus barge Wednesday, June 26, 2019, at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The barge will deliver the liquid oxygen (LOX) tank structural test article from Michoud to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for critical structural testing. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two propellant tanks in the rocket’s core stage that will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help send Artemis 1, the first flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and SLS, to the Moon. The nearly 70-foot-long test article is structurally identical to the flight version, which will hold 196,000 gallons of liquid oxygen super cooled to minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit. We're working to land the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024. SLS is part of our backbone for deep space exploration, along with Orion and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts and supplies to the Moon on a single mission. Credit: NASA/Jude Guidry #NASA #SLS #rocket #artemis #moon #deepspace #exploration #orion #groundsystems #corestage

ExploreNASA

😍 Magnificent! The Ascent Abort-2 flight test of the launch abort system for NASA’s Orion spacecraft, featuring a test version of the crew module, lifted off from Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Tuesday, July 2, at 7 a.m. EDT. According to Orion program manager Mark Kirasich, the quick-look data looks great. “It was a very smooth liftoff, Kirasich said. “By all first accounts, it was magnificent.” Photo credit: NASA #nasa #artemis #orion #spacecraft #moontomars #humansinspace #sls #rocket #exploration #groundsystems

ExploreNASA

Tomorrow is the big day! 🚀💫 🙌 A test version of NASA’s Orion crew module is ready for rollback at Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. During a Launch Readiness Review on June 28, the team preparing to launch Orion’s Ascent Abort-2 flight test gave a “go” to proceed to launch on Tuesday, July 2. The four-hour launch window opens at 7 a.m. EDT. NASA TV will broadcast launch activities, starting at 6:40 a.m. A postlaunch briefing is  scheduled for approximately two hours after launch. Image Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett #NASA #orion #spacecraft #AA2 #test #moon #artemis #humansinspace #goforlaunch

ExploreNASA

This stunning image of Jupiter's stormy northern hemisphere was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it performed a close pass of the gas giant planet. Some bright-white clouds can be seen popping up to high altitudes on the right side of Jupiter's disk. Juno took the four images used to produce this color-enhanced view on May 29, 2019, between 3:52 a.m. EDT and 4:03 a.m. EDT, as the spacecraft performed its 20th science pass of Jupiter. At the time the images were taken, the spacecraft was between 11,600 miles (18,600 kilometers) and 5,400 miles (8,600 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops, above a northern latitude spanning from about 59 to 34 degrees. Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager. JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at: https://missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing Happy #spacesaturday folks! 💫 Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill #nasa #juno #jupiter #space #exploration #solarsystem #northernhemisphere #planets

explorenasa

50 years ago, Apollo 11 astronauts participated in simulations of deploying and using lunar tools on the surface of the moon as shown in the first photo taken April 22, 1969. Today, members of the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab run tests, which simulate the Moon’s reduced gravity to see how the Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) excavates this moon-like surface. On the actual surface of the Moon, mining robots like RASSOR will excavate the regolith and take the material to a processing plant where usable elements such as hydrogen, oxygen and water can be extracted for life support systems. RASSOR can scoop up icy regolith which can be used to make operations on the Moon sustainable. Credit: NASA #NASA #apollo #artemis #moontomars #moon

explorenasa

NASA achieved a significant milestone in manufacturing the first large, complex core stage that will help power the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on upcoming missions to the Moon. NASA and lead contractor Boeing have assembled four-fifths of the massive core stage needed to launch SLS and the Orion spacecraft on their first mission to the Moon: Artemis 1. At approximately 190 feet, about the size of 12 cars parked end-to-end, the stage in its current configuration is the largest rocket stage we’ve built since the Saturn V stages that first sent humans to the Moon nearly 50 years ago. The completed core stage, which includes two propellant tanks as well as four RS-25 engines, will tower at 212 feet. It, along with the twin five-segment solid rocket boosters, will produce the majority of the power to send the SLS and Orion to space. Credit: NASA #NASA #artemis #moontomars #sls #rocket #explore #deepspace

explorenasa

The test version of Orion attached to the Launch Abort System for the Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) flight test is moved by crane into the vertical integration facility at Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on May 23, 2019. The flight test article will be stacked atop the booster, which was procured by the U.S. Air Force and manufactured by Northrop Grumman. During AA-2, targeted for July 2, the LAS with Orion will launch on the booster more than six miles in altitude, where Orion’s Launch Abort System will pull the capsule and its crew away to safety if an emergency occurs during ascent on the Space Launch System rocket. AA-2 is a critical safety test that helps pave the way for Artemis missions near the Moon, and will enable astronauts to set foot on the lunar surface by 2024. Credit: NASA/Tony Gray #nasa #orion #artemis #moon2024 #moontomars #moonmonday #spaceship #space #exploration

explorenasa

This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59. As this latter moniker indicates, the galaxy is listed in the famous catalog of deep-sky objects compiled by French comet-hunter Charles Messier in the 18th century. However, German astronomer Johann Gottfried Koehler is credited with discovering the galaxy just days before Messier added it to his collection in 1779. Modern observations show that Messier 59 is an elliptical galaxy, one of the three main kinds of galaxies along with spirals and irregulars. Ellipticals tend to be the most evolved of the trio, full of old, red stars and exhibiting little or no new star formation. Messier 59, however, bucks this trend somewhat; the galaxy does show signs of star formation, with some newborn stars residing within a disk near the core. Located in the 2,000-strong Virgo cluster of galaxies within the constellation of Virgo (the Virgin), Messier 59 lies approximately 50 million light-years away from us. This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. Messier 59 is featured in Hubble’s Messier catalog, which includes some of the most fascinating objects that can be observed from Earth’s Northern Hemisphere. Happy #spacesaturday folks! ✨ Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, P. Cote #nasa #esa #hubble #stars #space #explore #theuniverse

explorenasa

NASA Astronaut Christina Koch shared some amazing shots last Friday from on board the International Space Station writing, “Moon set from last weekend showing how the atmosphere acts like a lens! Denser layers bend the light more, making the moon appear flatter as light reflected off of it travels through the denser atmosphere of Earth.” 😍🌕 Credit: NASA #NASA #spacestation #astronaut #moon #photography #exploration  #science

explorenasa

Progress towards Artemis 2! NASA and Northrop Grumman technicians in Promontory, Utah, have applied insulation to the final booster motor segment for Artemis 2, the second flight of our deep space rocket, the Space Launch System, and Orion spacecraft. The insulation, applied to the interior of each steel motor segment, protects the casing from the heat generated by the propellant during launch and flight. The twin, five-segment solid rocket motor boosters for SLS are the largest, most powerful solid propellant boosters ever built. SLS uses both liquid and solid propellant to provide the thrust needed to launch the vehicle and send it to space. 💪The boosters provide more than 75% of the total thrust at launch and into the first two minutes of flight. Five motor segments are stacked together to create a single, very large motor for each booster. The manufacture and checkout of all 10 motor segments for Artemis 1, the first test flight of SLS and Orion, were completed earlier this year. ✅ Credit: Northrop Grumman #NASA #moon2024 #SLS #rocket #orion #spacecraft #groundsystems #deepspace #exploration #powerful

explorenasa

It’s time to bust out the sunscreen! 😎 Did you know the thermal protection applied to the Space Launch System hardware “tans” from a canary yellow to a burnt orange over time? Slide to see what the liquid hydrogen tank test article looked like at NASA’s Michoud Assembly back in December compared to what it looks like in the test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center now. The liquid hydrogen tank is part of the rocket’s core stage that is more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, and stores cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25 engines. The liquid hydrogen tank test article is structurally identical to the flight version of the tank that will comprise two-thirds of the core stage and hold 537,000 gallons of supercooled liquid hydrogen at minus 423 degrees Fahrenheit. Dozens of hydraulic cylinders in the 215-foot-tall test stand have been pushing and pulling the tank, subjecting it to the same stresses and loads it will endure during liftoff and flight on Artemis 1, the first flight test of SLS and the Orion spacecraft as an integrated system. 🚀💫 Credit: NASA #NASA #moon2024 #sls #rocket #orion #spacecraft #rocketscience #space #exploration

explorenasa

The vehicle for Orion’s Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) flight test exited the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 22, 2019. The flight test article then made a 21.5 mile trek to Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in preparation for its launch this summer. During AA-2, a test version of Orion will launch on a booster to more than six miles in altitude, where Orion’s launch abort system will pull the capsule away to demonstrate it can keep a future crew inside safe if an emergency occurs during ascent on the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The AA-2 elements will be stacked together at the launch pad over the next several weeks. Save the date! The launch is planned for ‪July 2‬ and is a critical safety test that helps pave the way for Artemis missions near the Moon, and will enable astronauts to set foot on the lunar surface by 2024. Credit: NASA #NASA #moon2024 #AA2 #orion #spacecraft #sls #rocket #groundsystems #capecanaveral #spacecoast

explorenasa

The aurora australis, also known as the "southern lights," is pictured as the International Space Station orbited 264 miles above the Indian Ocean south of the Australian island state of Tasmania. Credit: NASA/Nick Hague #nasa #southernlights #explore #space #astrophotography #auroraaustralis #iss #spacestation #humansinspace

explorenasa

This image is of Jezero Crater on Mars, the landing site for NASA's Mars 2020 mission. It was taken by instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which regularly takes images of potential landing sites for future missions. On ancient Mars, water carved channels and transported sediments to form fans and deltas within lake basins. Examination of spectral data acquired from orbit show that some of these sediments have minerals that indicate chemical alteration by water. Here in Jezero Crater delta, sediments contain clays and carbonates. Happy #spacesaturday folks! Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/JHU-APL #nasa #space #mars #exploration #robots #planets #solarsystem

explorenasa

Prior to Exploration Flight Test-1, Orion's first flight in December 2014, NASA's Super Guppy was moving part of the heat shield around the country — this picture shows it landing at a base near Denver with the support structure onboard before it was transported to the Lockheed Martin Waterton facility. There was a light dusting of snow around the airport that day; the mist is actually snow perpetuated by the movement of the propeller. Credit: NASA #nasa #superguppy #orion #snowy #spacecraft #aircraft #flynasa #throwback #tbt #runway #space

explorenasa

Engineers at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans have completed the “forward join,” connecting structures to form the top part of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage. This first core stage will send Exploration Mission-1 the first integrated flight of SLS and the Orion spacecraft, out beyond the Moon. The forward join mated three structures shown here: the forward skirt, the liquid oxygen tank and the intertank. This milestone marks the beginning of integration and assembly of the massive, 212-foot-tall SLS core stage which will include the rocket’s four RS-25 rocket engines, propellant tanks, and flight computers. Now, NASA and Boeing, the SLS prime contractor, will continue to integrate various systems inside the forward part of the core stage and prepare for structural joining of the liquid hydrogen tank and engine section to form the bottom of the stage. These two parts of the core stage will then be assembled to form the largest stage NASA has ever built. Learn more at www.nasa.gov/EM1 Image Credit: NASA/Jude Guidry #nasa #spacelaunchsystem #sls #orion #michoud #nola #engineering #building #techtuesday #welding #technology #scale #rockets #spaceships #space #exploration #moontomars

explorenasa

A multitude of magnificent, swirling clouds in Jupiter's dynamic North North Temperate Belt is captured in this image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Appearing in the scene are several bright-white “pop-up” clouds as well as an anticyclonic storm, known as a white oval. Learn more at www.nasa.gov/juno Happy #spacesaturday folks! Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran #nasa #juno #jupiter #solarsystem #space #exploration #swirls #spacescience

explorenasa

Wishing us all a good morning from aboard the International Space Station, astronaut Anne McClain wrote on Twitter: "Good morning to our beautiful world, and to all the beautiful people who call it home! #TeamHuman" 🌞 Credit: NASA #nasa #spacestation #astronaut #earth #space #home #humansinspace

explorenasa

Robert Curbeam currently holds the record for the most spacewalks during a single spaceflight. In this image from December 2006, Curbeam works on the port overhead solar array wing on the International Space Station's P6 truss during Space Shuttle Discovery's STS-116 mission. This was the mission's fourth spacewalk. Curbeam conducted this spacewalk with European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), using specially prepared, tape-insulated tools, to guide the array wing neatly inside its blanket box during the 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk. Image Credit: NASA #nasa #astronauts #explore #space #humansinspace #spacewalk #iss #spacestation #exploration #discovery #solarsystem #BlackHistoryMonth

explorenasa

Also known as NGC 6523 or the Lagoon Nebula, Messier 8 is a giant cloud of gas and dust where stars are currently forming. At a distance of about 4,000 light years from Earth, Messier 8 provides astronomers an excellent opportunity to study the properties of very young stars. Many infant stars give off copious amounts of high-energy light including X-rays, which are seen in the Chandra data (pink). The X-ray data have been combined with an optical image of Messier 8 from the Mt. Lemmon Sky Center in Arizona (blue and white). Wishing everyone a very happy #spacesaturday! Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona #nasa #space #universe #stars #nebula #beautiful #exploration #spacescience #chandra #xray #twinkletwinklelittlestar

explorenasa

NASA Stennis Space Center NASA marked the first RS-25 engine test of the year on Feb. 13 on the A-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. This test, featured a flight controller that will serve as the RS-25 avionics for missions. It was also the third time NASA has powered an RS-25 engine to 113 percent of original thrust level. The hot fire test also continued testing of two engine components – a 3D-printed pogo accumulator to dampen pressure oscillations that can cause flight instability and a main combustion chamber fabricated using a new hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding technique. Aerojet is making both components with innovative techniques that saves considerable time and money. Slide forward to see a really great shot of the engine firing up inside the test stand! 🚀 Credit: NASA #nasa #spacelaunchsystem #hotfire #rocketscience #sls #stennisspacecenter #engines #smokeandfire #mississippi

explorenasa

The surface of the Moon is reflected in the command and service module as it prepares to rendezvous with the lunar module in this December 1972 image from the Apollo 17 mission. 🌙 Image Credit: NASA #nasa #apollo #moon #lunar #exploration #flashbackfriday #nasahistory #missions #inspace #explore #solarsystem #moontomars #space #adastra ✨

ExploreNASA

A close look at the brightest comet of 2018... As the brilliant comet streaked across the sky, @NASA telescopes caught it on camera from multiple angles. NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope photographed comet 46P/Wirtanen on Dec. 13, 2018, when the comet was 7.4 million miles (12 million kilometers) from Earth. In this visible-light image, the comet’s nucleus is hidden in the center of a fuzzy glow from the comet’s coma. The coma is a cloud of gas and dust that the comet has ejected during its pass through the inner solar system due to heating from the Sun. To make this composite image, the color blue was applied to high-resolution grayscale exposures acquired from the spacecraft’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. More info as always at NASA.gov/Hubble 💫 Credits: NASA, ESA, D. Bodewits (Auburn University) and J.-Y. Li (Planetary Science Institute) #nasa #comet #solarsystem #hubble #space #telescope #science #technology #explore #solarsystemandbeyond

ExploreNASA

Fifty years ago on Dec. 21, 1968, Apollo 8 launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center at 7:51 a.m. EST. Frank Borman commanded the crew of the Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. James Lovell served as command module pilot and William Anders was the lunar module pilot. Apollo 8 was the first crewed Saturn V launch. Apollo 8 was supposed to be a test flight to simulate atmospheric re-entry from the Moon but never meant to go there. But then the Soviet Union successfully launched two successful uncrewed lunar missions — Zond 5 and 6 — and NASA's plans changed. The rest, as they say, is history. More info as always on NASA.gov! Credit: NASA #nasa #nasahistory #apollo8 #apollo #saturnv #launch #capecanaveral #spacecoast

ExploreNASA

Like NASA's Curiosity rover, NASA’s InSight lander has a full-scale working model at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California ( @nasajpl). This sister lander, aptly named ForeSight, lets the team test all operations before they happen on Mars. To practice how InSight will place its instruments, JPL engineers built a Martian rock garden modeled on images from the spacecraft's cameras. The team raked, shoveled and patted down a bed of crushed garnet intended to simulate Martian sand. They call the shaping of this gravel-like material "Marsforming." In this picture, engineers practice deploying InSight's instruments at JPL. Several of them are wearing sunglasses to block the bright yellow lights in the test space, which mimic sunlight as it appears on Mars. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP #nasa #jpl #space #science #solarsystem #rockgarden #insight #mars #engineers #explore #moontomars

ExploreNASA

The Orion Crew Module Uprighting System (CMUS) and Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory team completed two successful sea tests off the coast of Galveston, Texas, Dec. 1-3. CMUS is designed to inflate five bags after the Orion spacecraft and its crew splash down after returning from deep space missions, enabling the capsule to upright itself. @NASA partnered with United States Coast Guard and Air Force and Texas A&M Galveston teams to perform the tests operations. Orion will launch on its first integrated flight atop the Space Launch System rocket from a modernized Kennedy Space Center in 2020. Credit: NASA/Bill Stafford #nasa #orion #exploration #groundsystems #coastguard #usairforce #em1 #testing #explore #moontomars

ExploreNASA

To create the liquid hydrogen tank structural test article, engineers built a tank identical to the Space Launch System tank that will be flown on Exploration Mission-1, the first flight of Space Launch System and the Orion spacecraft. A test article is a version of spacecraft specifically built as a platform to perform testing, which are built to the same specifications to replicate conditions and behaviors of flight-ready vehicles. Then, as shown in this photo, engineers attached the pieces that simulate the two parts of the core stage that attach to the hydrogen tank: the engine section and the intertank. The 149-foot test article built at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans by Boeing, the prime contractor for the SLS core stage, will travel on the barge Pegasus to Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where it will be placed in the largest SLS structural test stand. Learn more: NASA.gov/EM1 Image Credit: NASA/Jude Guidry #nasa #sls #spacelaunchsystem #rockets #explore #space #michoud #engineering #em1 #moontomars

ExploreNASA

A sunrise view of the iconic Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) and Launch Control Center @nasakennedy in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Ten levels of work platforms have been installed in High Bay 3 of the VAB. They will surround and provide access for service and processing of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft. SLS and Orion will launch from the historic launch pad 39B just 4 miles from the VAB on Exploration Mission-1. Learn more at NASA.gov/EM1! 🚀✨ Credit: NASA #nasa #kennedyspacecenter #vab #vehicleassemblybuilding #capecanaveral #florida #spacecoast #space #exploration #groundsystems #sls #orion #explore #moontomars #em1

ExploreNASA

Technicians at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans moved the largest piece of structural test hardware for America's new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System, from the factory to the dock where it was loaded onto NASA’s barge Pegasus Dec. 14, 2018. The liquid hydrogen tank test article will make its way up the river to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (@nasa_marshall) in Huntsville, Alabama, where dozens of hydraulic cylinders in Test Stand 4693 will push and pull on the giant tank, subjecting it to the same stresses and loads it will endure during liftoff and flight. The test hardware is structurally identical to the flight version of the liquid hydrogen tank that will comprise two-thirds of the core stage and hold 537,000 gallons of liquid hydrogen cooled to minus 423 degrees Fahrenheit. Image Credit: NASA/Steven Seipel #nasa #sls #spacelaunchsystem #pathfinder #michoud #rockets #hardware #engineering #spaceflight #space #explore #moontomars

ExploreNASA

Russian spacewalker Oleg Kononenko works outside the International Space Station ( @iss) over 250 miles above Earth to inspect the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft. During the spacewalk, he and fellow spacewalker Sergey Prokopyev (out of frame) examined the external hull of the Soyuz crew ship docked to the Rassvet module. The area corresponded with the location of a small hole inside the Soyuz habitation module that was found in August and caused a decrease in the space station’s pressure. The hole was fixed internally with a sealant within hours of its detection. During the spacewalk, Kononenko and Prokopyev collected samples of some of the sealant that extruded through hole to the outer hull before heading back inside the Pirs docking compartment and closing the hatch completing a seven-hour, 45-minute spacewalk. Credit: NASA #nasa #astronauts #cosmonauts #iss #spacewalk #explore #space #exploration #humansinspace #soyuz #roscosmos #partnerships #anotherdayatwork

ExploreNASA

A "brown barge" in Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt is captured in this color-enhanced image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. This color-enhanced image was taken at 10:28 p.m. PDT on July 15, 2018 (1:28 a.m. EDT on July 16), as the spacecraft performed its 14th close flyby of Jupiter. Citizen scientist Joaquin Camarena created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager. JunoCam's raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products. Happy #space Saturday folks! Credit: NASA #nasa #jupiter #solarsystem #explore #space #spacescience #junocam #marbled #planet #jupiter

ExploreNASA

In December 1968 as Apollo 8 was preparing for its historic mission to orbit the Moon, Apollo 9 astronauts Commander James A. McDivitt, Command Module Pilot (CMP) David R. Scott, and Lunar Module Pilot (LMP) Russell L. Schweickart were in training for their February 1969 flight to test the Lunar Module in Earth orbit. At the time planned for late February 1969, Apollo 9 was the first crewed mission to test the all-important Lunar Module (LM), the vehicle that took two astronauts down to the Moon’s surface and returned them to the waiting Command Module (CM) in lunar orbit. During Apollo 9, in the relative safety of Earth orbit, McDivitt and Schweickart planned to enter the LM, undock from Scott who would remain in the CM, and fly the LM up to 100 miles away, testing the systems of its descent and ascent stages before performing a rendezvous and docking with the CM and reuniting with Scott. The prime crewmembers, as well as their backups Commander Charles “Pete” Conrad, CMP Richard F. Gordon, and LMP Alan L. Bean trained for the EVAs. In December, Schweickart and Bean (pictured here) tested their A7L EVA space suits with the PLSS under vacuum conditions in Chamber A of the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) at the Manned Spacecraft Center, now the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Enjoy this look back at NASA history, and have a great weekend folks! 🌒 Credit: NASA #NASA #nasahistory #flashbackfriday #apollo #astronauts #amazing #space #exploration

ExploreNASA

International Space Station Commander Alexander Gerst viewed SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft chasing the orbital laboratory on Dec. 8, 2018. Gerst watched as the Dragon approached the station and took a series of photographs, saying "Hard to decide which photo of the approaching SpaceX Dragon 16 is the most stunning." The Dragon cargo craft contained supplies and experiments, including the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI), which will provide high-quality laser ranging observations of the Earth’s forests; a small satellite deployment mechanism, called SlingShot to be installed in a Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft prior to its departure from the space station and the Robotic Refueling Mission-3 (RRM3), among others. Dragon is scheduled to depart the station in January 2019 and return to Earth with more than 4,000 pounds of research, hardware and crew supplies. Image Credit: ESA/Gerst #NASA #ESA #spacestation #astronaut #spacex #dragon #photography #space #exploration

explorenasa

On this #VeteransDay, we salute the Americans who are serving or have served in the military. Thank you for your service, sacrifice and selflessness. #thankyouforyourservice Credit: NASA #nasa #salute #astronaut #onthemoon